US3359759A - Control of yarn in circular knitting machines - Google Patents

Control of yarn in circular knitting machines Download PDF

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US3359759A
US3359759A US563445A US56344566A US3359759A US 3359759 A US3359759 A US 3359759A US 563445 A US563445 A US 563445A US 56344566 A US56344566 A US 56344566A US 3359759 A US3359759 A US 3359759A
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yarn
needles
nozzle
float
knitting
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US563445A
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Mattingly Denis Albert Edward
Gilchrist Reginald Selby
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KLINGER Manufacturing CO Ltd
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KLINGER Manufacturing CO Ltd
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B15/00Details of, or auxiliary devices incorporated in, weft knitting machines, restricted to machines of this kind
    • D04B15/38Devices for supplying, feeding, or guiding threads to needles
    • D04B15/54Thread guides
    • D04B15/58Thread guides for circular knitting machines; Thread-changing devices
    • D04B15/60Thread guides for circular knitting machines; Thread-changing devices with thread-clamping or -severing devices

Description

967 D, A. E. MATTINGLY ET AL 3,359,759

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed July 7, 1966 10 Sheet$Sheet 1 l q 2O 1" 9 )4 15 II a l 15 E I 4 H5 12 INVENTORS. DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY REGINALD SELBY GILCHRIST ATTORNEYS.

Dec. 26, 1967 D A. E. MATTINGLY ET AL 3,359,759

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed July 7, 1966 10 Sheet$-Sheet 2 F/QB.

INVENTORS. DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY H6 REGINALD SELBY GILCHRIST ATTORN EYS.

Dec. 26, 1967 A TT Y ET AL 3,359,759

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHTNES Filed July '7, 1966 10 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS.

' DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY REGINALD SELBY GILCH RIST ATTORNEYS.

Dec. 26, 1967 MATTINGLY ET AL 3,359,759

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed July 7, 1966 10 Sheets-Sheet 4 A INVENTORS.

DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY REGINALD SELBY GILCHRlS-T ATTORNEYS.

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed July 7, 1966 6, 1967 D. A. E. MATT'INGLY ET AL 10 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS. DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY REGINALD SELBY GILCHRIST BY fwhw ATTORNEYS.

Dec. 26, 1967 D, A, E. MATTINGLY ET Al. 3,359,759

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KN ITTTNG MACHINES Filed July 7, 1966 10 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTORSv DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY v REGINALD SELBY GILCHRIST BY p j z ATTORNEYS.

Dec. 26, 1967 D. A. E. MATTINGLY ET AL 3,35

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed July 7, 1966 10 Sheets-Sheet '7 INVENTORS.

DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY REGINALD SELBY.GILCHR|ST I ATTORNEYS.

Dec. 26, 1967 E. MATTINGLY ET AL 3,359,759

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed July 7, 1966 l0 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTORS.

DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY REGINALD SELBY GILCHRIST BY @AMW ATTORNEYS.

Dec. 26, 1967 A T LY ET AL 3,359,759

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed July '7, 1966 l0 Sheets-Sheet 9 DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MATTINGLY.

REGINALD SELBY GILCHRIST BY @Lw ATTORNEYS.

Dec. 26, 1967 MATTINGLY ET AL. 3,359,759

CONTROL OF YARN IN CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed July 7, 1966 10 Sheets-Sheet 1O MWH INVENTORS.

DENIS ALBERT EDWARD MA NGLY REGINALD SELBY GILCHRIS ATTORNEYS.

BY W W I United States Patent London, England Filed July 7, 1966, Ser. No. 563,445 Claims. (Cl. 66-125) This invention is for improvements in or relating to control of yarn in circular knitting machines and has for one of its objects to enable yarn fioats to be controlled in a simple and effective manner for presentation to the needles to enable such floats to be incorporated in the knitted fabric. This application is a continuation-in-part of applicants co-pending patent application Ser. No. 255,521, filed Feb. 1, 1963, now abandoned. The invention has reference to the control of yarn by means of a localized air current as described by B. T. R. Reymes- Cole in his US. Patent No. 3,120,115, issued Feb. 4, 1964.

In accordance with the invention there is provided a method of controlling a yarn in a circular knitting machine wherein the yarn is subjected to a localized air current directed upwardly at a position within the needle circle to cause it to be raised above the needles for deflection to a position outside the needle circle. The localized air current is conveniently caused to take place by suction action and is spread widthwise across the needle circle at an appropriate position so that the yarn can be controlled initially from within the needle circle and subsequently permitted to pass to the needles from a position outside the needle circle whilst remaining under control by the air stream. This method of yarn control is found to have certain advantages and in particular to provide the control means at a place where it is not liable to interfere with the accommodation of other parts of the machine.

In a preferred procedure the localized air stream is caused to be set up at both the inside and the outside of the needle circle through a nozzle of elongated cross section which crosses the needle circle at a position at which the needles are at low level and provides externally of the needle circle an elongated mouth through which the yarn can be delivered to the needles.

The invention is of particular use for incorporating yarn floats formed between the ends of partial courses of either a main yarn or a splicing yarn into fabric produced on needles on which the loops of the part courses are knitted. The yarn floats may be constant in length, as in the reinforcement in the foot of a stocking. On the other hand it may be desirable for the length of the yarn floats to be measured to suit the width of fabric into which the floats are to be incorporated and this may be effected as described in our co-pending United States patent application Ser. No. 257,393. The localized air stream is set up at a position in the needle circle immediately following a main knitting station and preceding a secondary station at which the needles, or certain of them, are acted on by cams to effect knitting action or at least to raise needles to a level at which they can receive the yarn float.

The invention includes apparatus for controlling yarn in a circular knitting machine comprising a suction nozzle of elongated cross section positioned above and extending across the needle circle and means for withdrawing air through the nozzle by suction action to create a localized air stream moving upwardly within and across the needle circle and externally thereof, such stream being spread in a direction across the needle line. The suction nozzle 3,359,759 Patented Dec. 26, 1967 "ice may be of a cross section which is somewhat bulbous at a position within the needle circle and reduces in Width on crossing the needle circle besides curving round to lie outside of and approximately parallel to an arc of the needle circle. The bottom edge of the nozzle is conveniently at a level somewhat above the lowered position of the needles and crosses the needle circle at a position whereat the needles are lowered, the part of the nozzle outside the needle circle remaining at approximately the same level as the remainder to provide a feeding edge along which the yarn can run to guide it into hooks of needles which have been raised. The nozzle is positioned so as to cross the needle circle just beyond a main knitting position and adjacent to a secondary knitting or laying in position, the arcuate form of the nozzle outlet as seen in plan causing it to extend alongside of and outside the needle circle at a position at which the needles or at least some of them are raised by cams to take the yarn which is guided to them by the edge of the arcuate part of the outlet nozzle.

The foregoing and other provisions of the invention will be apparent from the following description given by way of example of a particular embodiment of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which FIGURE 1 is a general elevation view of a portion of a circular knitting machine of orthodox type fitted with apparatus in accordance with the invention,

FIGURE 2 is a similar view of certain parts shown in FIGURE 1 showing them in a different position,

FIGURE 3 is a diagrammatic plan view indicating the shape of the mouth of a nozzle and its position in relation to the needle circle,

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged perspective view of the suction nozzle and certain related parts, detached from the knitting machine,

FIGURE 5 is somewhat diagrammatic development view of a cam layout as seen from within the needle circle,

FIGURES 6, 7, 8 and 9 are somewhat diagrammatic perspective views showing the manner in which the apparatus is used to control yarn floats for presenting them to the needles,

FIGURE 10 is a perspective view on a scale larger than that of FIGURES 1 and 2 of mechanism for measuring the lengths of yarn floats,

FIGURE 11 is a detail view showing means for operating the parts shown in FIGURE 10,

FIGURE 12 is a View corresponding to FIGURE 1 but showing a modification,

FIGURE 13 is a view corresponding to FIGURE 5 but showing a cam layout for the machine construction of FIGURE 12, and

FIGURE 14 is a diagram showing part of the paths of needles in the machine construction of FIGURE 12.

Referring firstly to FIGURES 1 and 2 the machine parts shown are those of an orthodox circular knitting machine of Scott & Williams type similar in construction to the machine described and illustrated in US. Patent No. 3,120,115. The machine comprises a bed plate 10 mounted on a sup-porting frame 11 and supporting a rotatable needle cylinder 12. The machine also comprises a stationary sinker cam ring 13 surrounding the top end of the cylinder 12 and a latch guard ring 14 which is pivoted at 15 to a bracket 16 upstanding from the bed plate 10. The latch guard ring carries centrally within it in known manner a rotatable dial associated with the cylinder 12 and used for the making of the welt part of a seamless stocking in a manner well known to those versed in the art. The machine also comprises a bank of feeders (not shown in FIGURE 1) for supplying yarn as required at a main feeding station on the left of the cylinder 12 as seen in FIGURE 1 and in addition splicing control mechanism (also not shown) for control of a splicing feeder to cause said feeder to move into and out of active position at appropriate times. These mechanisms are quite well known and may for instance be as described and illustrated in the aforesaid patent of B. T. R. Reymes-Cole.

The machine is fitted in known manner with a main control drum which is racked round periodically to perate instrumentalities for controlling operation of the machine as is well known in the art. The needle cylinder 12 is embraced by the usual cam ring 112 mounted on the bed plate and this carries cams for operating needles and jacks (when required) at a main station and needle operating cams at an auxiliary station at a short distance from the main feeding station. The cams at the main station are mounted on a plate shown at 113 at the left hand of the cylinder as seen in FIGURE 1 and the needle operating cams at the auxiliary station are shown at 114 and 115.

In practising the invention there is provided a depending suction nozzle 17 which is mounted on the latch guard ring 14 by means of brackets 18 and 19 secured, for example by welding, to the nozzle tube 17 and attached by screws to blocks 20 and 21 fixed to the latch guard ring 14. The nozzle tube 17 is of elongated cross section having upstanding parallel sides and is connected at its upper end to a suction tube 22 extending transversely of the length and along the width of the nozzle 17 and leading to an elbow piece 23. The latter has a flanged downwardly directed inlet 24 adapted to fit in a seating 25 provided at the top end of an upwardly extending pipe 26 fixed to the machine frame by means of a cleat 27 attached to the edge of the bed plate 10 and preferably welded to pipe 26. The lower end of the tube 26 is connected by a flexible pipe or otherwise to a source of suction 100 associated with the machine which may be used for example also in connection with a suction take down arrangement and for suction operated yarn float measuring apparatus such as is described in our co-pending United States patent application Ser. No. 257,393.

The end 24 of elbow piece 23 and seating 25 of pipe 26 form a detachable spigot and socket connection between the nozzle 17 and the pipe 26. As shown in FIGURE 2 this permits the latch guard ring 14 to be raised about its pivot 15, carrying bodily with it the welt dial and the nozzle 17, to afford access to the top of needle cylinder 12. When the latch guard ring 14 is lowered the parts 24 and 25 interengage with a close fit to connect the nozzle 17 for operation of the machine.

As will be seen from FIGURES 3 and 4 the suction nozzle 17 is in the form of a flattened tube of elongated and curved shape in cross section and so formed that its outlet has a widened form at one end seen at 28 in FIG- URE 3, the cross section tapering towards the other end 29 which is the narrowest part of the cross section. In FIGURE 3 the line of the needle circle is indicated as a broken line at 30 and the position of the welt dial is shown at 31. A feeder which may for example be a splicing feeder at a main knitting station is indicated at 32 in FIGURE 3 being one of the feeders above referred to as being positioned on the left of FIGURE 1. A feeder for a main yarn is also shown at 95 in FIGURE 3. It will be seen that the wider end 28 of the opening of the nozzle 17 is positioned immediately beyond the main feeding station and the nozzle opening extends therefrom round about a quarter of the needle cylinder circumference in the counterclockwise direction as seen from above, this being the direction of rotation of the cylinder 12 and dial 31.

The widened end 28 of the nozzle opening is positioned inwardly of the needle circle 30 and the nozzle opening crosses said circle and extends on the outside thereof substantially parallel thereto up to the narrower end 29 of the nozzle opening. The nozzle 17 is further so positioned in relation to the needle cams at the main knitting station that at the position at which it crosses the needle circle 30 the needles have been brought to lowered position. The bottom edge of the nozzle at its outlet lies at a level somewhat above the lowered position of the needles and slightly below the level to which the needles are raised in performing knitting action. The position of the nozzle is moreover so related to the position of the cams 114 and 115 at the auxiliary station that the needles or selected ones of them are caused to be raised beyond the position where the nozzle opening crosses the needle circle 30 and as they approach the narrow end 29 of the nozzle opening, so that the raised needles will then be in a position to receive a yarn from the nozzle opening.

When a feeder such as the splicing feeder 32 is moved out of position for feeding the yarn to the needles the suction nozzle 17 is arranged to be in operation so as to create an air current extending upwardly and across the needle circle to control the free length of yarn extending from the needles to the feeder. For example when a splicing yarn i supplied by feeder 32 to needles over a part only of the needle cylinder 30, floats of splicing yarn are caused to extend between the ends of the partial courses and these are arranged to be controlled by air flow through the nozzle 17. When a slack length of free yarn extending from the needles comes into the air stream drawn into the nozzle, the yarn becomes deflected into the month of the nozzle and is held in taut condition therein by the air flow. As the part of such yarn extending from the needles is moved round by the rotation of the cylinder 12 the part of the yarn within the nozzle will be drawn along the length of the nozzle opening towards the narrow end 29 thereof, riding along the bottom inner edge of the nozzle opening indicated at 33 in FIGURE 4 in readiness to be taken up in the needles which are raised at the auxiliary station in the region of the narrow end 29 of the nozzle opening. In practice the narrow end 29 of the nozzle opening acts in the manner of a feeder to guide the yarn held releasably by the air stream, into the hooks of raised needles. The yarn thus fed may be knitted into the fabric being produced on the machine or laid in accordance with requirements by suitable organization of the cam action at the auxiliary station. It is advantageous to have the inner edge 33 of the nozzle opening of some what wavy form as shown in FIGURE 4 to assist the yarn in taking up a proper position in the nozzle for feeding to the needles.

The feeding of the splicing yarn at the main feeder 32 is controlled by mechanism exactly as described in US. Patent No. 3,120,115, of B. T. R. Reymes-Cole, issued Feb. 4, 1964, the feeder 32 being moved into and out of action to control the length of partial courses of splicing yarn. A feeder for the main yarn is kept continuously in action meanwhile.

In the case where the yarn which is to be controlled by the air flow through the nozzles 17 is a float extending between the ends of partial courses of knitting it is necessary for the float of yarn to be caused to pass under the dial 31 during rotation of the cylinder and dial. To this end there is conveniently provided a float yarn guiding plate 34, FIGURE 4, which overlies the inner face of the nozzle 17, and which is vertically slidable in a supporting bracket 35 attached to the inner face of the nozzle 17. The plate 34 is positioned just outside the periphery of the dial 31 within the needle circle, as shown in FIGURE 3. The plate 34 is connected at its upper end by a link 36 to one end of a centrally pivoted lever 37 by an anchorage at 38. The lever 37 is pivoted at 39 to a supporting bracket 72 on an upstanding fixed part of the machine, and the lever has its other arm 40 connected to an operating member (actuated for example from the main control drum of the machine) whereby the guide plate 34 is lowered during periods when part round splicing is being performed. In FIGURE 4 the operating member is shown as a push rod 73 extending from the main control drum upwardly to engage with an adjustable screw 74 screwed into the free end of lever 37 and provided with a locking nut 75. The guide plate 34 has a curved finger 41 and a notched part 42 and when lowered for the period of part course knitting the position of the guide plate is such that float yarn extending from the point where the yarn is withdrawn from the needles to a splicing feeder which has been raised out of active position will be caused to engage and ride under the toe portion 41 and into the notched portion 42 as the withdrawal point of the yarn moves round the needle circle due to rotation of the needle cylinder. The yarn is held thereby at a level below the dial 31. The toe portion 41 and a lip of the notched part 42 are curved outwardly at their lower parts to facilitate the guiding of the yarn into the notch 42 and its release therefrom when required.

A tension spring 45 biases the lever 40 in the direction to hold the screw 74 against the end of the push rod 73.

Relevant parts of the cam system of the machine construction illustrated in FIGURE 1 are shown approximately in development view in FIGURE 5 as seen from within the needle cylinder. It will be understood that butts of needles and jacks as normally provided in a machine of Scott & Williams type will during rotation of the needle cylinder pass from right to left of the cam system as seen in this figure. The cams for knitting at the main feed station will be recognized as the group of ca-ms bracketed at 76 and also a raising cam 77 which raises the needles to near or somewhat below tucking height. The cams 114 and 115 at the auxiliary station are bolt cams and during the knitting of the major part of a ladies hose may be out of action completely. When part course knitting is required to occur (for example with a splicing yarn at the heel and for under the foot of a hose blank) the cams 114 and 115 are moved in by orthodox bolt cam mechanism operated from the control drum of the machine or by other timing control to a position in which they will engage and operate all of the needle butts. On the heel needles part course knitting is required to occur at the heel leaving floats extending from end to end of those needles forming the part courses. The raising of these needles by the cam 114 causes them to receive at knitting height in their hooks both a new yarn (which is fed to all of the needles) and the last formed float of yarn. Subsequently, lowering of the needles down cam 115 causes them to form knitted stitches so that those carrying the yarn float will knit this along with the new yarn. Subsequently, the needles are raised by a cam 78 to tucking height. After partial course knitting has been completed, the bolt cams 114 and 115 may be withdrawn to their inoperative positions by their operating mechanisms.

The new yarn is fed at the auxiliary station through a vertically disposed feeder 92, FIGURES 3 and 4, carried on a feeder arm 93 shown diagrammatically as pivoted to a fixed bracket 94. When not in use the feeder arm 93 is rocked to move the feeder 92 within the needle circle and cause its yarn to be trapped and severed in a manner well-known in the art. Similarly, the feeder arm 93 is rocked to move the feeder 92 outside the needle circle when it is again brought into use.

Before describing operation of the parts so far men-' tioned reference will be made to FIGURES and 11 which show mechanism and its operating means for measuring lengths of floats formed between the ends of partial courses (which may be partial courses of splicing yarn or of the main yarn). Mounted on a post (not shown) which upstands from the main frame of the machine is a tension bar 46 carrying a row of tension devices 47 relating to yarns other than the splicing yarn. From the bent over end 48 of the tension bar 46 there depends a bracket 49 comprising parallel side bars 50 and 51 joined by cross members at their upper and lower ends the lower cross member being provided by a trough like tension bracket 52. Between the bars 50, 52 a slide block 53 can move up and down in a slideway presented by the bars and the block 53 is provided with a yarn guide eye 54. The block 53 is secured to the lower end of a piston rod 55 carrying a piston 56 sliding in a double acting pneumatic cylinder 57 fixed to the top end of the bars 50, 51 and having air supply pipes 58 and 59 connected to its opposite ends. Thus when air is supplied through the lower pipe 59 and the upper pipe 56 is connected to exhaust the piston 56 is raised and carries the block 53 with it. Converse energisation lowers the block 53 to the bottom end of its slideway.

The bracket 52 has at its opposite ends upwardly extending wings provided with yarn guide eyes 60 and 61 positioned between which is a tension device 62. Yarn Y from the supply passes first through eye 60 then through tension device 62 and out through eye 61 from which it extends to and through the eye 54 and downwardly through a fixed guide eye (not shown) and on to the yarn feeder 32 (FIGURES 3 and 6). Thus by raising the block 53 suitably a loop of required length can be formed in the yarn between tension device 62 and feeder 32 which loopextends upwardly from guide eye 61 and down from guide eye 54. This loop supplements the length of yarn extending from the needles to the feeder 32 to provide a required total length of float yarn. Any extra length of yarn required to form the loop is drawn through the tension device 62 from the yarn supply. After the formation of the loop lowering of the block 53 will release it permitting a length of yarn to be drawn by air flow into the suction nozzle 17 through the feeder 32 and held in readiness for presentation to the knitting needles.

To actuate the piston 56 of the pneumatic cylinder 57 the air supply pipes 58 and 59 are connected to an air control valve 70, FIGURE 11, of known type having a main pipe 71 connected to a source of suction. The valve 70 is supported by a bracket 79 upstanding from the bed plate 10 at a position somewhat beyond that of the up standing pipe 26 of FIGURE 1. The valve 70 has a plunger which is arranged to be engaged and operated periodically at an appropriate time in the knitting cycle by a cam 70a secured to the rotating sinker ring 13a. Conveniently the cam 70a is of such length as to operate the plunger 80 so as to energise the plunger 56 for a float measuring operation, whereafter the float is released.

To measure the lengths of yarn loops drawn by movement of block 53 variable stop means is provided to determine the extent of upward movement of the block whereby ditferent lengths of yarn loops will be drawn to correspond to different lengths of partial courses into which the splicing or other yarn float is to be introduced. Such variable stop means comprises a rotatable ring 63 encircling the bar 51 and mounted on an appropraite bearing to rotate therearound. To the ring 63 there are fixed at spaced intervals a succession of stop rods 64 graded in length to provide for the required changes in measurement in the length of yarn loops to be formed. In different setting of the ring 63 different ones of the rods 64 are positioned endwise in the path of the block 53 to limit its upward stroke of movement. To the ring 63 is attached a toothed racking ring 65 acted on by a pawl 66 on a pawl carrier 67.

Carrier 67 comprises a plate pivotally supported on a post which depends from bracket 49. At its end remote from the pivot, carrier 67 support-s a depending post 67a to which is connected the center wire 98 of Bowden cable 68, the sheath of which is attached to a bracket 69a. Cable 98, which is operated in known manner from the main con trol drum, is periodically retracted and extended at selected times during knitting, and carrier plate 67 is thereby oscillated about pivot 170. P'awl 66 on carrier 67 is biased inwardly to engage racking ring 65 by a spring 17 1 which is connected to fixed bracket 69a. Accordingly, operation of the Bowden cable 68 and the resultant oscillation of carrier 67 causes pawl 66 to advance rack 65.

Also attached to carrier post 67a is the sheath of a second Bowden cable 69. Post 67a is suitably bored to permit the passage of a rod 169 which forms an extension of the center wire (not shown) of cable 69. The center wire of cable 69 is also controlled in known manner from the main control drum. To bluff operation of the pawl 66, the Bowden cable 69 is operated to move the rod 169 against the tail of pawl 66 to rock it against the action of spring 171 out of engagement with the teeth of the rack wheel 65.

The manner of operation of the suction nozzle for the control of yarn floats during knitting of part round spliced fabric will now be explained with reference to the diagrammatic views of FIGURES 6 to 9. It will be understood that the control arrangement of the machine will be such that the suction nozzle 17 is brought into action during periods in which part round splicing occurs and that the guide plate 34 will simultaneously be lowered. It will be noted that the needle circle is indicated diagrammatically by the full line 30 in FIGURES 6 to 9 and the splicing feeder 32 is also shown diagrammatically therein. A splicing yarn S is shown as passing from the direction of the yarn supply to a tension device 43 and thence through the eye of the float measuring bar 53. From the bar 53 the yarn extends as aforementioned through a fixed guide and down on to the feeder 32. In FIGURE 6 the feeder 32 is shown in its lowered position near the completion of a partial course in a part round spliced area, a previous float indicated at F having been drawn into the nozzle 17 and being fed at the auxiliary station to raised needles of the spliced area from the narrow end 29 of the nozzle opening. The float measuring bar 53 is at this time rising to draw a length of extra yarn through the tension device 43 to complete a desired amount for the float. As soon as the yarn has been fed from the feeder 312 up to the point marked A on the needle circle the feeder '32 is raised to an inactive position and after a partial turn of the needle cylinder the condition of FIGURE 7 is reached. In moving to this position the needle cylinder causes the yarn leaving the needles at the point A to be drawn through the feeder 32 and to pass during rotation of the cylinder under the nose 41 of guide plate 34 into the notch 42 therein, thereby ensuring that the yarn float will pass under the dial during the subsequent rotation of the cylinder.

In FIGURE 7 the float measuring bar 53 has reached its highest loop drawing setting to measure a required extra length of yarn and it then falls to the position of FIGURE 8 releasing the drawn loop and permitting the extra amount of yarn drawn by it through the feeder 32 to be sucked into the nozzle 17 as shown in FIGURE 8. The feeder 32 is afterwards lowered to introduce the yarn S to the needles for a further part course in the spliced area such introduction of the yarn occurring at a point B of the needle circle as indicated in FIGURE 9 which shows the stage at which knitting of the subsequent part course has commenced. The reintroduction of the yarn to the needles fixes the length of the float. As the cylinder continues to rotate the end of the float F extending from the point B is drawn alongside the nozzle opening and rides along the edge 33 so that the leading end of the float passes into the narrow end 29 of the opening. The float F just formed then passes into the position of the previous float F as in FIGURE 6 and it will be seen that it is being fed from the nozzle for introduction to the needles from the point B onwards so as to be incorporated in the spliced area of the fabric being knitted. As the end of the float at point A approaches the guide 34 the remainder of the float is permitted to slide under the outwardly bent hooked part of the notch 42 and then runs fully into the nozzle 17 being impelled into the nozzle by the localized air stream. From the nozzle end 29 the rest of the float F is in due course fed to the needles. The procedure is repeated in subsequent courses of knitting until the spliced area has been completed. As already described the float measuring bar 53 forms part of a periodically adjusted measuring device to enable variable width splicing to be etfected and the lengths of the floats to be appropriately adjusted to provide floats of the correct length to be incorporated within the spliced area.

The improved nozzle and the conduit through which suction is applied to it to provide the localized air stream are positioned in such a manner as to avoid interference with the positioning of other parts required to be provided around the needle circle below the lowest level to which the needles are moved. The improved suction nozzle and related parts thus enable the control of free portions of yarn extending from the needles to be carried out effectively without substantially interfering with the arrangement and operation of other parts of the machine.

FIGURE 12 illustrates a machine head construction which corresponds to that described with reference to FIGURE 1 except that instead of bolt cams 114, 115, provided for knitting in yarn floats, there are substituted bolt cams 81 and 82 adapted to lay in floats of yarn into the fabric by passing the yarn of the floats alternately in front of and behind knitted loops in the fabric. The relevant parts of the cam layout are shown in FIGURE 13 which again shows the cam assembly 76 and the raising cam 77. It will be seen that the cams 81 and 82 are both lowering cams for lowering needles which are at different levels. At the auxiliary feed there is also a jack cam 83 and related cam track 84. It will be appreciated that in a machine of Scott & Williams type provision is made for raising alternate needles by means of jack selection for the purpose of commencement of a hose and welt formation, part of the jack cam used for this purpose being shown at 85 in FIGURE 13. Use is made of the jack selection provision to raise alternate needles in 1 x 1 formation at the auxiliary feed, the alternate needles being acted on through their jacks by jack cams 83 to raise them to tucking height so that their needle butts pass over the cam 81. Such raised needles are subsequently lowered by cam 82 and then pass on to a raising cam 86. FIGURE 14 illustrates the tops of the needles as seen from outside the cylinder as they approach and pass the auxiliary feed station and shows them all rising from a lowered level indicated at 87 and afterwards passing to the position at which alternate ones are raised by means of the jack cam 83, the tops of such alternate needles being indicated at 88. The needles that are not soraised are lowered by cam 81 so that the tops of such needles move downwardly as indicated at 89. Subsequently the raised needles are moved downwardly by cam 82 so that their tops follow the path indicated at to join the path of the lowered needles. Thereafter all needles move upwardly as indicated at 91. The float of yarn is fed intothe hooks of the needles raised as at 88 and at the same time the sinkers are withdrawn as described in US. Patent No. 3,120,115. In result the float of yarn is caused to pass in front of the needles into the hooks of which it has been laid and behind the alternate needles which were lowered at that time and at the next knitting station the yarn float is incorporated into fabric by being caused to extend behind alternate loops and in front of the others.

During the procedure just described for laying in the yarn floats instead of knitting them, a yarn feeder such as 92, if provided at the auxiliary feed station, is kept out of action.

What we claim is:

1. In a circular knitting machine, the combination comprising a needle cylinder, needles carried by said cylinder, a main knitting station, and means for causing an uncut yarn float formed between part courses to be knitted into the fabric including means for lowering the needles as they pass a portion of their path following said knitting station, means for creating a localized air stream to raise said uncut yarn float above the needles including a nozzle having an elongated mouth immediately above and extending across said lowered needles and along said needle circle at a position in advance of a secondary station at which needles are positioned to receive yarn, and a source of suction connected to said nozzle for drawing said uncut yarn float thereinto, said nozzle being provided with a terminal guiding and feeding edge for guiding said uncut yarn float from the inside to the outside of said needle circle as said needles advance, and for holding said uncut yarn float at such an angle relative to the needles at said secondary station that said uncut float yarn may be progressively drawn from said nozzle and incorporated in the fabric.

2. The combination defined in claim 1 wherein the suction nozzle is directed downwardly over the needle circle and the mouth thereof, after crossing the needle circle from the inside to the outside thereof, extends substantially parallel to the needle circle.

3. The combination defined in claim 2 wherein the open mouth of the nozzle is reduced in size progressively from the end thereof inside the needle circle and proximate the main knitting station to the end thereof outside the needle circle and proximate the secondary station.

4. The combination defined in claim 2 wherein the portion of the mouth defining edge of the nozzle which is outside the needle circle provides the feeding outlet by which yarn is guided into the hooks of needles that have been raised.

5. The combination definedin claim 2 wherein the part of the mouth outside of the needle circle is at a position at which at least some of the needles are raised by cams to take the yarn.

6. In a circular knitting machine, the combination comprising a needle cylinder, needles carried by said cylinder, a dial, a finger for feeding yarn at a main knitting station, means for causing an uncut yarn float formed between part courses to be knitted into the fabric including means for lowering the needles as they pass a portion of their path following said knitting station, means for creating a localized air stream to raise said uncut yarn float above the needles including a nozzle having an elongated mouth immediately above and extending across said lowered needles and along said needle circle at a position in advance of a secondary station at which needles are positioned to receive yarn, and a source of suction connected to said nozzle for drawing said uncut yarn float thereinto, said nozzle being provided with a terminal guiding and feeding edge for guiding said uncut yarn float from the inside to the outside of said needle circle as said needles advance, and for holding said uncut yarn float at such an angle relative to the needles at said secondary station that said uncut float yarn may be progressively drawn from said nozzle and incorporated in the fabric, a yarn control member for engaging the yarn extending to the needles from said feed finger, and means for lowering said member whereby to depress said yarn and thereby guide the same under said dial when said feed finger is raised, and for thereafter raising said memher.

7. The combination defined in claim 6 wherein the yarn control member is provided with a hooked portion for engaging and guiding the yarn.

8. The combination defined in claim 6- wherein the suction nozzle is a hollow tubular member elongated and curved in transverse section, and wherein the yarn control member is slidably mounted upon the side thereof facing the central axis of the machine.

9. In a circular knitting machine, the combination comprising a needle cylinder equipped with needles forming a needle circle, means for feeding yarn for knitting part way only around the needle circle leaving a float of yarn extending from the termination of such knitting to the point of recommencement of knitting, means creating an uprising localized air stream to raise the float of yarn above the needles including a nozzle having an elongated mouth extending above and across the needle circle and partly round it at a position in advance of a secondary station, cam means associated with the secondary station for raising the needles on which knitting has occurred part way round the needle circle to cause such needles to receive yarn delivered from the mouth of the nozzle and for lowering the needles after receiving such yarn, a source of suction, and means connecting such source to said nozzle to draw said yarn float into the mouth of the nozzle. 1

10. The combination defined in claim 9 wherein the mouth of the nozzle is reduced in size from the end Within the needle circle to the opposite end and such opposite end constitutes a feeder for feeding the float of yarn to the needles at the auixilary station.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,457,104 12/1948 Moore 669 2,712,225 7/ 1955 Moore 66---9 2,810,280 10/1957 Rossman 66-l45 X 2,953,912 9/1960 Hill 66-9 2,959,949 11/ 1960 Crawford 66125 3,120,115 2/1964 Reymes-Cole 66125 FOREIGN PATENTS 195,802 4/1923 Great Britain.

955,038 4/ 1964 Great Britain.

958,154 5/ 1964 Great Britain.

WILLIAM CARTER REYNOLDS, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

  1. 9. IN A CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINE, THE COMBINATION COMPRISING A NEEDLE CYLINDER EQUIPPED WITH NEEDLES FORMING A NEEDLE CIRCLE, MEANS FOR FEEDING YARN FOR KNITTING PART WAY ONLY AROUND THE NEEDLE CIRCLE LEAVING A FLOAT OF YARN EXTENDING FROM THE TERMINATION OF SUCH KNITTING TO THE POINT OF RECOMMENCEMENT OF KNITTING, MEANS CREATING AN UPRISING LOCALIZED AIR STREAM TO RAISE THE FLOAT OF YARN ABOVE THE NEEDLES INCLUDING A NOZZLE HAVING AN ELONGATED MOUTH EXTENDING ABOVE AND ACROSS THE NEEDLE CIRCLE AND PARTLY ROUND IT AT A POSITION IN ADVANCE OF A SECONDARY STATION, CAM MEANS ASSOCIATED WITH THE SECONDARY STATION FOR RAISING THE NEEDLES ON WHICH KNITTING HAS OCCURRED PART WAY ROUND THE NEEDLE CIRCLE TO CAUSE SUCH NEEDLES TO RECEIVE YARN DELIVERED FROM THE MOUTH OF THE NOZZLE AND FOR LOWERING THE NEEDLES AFTER RECEIVING SUCH YARN, A SOURCE OF SUCTION, AND MEANS CONNECTING SUCH SOURCE TO SAID NOZZLE TO DRAW SAID YARN FLOAT INTO THE MOUTH OF THE NOZZLE.
US563445A 1966-07-07 1966-07-07 Control of yarn in circular knitting machines Expired - Lifetime US3359759A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3735608A (en) * 1970-02-10 1973-05-29 Billi Spa Yarn tensioning device for circular knitting machines and the like
US3776000A (en) * 1968-09-05 1973-12-04 Moncenisio Gia Anonima Bauchie Knitting of stocking toes on circular knitting machines
US5056339A (en) * 1988-05-18 1991-10-15 Lonati S.P.A. Process and device for producing designs on stocking in twin-cylinder circular knitting machine
US5177981A (en) * 1991-09-16 1993-01-12 Raymond Haas Drink cooler
US5239845A (en) * 1991-06-06 1993-08-31 Savio S.P.A. Device for changing and controlling the yarn feeds in a double-cylinder circular knitting machine
US7707676B2 (en) 1999-06-14 2010-05-04 The Procter & Gamble Company Toothbrush
US8584299B2 (en) 2003-04-23 2013-11-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Electric toothbrushes

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GB195802A (en) * 1922-01-23 1923-04-12 Iowa Smith Improvements in and relating to the manufacture of pile knitted fabrics
US2457104A (en) * 1946-06-22 1948-12-21 Godfrey Bloch Inc Suction apparatus for knitting machines
US2712225A (en) * 1951-05-11 1955-07-05 Moore David Pelton Methods of and apparatus for making double faced fleece knitted fabrics
US2810280A (en) * 1956-01-25 1957-10-22 Ralph K Rossman Clipping dial for circular knitting machine
US2953912A (en) * 1957-04-02 1960-09-27 Wildman Jacquard Co Method and mechanism for knitting pile fabrics
US2959949A (en) * 1958-06-26 1960-11-15 H E Crawford Company Inc Yarn control means for knitting machines
US3120115A (en) * 1959-03-25 1964-02-04 Reymes-Cole Bernard Tho Reymes Means for controlling yarn in knitting machines
GB955038A (en) * 1961-10-12 1964-04-08 Klinger Mfg Co Ltd Improvements in or relating to circular knitting machines
GB958154A (en) * 1962-01-11 1964-05-13 Klinger Mfg Co Ltd Improvements in or relating to control of yarn in circular knitting machines

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB195802A (en) * 1922-01-23 1923-04-12 Iowa Smith Improvements in and relating to the manufacture of pile knitted fabrics
US2457104A (en) * 1946-06-22 1948-12-21 Godfrey Bloch Inc Suction apparatus for knitting machines
US2712225A (en) * 1951-05-11 1955-07-05 Moore David Pelton Methods of and apparatus for making double faced fleece knitted fabrics
US2810280A (en) * 1956-01-25 1957-10-22 Ralph K Rossman Clipping dial for circular knitting machine
US2953912A (en) * 1957-04-02 1960-09-27 Wildman Jacquard Co Method and mechanism for knitting pile fabrics
US2959949A (en) * 1958-06-26 1960-11-15 H E Crawford Company Inc Yarn control means for knitting machines
US3120115A (en) * 1959-03-25 1964-02-04 Reymes-Cole Bernard Tho Reymes Means for controlling yarn in knitting machines
GB955038A (en) * 1961-10-12 1964-04-08 Klinger Mfg Co Ltd Improvements in or relating to circular knitting machines
GB958154A (en) * 1962-01-11 1964-05-13 Klinger Mfg Co Ltd Improvements in or relating to control of yarn in circular knitting machines

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3776000A (en) * 1968-09-05 1973-12-04 Moncenisio Gia Anonima Bauchie Knitting of stocking toes on circular knitting machines
US3735608A (en) * 1970-02-10 1973-05-29 Billi Spa Yarn tensioning device for circular knitting machines and the like
US5056339A (en) * 1988-05-18 1991-10-15 Lonati S.P.A. Process and device for producing designs on stocking in twin-cylinder circular knitting machine
US5239845A (en) * 1991-06-06 1993-08-31 Savio S.P.A. Device for changing and controlling the yarn feeds in a double-cylinder circular knitting machine
US5177981A (en) * 1991-09-16 1993-01-12 Raymond Haas Drink cooler
US7707676B2 (en) 1999-06-14 2010-05-04 The Procter & Gamble Company Toothbrush
US8584299B2 (en) 2003-04-23 2013-11-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Electric toothbrushes
US8955186B2 (en) 2003-04-23 2015-02-17 The Procter & Gamble Company Electric toothbrushes

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