US3303001A - Low temperature shift reaction involving a zinc oxide-copper catalyst - Google Patents

Low temperature shift reaction involving a zinc oxide-copper catalyst Download PDF

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US3303001A
US3303001A US330542A US33054263A US3303001A US 3303001 A US3303001 A US 3303001A US 330542 A US330542 A US 330542A US 33054263 A US33054263 A US 33054263A US 3303001 A US3303001 A US 3303001A
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copper
zinc
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sodium
oxide
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Edward K Dienes
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Catalysts and Chemicals Inc
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B3/00Hydrogen; Gaseous mixtures containing hydrogen; Separation of hydrogen from mixtures containing it; Purification of hydrogen
    • C01B3/02Production of hydrogen or of gaseous mixtures containing a substantial proportion of hydrogen
    • C01B3/06Production of hydrogen or of gaseous mixtures containing a substantial proportion of hydrogen by reaction of inorganic compounds containing electro-positively bound hydrogen, e.g. water, acids, bases, ammonia, with inorganic reducing agents
    • C01B3/12Production of hydrogen or of gaseous mixtures containing a substantial proportion of hydrogen by reaction of inorganic compounds containing electro-positively bound hydrogen, e.g. water, acids, bases, ammonia, with inorganic reducing agents by reaction of water vapour with carbon monoxide
    • C01B3/16Production of hydrogen or of gaseous mixtures containing a substantial proportion of hydrogen by reaction of inorganic compounds containing electro-positively bound hydrogen, e.g. water, acids, bases, ammonia, with inorganic reducing agents by reaction of water vapour with carbon monoxide using catalysts
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J23/00Catalysts comprising metals or metal oxides or hydroxides, not provided for in group B01J21/00
    • B01J23/70Catalysts comprising metals or metal oxides or hydroxides, not provided for in group B01J21/00 of the iron group metals or copper
    • B01J23/76Catalysts comprising metals or metal oxides or hydroxides, not provided for in group B01J21/00 of the iron group metals or copper combined with metals, oxides or hydroxides provided for in groups B01J23/02 - B01J23/36
    • B01J23/80Catalysts comprising metals or metal oxides or hydroxides, not provided for in group B01J21/00 of the iron group metals or copper combined with metals, oxides or hydroxides provided for in groups B01J23/02 - B01J23/36 with zinc, cadmium or mercury
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02PCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN THE PRODUCTION OR PROCESSING OF GOODS
    • Y02P20/00Technologies relating to chemical industry
    • Y02P20/50Improvements relating to the production of products other than chlorine, adipic acid, caprolactam, or chlorodifluoromethane, e.g. bulk or fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals
    • Y02P20/52Improvements relating to the production of products other than chlorine, adipic acid, caprolactam, or chlorodifluoromethane, e.g. bulk or fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals using catalysts, e.g. selective catalysts

Description

a life at these temperatures is short.

United States Patent 3,303,001 LOW TEMPERATURE SHIFT REACTION INVOLV- ING A ZINC OXIDE-COPPER CATALYST Edward K. Dienes, Louisville, Ky., assignor toCatalysts and Chemicals, Inc., a corporation of New Jersey No Drawing. Filed Dec. 16, 1963, Ser. No. 330,542 3 Claims. (Cl. 23-213) This invention in one of its aspects pertains to low temperature shift reactions. In another of its aspects the invention relates to catalysts for such low temperature shift reactions. In still another of its aspects this invention relates to methods for preparing low temperature shift reaction catalysts.

The most important uses of hydrogen today are its use in the petrochemical industry, and for the synthesis of ammonia. To produce hydrogen for these purposes a gas reforming process is generally used. In gas reforming, natural gas, or a low molecular weight hydrocarbon such as methane, ethane or propane, is usually reacted with steam. Steam and hydrocarbons when passed over a catalyst containing certain metals such as a metal of the iron group, form hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. In a second stage of this well known and commercial process for hydrogen preparation the process is operated to bring about a water gas shift reaction by which carbon monoxide and water, or steam, are reacted to form carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The carbon monoxide must be thus converted to carbon dioxide because carbon dioxide can be removed more readily from the system to produce more pure hydrogen.

To produce pure hydrogen from water gas, or other carbon monoxide containing gases and steam, it is the practice to pass the water gas over a shift catalyst, the following reaction occurring:

The temperature at which this reaction is generally car' ried out is 750 F. to 850 F. Unfortunately, catalyst In addition the required high temperatures do not favor the above equilibrium. The equilibrium shifts to the right, that is, to the production of hydrogen, as the temperature is decreased. However, heretofore a catalyst has not been found which promotes this reaction at temperatures of 500 F. and lower. In order to overcome this difliculty it has been the practice to increase the amount of steam in order to shift the equilibrium in the desired direction. This invention, however, is based on the discovery that certain copper-zinc catalysts, if carefully prepared following the teachings of this invention, permit the water gas shift reaction to be carried out at temperatures of 500 F. and below.

Catalysts normally employed in a water gas shift reaction are iron-chromium catalysts such as Fe O in combination with 1 to percent by weight of Cr O However a reduced copper oxide-zinc oxide catalyst (CuO-ZnO) is disclosed for this purpose in US. 1,797,- 426, along with shift reaction temperatures of 570 F. or higher. These catalysts are prepared by coprecipitating copper and zinc salts using dilute ammonia, or by fusing a mixture of the oxides.

It is generally known in industrial catalysts that catalyst efficiency depends upon such physical characteristics as the surface area and pore volume of a catalyst. It is also known that pore volume and surface area vary widely depending on how a given catalyst is made. It has now been found that if a copper oxide-zinc oxide catalyst is made by a specific technique following the teachings of this invention a copper oxide-zinc oxide catalyst results, which when reduced to zinc oxide and copper permits a high conversion of carbon monoxide in water gas to hydrogen and carbon dioxide at a temperature of 500 F.

Patented Feb. '7, i967 ice and lower, say 350 F. to 500 F. Not only do the catalysts of this invention favor a low temperature shift reaction with its more desirable equilibrium, but they perform much longer due to the low temperature conditions under which they are used.

An object of this invention, therefore, is to produce a long life, low temperature shift catalyst.

Another object of this invention is to provide a process for the production of such a low temperature shift catalyst. Heretofore no catalyst has been known which could be used in a shift converter operated at 5 00 F. or lower.

Still another object of the invention is to produce a catalyst whose physical characteristics favor the low temperature conversion of carbon monoxide in a water gas shift reaction.

In accordance with this invention a low temperature copper oxide-zinc oxide shift catalyst is made containing zinc oxide and copper as its active ingredients after reduction, in a weight ratio based on metal of 0.5 to 3 zinc to 1 copper. This catalyst is prepared by coprecipitating copper and zinc as their carbonates from an aqueous solution of their soluble salts through double decomposition reaction with sodium carbonate, removing the sodium salts so that the level of sodium, calculated from sodium oxide after calcining to the oxides, is less than 0.2 percent and calcining the sodium carbonate-containing copper and Zinc carbonate precipitate to form the oxides.

As indicated hereinbefore catalyst activity is very dependent upon the steps used in the preparation of the catalyst. In preparing the catalyst of this invention water soluble mixtures of copper and zinc salts, for instance their chlorates, chlorides, sulfates, nitrates and acetates, are coprecipitated in amounts resulting in the desired copper-zinc ratios. It is preferred to employ the nitrates,

and coprecipitation is brought about by the addition of sodium carbonate. A dilute aqueous solution of the copper and zinc salts is combined with a dilute aqueous solution of sodium carbonate, forming the coprecipitate by double decomposition. Usually it is the practice to add the sodium carbonate solution to the copper-zinc salt solution. In other words the basic substance is added to the acidic substance. however, stainless steel or other similar reaction vessels are required. In accordance with one aspect of this invention the acidic material, contray to prior art methods, is added to the basic material. When the sodium carbonate solution is placed in the reactor and the copperzinc salt solution is added thereto, it is unnecessary to use stainless steel equipment. More important, without intending to be bound by any theory, the surface area 'and pore volume of a catalyst precipitated in this way appear to differ from those of similar catalysts otherwise precipitated.

One of the discoveries on which this invention is based concerns the sodium level in the catalyst. The quantity of sodium, generally present in the final catalyst as the oxide, markedly affects the performance of the copperzinc catalyst. In accordance with this invention it has been found that the sodium content of the copper-zinc catalyst should not exceed 0.2 percent based on metal. Preferably the sodium content in the catalyst should be below 0.05 percent based on sodium metal. To remove sodium contaminants the precipitated carbonates are washed, either by repeated decantation or by the use of conventional thickening apparatus until the precipitate is virtually devoid of sodium, in other words until the so dium level is below 0.2 percent.

Referring now more specifically to the shift process, except for the low temperature, with its favorable effect on reaction equilibrium, resulting from the practice of this invention, water gas shift reactions are well known.

When the base is added to the acid,

Carbon monoxide, or a gas containing 20 percent or more carbon monoxide by volume, and steam are introduced into a shift converter and passed over the reduced copper oxide-zinc oxide shift catalyst. The reduction canbest be carried out in situ using the reaction mixture of steam and carbon monoxide. The catalyst can also be reduced with hydrogen gases. However, if certain particular techniques are not followed during such a hydrogen reduction, the reduced catalyst is ineffective as a shift catalyst. After reduction, in the shift converter, carbon monoxide and steam, in an amount of 3 to volumes per volume of carbon monoxide in the feed gas, in contact with the shift catalyst, undergo reaction at the required temperature, which according to this invention is 350 F. to 500 F. The pressure is preferably in the range of 200 to 400 pounds per square inch (p.s.i.g.), although it may vary from atmospheric to 800 p.s.i.g. The space velocity, which is the volume of gas flowing under standard conditions of temperature and pressure per unit volume of catalyst per hour, of the carbon monoxide-com taining gas, on a dry basis, is desirably between 300 and 6500 (cubic feet per hour per cubic foot of catalyst).

The preparation of the catalysts of this invention and their effectiveness in the conversion of carbon monoxide can, perhaps, best be illustrated by reference to specific examples. For a further understanding of the invention reference is made to the following.

EXAMPLE 1 Preparation of the catalyst To 4300 parts by weight of a 16 percent sodium carbonate solution heated to 140 F., are added 2620 parts by weight of an 8 percent (based on metal) solution consisting of zinc and copper nitrates in a mol ratio (also based on metal) of one zinc to one copper, heated to 90 F. The 8 percent metal solution is made by mixing 482 parts by weight of Zn (NO -6H O and 478 parts by weight of Cu(NO -6H O With .1670 parts by Weight of ,water. The zinc carbonate-copper carbonate formed is washed free of sodium nitrate and sodium bicarbonate by decantation, allowing'the solid to settle to to percent of vessel volume, decanting, and refilling to original volume. Approximately four to six decantations are needed to remove the sodium to the required level. The metal carbonates are filtered on a Sperry filter press and calcined for four hours at 700 F. to form the oxides. The resulting oxides are de-aerated by forming a mud and then they are control dried to .5. to 10 percent moisture. The cake is granulated through a No. 8 mesh screen, mixed with 1 to 3 weight percent graphite as a lubricant and pelletized into inch tablets on a Stokes tabletting machine. The tablets are then heated for four to ten hours at 300 F. to temper tabletting stresses.

EXAMPLE 2 Catalyst preparation Following the procedure set forth in Example 1, a catalyst is made by combining 578 parts by weight of Zn(NO '6H O with 383 parts by weight with the same amount of water used in Example 1. The resulting catalyst contains zinc and copper in a ratio, based on metal, of 1.5 zinc to 1 copper.

EXAMPLE 3 Catalyst preparation According to the procedure of Example 1 another catalyst is made using 640 parts by weight Zn(NO -6H O and 309 parts by weight Cu(NO '6H O withthe amount of water set forth in Example 1. The resulting catalyst contains zinc and copper in a ratio, based on metal of 2 to 1.

4 EXAMPLE 4 Catalyst preparation Using the procedure of Example 1 a catalyst is made with 720 parts by weight Zn(NO -6H O, 240 parts by weight Cu(NO -6H O and the same amount of water. The resulting catalyst contains zinc and copper in a Weight ratio based on metal of 3 to 1. v

In one of its aspects this invention is based on the discovery that the sodium content of the catalyst must be below 0.2 Weight percent. This is shown by the following:

TABLE A Reaction: CO+H90 S CO +Ha Conditions-Shift convertert Catalyst-Example 3 v 'Iernperaturc360 F., 400 F., 500 F. Pressure'150 p.s.i.g. Space Velocity (dry as)4,500 Steam/Gas Ratio1 1 Gas Composition-25% CO:% Hg

Percent Conversion Sodium Content of Catalyst,

t Percen 500 F. 400 F. 360 F.

Reaction: Same as in Table A. Conditions: Same as in Table A.

Percent Conversion Zine/Copper Ratio of Catalyst 500 F. 400 F. 360 F.

It can be seen that at higher temperatures within the range contemplated herein the zinc/ copper ratio is not as critical as it is'in the narrower 360 F. to 400 F.

EXAMPLE 5 Plant preparation In a commercial unit a copper-zinc catalyst is produced by pumping 565 cubic feet of a solution containing 918 pounds of copper as copper nitrate and 1890 pounds of zinc as zinc nitrate (specific gravity approx. 1.180) into a 15.7 percent solution of soda ash (light). The volume of the soda ash solution is 450 cubic feet. (Theoretical weight of precipitate3500 lbs.) The soda ash solution is pumped into a 1695 cu. ft. tank equipped with a mechanical agitator and heated to 140 F. The copper-zinc solution is heated to 110 F. and sprayed over the surface of the soda ash solution. The soda ash solution is maintained at 140 F. to 142 F. during this precipitation reaction by sparging with live steam. The final pH of the mixture is 7.0 to 8.5. After precipitation the batch is washed to remove sodium by decanting off approximatelypercent of the solution in the precipitation tank. The wash temperature is approximately F. Four washes are used in this decantation as follows: 1st- 4th1310 cu. ft. After the fourth decantation, the material is filter-ed and then loaded on racks and calcined at 700 F. to a weight loss of 1 percent or less. At this point the sodium content is 0.10 to 0.15 percent. The calcined material is suspended in water (3500 lbs. of the oxides in 1695 cu. ft. of water) at 90 F. to 100 F. The resulting mixture is filtered out of the slurry and dried to 1 percent or less weight loss at 325 F. The sodium content at this point is 0.05 percent or less. The dried filter cake to which 2 percent graphite is added as a lubricant is then sized and formed into inch tablets. Conversion with this catalyst is similar to that shown for the 0.05 percent sodium catalyst in Table A.

In one of its aspects this invention is concerned with the addition of the acidic material to the basic material. The catalysts of the invention, insofar as sodium content is concerned, can, however, be prepared by the addition of the basic material to the acidic material. This reverse method of precipitation is shown in Example 6 which follows.

EXAMPLE 6 The precipitated catalyst is produced by adding 2080 parts by weight of a 15.7 weight percent soda ash solution (sp. gr. 80 F.1.16) into an 8 weight percent metal solution containing 68.8 copper as copper nitrate and 142 parts by weight zinc as zinc nitrate. The temperature of the mechanically agitated metal solution is maintained at 140 F. during the precipitation, and the soda ash, heated to 110 F. is added to the copper-zinc nitrate solution at such a rate as to give a 45 to 60 minute precipitation. The precipitate is washed free of sodium by decantation, approximately 80 percent of the solution being withdrawn during four washings. After further washing and decanting at 90 F. the material is filtered, mixed with graphite and tableted as set forth in the preceding examples, tablets being or A inch pellets.

EXAMPLE 7 Precipitation according to the procedure of Example 6 but at a lower temperature (80 F. to 100 F.) results in a lighter density precipitate with slow settling properties making decantation diflicult. This precipitate is washed by filtration. At temperatures below 500 F. outstand ing conversions, though slightly less than in Table B, are obtained using both of these catalysts.

The foregoing examples and tables show that this invention permits operation of a shift converter on a commercial scale at a low temperature and thus provides great flexibility in the manufacture of hydrogen. Because of the low temperatures used, the catalysts of this invention are longer lasting and more efficient due to less deterioration and a favorable shift in the reaction equilibrium. Given the teachings of this invention, variations and modifications will occur to those skilled in the art. Thus, other methods of handling the precipitate can be used. In addition the catalysts herein can be used in gas purification in addition to the manufacture of hydrogen. Such ramifications are within the scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In the process for producing hydrogen by a shift reaction involving reacting carbon monoxide with steam the improvement permitting said shift reaction to be carried out at a low temperature in the range of 350 F. to 500 P. which comprises at said temperature, at a pressure in the range of atmospheric to 800 pounds per square inch gauge, and at a space velocity of 300 to 6500 cubic feet per hour per cubic foot of catalyst passing the reaction gases, including steam, over a reduced copper oxide-zinc oxide shift catalyst containing as its active ingredients after reduction zinc oxide and copper in a weight ratio based on metal of 0.5 to 3 zinc to 1 copper prepared by coprecipitating copper and Zinc as their carbonates from an aqueous solution of their soluble salts through double decomposition reaction with sodium carbonate, removing the sodium salts so that the level of sodium, calculated from sodium oxide after calcining to the oxides, is less than 0.2 percent, calcining the sodium carbonate-containing copper and Zinc carbonate precipitate to form a mixture of the oxides, and reducing the oxide mixture to zinc oxide and copper.

2. The process of claim 1 wherein the zinc to copper ratio is 2 to 1 and wherein a sodium level of less than 0.15 percent is obtained by repeated washing of the carbonate precipitate.

3. The process of claim 1 wherein the zinc to copper ratio is 2 to 1, wherein the precipitation is accomplished by the adidtion of the copper-zinc salt solution to the sodium carbonate solution, and wherein the sodium level is less than 0.10 percent.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,797,426 3/1931 Larson 23213 1,809,978 6/1931 Larson 23213 2,206,773 7/1940 Hale 252-475 X 2,275,181 3/1942 Ipatietf et al 252475 X FOREIGN PATENTS 636,800 5/1950 Great Britain.

OSCAR R. VERTIZ, Primary Examiner.

B. H. LEVENSON, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN THE PROCESS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY A SHIFT REACTION INVOLVING REACTING CARBON MONOXIDE WITH STEAM THE IMPROVEMENT PERMITTING SAID SHIT REACTION TO BE CARRIED OUT AT A LOW TEMPERATURE IN THE RANGE OF 350%F. TO 500*F. WHICH COMPRISES AT SAID TEMPERATURE, AT A PRESSURE IN THE RANGE OF ATMOSPHERIC TO 800 POUNDS PER SQURE INCH GAUGE, AND AT A SPACE VELOCITY OF 300 TO 6500 CUBIC FEET PER HOUR PER CUBIC FOOT OF CATALYST PASSING THE REACTION GASES, INCLUDING STEAM, OVER A REDUCED COPPER OXIDE-ZINC OXIDE SHIFT CATALYST CONTAINING AS ITS ACTIVE INGREDIENTS AFTER REDUCTION ZINC OXIDE AND COPPER IN A WEIGHT RATIO BASED ON METAL OF 0.5 TO 3 ZINC TO 1 COPPER PREPARED BY COPRECIPITATING COPPER AND ZINC AS THEIR CARBONATES FROM AN AQUEOUS SOLUTION OF THEIR SOLUBLE SALTS THROUGH DOUBLE DECOMPOSITION REACTION WITH SODIUM CARBONATE, REMOVING THE SODIUM SALTS SO THAT THE LEVEL OF SODIUM, CALCULATED FROM SODIUM OXIDE AFTER CALCINING TO THE OXIDES, IS LESS THAN 0.2 PERCENT, CALCINING THE SODIUM CARBONATE-CONTAINING COPPER AND ZINC CARBONATE PRECIPITATE TO FORM A MIXTURE OF THE OXIDES, AND REDUCING THE OXIDE MIXTURE TO ZINC OXIDE AND COPPER.
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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US3382045A (en) * 1965-05-10 1968-05-07 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Production of hydrogen
US3382044A (en) * 1965-02-03 1968-05-07 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Removal of sulfur compounds in steamgas reforming and shift conversion processes
US3387942A (en) * 1965-05-10 1968-06-11 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Production of hydrogen
US3388972A (en) * 1966-12-14 1968-06-18 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Low temperature shift reaction catalysts and methods for their preparation
US3390102A (en) * 1966-12-01 1968-06-25 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Reduction-activation of copper oxidezinc oxide low temperature shift catalysts
US3546140A (en) * 1967-09-14 1970-12-08 Catalysts & Chem Inc Low temperature shift reactions
US3615217A (en) * 1966-06-27 1971-10-26 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Low temperature copper-zinc shift reaction catalysts and methods for their preparation
US3615216A (en) * 1968-03-26 1971-10-26 Exxon Research Engineering Co Water gas shift process for producing hydrogen using a cesium compound catalyst
US3666682A (en) * 1969-11-26 1972-05-30 Texaco Inc Water-gas shift conversion process
JPS50122487A (en) * 1974-03-13 1975-09-26
US3922337A (en) * 1970-07-22 1975-11-25 Ici Ltd Hydrogen
US3961037A (en) * 1965-01-05 1976-06-01 Imperial Chemical Industries Limited Process for forming hydrogen and carbon dioxide using a catalyst consisting essentially of oxides of copper, zinc and aluminum or magnesium
US4166101A (en) * 1976-11-10 1979-08-28 Clement Jean Claude Process of the preparation of a hydrogen-rich gas and the catalyst used in the process
US4177252A (en) * 1977-05-09 1979-12-04 Imperial Chemical Industries Limited Low temperature shift conversion process
US4308176A (en) * 1980-03-28 1981-12-29 Norsk Hydro A.S. Catalyst and method for producing said catalyst
US4338292A (en) * 1980-12-08 1982-07-06 Texaco Inc. Production of hydrogen-rich gas
US4375425A (en) * 1980-12-08 1983-03-01 Texaco Inc. Catalyst for the production of a hydrogen-rich gas
FR2606013A1 (en) * 1986-11-03 1988-05-06 Union Carbide Corp Improved process and catalyst for hydrogenation of aldehydes
US4876402A (en) * 1986-11-03 1989-10-24 Union Carbide Chemicals And Plastics Company Inc. Improved aldehyde hydrogenation process
US5021233A (en) * 1983-06-01 1991-06-04 Lehigh University Water gas shift reaction with alkali-doped catalyst
EP0721799A1 (en) 1995-01-11 1996-07-17 United Catalysts Incorporated Promoted and stabilized copper oxide and zinc oxide catalyst and preparation method
US6693057B1 (en) 2002-03-22 2004-02-17 Sud-Chemie Inc. Water gas shift catalyst
CN102316983A (en) * 2009-02-23 2012-01-11 三井化学株式会社 Copper-based catalyst manufacturing method, copper-based catalyst, and pretreatment method for same

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GB8714539D0 (en) * 1987-06-22 1987-07-29 Ici Plc Catalysts

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US2275181A (en) * 1939-04-03 1942-03-03 Universal Oil Prod Co Process for hydrogenating hydrocarbons
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US1797426A (en) * 1928-05-15 1931-03-24 Pont Ammonia Corp Du Manufacture of hydrogen
US1809978A (en) * 1928-07-21 1931-06-16 Pont Ammonia Corp Du Process of producing hydrogen
US2206773A (en) * 1936-06-13 1940-07-02 William J Hale Production of catalytic septa
US2275181A (en) * 1939-04-03 1942-03-03 Universal Oil Prod Co Process for hydrogenating hydrocarbons
GB636800A (en) * 1948-04-07 1950-05-03 Donald Mcneil Improvements in and relating to the dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols to ketones

Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3961037A (en) * 1965-01-05 1976-06-01 Imperial Chemical Industries Limited Process for forming hydrogen and carbon dioxide using a catalyst consisting essentially of oxides of copper, zinc and aluminum or magnesium
US3382044A (en) * 1965-02-03 1968-05-07 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Removal of sulfur compounds in steamgas reforming and shift conversion processes
US3387942A (en) * 1965-05-10 1968-06-11 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Production of hydrogen
US3382045A (en) * 1965-05-10 1968-05-07 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Production of hydrogen
US3615217A (en) * 1966-06-27 1971-10-26 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Low temperature copper-zinc shift reaction catalysts and methods for their preparation
US3390102A (en) * 1966-12-01 1968-06-25 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Reduction-activation of copper oxidezinc oxide low temperature shift catalysts
US3388972A (en) * 1966-12-14 1968-06-18 Catalysts & Chemicals Inc Low temperature shift reaction catalysts and methods for their preparation
US3546140A (en) * 1967-09-14 1970-12-08 Catalysts & Chem Inc Low temperature shift reactions
US3615216A (en) * 1968-03-26 1971-10-26 Exxon Research Engineering Co Water gas shift process for producing hydrogen using a cesium compound catalyst
US3666682A (en) * 1969-11-26 1972-05-30 Texaco Inc Water-gas shift conversion process
US3922337A (en) * 1970-07-22 1975-11-25 Ici Ltd Hydrogen
JPS50122487A (en) * 1974-03-13 1975-09-26
JPS5344916B2 (en) * 1974-03-13 1978-12-02
US4166101A (en) * 1976-11-10 1979-08-28 Clement Jean Claude Process of the preparation of a hydrogen-rich gas and the catalyst used in the process
US4177252A (en) * 1977-05-09 1979-12-04 Imperial Chemical Industries Limited Low temperature shift conversion process
US4308176A (en) * 1980-03-28 1981-12-29 Norsk Hydro A.S. Catalyst and method for producing said catalyst
US4338292A (en) * 1980-12-08 1982-07-06 Texaco Inc. Production of hydrogen-rich gas
US4375425A (en) * 1980-12-08 1983-03-01 Texaco Inc. Catalyst for the production of a hydrogen-rich gas
US5021233A (en) * 1983-06-01 1991-06-04 Lehigh University Water gas shift reaction with alkali-doped catalyst
EP0269888A1 (en) * 1986-11-03 1988-06-08 Union Carbide Corporation Aldehyde hydrogenation catalyst and process
US4762817A (en) * 1986-11-03 1988-08-09 Union Carbide Corporation Aldehyde hydrogenation catalyst
BE1000439A3 (en) * 1986-11-03 1988-12-06 Union Carbide Corp Improved method and catalyst for hydrogenation of aldehydes.
US4876402A (en) * 1986-11-03 1989-10-24 Union Carbide Chemicals And Plastics Company Inc. Improved aldehyde hydrogenation process
FR2606013A1 (en) * 1986-11-03 1988-05-06 Union Carbide Corp Improved process and catalyst for hydrogenation of aldehydes
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