US3280716A - Method of and apparatus for processing photographic materials - Google Patents

Method of and apparatus for processing photographic materials Download PDF

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US3280716A
US3280716A US31695763A US3280716A US 3280716 A US3280716 A US 3280716A US 31695763 A US31695763 A US 31695763A US 3280716 A US3280716 A US 3280716A
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container
means
tanks
liquids
tank
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Gall Kurt
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KURT GALL
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03DAPPARATUS FOR PROCESSING EXPOSED PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • G03D13/00Processing apparatus or accessories therefor, not covered by groups G11B3/00 - G11B11/00
    • G03D13/02Containers; Holding-devices
    • G03D13/04Trays; Dishes; Tanks Drums
    • G03D13/046Drums; Films convolutely fixed on the side of the drum
    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03DAPPARATUS FOR PROCESSING EXPOSED PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • G03D3/00Liquid processing apparatus involving immersion; Washing apparatus involving immersion
    • G03D3/02Details of liquid circulation
    • G03D3/06Liquid supply; Liquid circulation outside tanks

Description

Oct. 25, 1966 K. GALL 3,280,716

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS Filed Oct. 17, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORZ KURT GALA Jaslem, Russ 6' Jlesla:

Oct. 25, 1966 K. GALL 3,280,716

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS Filed Oct. 17, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Oct. 25, 1966 K. GALL 3,280,716

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS Filed Oct. 17, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 KURT GALL INVENTOR.

BY Jflesiern, was; 6f .J/Mmfem United States Patent 3,280,716 METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING PHOTGGRAPHIC MATERIALS Kurt Gall, Welfenstrasse 22, Stuttgart-Birkach, Germany Filed Oct. 17, 1963, Ser. No. 316,957 3 Claims. (CI. 95-89) My present invention relates to an apparatus for processing exposed sheets of photographic material, including a container adapted to receive a succession of treatment liquids, as well as to a method of treating photographic material in such container. This application 18 a continuation-in-part of my copending application Ser. No. 214,614 filed August 3, 1962, now abandoned.

In my prior application I have disclosed an apparatus for the treatment of photographic materials wherein an elongated container is substantially horizontally disposed and has a substantially semicyclindrical lower port on which can be closed by a complementary cover portion to form a partly cylindrical treatment chamber, a drum being rotatably disposed in that chamber for rotation about the cylinder axis and being provided with means for temporarily attaching the sheets to be treated to the drum surface. A plurality of storage tanks hold the necessary treatment liquids which are to be successively supplied to the container and removed therefrom via respective inlet and outlet pipes for maximum avoidance of mutual contamination of the several solutions. The admission and removal of these liquids, as also of flushing water where required, at predetermined points of an operating cycle is controlled by a suitable timing device, e.g. of the card controlled type.

My present invention has for its object the provision of further improvements in such a system including, particplarly, the means for controlling the removal of spent solution from the treatment container and for maintaining the proper composition of the treatment liquors to 'be admitted thereto.

An important feature of this invention, disclosed and broadly claimed in my prior application, resides in the provision of a bottom recess in the treatment container in which the inlets of the tubes serving to return the liquids to their tanks are disposed at axially spaced locations, along with a drain tube for flushing water and/ or solution residue, and are individually provided with solenoid controlled valves. The associated solenoids, pursuant to a more specific feature of my invention, are carried on arms which are rigid with the respective valve bodies and extend skew to the cylinder axis underneath the container, the valves having caps operatively linked With the solenoid cores by substantially horizontal levers whereby any danger of leakage of liquid into the solenoid is obviated.

A further feature of this invention resides in a method of regenerating the spent solutions by returning only a portion of each solution to its storage tank while allowing a definite residue to remain in the bottom recess from which it can readily be drained off, a commensurate quantity of fresh solution being admitted into the tank at the end of each operating cycle; for this purpose it will be convenient to elevate the inlets of the return tubes within the bottom recess above the level of the drain tube, the extent of elevation determining the amount of residue which remains in the recess upon the emptying of the container by way of one of the solenoid controlled valves. The replenishing of the contents of each storage tank, which may be initiated by the timer and halted by a level controlled (e.g., float-type) switch, when carried out immediately after the last treatment step will enable the freshly added solution to assume the proper treatment temperature at which the tanks are advantageously maintained by a surrounding bath.

The above and other objects, features and advantages of my invention will become more fully apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment, reference being made to the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of an apparatus according to my invention;

FIG. 2 is an end view taken in direction of arrow II in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of a drainage valve used in the apparatus, taken on the line III-III of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a graph showing the timing of the several treatment steps; and

FIG. 5 is a detail view illustrating a modification.

As illustrated particularly in FIG. 1 of the drawing, the apparatus according to the invention is provided with an elongated container 2, shaped semicylindrically in its lower portion, which is adapted to be sealed against incidental light by a cover 1 and is horizontally mounted on the two upper arms 3 of a frame 4. In this container 2 a closed cylindrical drum 5 is mounted so as to be rotatable with small peripheral clearance about its horizontal longitudinal axis, the shaft 6 of the drum being journaled in the end walls of the container. Drum 5 may be driven continuously in the direction of the arrow 9 by an electric motor 7 through a V-belt 8. The periphery of drum 5 is provided with a plurality of parallel bars 11, held spaced from its surface by blocks 22, 22", for securing to it one or more sheets of photographic material which are to be treated. Each bar 11 carries a series of clips 23 'by which the photographic films or papers are held so that liquid can pass over both surfaces thereof, the sheets 12 'being thus positionable side by side and also in overlapping relationship on adjoining bars 11.

The lower part of frame 4 further contains a basin 13 surrounding three tanks 14a, 14b, which are adapted to receive different liquids for treating the photographs, e.g., developer, stop-bath and fixing solutions, respectively. In order to permit these liquids to be passed successively from the storage tanks 14a, 14b, 140 into the container 2 without danger that they might contaminate and ruin one another, each tank is provided with a separate feed pipe 17a, 17b, which terminates in the container 2 and is also connected to a pump 21a, 21b, 210 for driving the respective processing liquid upwardly into the container 2. Each tank 14a, 14b, 14c has a volume considerably less than that of container 2 whereby it can be emptied into that container without raising the liquid level therein much above the nadir of drum 5, as shown in FIG. 1.

In order to avoid a mutual contamination of the processing liquids also when they are being discharged from the container 2, the latter is connected by three separate return pipes 24a, 24b, 24c and quick-acting gate valves 27a, 27b, 270 to the respective tanks 14a, 14b and 140. These valves 27a, 27b, 270, which have a relatively large flow area and are controlled by separate solenoids 26a, 26b, 26c, are connected to the floor of a narrow trough 32 which forms a bottom recess in the container 2 for collecting even the last residues of the several treatment solutions and returning all but a measured residue thereof through the respective solenoid valves to their original tanks. A suitable vent 68 with a hood 69 is provided on each tank to facilitate filling and emptying.

Since it is usually necessary to wash the photographic material 12 between the individual processing steps, the apparatus is further provided with a water-supply line 33, as shown particularly in FIG. 2, which also terminates in the container 2. and contains a solenoid valve 34 for controlling the water supply. For preventing the container 2 from being filled excessively with rinse water, it is further provided with an overflow pipe 35 whose open end is disposed at a suitable level to determine the maximum amount of water in the container 2. For the discharge of the water from the container 2 after each flushing step, another quick-acting solenoid valve 36 is disposed at the bottom of trough 32 in the inlet of a drain pipe 37 which merges with the overflow pipe 35. Container 2 is vented to the atmosphere by pipe 35 and, if desired, by further light-excluding passages (not shown) provided, for example on the sides of cover 1.

Since in the developing process of photographic materials it is of the greatest importance that the processing liquid is maintained at a proper temperature, the basin 13 containing the tanks 14a, 14b, 14c is filled with water which may be supplied through a branch 38 of line 33 and may, if necessary, be circulated by a pump 41 through pipes 39 which are connected to the basin 13. If it becomes necessary to increase the temperature of the water bath in basin 13, one or more electric heating elements 42 extending into the basin may be switched on. For cooling the bath, cold water is supplied to the basin 13 and, if desired, circulated through it. The maximum level of water in basin 13 is determined by an overflow pipe 43 which is likewise connected to the drain pipe 35.

The construction of the valves 27a, 27b and 270, and the manner in which they are secured to the container 2 at the bottom of its trough 32, will now be described with reference to FIG. 3 which particularly illustrates the valve 27a, the latter being representative of all the valves in the trough 32. Valve 27a has a cup-shaped body 51 which traverses a bore 62 in the floor of the trough 32 and whose open upper end is overlain by a cap 52 bearing by an annular flange 52 upon a packing ring 53 to form a tight seal therewith. The cap 52, which is upwardly convex to minimize the accumulation of liquid thereon, is fastened to a vertical stem 54 provided at its lower end with a shoulder 54'; a compression spring 55 bears upon the shoulder 54' and upon the end of a thimble-shaped boss 56 rising rigidly from the floor of cup 51, a packing disk 57 being disposed in that boss to form a fluid-tight seal around the stem 54. Cup 51 is rigid with a horizontal arm 50 which extends skew to the cylinder axis of container 1 and forms a base for the solenoid 26a supported thereon in a position laterally oifset from the associated valve 27a. The lower extremity 54" of stem 54 passes through a hole 50 in arm 50 and is articulated, with the necessary play, to a lever 58 pivoted at 59 to a stud 50" depending from arm 50. The other extremity of lever 58 is similarly articulated to a vertically movable core 61 of an electromagnet 60 forming part of the solenoid 26a. The solenoid is so designed that, upon energization of its magnet 60, core 61 is attracted downwardly so that lever 58 lifts the stem 54 and the valve cap 52 against the pressure of their restoring spring 55. Thus, valve 27a remains tightly closed as long as the solenoid 26a is cut off from its current source.

The flexible upper portion of the discharge tube 24a associated with valve 27a terminates at a lateral port 51' close to the bottom of cup 51. The entire assembly 26a, 50, 27a can be raised or lowered, with reference to the container 2 and its trough 32, upon a loosening of a clamping ring 46 which surrounds the cup 51 with clearance and is screwed onto a threaded boss 63 depending from trough 32. A resilient ring 67 of rubber or the like, normally held under compression in a recess of boss 63 by the clamping ring 64, permits the cup 51 to move'with sliding fit in the bore 62 when the clamping pressure is removed. As soon as the top of cup 51 has been positioned at the proper level above the floor of trough 32, ring 64 is tightened to compress the ring 67 which in turn exerts radial friction upon the cup 51 to hold the assembly in place.

The general manner of operation of the apparatus according to the invention is as follows:

After each sheet of photographic material 12 has been secured under the proper darkroom light to the surface of drum 5 by one or more clips 23 on the supporting bars 11 and after the cover 1 has then been closed so that the container 2 as well as the drum 5 are completely shielded from light, the bright room illumination may be switched on. A program record 44, such as a punch card, is then inserted into the timing unit indicated diagrammatically at 45, this unit being thereupon started by depressing a pushbutton switch, not shown. The timer 45, which then carries out all further control functions by delivering the required electrical impulses, first starts the electric motor 7 so as to rotate the cylinder 5 in the direction of the arrow 9 as shown in FIG. 2. A further impulse then starts the pump 21a which is associated with tank 14a and thus transfers the processing liquid from this tank to the container 2. After the first processing step has been completed, the next impulse given by the control unit 45 causes the quick-acting valve 27a to open so that the first processing liquid can flow rapidly from the container 2 back into the tank 14a. If a washing step has to be interposed between two successive processing steps, a further impulse given by the control unit 45 opens the solenoid valve 34 so that flushing water flows into the container 2 until it has reached the level of the mouth of the overflow pipe 35. After the washing step has been completed, another impulse from the control unit 45 opens the quick-acting valve 36 so that the water will rapidly run out of the container 2. Thereupon, pump 21b is started to drive the processing liquid from tank 14b upwardly into the container 2. When the second treatment step is completed, the quick-acting valve 27b is opened so that this processing liquid also flows back to its tank 14b. Finally, pump 210 is started so that the processing liquid in the third tank 14c is delivered to the container 2, the liquid being subsequently drained off by the operation of the quick-acting valve 270 after this processing step is also completed. Of course, if necessary, an intermediate washing step may also be interposed between the second and third processing steps by a repetition of the same functions of the control unit and the associated valves as were carried out for the first washing treatment. After the photographic material 12 has been completely processed in the container 2 and the motor 7 has been switched off to stop the rotation of drum 5, it is merely necessary to open the cover 1 and to remove the material 12 from the drum.

During the rotation of drum 5, the photographic material 12 to be processed is taken along continuously and drawn through the respective processing liquid in the container 2. A part of the processing liquid then also passes behind the photographic material to the back thereof, between the drum surface and the bars 11, and lifts the unclamped part of each sheet off the cylinder surface so that both sides of the sheet 12 will be intensively acted upon by the processing liquid.

In the foregoing description it has been assumed that all the valves 27a, 27b, 270 are in the same position as the drain valve 36, i.e. flush with the bottom of trough 32. I have found, however, that in many instancesparticularly if a large amount of material has to be processed in a succession of several treatment cyclesit will be desirable to regenerate the spent solutions after each cycle and that, for this purpose, it is advantageous to return only a portion of each solution to its tank while letting a controlled amount thereof go to waste. This is accomplished in the present system by the selective elevation of the valves 27a, 27b, 270 above the bottom of trough 32 in the manner described wtih reference to FIG. 3, as has been illustrated in FIG. 1. Thus, FIG. 1 shows the valve 27a projecting a certain distance above the floor of trough 32 whereby, when this valve is opened, a pool of a first processing liquid (e.g. developer) will remain in the trough, this residue being then drained off by a pipe 37 upon an opening of valve 36. Similarly, valve 27b is shown in an elevated position so that the corresponding liquid (e.g. stop bath) also leaves a predetermined amount of residue in the trough 32 for subsequent removal by way of pipes 37, 35. In the same manner a portion of the third processing liquid (e.g. fixing solution) is left over, as determined by the elevation of valve 270, and subsequently discarded.

FIG. 5 shows a modification in which a trough 132 has a stepped bottom, with the valves 27a, 27b, 27c disposed at the levels of the several steps above the valve 36 which again is at the very bottom of the trough. In this case, the valves may be permanently secured to the container bottom if no readjustment of the proportion of residue is required.

The regeneration of the treatment solutions proceeds by replenishing the contents of each tank to compensate for the wasted residue (and also for the small amount of liquid adhering to the Work and the drum and container surfaces after each treatment step), fresh solution being available for this purpose in respective reservoirs of which one has been illustrated at 460 in FIG. 2. The reservoir 460 is connected via a supply line 470, containing a solenoid valve 480, with its associated storage tank 14c which it enters at the top through a level-controlled valve 49c; the corresponding valves and supply lines of the other tanks 14a, 14b are shown at 49a, 47a and 49b, 47b. Valve 48c and its companion valves 48a, 48b, shown diagrammatically in FIG. 4, are operatively connected to the timer 45 by Wires 66; the conductors connecting the other solenoid valves to the timer, as well as the current source therefor located within the timer, have not been illustrated.

Whereas the valves 48a, 48b, 480 control the admission of fresh liquid into the storage tanks, the duration of the flow is controlled by respective floats 65 (FIG. 1) so that each tank is always refilled to a predetermined level. This level should, of course, be so selected that the liquid in container 2 will not rise beyond the top of overflow pipe 35 when the contents of the tank are discharged into the container.

In FIG. 4 I have shown diagrammatically a treatment cycle using the three tanks 14a, 14b, 14c and their associated pumps and valves as well as a source of flushing Water represented by the pipe 33 and its control valve 34. The diagram is designed to show only the relative order of the timing pulses emitted by control unit 45 and is not intended to depict accurately the relative duration of each treatment step; these steps, in fact, may last from a few seconds to as long as 15 minutes or more, depending upon the specific processing method employed, as is well known in the photographic art.

The operating :cycle of the timer begins with the energization of motor 7, as shown in graph A of FIG. 4, which remains operated until substantially the end of the cycle. The timer thereupon briefly operates the pump 21a (graph B) to admit developer from tank 14a into the container 2. After the proper treatment interval, a pulse is supplied to solenoid 26a (graph F) to return the developer to its tank with the exception of a controlled amount of residue. Thereupon, as per graph I, solenoid 31 of valve 36 is operated to drain off that residue. Immediately thereafter, pump 21b (graph C) delivers the stop bath to the container 2. After a further treatment interval, solenoid 26b responds to a pulse from the timer (graph G) to return part of the spent solution to its tank 14b, the residue being drained off immediately afterwards by reoperation of valve 31 (graph I). Next, solenoid valve 34 is opened (graph E) to admit rinse Water to the container 2 in a prolonged flushing step in which the overflow is discharged via pipe 35. Upon the reclosure of valve 34, solenoid 31 reoperates (graph I) to permit the removal of the remaining rinse Water along with all traces of the processing liquids previously used. Pump 210 is then put into operation to transfer the fixing solution from tank to container 2. Upon completion of the fixing step, solenoid 26c (graph H) opens its valve 270 to return part of the solution to its tank, the remainder being subsequently drained off as solenoid 31 (graph I) is briefly reenergized. Now, the aforedescribed flushing step (graph E) is repeated by a reopening of solenoid valve 34, the rinse Water being then drained off along With any traces of fixing bath as solenoid 31 (graph 1) operates once more. At this time the cover 1 of the processing container 2 may be opened, manually or by timer controlled automatic means not shown, whereupon the rotation of drum 5 by the motor 7 (graph A) may continue for a while to help dry the photographic material. Finally, either before or after the drum motor 7 has come to rest, solenoid valves 48a, 48b and 480 are opened, as shown in graphs J, K and L, for a time long enough to supply fresh solution to the tanks 14a, 14b and 140, the amount of the supply being controlled by the respective floats 65, independently of the timer, as previously described.

Although the fresh solutions can be admitted to the storage tanks also at the beginning of the next treatment cycle rather than at the end of the preceding one, the latter procedure is preferred since it enables the liquids to assume the proper temperature as determined by the water bath in vessel 13 under the control of heating and cooling means 42 and 39, 41.

Though the particularly illustrated embodiment of my invention includes only three tanks for different processing liquids and their associated equipment, the apparatus may of course be expanded so as to permit a considerably larger number of processing liquids to be successively applied. It is then possible also to carry out developing processes which require a large number of different treatment solutions or to use successions of different developing processes on different photographic materials. For this purpose it is then only necessary to insert different program cards 55, which are suitably prepared, into the control unit 45.

My invention, moreover, is not limited to the structural details described and illustrated but is capable of numerous modifications within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An apparatus for processing exposed sheets of pho- O tographic material, comprising:

an elongated horizontal container provided with a substantially semicylindrical lower portion having a bottom recess;

cover means forming an upper portion complementary to said lower portion for sealing the interior of said container against incident light;

a horizontal drum provided with holder means for said sheets and disposed with small peripheral clearance in said container for rotation about the axis of said semicylindrical portion;

a plurality of tanks for storing different treatment liquids;

individual conduits leading from said tanks to said container and terminating above the bottom thereof;

pumps in said conduits for delivering any of said treatment liquids from the respective tank to said container;

separate tubes leading from axially spaced locations of said container to said tanks for the return of the respective liquids thereto, said tubes having elevated inlets in said bottom recess;

individual valves in said inlets normally blocking said tubes;

21 source of flush-ing water including a pipe opening into said container above the bottom thereof;

a drain tube opening from below into said bottom recess below the level of said inlets for removing flushing water and residual treatment liquids from said container;

a further valve in said bottom recess normally blocking said drain tubes;

timer means for actuating said pumps, said source and said valves in a predetermined order for successively admitting and removing selected treatment liquids and flushing water to and from said container;

drive means for rotating said drum about said axis during an operating cycle of said timer means;

and supply means for restoring the contents of each tank to a predetermined level at the end of said operating cycle, said supply means comprising a plurality of reservoirs for said liquids each connected to a respective tank, additional valves controlled by said timer means in the connections between said reservoirs and said tanks, and level-controlled shutoff means in said connections.

2. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein each of said valves comprises a cup adjustably extending from below into said bottom recess, a closure cap overlying said cup, a vertical stern secured to said valve cap and passing downwardly through said cup, a substantially horizontal arm rigid with said cup and disposed skew to said axis below said bottom recess, a solenoid controlled by said timer means and mounted on said arm alongside said cup,

and a lever fulcrumed to said arm, said lever extending 2:.

below said arm and operatively linking said stem with said solenoid.

I 3. A method of processing exposed sheets of photographic material in a container having connections to a plurality of storage tanks for different treatment solutions, comprising the steps of admitting each solution into said container at a predetermined point in an operating cycle, moving a sheet to be processed through the solution in said container, returning part of the spent solution from said container to its storage tank and draining ofi a controlled amount of residue prior to admission of the next solution, and regenerating the contents of each storage tank by the introduction of a commensurate quantity of fresh solution at the end of each operating cycle.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 746,632 12/1903 Holcombe 9593 2,534,603 12/1950 Katzen et al 9590 2,612,906 10/1952 Shafer 251138 X 2,630,827 3/1953 Miller 251-138 X 2,800,845 7/1957 Nieth 9589 X 2,837,988 6/1958 P'avelle 95-89 2,920,548 1/ 1960 Copenhefer 95-89 NORTON ANSI-IER, Primary Examiner.

C. B. PRICE, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. AN APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING EXPOSED SHEETS FOR PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIAL, COMPRISING: AN ELONGATED HORIZONTAL CONTAINER PROVIDED WITH A SUBSTANTIALLY SEMICYLINDRICAL LOWER PORTION HAVING A BOTTOM RECESS; COVER MEANS FORMING AN UPPER PORTION COMPLEMENTARY TO SAID LOWER PORTION FOR SEALING THE INTERIOR OF SAID CONTAINER AGAINST INCIDENT LIGHT; A HORIZONTAL DRUM PROVIDED WITH HOLDER MEANS FOR SAID SHEETS AND DISPOSED WITH SMALL PERIPHERAL CLEARANCE IN SAID CONTAINER FOR ROTATION ABOUT THE AXIS OF SAID SEMICYLINDRICAL PORTION; A PLURALITY OF TANKS FOR STORING DIFFERENT TREATMENT LIQUIDS; INDIVIDUAL CONDUITS LEADING FROM SAID TANKS TO SAID CONTAINER AND TERMINATING ABOVE THE BOTTOM THEREOF; PUMPS IN SAID CONDUITS FOR DELIVERING ANY OF SAID TREATMENT LIQUIDS FROM THE RESPECTIVE TANK TO SAID CONTAINER; SEPARATE TUBES LEADING FROM AXIALLY SPACED LOCATIONS OF SAID CONTAINER TO SAID TANKS FOR THE RETURN OF THE RESPECTIVE LIQUIDS THERETO, SAID TUBES HAVING ELEVATED INLETS IN SAID BOTTOM RECESS; INDIVIDUAL VALVES IN SAID INLETS NORMALLY BLOCKING SAID TUBES; A SOURCE OF FLUSHING WATER INCLUDING A PIPE OPENING INTO SAID CONTAINER ABOVE THE BOTTOM THEREOF; A DRAIN TUBE OPENING FROM BELOW INTO SAID BOTTOM RECESS BELOW THE LEVEL OF SAID INLETS FOR REMOVING FLUSHING WATER AND RESIDUAL TREATMENT LIQUIDS FROM SAID CONTAINER; A FURTHER VALVE IN SAID BOTTOM RECESS NORMALLY BLOCKING SAID DRAIN TUBES; TIMER MEANS FOR ACTUATING SAID PUMPS, SAID SOURCE AND SAID VALVES IN A PREDETERMINED ORDER FOR SUCCESSIVELY ADMITTING AND REMOVING SELECTED TREATMENT LIQUIDS AND FLUSHING WATER TO AND FROM SAID CONTAINER; DRIVE MEANS FOR ROTATING SAID DRUM ABOUT SAID AXIS DURING AN OPERATING CYCLE OF SAID TIMER MEANS; AND SUPPLY MEANS FOR RESTORING THE CONTENTS OF EACH TANK TO A PREDETERMINED LEVEL AT THE END OF SAID OPERATING CYCLE, SAID SUPPLY MEANS COMPRISING A PLURALITY OF RESERVOIRS FOR SAID LIQUIDS EACH CONNECTED TO A RESPECTIVE TANK, ADDITIONAL VALVES CONTROLLED BY SAID TIMER MEANS IN THE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN SAID RESERVOIRS AND SAID TANKS, AND LEVEL-CONTROLLED SHUTOFF MEANS IN SAID CONNECTIONS.
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US3418911A (en) * 1966-08-03 1968-12-31 Philco Corp Film developing apparatus
US3437030A (en) * 1965-10-15 1969-04-08 Michael Mastrosimone Apparatus for removing film from a packet and developing,fixing,washing and drying the film
US3438317A (en) * 1965-10-22 1969-04-15 Mario Merolli Apparatus for processing photographic film
US3517600A (en) * 1967-06-08 1970-06-30 Derrick Sunnucks Woollacott Apparatus for processing photographic materials
US3554108A (en) * 1968-05-16 1971-01-12 Kurt Gall Apparatus and method for processing photographic materials
US3585918A (en) * 1969-02-11 1971-06-22 Potomac Research Inc Photographic processing apparatus
US3626835A (en) * 1968-07-19 1971-12-14 Werner W Buechner Photographic processing machine
US3633487A (en) * 1968-08-31 1972-01-11 Herbert Reinhold Langkopf Apparatus for processing photographic material
US3693529A (en) * 1970-10-01 1972-09-26 Autopan Heimerdinger & Stabler Developing apparatus
US3696728A (en) * 1969-12-19 1972-10-10 Stephen F Hope Film processor
US3724354A (en) * 1971-11-18 1973-04-03 J Smith Photographic processing apparatus
US3727536A (en) * 1973-01-03 1973-04-17 Dyna Flex Corp Exposed printing plate washer
US3792487A (en) * 1972-12-21 1974-02-12 Peres Electronics Inc Film processor
US3846818A (en) * 1972-02-16 1974-11-05 W Merz Apparatus for developing photographic materials
US3856395A (en) * 1973-02-15 1974-12-24 A Comstock Color photo processing apparatus
US3864710A (en) * 1973-12-03 1975-02-04 Edward F Zuber Photographic processing apparatus
US4054902A (en) * 1975-02-03 1977-10-18 Rebek Dennis C Apparatus for developing photographic prints
US4178088A (en) * 1978-07-03 1979-12-11 Harding Herbert D Photographic processor
EP0488207A2 (en) * 1990-11-27 1992-06-03 Dainippon Screen Mfg. Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for processing photosensitive material
US7644514B2 (en) * 2003-12-23 2010-01-12 Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete Gmbh Clothes dryer

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US746632A (en) * 1903-02-09 1903-12-08 Burton J Holcombe Photographic developing-machine.
US2612906A (en) * 1946-06-01 1952-10-07 Shafer Valve Co Pressure fluid actuated operator for pipe line valves
US2534603A (en) * 1947-05-06 1950-12-19 Katzen Cyrus Automatic x-ray film processing apparatus
US2630827A (en) * 1947-06-20 1953-03-10 Harvey V Boggs Control valve
US2837988A (en) * 1954-08-02 1958-06-10 Technicolor New York Corp Apparatus for automatically processing a sensitized film in successive steps
US2800845A (en) * 1955-03-15 1957-07-30 Photogrammetry Inc Photographic film developer
US2920548A (en) * 1955-12-21 1960-01-12 Brown Forman Distillers Corp Photographic film developing apparatus

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3437030A (en) * 1965-10-15 1969-04-08 Michael Mastrosimone Apparatus for removing film from a packet and developing,fixing,washing and drying the film
US3438317A (en) * 1965-10-22 1969-04-15 Mario Merolli Apparatus for processing photographic film
US3418911A (en) * 1966-08-03 1968-12-31 Philco Corp Film developing apparatus
US3517600A (en) * 1967-06-08 1970-06-30 Derrick Sunnucks Woollacott Apparatus for processing photographic materials
US3554108A (en) * 1968-05-16 1971-01-12 Kurt Gall Apparatus and method for processing photographic materials
US3626835A (en) * 1968-07-19 1971-12-14 Werner W Buechner Photographic processing machine
US3633487A (en) * 1968-08-31 1972-01-11 Herbert Reinhold Langkopf Apparatus for processing photographic material
US3585918A (en) * 1969-02-11 1971-06-22 Potomac Research Inc Photographic processing apparatus
US3696728A (en) * 1969-12-19 1972-10-10 Stephen F Hope Film processor
US3693529A (en) * 1970-10-01 1972-09-26 Autopan Heimerdinger & Stabler Developing apparatus
US3724354A (en) * 1971-11-18 1973-04-03 J Smith Photographic processing apparatus
US3846818A (en) * 1972-02-16 1974-11-05 W Merz Apparatus for developing photographic materials
US3792487A (en) * 1972-12-21 1974-02-12 Peres Electronics Inc Film processor
US3727536A (en) * 1973-01-03 1973-04-17 Dyna Flex Corp Exposed printing plate washer
US3856395A (en) * 1973-02-15 1974-12-24 A Comstock Color photo processing apparatus
US3864710A (en) * 1973-12-03 1975-02-04 Edward F Zuber Photographic processing apparatus
US4054902A (en) * 1975-02-03 1977-10-18 Rebek Dennis C Apparatus for developing photographic prints
US4178088A (en) * 1978-07-03 1979-12-11 Harding Herbert D Photographic processor
EP0488207A2 (en) * 1990-11-27 1992-06-03 Dainippon Screen Mfg. Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for processing photosensitive material
EP0488207A3 (en) * 1990-11-27 1993-02-03 Dainippon Screen Mfg. Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for processing photosensitive material
US5349412A (en) * 1990-11-27 1994-09-20 Dainippon Screen Mfg. Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for processing photosensitive material
US7644514B2 (en) * 2003-12-23 2010-01-12 Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete Gmbh Clothes dryer

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