US3260531A - Terrain-conforming and torsionalresponsive skis - Google Patents

Terrain-conforming and torsionalresponsive skis Download PDF

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US3260531A
US3260531A US341657A US34165764A US3260531A US 3260531 A US3260531 A US 3260531A US 341657 A US341657 A US 341657A US 34165764 A US34165764 A US 34165764A US 3260531 A US3260531 A US 3260531A
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ski
runner
skis
supports
mounting
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Johan G F Heuvel
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Johan G F Heuvel
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C5/00Skis or snowboards
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C9/00Ski bindings
    • A63C9/007Systems preventing accumulation of forces on the binding when the ski is bending

Description

July 12, 1966 J. G. F. HEUVEL TERRAIN-CONFORMING AND TORSIONAL-RESPONSIVE SKIS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 31. 1964 Ha Z INVENTOR \B 1 FALL UNE ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,260,531 TERRAIN-CONFORMING AND TORSIONAL- RESPONSIVE SKIS 'Johau G. F. Heuvel, 2035 Fort St., Montreal, Quebec, Canada Filed Jan. 31, 1964, Ser. No. 341,657 12 Claims. (Cl. 280-1113) This invention relates generally to skis, and is particularly related to improvements which permit the skis to more readily conform to variable terrain conditions as well as affording a torsion-responsive ski which provides improved edging charactersistics.

When skiing on relative smooth, hard packed snow or during icy conditions, a relatively stiff ski without too much longitudinal flexibility is preferred. However, when skiing in soft powder snow, a relatively flexible ski is preferred.

A primary object of this invention is to increase the adaptability of skis over a greater range of various conditions, particularly wherein the more flexible skis will be suitable for use in the conditions normally reserved for relatively stiff skis.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel ski in which there is afforded a pre-adjusted tip and tail pressure which will adapt to different snow conditions to provide improved tracking characteristics.

In conventional skis, the skiers weight distribution along the ski length is closely related to the bending rigidity built into the ski. A decrease in the bending rigidity will decrease the weight sharing capacity of the tip and tail of the ski. Thus, a practical limitation is placed on the minimum bending rigidity of the ski. Another object of this invention is to provide means for extending the useful range of longitudinal flexibility of the skis by adjusting the weight along the longitudinal ski axis independently of the bending rigidity of the ki.

Additionally, it is generally recognized that skis with a high torsional rigidity, i.e., resistance to twisting transversely along the longitudinal axis, are easier to turn than skis with relatively low torsional rigidity. This is primarily due to the fact that the more torsion resistant ski will have less ski surface in contact with the snow than the ski that more readily twists. Thus, another object of this invention is to provide skis which include means for adjusting torsional rigidity over a wide range of practical values.

It is further recognized in the art that excessive vibrations and chattering of skis while skiing is indicative that portions of the ski edges are not in contact with the snow and therefore there is a resulting loss of control by the skier. Accordingly, another object of this invention is to provide a ski construction whereby optimum vibrational characteristics are provided. Additionally, as recognized by the advanced skier, when attempting to make a parallel turn, i.e., skis are maintained close and parallel to each other, a turn is initiated by unweighting the skis with a substantial uplift movement. It is a further object of the present invention to provide skis which will reduce the amount of effort necessary to unweight or afford uplift to skis particularly when making parallel turns.

Briefly in review, objects of this invention are to provide improvements in skis whereby weight distribution can be adjusted so tip and tail pressures can be varied to afford improved tracking; weight can be adjusted longitudinally of the skis independent of the longitudinal bending rigidity; the skis will substantially conform to undulations of the terrain while maintaining weight distribution; means are provided whereby indicia can be supplied on the skis to generally indicate the position of "ice adjustment of the skis without requiring the user to mathematically compute the adjusted position of the parts; means are provided whereby the skis can be readily unweighted to particularly adapt the skis for parallel turns; the skis are provided with an adjustable torsion rigidity independent of the adjustable longitudinal rigidity; the skis are provided with a construction to obviate chattering caused by excessive vibration; adjustments of the skis can be made independently of built-in characteristics of the ski runners; and the parts can be readily assembled and disassembled for purposes of adjustment, replacement and repair.

These together with other and more specific objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, wherein:

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the novel ski of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a longitudinal section taken substantially on the plane of line 33 of FIGURE 1, and showing details of the torsion-control binding mounting;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged vertical section on the plane of line 44 of FIGURE 1, showing details of a preferred construction;

FIGURE 5 is a side elevation of a conventional ski, and showing by solid lines the attitude of the ski when the tail is unweighted;

FIGURE 6 -is an elevation of the ski of the invention, showing the general position of the parts when the tail is unweighted;

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of a ski when traversing the fall line of a slope and generally subject to torsion due to edging of the ski, and showing how the ski generally conforms to a compound curve on the slope and can be edged substantially along its entire length;

FIGURE 8 is a side elevation looking substantially from the plane of line 88 of FIGURE 7;

FIGURES 9-11 are side elevational views of a conventional ski and illustrating diagrammatically the attitude assumed by the ski when passing over an undulation in the terrain;

FIGURES 12-14 are side elevations similar to FIG- URES 9-11, respectively, and illustrating diagrammatically the position assumed by the ski of the invention when passing over similar terrain conditions;

FIGURE 15 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation of the forwardmost mounting block of the ski of FIGURE 14; and

FIGURE 16 is a perspective view of one of the mounting blocks and retainer removed from the ski.

Referring to the drawings in detail, and first considering FIGURES 1-4, 15 and 16, the novel ski is indicated generally at 10 and comprises a runner 12, having secured thereto by means of forward and rear mounting block assemblies 14, 16 and 18, 20, respectively, a pair of slightly arched, forward and rear, concave-convex supports 22 and 24. The supports 22 and 24 are arched upwardly, and have suitably secured to intermediate portions thereof by means of forward and rear mounting block assemblies 26 and 28, respectively, a binding-support 30 which will accommodate thereon suitable ski bindings to which a ski boot 32 will be attached.

The ski 12 comprises an elongated runner 34 manufactured from epoxy resins, fiber glass, aluminum, etc., as well as wood or combinations thereof in order to afford the degree of flexibility and strength. The supports will likewise be constructed from any suitable material. The mounting block assemblies 14, 16, 18, 20, 26 and 28 are substantially the same except for variations which will affect torque control characteristics.

Referring to FIGURES and 16, a typical mounting block detail shows a plurality of depending, U-shaped loop-forming wire elements 36 which have lateral ends 38 thereof embedded in the support 22, for example. The ski runner 34 has extending upwardly therefrom inverted, loop-forming U-shaped wire, elements 40 having lateral ends 42 embedded in the ski runner 34. Telescopically received between the wire elements 36 and 40 are resilient blocks '44 of rubber, etc. The blocks can be withdrawn from between the elements 36 and 40 for purposes of replacement, repair and adjustment. The support 22 can be shifted longitudinally with respect to the runner 34 by withdrawal and replacement of the blocks. Re ferring to FIGURE 3, it will be noted that block 44 is of a Width which'is less than the width of block 44' of the mounting block assembly 16. In the mounting block assemblies 18 and 20, the blocks 44 and 44 are respec tively graduated in width, and thus it will be observed that the blocks 44"'44.- are graduated in width from the rear to front of the ski runner 34. The blocks 44"-44 can also he graduated in length; see phantom lines 45, 45, 45" and 45", respectively. The different mounting assem blies at the sides of the blocks 44-44 can be filled with foam rubber blocks 46, see FIGURE 4, for preventing snow from accumulating between the ski runners and sup ports.

Considering FIGURES 7 and 8, the ski is indicated as moving down the fall line of a slope where the contour changes and presents a compound curve. The uphill edge 48 of the ski runner 34 is edged by the skier by pressing the knees intothe slope. The skis are subject to torque, and due to the graduated resilient blocks, i.e., widthwise or lengthwise, as the skier applies lateral pressure to the flexible ski, i.e., presses the edge into the slope to edge the skis, the edge 48 will be twisted to conform to the compound curve of the slope; note edge portions 48 and 48 of the uphill ski edge. This ability of the ski runner and edge to substantially conform to the curve over which the runner traverses affords the skier greater control, i.e., greater edge contact across a hill crown, than afforded by conventional skis. Conventional skis, since they have a uniform twist or torque responsive action when encountering a compound curve will generally be in tangential relation to the fall line or crown of a hill at curve changes and thus edge engagement or control by the skier is limited at curvature changes when using conven tional skis.

Additionally, since the novel skis conform at the edges to contour changes, there will be a minimum of chattering of the skis due to loss of edge contact.

The presently preferred form of the ski will result in the skie-rs boot being positioned somewhat higher than conventional skis; however, this is not objectionable, and as a practical matter, positions the relatively wide boot slightly higher than in conventional skis to thus reduce resistance to movement through deep snow when using the invention.

Referring to FIGURES 9-11, a conventional ski, which would include a relatively high or stiff longitudinal bending rigidity is indicated at 100 and the positions assumed by the runner passing over an obstacle O are illustrated diagrammatically. In FIGURE 9, the tip 102 of the ski is above, the running surface due to the stiffness of the ski. This results in poor tracking and is not particularly desirable especially in deep powder snow.

In FIGURE, 10, when the intermediate portion of the runner is over the obstacle O, the tip 102 and tail 104 of the ski can be edged while in FIGURE 9 only the tail 104 can be edged. In FIGURE 11, only the tip 102 is edged as the tail 104 passes over the obstacle.

Referring to FIGURES l-4, 6-8 and 1214, the relatively flexible runner 34 will afford contact or tracking at both the tip 35 and tail 37, as will be noted from FIG- URES 12-14 as compared with FIGURES 9-11, respectively; see relative position of these parts with respect to obstacle O.

The spacers 4444" when varied in length will affect the rigidity of the supports 22 and 24 as well as the torque characteristics. The supports 22 and 24 although being stiff, will be sufficiently flexible to afford the rhythmic uplift so closely identified with parallel skiing or during wedeln. Thus, the application of a slight downward movement, or shifting of the skiers weight; see FIGURE 6, followed by an upward movement of the skier, i.e., raising at the knees, causes the tail 37 to have a free uplift to utliize the kinetic energy of the skiers weight imposed upon the camber of the supports 22 and 24. Note, for example, FIGURE 5, where conventional tracking of a conventional ski is illustrated, and the unweighting of the tail 104 is shown by solid lines. The arched supports 22, 24 and 30 combine to afford, in effect, a spring action similar to that afforded by a trampoline where the participant is jumping upwardly and moving downwardly in rhythm or in time with the movement of the trampoline springs or canvas.

Although the runner 34 is illustrated as being flexible and affording considerable edge contact and tracking, it will be observed that the uplift afforded by normal ski camber or stiffness is not lost. The amount of stiffness of the supports can be adjusted by longitudinal positioning of the spacer blocks 44-44'". Unlike conventional skis, where the weight is distributed on the tip and tail in relation to hte location of the ski binding, i.e., location of the skiers weight, the present invention contemplates a more uniform distribution of weight through the use of four mounting assemblies 1218 spaced longitudinally along the runner 34. When the skiers weight is received on support 30, weight is applied to the supports 22 and 24, and the load is then shared or distributed to points 14, 16 and 18, 20. As previously mentioned, all of the supports are adjustable longitudinally with respect to each other and the runners, i.e., the weight distribution of the skier can be adjusted independently of the camber or stiffness rigidity of the ski.

The skis and supports can be provided with indexing indicia (not shown) to compensate for different types of snow, skier weights, tracking characteristics in order to permit the individual to make his own adjustments. The various positions of the parts will have been previously determined empirically and the skier will not have to make computations prior to adjusting his skis.

Thus there has been disclosed novel skis which afford maximum tracking, improved edging, torque response during edging, and generally versatile skiing on a packed base as well as on deep powder, and skis which fully conform with the objects of the invention and advantages recognized by those skilled in the art.

It is understood that this invention is not confined to the particular embodiment shown and described, the same being merely illustrative, and that this invention may be carried out in other ways within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention as it is obvious to those skilled in the art that the particular embodiment shown and described is only one of the many that may be employed to attain the express and implied objects of the invention.

I claim:

1. A single ski-runner construction for use on an individuals foot on ice or snow comprising an elongated, tflat and flexible runner having a substantially greater. transverse width than vertical thickness, a tail and tip portion, a pair of elongated supports overlying said runner and disposed in longitudinally spaced relation thereon between the side margins of said runner, mounting means securing terminal ends of said supports to intermediate portions of said runner, and a third, elongated support overlying said pair of supports and said runner and disposed between the side margins thereof, mounting means securing terminal ends of said third support to intermediate portions of said pair of supports, said third support including an intermediate upper boot-binding receiving portion for receiving a ski-boot thereon and permitting the skier to impose edging substantially over the entire down-hill edge of the ski runner by imposing transverse torque to said third support.

2. A ski construction as claimed in claim 1 in which at least said pair of supports are bowed upwardly from said runner.

3. A ski construction as claimed in claim 1 in which said mounting means includes cooperating portions adjustably securing said pair of supports for longitudinal adjustment with respect to said runner.

4. A ski construction as claimed in claim 3 in which at least said pair of supports are bowed upwardly from said runner.

5. A ski construction as claimed in claim 1 in which said runner is flexible both longitudinally and transversely for conforming to compound curves to provide edging substantially along the entire length of said runner.

6. A ski construction as claimed in claim 5 in which said supports are concave-convex.

7. A ski construction as claimed in claim 5 in which said mounting means comprises a plurality of aligned loopt'o-rming elements on at least said pair of said supports and said runner, and an elongated block extending through said aligned loop-forming elements for retaining the pair of supports on said runner.

8. A ski construction as claimed in claim 5 in which said mounting means comprise a mounting block interposed between terminal ends of said pair of supports and said runner, said mounting blocks being graduated widthwise progressively from a tail to tip portion of said ski.

9. The structure of claim 5 in which said mounting means comprises a mounting block interposed between said pair of supports, adjacent mounting blocks differing in size for afiording different torque and bending characteristics.

10. A ski construction comprising an elongated flat and flexible ski runner having a tail and tip portion, a pair of elongated supports overlying said runner and disposed in longitudinally spaced relation thereon, mounting means securing terminal ends of said supports to intermediate portions of said runner, and a third, elongated support overlying said pair of supports and said runner, mounting means securing terminal ends of said third support to intermediate portions of said pair of supports, said mounting means for said pair of supports comprising mounting blocks interposed between the terminal ends of said supports and graduated in size progressively from one end of said runner to the other.

11. A ski construction as claimed in claim 10 in which said mounting blocks comprise a resilient material.

12. A ski construction as claimed in claim 10 in which said ski has packing means filling the space between said runners and said supports adjacent said blocks for preventing snow from impacting therebeneath.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 432,721 7/1890 Berry 280-25 1,335,096 3/1920 Dietz 280-25 2,377,504 6/1945 Lerrnont 280-11.13 2,389,001 11/1945 Schatz v 280-11.13 2,550,002 4/ 1951 Chorney 280-1 1.13 2,581,532 1/1952 Hem 280--11.13 2,661,219 12/ 1953 Coulson 2801 1.13

FOREIGN PATENTS 810,762 1/ 1937 France. 116,434 5/ 1946 Sweden.

BENJAMIN HERSH, Primary Examiner.

MILTON L. SMITH, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A SINGLE SKI-RUNNER CONSTRUCTION FOR USE ON AN INDIVIDUAL''S FOOT ON ICE OR SNOW COMPRISING AN ELONGATED, FLAT AND FLEXIBLE RUNNER HAVING A SUBSTANTIALLY GREATER TRANSVERSE WIDTH THAN VERTICAL THICKNESS, A TAIL AND TIP PORTION, A PAIR OF ELONGATED SUPPORTS OVERLYING SAID RUNNER AND DISPOSED IN LONGITUDINALLY SPACED RELATION THEREON BETWEEN THE SIDE MARGINS OF SAID RUNNER, MOUNTING MEANS SECURING TERMINAL ENDS OF SAID SUPPORTS TO INTERMEDIATE PORTIONS OF SAID RUNNER, AND A THIRD, ELONGATED SUPPORT OVERLYING SAID PAIR OF SUPPORTS AND SAID RUNNER AND DISPOSED BETWEEN THE SIDE MARGINS THEREOF, MOUNTING MEANS SECURING TERMINAL ENDS OF SAID THIRD SUPPORT TO INTERMEDIATE PORTIONS OF SAID PAIR OF SUPPORTS, SAID THIRD SUPPORT INCLUDING AN INTERMEDIATE UPPER BOOT-BINDING RECEIVING PORTION FOR RECEIVING A SKI-BOOT THEREON AND PERMITTING THE SKIER TO IMPOSE "EDGING" SUBSTANTIALLY OVER THE ENTIRE "DOWN-HILL" EDGE OF THE SKI RUNNER BY IMPOSING TRANSVERSE TORQUE TO SAID THIRD SUPPORT.
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Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3336036A (en) * 1964-02-17 1967-08-15 Manfreda Walter Articulated ski
DE2601951A1 (en) * 1976-01-20 1977-07-21 Hans Meyer Ski with spring mounted sole plate - has spherical recess in sole plate end to match boss screwed to ski
DE3505255A1 (en) * 1985-02-15 1986-08-28 Walter Kuchler Double-decked ski
WO1986004824A1 (en) * 1985-02-15 1986-08-28 Walter Kuchler Sliding device, particularly an alpine ski
US4696487A (en) * 1985-10-07 1987-09-29 Girard Donald A Ski which is stiff in torsion and relatively weak in beam
AT385667B (en) * 1984-11-15 1988-05-10 Head Sportgeraete Gmbh Ski for use with a plate for adapting binding parts
US4896895A (en) * 1982-03-25 1990-01-30 Brosi Bettosini Shock-absorbing element for skis
US5125680A (en) * 1988-08-03 1992-06-30 Salomon S.A. Device for binding a shoe or boot to a cross-country ski
US5251923A (en) * 1990-12-27 1993-10-12 Marker Deutschland Gmbh Support plate for a safety ski binding
US5269555A (en) * 1991-06-14 1993-12-14 Ruffinengo Piero G Modification of the flexibility of skis
US5280942A (en) * 1991-06-14 1994-01-25 Ruffinengo Piero G Apparatus for selectively varying the stiffness of a ski
US5284357A (en) * 1991-11-01 1994-02-08 Tinkler Michael R Apparatus and method for damping deflections and vibrations in skis
US5301976A (en) * 1990-12-27 1994-04-12 Marker Deutschland Gmbh Ski bonding
US5320377A (en) * 1991-06-14 1994-06-14 Ruffinengo Piero G Apparatus for selectivity varying the stiffness of a ski
US5326126A (en) * 1991-06-14 1994-07-05 Ruffinengo Piero G Modification of the flexibility of skis
US5332252A (en) * 1991-07-04 1994-07-26 Salomon S.A. Shock absorption device for a ski
US5465994A (en) * 1993-02-05 1995-11-14 Salomon S.A. Device for damping ski vibrations
US5636855A (en) * 1991-12-11 1997-06-10 Salomon S.A. Apparatus for modifying the pressure distribution of a ski along its sliding surface
US5775715A (en) * 1995-08-01 1998-07-07 K-2 Corporation Piezoelectric damper for a board such as a snow ski or snowboard
US5816601A (en) * 1989-07-26 1998-10-06 Ski-Shocks Inc. Ski device
US5865459A (en) * 1992-11-19 1999-02-02 Skis Rossignol S.A. Ski structure
US6095547A (en) * 1995-08-01 2000-08-01 K-2 Corporation Active piezoelectric damper for a snow ski or snowboard
US6270108B1 (en) * 1991-04-22 2001-08-07 Salomon S.A. Device for damping vibrations of a ski
EP1155716A1 (en) * 2000-05-18 2001-11-21 Look Fixations S.A. Device to raise at least a ski binding used on a sliding board
AT409935B (en) * 1997-08-14 2002-12-27 Atomic Austria Gmbh Distribution device for loads and / or forces to be transferred to a sports equipment
US20030151215A1 (en) * 2000-12-08 2003-08-14 Aaron Stief Sliding device
US6832979B1 (en) 2002-03-18 2004-12-21 Jesse D. Yarbrough Mobile spring board construction
US20060145451A1 (en) * 2004-11-23 2006-07-06 Wilson Anton F Ski with suspension
US20060226613A1 (en) * 2005-02-16 2006-10-12 Wilson Anton F Snowboards
US20070182129A1 (en) * 2004-11-23 2007-08-09 Wilson Anton F Suspension System for a Ski
US20080048415A1 (en) * 2006-08-07 2008-02-28 Mann James H Springloaded snowblade unit with complimentary binding complexes
EP1952856A1 (en) 2007-02-02 2008-08-06 ATOMIC Austria GmbH Ski or snowboard with a plate-like force transmission element
EP1952855A1 (en) 2007-02-02 2008-08-06 ATOMIC Austria GmbH Ski or snowboard with means of altering its geometry
WO2007084744A3 (en) * 2006-01-20 2008-11-06 Anton F Wilson Suspension system for a ski
US20090026052A1 (en) * 2006-02-10 2009-01-29 Marquardt Gmbh Electric switch
US20110001305A1 (en) * 2009-07-06 2011-01-06 Atomic Austria Gmbh Board-like sliding device in the form of a ski or snowboard
US20120056392A1 (en) * 2009-04-30 2012-03-08 Jean-Francois Pelchat Binding system for recreational board
US9016714B2 (en) 2009-04-30 2015-04-28 Jf Pelchat Inc. Binding system for recreational board
US20170043238A1 (en) * 2015-06-19 2017-02-16 Anton F. Wilson Automatically Adaptive Ski
US10695652B1 (en) 2019-03-21 2020-06-30 G3 Genuine Guide Gear Inc. Magnetically attachable sliding apparatus and systems

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US432721A (en) * 1890-07-22 Austin berry
US1335096A (en) * 1919-12-16 1920-03-30 John F Dietz Sled
FR810762A (en) * 1935-12-16 1937-03-30 variable reverse bending locker
US2377504A (en) * 1943-11-24 1945-06-05 Cairns Corp Metal ski
US2389001A (en) * 1944-06-21 1945-11-13 Clarence L Schatz Water ski
US2550002A (en) * 1947-07-29 1951-04-24 United Aircraft Corp Laminated ski
US2581532A (en) * 1946-08-23 1952-01-08 Arne G Hem Ski
US2661219A (en) * 1948-12-31 1953-12-01 Jr Bevis P Coulson Flexible ski

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US432721A (en) * 1890-07-22 Austin berry
US1335096A (en) * 1919-12-16 1920-03-30 John F Dietz Sled
FR810762A (en) * 1935-12-16 1937-03-30 variable reverse bending locker
US2377504A (en) * 1943-11-24 1945-06-05 Cairns Corp Metal ski
US2389001A (en) * 1944-06-21 1945-11-13 Clarence L Schatz Water ski
US2581532A (en) * 1946-08-23 1952-01-08 Arne G Hem Ski
US2550002A (en) * 1947-07-29 1951-04-24 United Aircraft Corp Laminated ski
US2661219A (en) * 1948-12-31 1953-12-01 Jr Bevis P Coulson Flexible ski

Cited By (70)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3336036A (en) * 1964-02-17 1967-08-15 Manfreda Walter Articulated ski
DE2601951A1 (en) * 1976-01-20 1977-07-21 Hans Meyer Ski with spring mounted sole plate - has spherical recess in sole plate end to match boss screwed to ski
US4896895A (en) * 1982-03-25 1990-01-30 Brosi Bettosini Shock-absorbing element for skis
AT385667B (en) * 1984-11-15 1988-05-10 Head Sportgeraete Gmbh Ski for use with a plate for adapting binding parts
WO1986004824A1 (en) * 1985-02-15 1986-08-28 Walter Kuchler Sliding device, particularly an alpine ski
DE3505255A1 (en) * 1985-02-15 1986-08-28 Walter Kuchler Double-decked ski
US4696487A (en) * 1985-10-07 1987-09-29 Girard Donald A Ski which is stiff in torsion and relatively weak in beam
US5125680A (en) * 1988-08-03 1992-06-30 Salomon S.A. Device for binding a shoe or boot to a cross-country ski
US5816601A (en) * 1989-07-26 1998-10-06 Ski-Shocks Inc. Ski device
US5342078A (en) * 1990-12-27 1994-08-30 Marker Deutschland Gmbh Support plate for a safety ski binding
US5651560A (en) * 1990-12-27 1997-07-29 Marker Deutschland Gmbh Support plate for a ski binding
US5421602A (en) * 1990-12-27 1995-06-06 Marker Deutschland Gmbh Support plate for a ski binding
US5301976A (en) * 1990-12-27 1994-04-12 Marker Deutschland Gmbh Ski bonding
US5362085A (en) * 1990-12-27 1994-11-08 Marker Deutschland Gmbh Support plate for a ski binding
US5251923A (en) * 1990-12-27 1993-10-12 Marker Deutschland Gmbh Support plate for a safety ski binding
US6270108B1 (en) * 1991-04-22 2001-08-07 Salomon S.A. Device for damping vibrations of a ski
US5280942A (en) * 1991-06-14 1994-01-25 Ruffinengo Piero G Apparatus for selectively varying the stiffness of a ski
US5326126A (en) * 1991-06-14 1994-07-05 Ruffinengo Piero G Modification of the flexibility of skis
US5320377A (en) * 1991-06-14 1994-06-14 Ruffinengo Piero G Apparatus for selectivity varying the stiffness of a ski
US5269555A (en) * 1991-06-14 1993-12-14 Ruffinengo Piero G Modification of the flexibility of skis
US5417448A (en) * 1991-07-04 1995-05-23 Salomon S.A. Shock absorption device for a ski
US5332252A (en) * 1991-07-04 1994-07-26 Salomon S.A. Shock absorption device for a ski
US5284357A (en) * 1991-11-01 1994-02-08 Tinkler Michael R Apparatus and method for damping deflections and vibrations in skis
US5636855A (en) * 1991-12-11 1997-06-10 Salomon S.A. Apparatus for modifying the pressure distribution of a ski along its sliding surface
US5865459A (en) * 1992-11-19 1999-02-02 Skis Rossignol S.A. Ski structure
US5465994A (en) * 1993-02-05 1995-11-14 Salomon S.A. Device for damping ski vibrations
US5775715A (en) * 1995-08-01 1998-07-07 K-2 Corporation Piezoelectric damper for a board such as a snow ski or snowboard
US6095547A (en) * 1995-08-01 2000-08-01 K-2 Corporation Active piezoelectric damper for a snow ski or snowboard
AT409935B (en) * 1997-08-14 2002-12-27 Atomic Austria Gmbh Distribution device for loads and / or forces to be transferred to a sports equipment
EP1155716A1 (en) * 2000-05-18 2001-11-21 Look Fixations S.A. Device to raise at least a ski binding used on a sliding board
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