US2377504A - Metal ski - Google Patents

Metal ski Download PDF

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Publication number
US2377504A
US2377504A US511504A US51150443A US2377504A US 2377504 A US2377504 A US 2377504A US 511504 A US511504 A US 511504A US 51150443 A US51150443 A US 51150443A US 2377504 A US2377504 A US 2377504A
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skis
ski
shell
planing
metal
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US511504A
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Lermont Basil
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CAIRNS Corp
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CAIRNS CORP
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C5/00Skis or snowboards
    • A63C5/12Making thereof; Selection of particular materials

Description

B. LERMONT June 5, 1945.

METAL SKI Filed NOV. 24, 1945 INVENTOR. 54.91, 5R/vom Y MATTQHNEYJ Patented June 5, 1945 UNITED. STATES PATENTQOFFICE 1 Basil Lerniont, New York, N. Y., assigner to Cairns Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application-November 24, 1"943,`Serial No.r51`1,5`0ll i 2 claims. (or esoy-11.130

This invention relates-to improvementsin skis and particularly relates to improvements in metal skis. l i i The manufacture and use of woodenskis has been almost universal inasmuch as such skis have the advantage of ease of manufacture, are light, strong, and have a` surface which is particularly adapted to receive the waxes suitableforfvarious snow conditions and to facilitate planing and climbing. It is conventional ski design to form the ski with'a camber which acts as a cushion for the weight of the skier concentrated almost at the center of the skis and to cause` a more or less uniform distribution of this weight along the ski so .thatthe planing surface is `maintained substantially flat. i

While wooden skis have been generally regarded as superior to any other types of skis heretofore produced, such wooden skis have certain disadvantages. relatively soft and easily subject to gouging and scratching when run over harder objects in the snow. The edges of skis are used by the skier for control and in executing turns.` Forthispurpose the bottom and sides of the skishould meet at a sharp 90 angle. Ordinary use rapidly wears the sharp control edges of wooden skis into rounded surfaces, and to the extent this happens the effectiveness of `the edges for control is reduced. To prevent this loss of sharp edges it has been a common practice to attach narrow steel strips along one of the control edges of the skis. Such steel edges must be accurately aligned and recessed if on the bottom andthe procedure adds considerably to the cost of the skis. i

In addition to damaging ofthe sk by use, there is always the possibility that the skis will warp. Warping, of course would provide unequal as well as untrue planing surfaces which would make the use of the skis dangerous if not impossible.` In order to avoid warping, it is necessary to provide presses and other equipment for the skis to keep them inalignment when not in use, This inconvenience also adds to the cost of skiingA equipment. Not only isthere danger of damage to the skis by warping, but moisture and high summer temperatures, when the skis are` in storage, may cause a splitting or other deterioration of the skis with the result that they are likely to break while in use and cause serious accidents to the skier.

Numerous attempts have been made heretofore to overcome the disadvantages of wooden skis by manufacturing the skis from metal. In order to keep within the necessary `weight limits, it `has been necessary to make such skis" of `relatively For example, the wooden surface is lil() lighter thinlmaterial. `Suchmetal skis have not been successful `for the reason that the metal `is extremely flexible both longitudinally and transversely, making it difficult, if not impossible, to provide an adequate planing surface on the ski without producinga construction which will bend longitudinallyand twist in use.

Another disadvantage ofthe use of metal is that the snow or ice tends to stick to the metal, thereby reducing the speed and preventing proper control ofthe skis. Y

A third disadvantage of such metal skis is that they haveA hardl and relatively smooth surfaces and as,` a result the waxes used on-skis will not adhere to the; surfacesufilciently stronglyA when theskis areinuse., l y i Because ofthe resistance to damageand warpingof such metal skis and the small amount of time and `expense required in l their upkeep, it would be highly desirable to make skis of metal, if the `above-noted disadvantages of metallic skis could b e overcome.

i An `object of the present invention is to provide metal skis which overcome the disadvantages of the prior types of metal skis noted above.

Another objectof the invention is to provide a ski having lat all times substantially the same flat planing surface. .i

Another object of the invention is to provide metal skis which provide a relatively rigid planing surfacethat is not subject to twisting or bending.

Another object of the invention is to provide metal skis in` which the weight of the skier is distributed substantially uniformly along the length of the ski, `thereby to reduce bending of the ski to a minimum.

A further object ofthe invention is to provide metallic skis in which the planing surfaces are treated to render them more receptive to and retentiveof ski waxes.

Other objects of the` invention will become apparent from the following description of typical forms of skis embodying the present invention.

Y In Vaccordance with the present invention, I provide skis in which the planing surface is substantially flat throughout, its length, except at the upturned leadingrendand with the exception of` longitudinally extending groove in the planing surface as is customaryin Such skis. 4 The element havingthe` planing surface preferably is of channel-shape throughout its length and having ahigher sidewall adjacentv its center portion than at its` ends` in` order to. render the center of the f ski ,more resistant `to twisting andV bending. ,Suena channel-shaped element has considerable resistance to twisting and bending, but it is further reinforced, in accordance with the present invention, by means of an opposed channel member disposed between the walls of the lower or planing portion which is resiliently supported in such a manner as vto distribute the weight of the skier, who stands upon the upper channel member, throughout. theoentire lengthf the. ski.`

More particularly,-` thempperf'cliannel member is pinned or otherwise secured at its forward end to the lower or planing member and is secured.

at its rear end to the lower member with capacity for relative longitudinal movement. Interposed between two channel membersare, a., series.. of...

leaf springs which preferably, varyin. strength so that the weight of the skier is distributed substantially uniformly along thelength of the ski.

With ski constructions of the; type described above, twisting of the ski is reduced to.a.minimum by the interftting channel members land there -is' little tendencyj of the11ski-toibendlongi tudinally-` inasmuch ,asA the idistributionfl of"- weight is-uniform:A j

Sucliskis,l if formedofalumnumiorima'gnesium containing'- metal, may' beanodized or."y otherwise treatedv to .maket waxeslandfotherz slil coating agents adherestrongly-thereto; For'a better` understanding of" tiie'=presentA invention,l referencet mayfbealia'dy tofth'e' accompany-` ingdrawing in'which'r: y

Figure 1 is a planA view of a typical formr of' ski embodying thepresentinvention;Y

Figure Zis aj viewin' sidefelevation oftheski-;

Figure 3iA isav Viewl inl-longitudinal section of 7 a portioniA of-'thev ski illustratingtheconnection -between the upper and lower shell's'; 'an'df AL. typical form of ski embody-ingr the present invention. may includel aA lower' planing' shell IU of i elongated: fornfrationy and generally the-shape of the skis heretofore commonly-'usedhavihg'ai transversely tapered' orpointedl leading endportionC lilo/"that is` turned or benti upwardly. The ski shell@preferablyl is'formedV of a; light weight metalsuch as; fori example, aluminum', an aluminum alloy, magnesium" or'` af magnesiurnl alloy-2 The sheet is formed by stampingfqorfbending to provide theplaningsurface described above and upwardly-'projectingsidef flanges; IIIliand` Ille' on oppositev sides thereofr providing' a 4shell member of.i generally' U `-sliapedi cross-section'.4

As best rshownin Figure=2, the--sidefl'anges Illa and Illby are higher adjacent'the centerfoff the shell` than they'are.= adjacent theopposite ends of the shell to reinforce and stilfenthesh'ell at the midVv 'zone4 which'Y isf subjected norm'allyf to greater stresses-thanthe-fendlzones;

Asf shown particula1-ly'-'ini Figures land` 4'; the bottom or planing surface of tliex'shellf Hlfmayj be provided with a` longitudi'nallyv extending groove In'order toforma platform for the foot' of the skier,l and a support fortheskiibin'dings; a' second shell II of generally @shaped cross-section" at its center is disposed' withinn the sideilan'ges'- |011' and 'Ille ofthe bottom shell-vand extends from adjacent the rear endv1 ofthe'ski shell II)L to just shortlof the'upwardlyturnedenw I'-'of the 'shell'.

A-sfshown-in Figure 3; the-side=walls IIa of" the upper` shell Il terminate short of'l the endofth'e shell andthe i topfsurfacel FI U =is-= bent downwardly andi forwardly toY form a VU` shaped`` portion I I c; 'IheA lower leg to the U-,shalped portion I I cv is receivedi slidinglyf between" thei bottom ofi` the shell I0 and a plate I2 which is secured to the bottom of the shell IIJ in order to permit relative movement longitudinally between the rear Vends of the shells I0 and II.

The forward end IId of the shell II is pinned or otherwise secured adjacent the leading end Illa of the shell I0, thereby anchoring this portion. of., the shell. II in.. positiong but permitting relative movement between theshellsv because of the sliding connection between the rear ends of these shells.

The upper shell II may not be suiciently strong to support all of the weight of the skier and aseries. of leaf springs I3 and I4 may be interposedgbetweenlthe bottom of the shell I0 and the upper surface. of the shell I I. As illustrated, two of s uch leaf springs are provided, but one or more'mayfbe-used if desired. The springs I3, I4, etc.may be formed of light spring metal, such as spring steel, and preferably are of unequal-'1,stiffness-fso;` as lto obtainc ai uniform distributioni off thei skierls'xweiglit'l along the length of the shell I0. Thus, the shorter leaf spring I3 maybeimoreresilient' orsless stifthan the spring IAf-ihz; order: tor compensate for thedifference-in lengths'oftliese springs.

The'aupperf ski; shell II may. be provided with awo'odenplatform I5for receiving'the ski bind'- ings, if? desired; andi for stiifening' the center portion; of'tthis? she'll The above-described onstrliction has' the acl-- vantageaof' satisfactory'stiffness, that is, atleast asagreatstiffnesspas axwoodeniski I'of similar weight and"y also: has theV desirable characteristicof dis-y tributing' tl1e..-weig1htl of" the. skier substantially uniformly along the length of the ski.' 'A flat planing.- surface.,v may.: be used inasmuch as the weight' is; distributedover thei entire length of the. ski;A The eliminati'on of camber inv the: ski

facilitates the manufacture `and maintenance of theskis: Y l I I g-ivelat: leastthev lower orplaning surface of thes shell Ill?, an. anodizingtreatment if' made of aluminum..V If. desired, the i entire` surface portions ofthe shellswlll` and IiI- canbe-anodizedv inasmuch. as? anodizingf impartsihighV corrosion-resistancetola'luminumas well asgiving it a desir'l ablefgrayish'zf andnon-metallic finish.

Anodizing; consists-z generally in `making the partz. tobeanodized-an anode in aV chromic acid electrolytic: bath: The chromic acid acts upon the; aluminum'. and: converts its surface" portion into arraluminumoxide or aluminum hydroxide l'llr'n` ofra; depth dependent upon the'- duration of the treating operation. This surface nlm" is slightly roughiand.porous The porosity of' the anodized'` finish permits the 1 wax to penetrate into and: adhere tightly tothe planing surface.

llf: the:- skisl are formed? of other light4 metal such. as, for: example; magnesium?, a phosphoric acidi: treatment may be'usedV ora chrome paint. Such apaint or 'treatment Withphosphoric acid provides: a `sufficiently.l uneven orf'rouglien'ecl4 sur'- face.v to'. facilitate the ladhesion ofi wax thereto;

Enom; the foregoing; description of' atypical form off-skiy embodying the 'present invention, Y'it will-be understood that the chief defectsof the priorsmetalli'c skis:andalsowoodenskis have vbeen overcome' by fmy invention. 'It will ybe understood; further, that.. skis zembodyin g `the* presentI invention are susceptible to" considerable'fmodication, for example, in theirshape and size'A aswell" as the means-f or distributing the'` weight', uniformly overthe surface. If springs are v used as dis.` o'l'osed the -number'and distribution oftliem may be varied. Accordingly, it should be understood that the above-described embodiment of the in- Vention is illustrative, only, and should not be regarded as limiting the scope of the following claims. l

I claim: l

1. In a metallic ski, the combination of a first elongated, metallic channel member having a straight base forming a planing portion, an upturned leading end,`and upwardly extending side walls; a second shorter inverted channel member disposed between said sidewalls; `means connecting the forward end of said inverted channel member to and restraining said forward `end against longitudinal movement relatively to said` rst channel member;` means slidably connecting the rear end of said inverted channel member member, substantially uniformly along the straight portion of said rst channel member.

2. In a metallic ski, the combination of arst elongated, metallic channel member having a straight base forming a planing portion, an upturned leading end, and upwardly extending side` walls; a secondshorterinverted channel member disposed between said sidewalls; means connecting the forward end of said inverted chanu nel member to andrestraining said forward end between said channel members for distributing stresses applied to said inverted channel member, substantially uniformly along the straight portion of said first channel member.

l BASIL LERMONT.

US511504A 1943-11-24 1943-11-24 Metal ski Expired - Lifetime US2377504A (en)

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2539224A (en) * 1944-10-07 1951-01-23 Beerli Louis Ski
US2560693A (en) * 1947-05-16 1951-07-17 Tey Mfg Corp Ski
US2564420A (en) * 1948-04-20 1951-08-14 Brown Robert Paul Ski apparatus
DE1011792B (en) * 1952-09-06 1957-07-04 Maria Stegmann Geb Reischl Hollow molded Metallski
US3095207A (en) * 1956-09-21 1963-06-25 Head Howard Ski
US3208761A (en) * 1963-09-04 1965-09-28 George C Sullivan Metal ski with cellular plastic structure
US3260531A (en) * 1964-01-31 1966-07-12 Johan G F Heuvel Terrain-conforming and torsionalresponsive skis
US3260532A (en) * 1965-04-02 1966-07-12 Johan G F Heuvel Ski binding mounting and runner construction
US3276784A (en) * 1965-05-12 1966-10-04 Jr Henry M Anderson Laminated ski having a foam filled honeycomb core
US3295859A (en) * 1964-06-04 1967-01-03 Elijah R Perry Metal ski having a pair of grooves at the opposite edges thereof
US3415529A (en) * 1966-11-18 1968-12-10 Fritzmeier Kg Georg Laminated ski having multiple core elements with individual glass fiber wrappings
FR2541904A1 (en) * 1983-03-04 1984-09-07 Lacroix Sa Skis Process for manufacturing laminate skis with incorporation of metal sheets and skis according to the process
AT379514B (en) * 1982-11-10 1986-01-27 Schwarz F G Dipl Ing Ski
US4568100A (en) * 1983-05-20 1986-02-04 Eriksson Karl G V Variable span device for skis
US4679813A (en) * 1986-04-10 1987-07-14 Girard Donald A Ski stiff in torsion
DE3619118A1 (en) * 1986-06-06 1987-12-10 Wilfried Matt Ski
WO2000062877A1 (en) * 1999-04-21 2000-10-26 Uwe Emig Alpine ski
US20030111824A1 (en) * 1999-12-22 2003-06-19 Bernhard Riepler Board-like gliding device, in particular a ski or snowboard
US20040026893A1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2004-02-12 Claude Donze Ski and snow board with variable radial geometry
US20040046362A1 (en) * 1999-10-14 2004-03-11 Skis Rossignol, S.A. Board for gliding
US6832979B1 (en) 2002-03-18 2004-12-21 Jesse D. Yarbrough Mobile spring board construction

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2539224A (en) * 1944-10-07 1951-01-23 Beerli Louis Ski
US2560693A (en) * 1947-05-16 1951-07-17 Tey Mfg Corp Ski
US2564420A (en) * 1948-04-20 1951-08-14 Brown Robert Paul Ski apparatus
DE1011792B (en) * 1952-09-06 1957-07-04 Maria Stegmann Geb Reischl Hollow molded Metallski
US3095207A (en) * 1956-09-21 1963-06-25 Head Howard Ski
US3208761A (en) * 1963-09-04 1965-09-28 George C Sullivan Metal ski with cellular plastic structure
US3260531A (en) * 1964-01-31 1966-07-12 Johan G F Heuvel Terrain-conforming and torsionalresponsive skis
US3295859A (en) * 1964-06-04 1967-01-03 Elijah R Perry Metal ski having a pair of grooves at the opposite edges thereof
US3260532A (en) * 1965-04-02 1966-07-12 Johan G F Heuvel Ski binding mounting and runner construction
US3276784A (en) * 1965-05-12 1966-10-04 Jr Henry M Anderson Laminated ski having a foam filled honeycomb core
US3415529A (en) * 1966-11-18 1968-12-10 Fritzmeier Kg Georg Laminated ski having multiple core elements with individual glass fiber wrappings
AT379514B (en) * 1982-11-10 1986-01-27 Schwarz F G Dipl Ing Ski
EP0120521A1 (en) * 1983-03-04 1984-10-03 Skis Lacroix S.A. Laminated ski with incorporation of metal sheets
FR2541904A1 (en) * 1983-03-04 1984-09-07 Lacroix Sa Skis Process for manufacturing laminate skis with incorporation of metal sheets and skis according to the process
US4568100A (en) * 1983-05-20 1986-02-04 Eriksson Karl G V Variable span device for skis
US4679813A (en) * 1986-04-10 1987-07-14 Girard Donald A Ski stiff in torsion
DE3619118A1 (en) * 1986-06-06 1987-12-10 Wilfried Matt Ski
WO2000062877A1 (en) * 1999-04-21 2000-10-26 Uwe Emig Alpine ski
US6679513B1 (en) 1999-04-21 2004-01-20 Uwe Emig Alpine ski
US7021647B2 (en) * 1999-10-14 2006-04-04 Skis Rossignol S.A. Board for gliding
US20040046362A1 (en) * 1999-10-14 2004-03-11 Skis Rossignol, S.A. Board for gliding
US6886848B2 (en) * 1999-12-22 2005-05-03 Atomic Austria Gmbh Ski or snowboard
US20030111824A1 (en) * 1999-12-22 2003-06-19 Bernhard Riepler Board-like gliding device, in particular a ski or snowboard
US20040026893A1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2004-02-12 Claude Donze Ski and snow board with variable radial geometry
US7014206B2 (en) * 2000-11-17 2006-03-21 Scott Sports Sa Ski and snow board with variable radial geometry
US6832979B1 (en) 2002-03-18 2004-12-21 Jesse D. Yarbrough Mobile spring board construction

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