US3212220A - Building structure - Google Patents

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US3212220A
US3212220A US278211A US27821163A US3212220A US 3212220 A US3212220 A US 3212220A US 278211 A US278211 A US 278211A US 27821163 A US27821163 A US 27821163A US 3212220 A US3212220 A US 3212220A
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structure
portions
means
shelter
securing
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Krystyna W Boniecki
Boniecki Maria Albin
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Krystyna W Boniecki
Boniecki Maria Albin
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H9/00Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate
    • E04H9/04Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate against air-raid or other warlike actions
    • E04H9/10Independent shelters; Arrangement of independent splinter-proof walls

Description

19, 1965 K. w. BONIECKI ETAL 3,212,220

BUILDING STRUCTURE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 6, 1963 F1 .3 INVENTORS.

km srn/A M/ BOU/EC/(l MAR/A ALB/u 500/500 BY:W%Q%/ 1965 K. w. BONIECKI ETAL 3,212,220

BUILDING STRUCTURE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 6, 1963 INVENTORS.

KRYSTYA/A W. Bow/5cm MAR/A ALB/A) Bow/[cm Arranun Oct. 19, 1965 Filed May 6, 1963 K. W. BONIECKI ETAL BUILDING STRUCTURE 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS. Mayan M4 W. BOAJ/EC/(l MAR/A ALB/u BO/U/ECK/ BY: 3 1/ W Esp-I0 United States Patent 3,212,220 BUILDING STRUCTURE Krystyna W. Boniecki and Maria Albin Boniecki, both of 1822 S. Sherman St., Denver, Colo. Filed May 6, 1963, Ser. No. 278,211 Claims. (Cl. 52-80) This invention relates to structures and more particularly to multi-purpose structures arranged for protection from blast and radio-active fallout, as well as general recreational purposes.

Shelters for human protection from radiation fallout and from blast shock damage have been suggested in many forms, most commonly rectangular, although halfcylindrical have been used. Simple shelters for partial protection from fallout may be built in a basement of a home or a building, but generally such shelters have little value as protection against the force of blast waves. Those shelters suggested for protection from both blast and fallout generally are concrete or metal structures built below ground level. Even strict economy construction processes and procedures for such underground concrete or metal structures results in expensive insurance against a remote contingency. Economy, on the other hand, dictates that such concrete structures be rectangular due to the readily available concrete forms, which results in wasted or little used space in the structure. Such underground concrete or metal structures are dark, dingy and invariably damp or wet. They also require finishing and expensive furniture. Such structures are permanent and not transferable.

According to the present invention we have provided a multi-purpose, portable, detachable structure which is easy to set up and ready for immediate use. The structure may be used for recreational purposes and may be placed underground to serve as a blast and fallout shelter, as Well as a shelter against natural forces such as hurricanes, typhoons, tornadoes, earthquakes, etc.

The structure of the invention is made generally ovaloid, of lightweight material, readily manufactured in preformed sections for fast and easy construction. The ovaloid shape permits installation of the shelter in underground positions without a foundation and by using a simple excavation which does not need exact dimension. The geometry of the shape makes it very strong, many times stronger than rectangular, dome or half-cylindrical structures. When buried underground, it resists high intensity blast shock waves even when made of light material such as Fiberglas.

In one form of the invention, an ovaloid construction includes a one-piece bottom with interlocking upper members secured together by a central pole securing all the members in a waterproof structure. When made of Fiberglas, the walls are smooth, of any desired color, and the entire space may be utilized in the shelter without danger of scratches from the walls, such as with concrete. The shape and the texture of the walls produces a vastly different psychological effect on long-term occupants than the prison or cellar psychological effect produced with conventional concrete shelters. With the Fiberglas or other plastic construction, the shelter may be used for purposes other than a fallout or blast shelter. It may be used as an extra room for a house, either directly connected or not, as a recreation cabin where it may be only partially covered with dirt, the Fiberglas permitting light to enter with the top made of transparent plastic. The arrangement of the shelter provides adequate ventilation for all parts of the shelter.

Included among the objects and advantages of the present invention is a multi-purpose shelter which is arranged to be manufactured in preformed sections for fast and easy installation in undimensioned excavations and with- 6 3,212,220 Patented Get. 19, 1965 out the use of foundations. The shelter of the invention is arranged to be manufactured in preformed sections for assembly about the central support and of lightweight material. The structure is ovaloid or generally eggshaped for increased strength and complete utilization of the space internally of the shelter. The preformed sections of the structure may be made of such lightweight material but when assembled produces a highly blast-resistant structure. The structure is readily covered with a waterproofing material if desired. The geometry of the construction provides a means for substantially increasing volume with only slight changes of the major and minor axes of the ovaloid for accommodating more persons without greatly increasing the size of the unit.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention may be readily ascertained by referring to the following description and appended illustrations in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation View of one form of the shelter illustrating the position of usable components therein;

FIG. 2 is a schematic view of an installation utilizing a shelter according to the invention;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional elevational view of a device according to FIG. 1 taken along section line 33;

FIG. 4 is a detail view of the upper portion of the shelter according to the invention taken along section line 44;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional side elevational view of a modified shelter according to the invention;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the shelter of FIG. 5 taken along section lines 66;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of a further modified shelter according to the invention;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the device of FIG. 7 in generally schematic showing to illustrate the components of the structure;

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of the structure of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view taken along section lines 10-10 of the structure of FIG. 7, and

FIG. 11 is an enlarged detail of a joint between segments of the structure.

In the shelter shown in FIG. 1, an ovaloid member 10 is mounted on a central hollow tubular support 11. The structure is provided with an upper floor 12 and a lower floor 1d. The ovaloid structure is egg-shaped, so that a plane taken through the longest axis or parallel thereto is oval and planes to longest axis are circles. The floors are mounted on shoulders 15 for the upper floor 12 and on shoulder 16 for the lower floor 14. When the structure is made of Fiberglas, the shoulders may be molded directly into the material and the floor set on the shoulders. Supporting the center of the floor 12 is a plate 18 secured to the tubular member 11. A series of shelves 19, 20, 21 and 22 are arranged in the shelter for the storage of goods, and a combination bed and seat 24 provided for bed and/ or seat. Additional shelves may be placed throughout the shelter for use of the occupant. The shelter is provided with an opening 25 which is arranged with a sliding door for closing the same. A foldable table 26 may also be provided on the center pole 11.

The hollow center pole is provided with an outlet 27 in the space below the floor 12 and an upper outlet 28 at the top of the shelter. The air exhausts through a standard exhaust outlet 29 or through a horizontal outlet pipe 30. An inlet 31 extends from the filter 32 to two inlets 33 and 34, shown in FIG. 2, into the inside of the shelter. Where desired, a battery or a hand-operated pump 37'may be attached to one of the inlets 33 and 34 for drawing air into the unit.

As shown in FIG. 3, the bed 24 has one straight edge and one curved edge against the wall of the unit. The leg 23 may be pulled out to form an enlarged bed to the center pole. A trap door 40 may be provided in the floor 12 for access to the material stored below.

The construction of the device is shown generally in FIGS. 2 and 4 wherein the egg-shaped structure includes a lower end piece 45 and an upper end piece 46. These pieces may be made as a single piece and side pieces, shown in FIG. 4, 47, 48, 49 and 50 are arranged to span the distance between the upper and lower members. The side members may be made from a single mold with the forms 49 and 50 having a blanked out spot to accommodate the entrance 25.

After the preformed parts are made, the device may be easily assembled in the field by digging an excavation to accommodate the structure. For example, in FIG. 2 the shell is shown only partially below the ground line 52, and an excavation which will accommodate the structure is substantially smaller than necessary to completely bury the structure. The center pole with the lower member 45 is inserted into the excavation and the side parts 4750 are then placed in position around the exterior and finally the top member 46 is placed in position. The whole is then drawn together by means of a fitting 54 at the top. The bottom member 45 is, likewise, held in position on the center pole by means of a fitting 55 secured to the center pole. After the structure is placed on the center pole, with its tip 56 embedded into the earth, the excavation is back-filled around the structure and around the opening 25. The dirt may be piled in a mound with the top as shown at 57 to provide a blast and fallout protection. The depth of the dirt should be at least about 36 inches, in accordance with accepted practices of the civil defense. Further, the mound should be rounded to aid the blast wave deflection. The approach to the entrance 25 may be by stairs 58 which extend downwardly so that the occupants can enter the entrance 25. A small mound 59 on the other side of the stairs again helps deflect blast from direct force against the entrance 25 in the case of direct entrance to the ovaloid. In place of the stairs, a ramp may be provided or a tunnel from the owners house to the shelter may extend directly from a basement or lower floor into the shelter. Furthermore, a straight entrance may be used instead of a curved entrance, which permits the use of a slant door to minimize exposure to fallout when not sufiicient room is available for the curved entrance. Any desired configuration of the entrance may be utilized to prevent direct exposure to fallout or blast.

In the size shown in FIG. 1, where the major vertical dimension is about 8 feet and the major horizontal dimension is about 6 /2 feet, two or three people are easily accommodated. By increasing the major horizontal dimension to 10 feet and the vertical dimension to about 13 feet, six to eight persons can be accommodated. The smooth walls aid in full utilization of the space, particularly where made of plastic or Fiberglas, which is not cold to the touch such as concrete. Also, since it is preformed it is made dry and stays dry.

The door 60, shown in FIG. 4, is generally conformed to the shape of the structure for the section providing the door opening, and preferably the door is mounted on the inside so that it may he slid across the opening to close the structure. All the interior fixtures, such as the shelves, beds, etc., are supported by small reliefs cast or stamped from the wall mold. The fixtures are contoured to fit the wall and provide maximum use of space by the occupants. The shape of the device is such that a small lateral diameter provides sulficient space for several occupants, and the long diameter of the ovaloid provides sufficient head room for standing and for exercising while the occupant is confined within the shelter. Furthermore, additional storage space is provided for very compact nad usable shelter. The floor in Fiberglas or in any other suitable material may be directly slept on in an emergency, since there is excellent insulation in all the structure and of the space formed by the lower compartment under the floor. The upper floor is, of course, dry.

In FIG. 5 there is shown a larger shelter which again is assembled on a central pole 70, held on the center pole by fittings 55 and 54. In this instance, a main floor 71 divides the unit into an upper living compartment and a lower storage compartment. In this instance, a bed and bench combination 72, which is contoured to the walls, is provided at one side, and a similar bed 73 is provided on the opposite side of the structure. In this case, the front edge 74 of the bed 72 folds down when not in use to provide a seat of the unit and folds up to provide a double bed. An upper double bunk 75 is provided with a foldable portion 76 which provides a double bunk for occupants above the lower bunk 72. In a like manner, a bunk 77 is provided on the opposite wall with its foldable portion 7 8 which may be folded out of the way when not in use as a bed. In this instance, the upper compartment provides sufficient room for a number of occupants with sufficient room for moving, stretching and the like. In the upper compartment of any size of the shelter, one section of the central pole may be removed and pushed back as desired for recreational purposes. An entrance 79 which may be the same type of entrance as in the shelter of FIG. 1 is provided in the side wall of the shelter and provides an entrance therein.

Supporting the middle floor 71 is a fitting 80 which supports the floor which is supported at its edges by means of a ledge 81 which is formed in the material and extends around the periphery of the shelter. In the lower compartment, the shelves 82, 83 and 84 are provided for storage of goods and provide means for setting water containers, trash containers and the like, and the lower floor 85 provides additional storage space for trash containers and chemical toilets. Trap doors are provided in the upper fioor 71 for entrance to the lower chambers and a ladder 71a is provided for access into the lower section. The center pole has an exhaust opening 86 for exhausting air from the lower compartment, and an upper exhaust opening 87 for exhausting air from the shelter. As shown in the plan view of FIG. 6, an extra bed 88 may be provided for use of the occupants in the upper compartment between the other beds. A hand or battery operated blower 89 is arranged to pull air through a filter, not shown, into inlet pipe 90 and into the interior of the compartment. In this instance as in the case of the first in FIG. 1, a plurality of shelves may be arranged around the shelter to accommodate various articles. The shelves are supported on ledges or shoulders formed in the material.

As in the case of the smaller unit of FIG. 1, the larger unit may be made in sections with a bottom one-piece mold and a top one-piece mold, with a plurality of side sections which are arranged to fit in water-tight engagement with the upper and lower members and held together by means of the fittings on the center pole 70. A simple rabbet or lap joint may effectively be used as shown in FIG. 11 where a center segment 47 (FIG. 2) is mounted on bottom segment 45 with a gasket 120 between the parts. Other types of joints may be used as is common practice in construction. Where too large, the bottom and top sections may be made in sections.

In the medium-sized unit shown in FIG. 7, the structure is mounted on the center pole which has a fitting 54 for supporting a bottom section and an upper fitting 55 to support the structure on the center pole. The center pole is again provided with exhaust openings 101, 102 in the separated compartments for exhausting air therefrom. A central floor 103 is mounted on a fitting 104 for separating the structure into two compartments. The device is provided with an entrance 105 into the living compartment which is provided with beds and fold-down beds for use of the occupants as explained above. Below the main floor 103 in the storage compartment, a lower floor 106 is provided with a plurality of shelves for supporting various items as shown.

In constructing the larger type unit, segmented portions may be utilized, as shown in FIGS. 8 and 9. In this case, the bottom section is formed in a series of portions A, B, C, D, etc. forming, when placed together, a generally hemispherical shell which is mounted on the center pole 100. The next section, which includes sections I, J, K, L, M, N, O and P, is then placed in position on top of the wall of the lower section, and the upper section, which consists of a plurality of sections Q, R, S, T, etc., is then placed in position on top of the center sections and the upper fitting 54 pulled down to form an integral unit on the center pole. It will be observed that the lower sections A, B, C, etc. and the upper sections Q, R, S, T, etc. are made from a single mold and the center sections I, J, K, etc. are made from another mold. Where the structure is egg-shaped, a different mold for the lower sections is necessary since an egg shape requires one end smaller than the other. The variety and plurality of sections for construction of the unit may be changed as desired.

The shelter may be assembled with other similar shelters grouped into a community center where any desired number of such shelters are combined in a unit through the use of tunnels to a central large shelter. In this instance, the individual units provide living quarters for family groups and the central shelter provides community activity. Such a system prevents disruption of the entire unit where one or more persons must be segregated from the entire group. The experience of the past war has shown that common life in a single shelter easily leads to disruption of the Whole group by a few nervous and hysterical people. By providing the separate shelters with a common room, such individuals may be segregated from the group and not exposed to the entire group at all times. Also, the morale of occupants in the separate shelters will be much higher, and the communal life with strangers in the same room may be very embarrassing.

In using curved tunnels, as shown in FIG. 4 and FIG. 2, to prevent a direct exposure of the entrance to fallout or to blast, a Plexiglas top covered with dirt provides a tunnel for the unit, and the use of mirrors in the curved tunnel provides means for securing light into the unit during daylight hours. Also, since the unit is preferably made of Fiberglas, reflection from the walls adds to the lightness of the entire unit.

While the invention has been described with reference to specific embodiments, there is no intent to limit the spirit or scope of the invention except as defined in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A structure of the class described for use above ground as well as buried underground, comprising a hollow ovaloid structure of relatively thin sheet, high strength wall material, said ovaloid structure having oval cross-sectional planes parallel to its major axis and circular cross-sectional planes at 90 thereto, said structure including separate bottom and top portions and a series of intermediate portions bridging the space between said top and bottom and collectively forming a closure, all of said portions including edge interlocking means for sealing with the edges of adjacent portions, a hollow center pole extending through said structure and provided with extensions beyond at least one end of said structure, means for securing said top portion to an upper part of said pole, means for securing said bottom portion to a lower portion of said pole, means for securing said intermediate portions in position between said upper and lower portions, an opening providing access to said structure, and a door for closing said opening.

2. A portable structure of the class described for use above ground as well as buried underground, comprising a hollow ovaloid structure of relatively thin sheet, high 6 strength wall material, said ovaloid structure having oval cross-sectional planes parallel to its major axis and circular cross-sectional planes at thereto, said structure including a separate one-piece bottom wall and a separate one-piece top wall portion and a series of intermediate wall portions bridging the space between said top and bottom and collectively forming a closure, all of said portions including edge interlocking means for sealing with adjacent edge portions, a center pole extending through said structure along the major axis thereof, means for securing said top portion to an upper part of said pole, means for securing said bottom portion to a lower portion of said pole, means for securing said intermediate portions in position between said upper and lower portions, a floor in said structure dividing it into two compartments, means for securing said floor to said pole, an opening providing access to said structure, and a door for closing said opening.

3. A shelter of the class described for use above ground as well as burried underground comprising a cup-shaped bottom portion and a cup-shaped top portion, a series of arcuate intermediate portions bridging the space between said upper and lower portions and cooperatively forming an ovaloid structure, said ovaloid structure having oval cross-sectional planes parallel to its major axis and circular cross-sectional planes at 90 thereto, all of said portions being preformed of relatively thin high strength sheet material and having a smooth interior surface, all of said portions including interlocking means along the edges thereof for sealing against the edges of adjacent portions, center pole means having a removable section extending through said structure, means for securing said top portion to an upper part of said pole and means for securing said bottom portion to a lower part of said pole means for securing all said portions in an ovaloid structure, the lower extension of said center pole extending a substantial distance beyond said structure, there being a plurality of internally extending projections formed in said portions for supporting shelves and the like, an opening in at least one of said intermediate portions providing access to said structure, and an arcuate door for closing said opening.

4. A thin wall shelter of the class described for use above ground as well as buried underground comprising a one-piece cup-shaped transparent bottom portion and a one-piece cup-shaped top portion, a series of arcuate intermediate portions bridging the space between said upper and lower portions and cooperatively forming an ovaloid structure, said ovaloid structure having oval crosssectional planes parallel to its major axis and circular cross-sectional planes at 90 thereto, all of said portions being preformed of relatively thin high strength sheet material and having a smooth interior surface, all of said portions including interlocking means along the edges thereof for sealing against the edges of adjacent portions, sectional hollow center pole means extending through said structure including extensions beyond each end thereof, ventilating openings in said pole internally of said structure, means for securing said top portion to an upper part of said pole and means for securing said bottom portion to a lower part of said pole, means for securing all said portions in an ovaloid structure, there being a plurality of internally extending projections formed in said portions for supporting shelves and the like, an opening in at least one of said intermediate portions providing access to said structure, and an arcuate door of a similar contour as said intermediate portions for closing said opening.

5. A shelter of the class described for use above ground as well as buried underground comprising a sectional cup-shaped bottom portion and a sectional cup-shaped top portion, a series of arcuate intermediate portions bridging the space between said upper and lower portions and cooperatively forming an ovaloid structure, said ovaloid structure having oval cross-sectional planes parallel to its major axis and circular cross-sectional planes at 90 thereto, all of said portions being preformed of relatively thin high strength sheet material and having a smooth interior surface, all of said portions including interlocking means along the edges thereof for sealing against the edges of adjacent portions, center pole means having a centerwise removable section and extensions beyond said structure extending through said structure, means for securing said top portion to an upper part of said pole and means for securing said bottom portion to a lower part of said pole means for securing all said portions in an ovaloid structure, floor support means on at least some of said intermediate portions, a floor mounted on said supports for dividing said structure into two compartments, a plurality of internally extending integral projections formed in said portions for supporting shelves and the like, means on said pole for supporting furniture internally of said structure, an opening in at least one of said intermediate portions providing access to said structure, and an arcuate door for closing said opening.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,166,577 7/39 Beckius 1091 2,686,609 8/ 54 Fletcher 220-5 2,822,765 2/58 Rudinger l091 2,968,130 1/61 Bascom 109-1 3,115,281 12/63 Somme 220-5 FOREIGN PATENTS 892,511 10/53 Germany. 287,262 3/53 Switzerland.

REINALDO P. MACHADO, Primary Examiner.

HARRISON R. MOSELEY, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A STRUCTURE OF THE CLASS DESCRIBED FOR USE ABOVE GROUND AS WELL AS BURIED UNDERGROUND, COMPRISING A HOLLOW OVALOID STRUCTURE OF RELATIVELY THIN SHEET, HIGH STRENGTH WALL MATERIAL, SAID OVALOID STRUCTURE HAVING OVAL CROSS-SECTIONAL PLANES PARALLEL TO ITS MAJOR AXIS AND CIRCURLAR CROSS-SECTIONAL PLANES AT 90* THERETO, SAID STRUCTURE INCLUDING SEPARATE BOTTOM AND TOP PORTIONS AND A SERIES OF IMTERMEDIATE PORTIONS BRIDGING THE SPACE BETWEEN SAID TOP AND BOTTOM AND COLLECTIVELY FORMING A CLOSURE, ALL OF SAID PORTIONS INCLUDING EDGE INTERLOCKING MEANS FOR SEALING WITH THE EDGES OF ADJACENT PORTIONS, A HOLLOW CENTER POLE EXTENDING THROUGH SAID STUCTURE AND PROVIDED WITH EXTENSIONS BEYOND AT LEAST ONE END OF SAID STRUCTURE, MEANS FOR SECURING SAID TOP PORTION TO AN UPPER PART OF SAID POLE, MEANS FOR SECURING SAID BOTTOM PORTION TO A LOWER PORTION OF SAID POLE, MEANS FOR SECURING SAID INTERMEDIATE PORTIONS IN POSITION BETWEEN SAID UPPER AND LOWER PORTIONS, AN OPENING PROVIDING ACCESS TO SAID STRUCTURE, AND A DOOR FOR CLOSING SAID OPENING.
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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3468083A (en) * 1965-07-22 1969-09-23 Sciper Sa Soc Compoundly curved,sectional structure
US3793145A (en) * 1971-05-25 1974-02-19 Pittsburgh Des Moines Steel Nuclear containment vessel and method of making same
US4129123A (en) * 1976-10-01 1978-12-12 Smidak Emil F Defined space having sound-insulated and light-impermeable walls, preferably intended to enclose a bed
US4507899A (en) * 1981-11-06 1985-04-02 Manfred Janitzky Underground shelter
US4519176A (en) * 1982-06-28 1985-05-28 Earthship Enterprise, Inc. Modular method of making a building structure
US4686804A (en) * 1983-10-05 1987-08-18 Smith Randley A Prefabricated panelized nuclear-hardened shelter
US4955166A (en) * 1988-11-15 1990-09-11 Qualline Steve M Tornado underground shelter
US5600925A (en) * 1995-04-14 1997-02-11 Hoogervorst; Gary W. Rooftop skylounge having hemispherical dome and wraparound seating for panoramic viewing of countryside, snowstorms, sunsets sunrises and stars
US5749181A (en) * 1996-04-17 1998-05-12 Bauman; Michael James Underground emergency shelter system
US5809936A (en) * 1997-01-09 1998-09-22 Wall; Ryan A. Subterranean animal sanctuary
US5930961A (en) * 1998-06-10 1999-08-03 Beaudet; Judith Holly Site assembled emergency shelter
WO2001080944A1 (en) * 2000-04-20 2001-11-01 Ali Alishahi Device for shielding against radiation
US6349508B1 (en) * 1999-10-21 2002-02-26 Chien-Ping Ju Small type of seismic shelter case
US6385919B1 (en) * 1999-09-30 2002-05-14 Mccarthy Walton W. Disaster shelter
US6434896B1 (en) 2000-06-07 2002-08-20 Applied Solar Technology, Inc. Double-walled underground tornado shelter with connection means on the flanges of upper and lower hemispherical halves
US20080172954A1 (en) * 2007-01-23 2008-07-24 The Granger Plastics Company Subterranean emergency shelter
US20110088339A1 (en) * 2006-03-10 2011-04-21 Mccarthy Walton W Disaster shelter and shelter system
US20140283465A1 (en) * 2011-08-14 2014-09-25 David Ajasa-Adekunle Building system
US10180010B2 (en) * 2015-06-02 2019-01-15 Shelter Japan Co., Ltd. Half-underground evacuation shelter

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US2166577A (en) * 1937-10-06 1939-07-18 Beckius Antoine Building suitable for countries liable to earthquakes
CH287262A (en) * 1951-02-06 1952-11-30 Meier Ernst Air-raid shelter.
DE892511C (en) * 1951-12-30 1953-10-08 Dyckerhoff & Widmann Ag Air raid shelter
US2686609A (en) * 1948-12-06 1954-08-17 Fletcher Aviat Corp Auxiliary tip fuel tank
US2822765A (en) * 1956-02-13 1958-02-11 Gibralter Shelters Inc Bombshelter
US2968130A (en) * 1957-11-29 1961-01-17 American Home Shelters Protective underground shelter
US3115281A (en) * 1961-01-16 1963-12-24 R & C Investment Inc Shipping container

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2166577A (en) * 1937-10-06 1939-07-18 Beckius Antoine Building suitable for countries liable to earthquakes
US2686609A (en) * 1948-12-06 1954-08-17 Fletcher Aviat Corp Auxiliary tip fuel tank
CH287262A (en) * 1951-02-06 1952-11-30 Meier Ernst Air-raid shelter.
DE892511C (en) * 1951-12-30 1953-10-08 Dyckerhoff & Widmann Ag Air raid shelter
US2822765A (en) * 1956-02-13 1958-02-11 Gibralter Shelters Inc Bombshelter
US2968130A (en) * 1957-11-29 1961-01-17 American Home Shelters Protective underground shelter
US3115281A (en) * 1961-01-16 1963-12-24 R & C Investment Inc Shipping container

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3468083A (en) * 1965-07-22 1969-09-23 Sciper Sa Soc Compoundly curved,sectional structure
US3793145A (en) * 1971-05-25 1974-02-19 Pittsburgh Des Moines Steel Nuclear containment vessel and method of making same
US4129123A (en) * 1976-10-01 1978-12-12 Smidak Emil F Defined space having sound-insulated and light-impermeable walls, preferably intended to enclose a bed
US4507899A (en) * 1981-11-06 1985-04-02 Manfred Janitzky Underground shelter
US4519176A (en) * 1982-06-28 1985-05-28 Earthship Enterprise, Inc. Modular method of making a building structure
US4686804A (en) * 1983-10-05 1987-08-18 Smith Randley A Prefabricated panelized nuclear-hardened shelter
US4955166A (en) * 1988-11-15 1990-09-11 Qualline Steve M Tornado underground shelter
US5600925A (en) * 1995-04-14 1997-02-11 Hoogervorst; Gary W. Rooftop skylounge having hemispherical dome and wraparound seating for panoramic viewing of countryside, snowstorms, sunsets sunrises and stars
US5749181A (en) * 1996-04-17 1998-05-12 Bauman; Michael James Underground emergency shelter system
US5809936A (en) * 1997-01-09 1998-09-22 Wall; Ryan A. Subterranean animal sanctuary
US5930961A (en) * 1998-06-10 1999-08-03 Beaudet; Judith Holly Site assembled emergency shelter
US6385919B1 (en) * 1999-09-30 2002-05-14 Mccarthy Walton W. Disaster shelter
US6349508B1 (en) * 1999-10-21 2002-02-26 Chien-Ping Ju Small type of seismic shelter case
WO2001080944A1 (en) * 2000-04-20 2001-11-01 Ali Alishahi Device for shielding against radiation
JP2003531388A (en) * 2000-04-20 2003-10-21 アリシャヒ、アリ Device for the shielding of radiation
US20040011972A1 (en) * 2000-04-20 2004-01-22 Ali Alishahi Device for shielding against radiation
US6434896B1 (en) 2000-06-07 2002-08-20 Applied Solar Technology, Inc. Double-walled underground tornado shelter with connection means on the flanges of upper and lower hemispherical halves
US20110088339A1 (en) * 2006-03-10 2011-04-21 Mccarthy Walton W Disaster shelter and shelter system
US20080172954A1 (en) * 2007-01-23 2008-07-24 The Granger Plastics Company Subterranean emergency shelter
US20140283465A1 (en) * 2011-08-14 2014-09-25 David Ajasa-Adekunle Building system
US10180010B2 (en) * 2015-06-02 2019-01-15 Shelter Japan Co., Ltd. Half-underground evacuation shelter

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