US3211154A - Sequence switch for ventricular defibrillator - Google Patents

Sequence switch for ventricular defibrillator Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3211154A
US3211154A US204947A US20494762A US3211154A US 3211154 A US3211154 A US 3211154A US 204947 A US204947 A US 204947A US 20494762 A US20494762 A US 20494762A US 3211154 A US3211154 A US 3211154A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
members
bridging
contacts
bridging members
means
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US204947A
Inventor
Earl M Becker
John J Bridge
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
MSA Safety Inc
Original Assignee
MSA Safety Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by MSA Safety Inc filed Critical MSA Safety Inc
Priority to US204947A priority Critical patent/US3211154A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3211154A publication Critical patent/US3211154A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H15/00Switches having rectilinearly-movable operating part or parts adapted for actuation in opposite directions, e.g. slide switch
    • H01H15/02Details
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N1/00Electrotherapy; Circuits therefor
    • A61N1/18Applying electric currents by contact electrodes
    • A61N1/32Applying electric currents by contact electrodes alternating or intermittent currents
    • A61N1/38Applying electric currents by contact electrodes alternating or intermittent currents for producing shock effects
    • A61N1/39Heart defibrillators
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H17/00Switches having flexible operating part adapted only for pulling, e.g. cord, chain
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H3/00Mechanisms for operating contacts
    • H01H3/32Driving mechanisms, i.e. for transmitting driving force to the contacts
    • H01H3/50Driving mechanisms, i.e. for transmitting driving force to the contacts with indexing or locating means, e.g. indexing by ball and spring
    • H01H3/503Driving mechanisms, i.e. for transmitting driving force to the contacts with indexing or locating means, e.g. indexing by ball and spring making use of electromagnets
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H43/00Time or time-programme switches providing a choice of time intervals for executing one or more switching actions and automatically terminating their operations after the programme is completed
    • H01H43/10Time or time-programme switches providing a choice of time intervals for executing one or more switching actions and automatically terminating their operations after the programme is completed with timing of actuation of contacts due to a part rotating at substantially constant speed
    • H01H43/12Time or time-programme switches providing a choice of time intervals for executing one or more switching actions and automatically terminating their operations after the programme is completed with timing of actuation of contacts due to a part rotating at substantially constant speed stopping automatically after a single cycle of operation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N1/00Electrotherapy; Circuits therefor
    • A61N1/18Applying electric currents by contact electrodes
    • A61N1/32Applying electric currents by contact electrodes alternating or intermittent currents
    • A61N1/38Applying electric currents by contact electrodes alternating or intermittent currents for producing shock effects
    • A61N1/39Heart defibrillators
    • A61N1/3906Heart defibrillators characterised by the form of the shockwave
    • A61N1/3912Output circuitry therefor, e.g. switches

Description

OC- 12, 1965 E. M. BECKER ETAL 3,211,154

SEQUENCE SWITCH FOR VENTRICULAR DEFIBRILLATOR Filed June 25, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet l I W C),

INVENTORS E491. M. 55C/(ER Oct. l2, 1965 E M BECKER ETAL 3,211,154

SEQUENCE SWITCH FOR VENTRICULAR DEFIBRILLATOR Filed June 25, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 6 MLSEC.

INVENTORS. EARL M EEC/(ER JO//N J. B/GE BY ATTORNEKS.

United States Patent 3,211,154 SEQUENCE SWITCH FOR VENTRECULAR DEFBRKLLATOR Earl M. Becker, Pittsburgh, and .Folin l. Bridge, Turtle Creek, Pa., assignors to Mine Safety Appliances Cornpany, a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed June 25, 1962, Ser. No. 204,947 Claims. (Cl. 12S-421) This invention relates to an electrical switch for momentarily closing an electrical circuit to transmit a pulse of current, and is particularly adapted for use as a sequence switch in a ventricular defibrillator for stopping cardiac fibrillation by the delivery of rapid pulses of electric current, represented by sequential discharges of a plurality of capacitors, through a patients body in the region of the heart.

It is among the objects of this invention to provide a switch of the type referred to that can simply and reliably transmit one or more pulses olf electric current, as by initiating the discharge of one or more capacitors charged to a high voltage, so that the 'duration of a single current pulse, or the duration and spacing of multiple current pulses, can be adjusted Within defined limits.

Further objects of the invention will be apparent from the following description in connection with the attached drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 includes a diagrammatic view of the sequence switch of this invention and a schematic wiring diagram of a defibrillator associated therewith;

FIG. 2 is a section of the sequence switch itself, showing its structural details; and

FIG. 3 is a representation of the wave shape of the current pulse produced by the discharge of two capacitors when connected in the circuit by FIG. 1.

Broadly stated, the switch of this invention includes electrically conducting bridging means slidably received in an insulated guide for reciprocal movement therein along a defined straight path. Spring means are provided to move the bridging means rapidly along this path in one direction towards an uncocked position and normally to hold the bridging means in this position. The bridging means can be moved manually in the opposite direction to a cocked position and held there by releasable latch means. When released from the cocked position, the bridging means move rapidly along the defined path toward the uncocked position and, in so doing, momentarily engage electrical contact means disposed in the path of movement and thereby close an electrical circuit for the duration of the engagement between the bridging means and the contact means.

More specifically, as applied to one type of cardiac defibrillator, the switch of this invention includes a pair of electrically conducting bridging members mounted in axially spaced and insulated relation to each other. Means are provided for guiding the bridging members in a linear reciprocal path, and a spring motor normally holds them in an uncocked position at one end of their path. The bridging members are moved manually in the opposite direction to a cocked position, where they are held by releasable latch means. On release of the latch, the bridging members move rapidly under the urging of the spring motor towards their uncocked position and, in so doing, successively engage a plurality of spaced sets of contact members, for example, four such sets. Each set includes two contacts insulated from each other but lying in substantially the same plane at right angles to the axis of travel of the bridging members, and each set is axially spaced from an adjacent set by a distance substantially equal to the axial distance between the leading edge of the contact engaging surface of the first bridging member and the corresponding edge of the second bridging member. As a result, in moving from its cocked t0 its uncocked position, the first bridging member will momentarily and successively connect together the contacts of the second and fourth sets of contact members at the same time as the second bridging member momentarily and successively connects together the contacts, respectively, of the first and third sets of contact members. Electrical conductors connect the first contact of each set to the capacitors and the second contact of each set to the electrodes in a way that provides two successive pulses of current of opposite polarity.

Referring to the drawings, the general features of a defibrillator, including the electrical connections between its component parts, are shown schematically in FIG. 1. A source of electrical current 1, which may be either conventional volt A.C. or batteries providing either 6- or 12-volt D.C., is connected through a function switch 2 to a transformer-converter 3, either directly (as when source 1 is 115 volts A.C.) or indirectly through a 6volt converter 4 or a 12-volt converter 6 (depending upon whether source 1 is 6 or 12 volts D.C.), which changes the 6-12 volts D.C. to 115 volts A.C.

In transformer-converter 3, the 115 volt A.C. input is changed to a high voltage D.C. output, for example, 2,500 volts, which is used to charge two high voltage capacitors C1 and C2 connected respectively in series with resistors R1 and R2, as shown in FIG. 1. Connected across the capacitors and their associated resistors is a charge light circuit that includes resistors 7, 8, and 9, and a neon glow discharge tube 11 with a condenser 12 connected across it, as shown in FIG. 1. When capacitors C1 and C2 are charged to the desired voltage, tube 11 will blink. A shorting switch 13 in series with a resistor 14 is also connected across capacitors C1 and C2, for discharging them otherwise than through the electrodes to be described below.

Capacitors C1 and C2 are connected to the sequence switch of this invention, which is designated generally by the numeral 2l, and best shown in FIG. 2. The purpose of this switch is to discharge the two capacitors C1 and C2 serially, so that they will deliver two short pulses of current with the second pulse following very quickly after the first one and having a reverse polarity. Switch 21 is a linear plunger type switch, with a handle 22 at one end of an insulating plunger rod 23 and two separate bridging members 24 and 26 at the other end of the rod. The bridging members may be constructed in various ways, including separated outer surfaces of conducting material, such as metal bands 27, secured to an insulating plastic core 28, so that the bridging members will be axially spaced and insulated from each other. They are slidably received in a bore 29 of a thick-walled body 3l of insulating material, with end closure plates 32 and 33. Plunger rod 23 extends through end plate 32. The switch is cocked by pulling the handle to lthe left, as shown in the drawings, until a locking pin 34, slidably supported in the wall of body 31, drops into a circumferential groove 36 between the bridging members to hold them in their cocked position (shown in broken lines in the drawings). A spring motor 38 exerts a predetermined axial force on the -bridging members through a nylon cord 39, urging the bridging members to the right towards their uncocked position. The spring motor includes a conventional coiled flat spring (not shown) secured rat one end to a housing 40 and at the other end to a shaft 4i. Both the housing 40 and the body 31 are mounted in spaced relation on the wall of a suitable container 42. The spring motor 38 is wound to the desired tension by a key 43, which is attached to the end of shaft 41, and held in its wound position by the engagement of ratchet 44 with pawl 46. The nylon cord 39 is wrapped around a drum (not shown) attached to the shaft 42 inside the housing 40; and its free end, passing through the end plate 33 of switch 21, is secured to the bridging member end of plunger rod 23. A signal light 48, connected to a low voltage source 49, through contacts 51 and 52 in the wall of body 31, lights up when those contacts are bridged by bridging member 24, when the latter is in its cocked (broken line) position.

The bridging members are released from their cocked position by energizing (as hereinafter described) a solenoid 53, causing its armature 54 to turn a bell crank 56 on its pivot 57 to withdraw locking pin 34 from groove 36, against the urging of a light spring 58. If desired, the bridging members can be uncocked by a manual release 59, which includes a cam disc 61 mounted on a pivot 62 and rotated b-y a handle (not shown). When the disc is turned (counter-clockwise -in FIG. 2), the cam turns the bell crank 56 to withdraw the locking pin 34. A spring 63 returns the cam to its normal position.

In moving from their cocked to their uncocked position, the bridging members pass rapidly by and momentarily engage a series of electrical contacts A, B, C, and D, and their respectively and diametrically opposed contacts A', B', C', and D'. These contacts, as well as signal light contacts 51 and 52, are slidably received in the wall of body 31 'and have rounded ends protruding a short distance into bore 29. The contacts are urged inwards by leaf springs 64 mounted on body 31 and pressing against the enlarged heads 65 of the contacts. Contacts A and D are connected to one side (for example, the positive side) of capacitors C1 and C2, re` spectively, while contacts B and C are connected to the other side of those capacitors through a choke coil 66. Contacts A' and C' are connected to electrode E1 and contacts B and D' to electrode E2. It may be found desirable, as a means of reducing contact bounce, to taper the bridging members axially approximately 3 with their leading edges (to the right in the drawings) having the reduced diameter.

Contacts A and C' are connected to a rst switch S1 in electrode E1, While contacts B and D' are connected to a similar switch in electrode E2. Solenoid 53'is energized in a low voltage electrical circuit that also includes, in series connection, a source 67 of electric current and a second switch S2 in each of the electrodes. It will be apparent from FIG. 1 that electrodes E1 and E2 can normally receive pulses of current fro-m capacitors C1 and C2 only after (1) the rst electrode switches S1 are closed to connect the electrodes with contacts A',

B', C', and D' and (2) the second electrode switches S2 are lboth in their closed position to release sequence switch 21 from its cocked position. These electrode switches, S1 and S2, are closed in succession by pressing the contact surfaces '71 of the electrodes against the patients body, so that those surfaces are connected to the contacts of the sequence switch before that switch is red.

When switch 21 is released from its cocked position, it moves quickly to the right. Bridging member 26 rst bridges contacts A and A' (connected to the positive side of capacitor C1), but no circuit is thereby completed. When bridging member 26 moves farther to the right to bridge contacts B and B' (connected to the negative sides of both capacitors through choke coil 66), it will no longer be in engagement wit-h contacts A 4and A; but bridging member 24 will now bridge the latter contacts, completing a circuit that discharges capacitor C1 through the two electrodes and the patients body, represented by the resistance X. When bridging member 26 bridges contacts C and C', bridging member 24 will bridge contacts B and B', but no current llows through the electrodes. A moment later, when bridging members 24 andl 26 bridge contacts C-C and D-D, respectively, capacitor C2 will be discharged through the patients body, but in the reverse direction to the discharge of capacitor Cl.

Portions of the circuit referred to above are described more fully and claimed in the copending joint application of William P. Caywood and Robert S. Kush, Serial No. 204,948, tiled of even date herewith, and assigned to the same assignee. In addition, details of the electrodes E1 and E2 are more fully described and claimed in the copending joint application of Earl M. Becker, one of the applicants herein, and William C. Stuckrath, Serial No. 204,949, filed of even date herewith, and assigned to the same assignee.

lt is among the advantages of the present invention that it provides simple and reliable means for producing an electrical pulse of defined duration when connected in an electrical circuit. While the switch is especially suited for serially discharging a plurality of high voltage capacitors in the manner described in this application, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that it is capable of other uses as well. When used as herein described for discharging a pair of high voltage capacitors, the bridging members desirably move from their cocked to their uncocked position in about twenty milliseconds with each capacitor discharge lasting about four milliseconds and with about six milliseconds between successive discharges (see FIG. 3). Of course, these times can be varied within desired limits by suitable adjustments, for example, by adjusting the tension of spring motor 38 or by varying the mass of bridging members 24 and 26. It will also be noted that the duration of each current pulse transmitted by the switch can be made shorter, if desired, than the time required to discharge the capacitors. A further advantage of the switch of this invention resid-es in the fact that the bridging members are rotatable about the axis of plunger rod 23, so that fresh contact surfaces on the bridging members can be periodically presented to engage the contacts. This is a desirable feature, because under the conditions that occur in discharging high voltage capacitors, there is bound to be some arcing between the bridging members and the contacts they engage, and therefore, relatively large and freshly presentable contact surfaces on the bridging members will tend to reduce wear from arc erosion.

According to the provisions of the patent statutes, we have explained the principle of our invention and have illustrated and described what we now consider to represent its best embodiment. However, we desire to have it understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specilically illustrated and described.

We claim:

1. In a cardiac defibrillator, in combination with a pair of electrodes, a sequence switch for serially discharging pulses of current from a high voltage source through the electrodes, the sequence switch comprising: a pair of electrically conducting bridging members mounted in fixed axially spaced and insulated relation to each other, means guiding the bridging members for linear axial reciprocation along a dened path, spring means for moving the bridging members rapidly in one direction and for normally holding them in an uncocked position at one end of their path, means for manually moving the bridging members in the opposite direction to a cocked position, releasable latch means for holding the bridging members in their cocked position, means for releasing the latch means to cause the bridging members to move rapidly under the urging of the spring means towards their uncocked position, a plurality of axially spaced sets of contact members adapted to be momentarily and successively engaged by the surfaces of the bridging members When the bridging members are moving from their cocked to their uncocked position, each set of contact members including two contacts separated from each other but lying in substantially the same plane at right angles to the axis of travel of the bridging members, each set of contact members being axially spaced from an adjacent set by a distance substantially equal to the axial distance between the leading edge of the contact engaging surface of the first bridging member and the corresponding edge of the second bridging member, whereby when the bridging members are moving from their cocked to their uncocked position the first bridging member will momentarily connect together the contacts of one set of contact members at the same time as the second bridging member momentarily connects together the contacts of an adjacent set of contact members, and electrical conductors connecting the first contacts of the sets of contact members to the high voltage source and the second contacts of the sets to the electrodes.

2. In a cardiac defibrillator, in combination with a pair of electrodes, a sequence switch for serially discharging the capacitors through a pair of electrodes, the sequence switch comprising: a pair of electrically conducting bridging members mounted in fixed axially spaced and insulated relation to each other, means guiding the bridging members for linear axial axial reciprocation along a defined path, spring means for moving the bridging members rapidly in one direction and for normally holding them in an uncocked position at one end of their path, means for manually moving the bridging members in the opposite direction to a cocked position, releasable latch means for holding the bridging members in their cocked position, means for releasing the latch means to cause the bridging members to move rapidly under the urging of the spring means towards their uncocked position, at least four axially spaced sets of contact members adapted to be momentarily and successively engaged by peripheral surfaces of the bridging members when moving from their cocked to their uncocked position, each set of contact members including two contacts separated from each other but lying in substantially the same plane at right angles to the axis of travel of the bridging members, each set of contact members being axially spaced from an adjacent set by a distance substantially equal to the axial distance between the leading edge of the contact engaging surface of the first bridging member and the corresponding edge of the second bridging member, whereby while the bridging members are moving from their cocked to their uncocked position the first bridging member will momentarily and successively connect together the contacts of the second and fourth sets of contact members at the same time as the second bridging member momentarily and successively connects together the contacts of the first and third sets of contact members respectively, and electrical conductors connecting the first contacts of the sets of contact members to the capacitors and the second contacts of the sets to the electrodes.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2 that includes means for adjusting the tension of the spring means to change the axial speed of the bridging members in travelling from their cocked to their uncocked position.

4. Apparatus according to claim 2, in which the means for guiding the bridging members includes a body of electrically non-conductive material having a cylindrical bore in which the bridging members travel.

5. Apparatus according to claim 2, in which the latch means includes a locking pin movable radially of the bridging members, the bridging members being separated axially by a circumferential groove into which the locking pin is adapted to be inserted when the bridging members are brought to their cocked position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,471,859 10/23 Patton 12S-423 X 1,600,127 9/26 Nero 12S- 423 X 1,981,987 11/34 Bryce 200-16 X 2,730,581 1/56 Bruno 12S-423 X FOREIGN PATENTS 766,504 1/ 57 Great Britain.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A CARDIAC DEFIBRILLATOR, IN COMBINATION WITH A PAIR OF ELECTRODES, A SEQUENCE SWITCH FOR SERIALLY DISCHARGING PULSES OF CURRENT FROM A HIGH VOLTAGE SOURCE THROUGH THE ELECTRODES, THE SEQUENCE SWITCH COMPRISING: A PAIR OF ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTING BRIDGING MEMBERS MOUNTED IN FIXED AXIALLY SPACED AND INSULATED RELATION TOEACH OTHER, MEANS GUIDING THE BRIDGING MEMBERS FOR LINEAR AXIAL RECIPROCATION ALONG A DEFINED PATH, SPRING MEANS FOR MOVING THE BRIDGING MEMBERS RAPIDLY IN ONE DIRECTION AND FOR NORMALLY HOLDING THEM IN AN UNCOCKED POSITION AT ONE END OF THEIR PATH, MEANS FOR MANUALLY MOVING THE BRIDGING MEMBERS IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION TO A COCKED POSITION, RELEASABLE LATCH MEANS FOR HOLDING THE BRIDGING MEMBERS IN THEIR COCKED POSITION, MEANS FOR RELEASING THE LATCH MEANS TO CAUSE THE BRIDGING MEMBERS TO MOVE RAPIDLY UNDER THE URGING OF THE SPRING MEANS TOWARDS THEIR UNCOCKED POSITION, A PLURALITY OF AXIALLY SPACED SETS OF CONTACT MEMBERS ADAPTED TO BE MOMENTARILY AND SUCCESSIVELY ENGAGED BY THE SURFACES OF THE BRIDING MEMBERS WHEN THE BRIDGING MEMBERS ARE MOVING FROM THEIR COCKED TO THEIR UNCOCKED POSITION, EACH SET OF CONTACT MEMBERS INCLUDING TWO CONTACTS SEPARATED FROM EACH OTHER BUT LYING IN SUBSTANTIALY THE SAME PLANE AT RIGHT ANGLES TO THE AXIS OF TRAVEL OF THE BRIDGING MEMBERS, EACH SET OF CONTACT MEMBERS BEING AXIALLY SPACED FROM AN ADJACENT SET BY A DISTANCE SUBSTANTIALLY EQUAL TO THE AXIAL DISTANCE BETWEEN THE LEADING EDGE OF THE CONTACT ENGAGING SURFACE OF THE FIRST BRIDGING MEMBER AND THE CORRESPONDING EDGE OF THE SECOND BRIDGING MEMBER, WHEREBY WHEN THE BRIDGING MEMBERS ARE MOVING FROM THEIR COCKED TO THEIR UNCOCKED POSITION THE FIRST BRIDGING MEMBER WILL MOMENTARILY CONNECT TOGETHER THE CONTACTS OF ONE SET OF CONTACT MEMBERS AT THE SAME TIME AS THE SECOND BRIDGING MEMBER MOMENTARILY CONNECTS TOGETHER THE CONTACTS OF AN ADJACENT SET OF CONTACT MEMBERS, AND ELECTRICAL CONDUCTORS CONNECTING THE FIRST CONTACTS OF THE SETS OF CONTACT MEMBERS TO THE HIGH VOLTAGE SOURCE AND THE SECOND CONTACTS OF THE SETS TO THE ELECTRODES.
US204947A 1962-06-25 1962-06-25 Sequence switch for ventricular defibrillator Expired - Lifetime US3211154A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US204947A US3211154A (en) 1962-06-25 1962-06-25 Sequence switch for ventricular defibrillator

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US204947A US3211154A (en) 1962-06-25 1962-06-25 Sequence switch for ventricular defibrillator
GB2700462A GB976993A (en) 1962-06-25 1962-07-13 A momentary contact electric switch particularly for use in a cardiac defibrillator
DE1962M0053720 DE1234339B (en) 1962-06-25 1962-07-27 Sequencer for a defibrillator

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3211154A true US3211154A (en) 1965-10-12

Family

ID=22760137

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US204947A Expired - Lifetime US3211154A (en) 1962-06-25 1962-06-25 Sequence switch for ventricular defibrillator

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US3211154A (en)
DE (1) DE1234339B (en)
GB (1) GB976993A (en)

Cited By (55)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3378796A (en) * 1966-07-25 1968-04-16 Dante A. Caputo Sliding-action, multiple-contact, multiple-initial-condition relay
US3378797A (en) * 1966-07-25 1968-04-16 Dante A. Caputo Sliding-action, multiple-contact, multiple-initial-condition relay
US3467922A (en) * 1968-01-18 1969-09-16 B J Management Corp Multiple circuit electrical switchboard with circuit selector
US4143254A (en) * 1977-04-25 1979-03-06 Heyrana Pablo M Waterproof multiple electrical switch assembly
US4548203A (en) * 1982-06-01 1985-10-22 Purdue Research Foundation Sequential-pulse, multiple pathway defibrillation method
US4708145A (en) * 1982-06-01 1987-11-24 Medtronic, Inc. Sequential-pulse, multiple pathway defibrillation method
EP0280526A2 (en) * 1987-02-27 1988-08-31 Intermedics, Inc. Biphasic waveforms for defibrillation
EP0281219A1 (en) * 1987-01-14 1988-09-07 Medtronic, Inc. Cardiac defibrillator
US4800883A (en) * 1986-04-02 1989-01-31 Intermedics, Inc. Apparatus for generating multiphasic defibrillation pulse waveform
US4953551A (en) * 1987-01-14 1990-09-04 Medtronic, Inc. Method of defibrillating a heart
EP0445800A1 (en) * 1990-03-07 1991-09-11 Müller, Gerhard Electric circuit for providing a high tension impulse, particularly for a defibrillator
EP0507504A1 (en) * 1991-04-04 1992-10-07 Physio-Control Corporation Cardiac defibrillator
US5383907A (en) * 1992-12-18 1995-01-24 Angeion Corporation System and method for delivering multiple closely spaced defibrillation pulses
US5522853A (en) * 1992-10-27 1996-06-04 Angeion Corporation Method and apparatus for progressive recruitment of cardiac fibrillation
US5586646A (en) * 1992-06-16 1996-12-24 Bridgeman; Mark Vehicle locking systems
US5593427A (en) * 1993-08-06 1997-01-14 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method
US5607454A (en) * 1993-08-06 1997-03-04 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method and apparatus
US5620464A (en) * 1992-12-18 1997-04-15 Angeion Corporation System and method for delivering multiple closely spaced defibrillation pulses
US5697953A (en) * 1993-03-13 1997-12-16 Angeion Corporation Implantable cardioverter defibrillator having a smaller displacement volume
US5827326A (en) * 1991-03-15 1998-10-27 Angeion Corporation Implantable cardioverter defibrillator having a smaller energy storage capacity
US5957956A (en) * 1994-06-21 1999-09-28 Angeion Corp Implantable cardioverter defibrillator having a smaller mass
US6148233A (en) * 1997-03-07 2000-11-14 Cardiac Science, Inc. Defibrillation system having segmented electrodes
US6252477B1 (en) * 1997-07-04 2001-06-26 Yazaki Corporation Power shut-off connector
US6405081B1 (en) 1999-04-22 2002-06-11 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Damped biphasic energy delivery circuit for a defibrillator
US7082336B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2006-07-25 Synecor, Llc Implantable intravascular device for defibrillation and/or pacing
US20070060956A1 (en) * 2005-09-09 2007-03-15 Nassif Rabih C Method and apparatus for variable capacitance defibrillation
US20080032473A1 (en) * 2006-08-03 2008-02-07 Bocek Joseph M Method and apparatus for charging partitioned capacitors
US20080029482A1 (en) * 2006-08-03 2008-02-07 Sherwood Gregory J Method and apparatus for selectable energy storage partitioned capacitor
US20080030927A1 (en) * 2006-08-03 2008-02-07 Sherwood Gregory J Method and apparatus for partitioned capacitor
WO2008019141A1 (en) * 2006-08-03 2008-02-14 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Selectable energy storage partitioned capacitor for defibrillation and method for pulse generation
US20080065164A1 (en) * 1996-01-08 2008-03-13 Shlomo Ben-Haim Electrical Muscle Controller
US20080121510A1 (en) * 2006-03-13 2008-05-29 Von Kruchten Markus Switchable blower motor resistor for hvac application
US7529589B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2009-05-05 Synecor Llc Intravascular electrophysiological system and methods
US7617007B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2009-11-10 Synecor Llc Method and apparatus for retaining medical implants within body vessels
US7747335B2 (en) 2003-12-12 2010-06-29 Synecor Llc Implantable medical device having pre-implant exoskeleton
US20110212721A1 (en) * 2010-02-16 2011-09-01 Hsiao-Tse Chang Methods and system for detecting roaming location of mobile network
US8014858B1 (en) 1999-05-26 2011-09-06 Impulse Dynamics N.V. Shockless defibrillation
US8133286B2 (en) 2004-07-16 2012-03-13 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Method and apparatus for high voltage aluminum capacitor design
US8239045B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2012-08-07 Synecor Llc Device and method for retaining a medical device within a vessel
US8244371B2 (en) 2005-03-18 2012-08-14 Metacure Limited Pancreas lead
US8321013B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2012-11-27 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller and pacing with hemodynamic enhancement
US8326416B2 (en) 2003-03-10 2012-12-04 Impulse Dynamics Nv Apparatus and method for delivering electrical signals to modify gene expression in cardiac tissue
US8352031B2 (en) 2004-03-10 2013-01-08 Impulse Dynamics Nv Protein activity modification
US20130282079A1 (en) * 2012-04-24 2013-10-24 Medtronic, Inc. Charge-balancing during electrical stimulation
US8655444B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2014-02-18 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller
US8666495B2 (en) 1999-03-05 2014-03-04 Metacure Limited Gastrointestinal methods and apparatus for use in treating disorders and controlling blood sugar
US8700161B2 (en) 1999-03-05 2014-04-15 Metacure Limited Blood glucose level control
US8792985B2 (en) 2003-07-21 2014-07-29 Metacure Limited Gastrointestinal methods and apparatus for use in treating disorders and controlling blood sugar
US8825152B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2014-09-02 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Modulation of intracellular calcium concentration using non-excitatory electrical signals applied to the tissue
US8934975B2 (en) 2010-02-01 2015-01-13 Metacure Limited Gastrointestinal electrical therapy
US8977353B2 (en) 2004-03-10 2015-03-10 Impulse Dynamics Nv Protein activity modification
US9101765B2 (en) 1999-03-05 2015-08-11 Metacure Limited Non-immediate effects of therapy
US9289618B1 (en) 1996-01-08 2016-03-22 Impulse Dynamics Nv Electrical muscle controller
US9713723B2 (en) 1996-01-11 2017-07-25 Impulse Dynamics Nv Signal delivery through the right ventricular septum
US9931503B2 (en) 2003-03-10 2018-04-03 Impulse Dynamics Nv Protein activity modification

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1471859A (en) * 1920-08-25 1923-10-23 Bishop & Babcock Company Automatic control mechanism for electric switches
US1600127A (en) * 1921-05-10 1926-09-14 Arrow Electric Co Push switch
US1981987A (en) * 1933-05-25 1934-11-27 Ibm Word printing mechanism
US2730581A (en) * 1953-07-19 1956-01-10 Bruno Peter Dual storage battery switch
GB766504A (en) * 1954-01-29 1957-01-23 Spladis Soc Pour L Applic D In Improvements in and relating to electromedical appliances

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1048643B (en) *
GB717226A (en) * 1952-11-26 1954-10-20 Spladis Soc Pour L Applic D In Electro-medical apparatus

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1471859A (en) * 1920-08-25 1923-10-23 Bishop & Babcock Company Automatic control mechanism for electric switches
US1600127A (en) * 1921-05-10 1926-09-14 Arrow Electric Co Push switch
US1981987A (en) * 1933-05-25 1934-11-27 Ibm Word printing mechanism
US2730581A (en) * 1953-07-19 1956-01-10 Bruno Peter Dual storage battery switch
GB766504A (en) * 1954-01-29 1957-01-23 Spladis Soc Pour L Applic D In Improvements in and relating to electromedical appliances

Cited By (90)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3378796A (en) * 1966-07-25 1968-04-16 Dante A. Caputo Sliding-action, multiple-contact, multiple-initial-condition relay
US3378797A (en) * 1966-07-25 1968-04-16 Dante A. Caputo Sliding-action, multiple-contact, multiple-initial-condition relay
US3467922A (en) * 1968-01-18 1969-09-16 B J Management Corp Multiple circuit electrical switchboard with circuit selector
US4143254A (en) * 1977-04-25 1979-03-06 Heyrana Pablo M Waterproof multiple electrical switch assembly
US4548203A (en) * 1982-06-01 1985-10-22 Purdue Research Foundation Sequential-pulse, multiple pathway defibrillation method
US4708145A (en) * 1982-06-01 1987-11-24 Medtronic, Inc. Sequential-pulse, multiple pathway defibrillation method
US4800883A (en) * 1986-04-02 1989-01-31 Intermedics, Inc. Apparatus for generating multiphasic defibrillation pulse waveform
EP0281219A1 (en) * 1987-01-14 1988-09-07 Medtronic, Inc. Cardiac defibrillator
US4953551A (en) * 1987-01-14 1990-09-04 Medtronic, Inc. Method of defibrillating a heart
EP0280526A2 (en) * 1987-02-27 1988-08-31 Intermedics, Inc. Biphasic waveforms for defibrillation
EP0280526A3 (en) * 1987-02-27 1989-03-08 Intermedics, Inc. Biphasic waveforms for defibrillation
EP0445800A1 (en) * 1990-03-07 1991-09-11 Müller, Gerhard Electric circuit for providing a high tension impulse, particularly for a defibrillator
US5827326A (en) * 1991-03-15 1998-10-27 Angeion Corporation Implantable cardioverter defibrillator having a smaller energy storage capacity
US5237989A (en) * 1991-04-04 1993-08-24 Physio-Control Corporation Cardiac defibrillator with movable contact switch
EP0507504A1 (en) * 1991-04-04 1992-10-07 Physio-Control Corporation Cardiac defibrillator
US5586646A (en) * 1992-06-16 1996-12-24 Bridgeman; Mark Vehicle locking systems
US5522853A (en) * 1992-10-27 1996-06-04 Angeion Corporation Method and apparatus for progressive recruitment of cardiac fibrillation
US5383907A (en) * 1992-12-18 1995-01-24 Angeion Corporation System and method for delivering multiple closely spaced defibrillation pulses
US5620464A (en) * 1992-12-18 1997-04-15 Angeion Corporation System and method for delivering multiple closely spaced defibrillation pulses
US5697953A (en) * 1993-03-13 1997-12-16 Angeion Corporation Implantable cardioverter defibrillator having a smaller displacement volume
US6047212A (en) * 1993-08-06 2000-04-04 Heartstream, Inc. External defibrillator capable of delivering patient impedance compensated biphasic waveforms
US5620470A (en) * 1993-08-06 1997-04-15 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method
US5607454A (en) * 1993-08-06 1997-03-04 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method and apparatus
US5735879A (en) * 1993-08-06 1998-04-07 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method for external defibrillators
US5749904A (en) * 1993-08-06 1998-05-12 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method utilizing patient dependent electrical parameters
US5749905A (en) * 1993-08-06 1998-05-12 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method utilizing patient dependent electrical parameters
US5776166A (en) * 1993-08-06 1998-07-07 Heartstream, Inc. Method for applying a multiphasic waveform
US5803927A (en) * 1993-08-06 1998-09-08 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method and apparatus for external defibrillation
US5601612A (en) * 1993-08-06 1997-02-11 Heartstream, Inc. Method for applying a multiphasic waveform
US5836978A (en) * 1993-08-06 1998-11-17 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method for producing a multiphasic discharge based upon a patient-dependent electrical parameter and time
US5593427A (en) * 1993-08-06 1997-01-14 Heartstream, Inc. Electrotherapy method
US5957956A (en) * 1994-06-21 1999-09-28 Angeion Corp Implantable cardioverter defibrillator having a smaller mass
US8655444B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2014-02-18 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller
US9186514B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2015-11-17 Impulse Dynamics Nv Electrical muscle controller
US20080065159A1 (en) * 1996-01-08 2008-03-13 Shlomo Ben-Haim Electrical Muscle Controller
US8958872B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2015-02-17 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller
US8825152B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2014-09-02 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Modulation of intracellular calcium concentration using non-excitatory electrical signals applied to the tissue
US9289618B1 (en) 1996-01-08 2016-03-22 Impulse Dynamics Nv Electrical muscle controller
US20080065164A1 (en) * 1996-01-08 2008-03-13 Shlomo Ben-Haim Electrical Muscle Controller
US8306616B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2012-11-06 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller
US8306617B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2012-11-06 Impulse Dynamics N.V. Electrical muscle controller
US8301247B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2012-10-30 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller
US8260416B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2012-09-04 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller
US8321013B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2012-11-27 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller and pacing with hemodynamic enhancement
US8311629B2 (en) 1996-01-08 2012-11-13 Impulse Dynamics, N.V. Electrical muscle controller
US9713723B2 (en) 1996-01-11 2017-07-25 Impulse Dynamics Nv Signal delivery through the right ventricular septum
US6148233A (en) * 1997-03-07 2000-11-14 Cardiac Science, Inc. Defibrillation system having segmented electrodes
US20030055460A1 (en) * 1997-03-07 2003-03-20 Owen James M. Defibrillator with configurable capacitor arrangement
US9089718B2 (en) 1997-03-07 2015-07-28 Cardiac Science Corporation Defibrillation system
US6252477B1 (en) * 1997-07-04 2001-06-26 Yazaki Corporation Power shut-off connector
US8700161B2 (en) 1999-03-05 2014-04-15 Metacure Limited Blood glucose level control
US9101765B2 (en) 1999-03-05 2015-08-11 Metacure Limited Non-immediate effects of therapy
US8666495B2 (en) 1999-03-05 2014-03-04 Metacure Limited Gastrointestinal methods and apparatus for use in treating disorders and controlling blood sugar
US20050101999A1 (en) * 1999-04-22 2005-05-12 Lyster Thomas D. Damped biphasic energy delivery circuit for a defibrillator
US6405081B1 (en) 1999-04-22 2002-06-11 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Damped biphasic energy delivery circuit for a defibrillator
US7079894B2 (en) 1999-04-22 2006-07-18 Koninklijke Philips Electronics, N.V. Damped biphasic energy delivery circuit for a defibrillator
US8014858B1 (en) 1999-05-26 2011-09-06 Impulse Dynamics N.V. Shockless defibrillation
US8326416B2 (en) 2003-03-10 2012-12-04 Impulse Dynamics Nv Apparatus and method for delivering electrical signals to modify gene expression in cardiac tissue
US9931503B2 (en) 2003-03-10 2018-04-03 Impulse Dynamics Nv Protein activity modification
US7082336B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2006-07-25 Synecor, Llc Implantable intravascular device for defibrillation and/or pacing
US7617007B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2009-11-10 Synecor Llc Method and apparatus for retaining medical implants within body vessels
US7899554B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2011-03-01 Synecor Llc Intravascular System and Method
US8239045B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2012-08-07 Synecor Llc Device and method for retaining a medical device within a vessel
US7734343B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2010-06-08 Synecor, Llc Implantable intravascular device for defibrillation and/or pacing
US7529589B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2009-05-05 Synecor Llc Intravascular electrophysiological system and methods
US7840282B2 (en) 2003-06-04 2010-11-23 Synecor Llc Method and apparatus for retaining medical implants within body vessels
US8792985B2 (en) 2003-07-21 2014-07-29 Metacure Limited Gastrointestinal methods and apparatus for use in treating disorders and controlling blood sugar
US7747335B2 (en) 2003-12-12 2010-06-29 Synecor Llc Implantable medical device having pre-implant exoskeleton
US8977353B2 (en) 2004-03-10 2015-03-10 Impulse Dynamics Nv Protein activity modification
US8352031B2 (en) 2004-03-10 2013-01-08 Impulse Dynamics Nv Protein activity modification
US9440080B2 (en) 2004-03-10 2016-09-13 Impulse Dynamics Nv Protein activity modification
US8133286B2 (en) 2004-07-16 2012-03-13 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Method and apparatus for high voltage aluminum capacitor design
US8465555B2 (en) 2004-07-16 2013-06-18 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Method and apparatus for high voltage aluminum capacitor design
US8244371B2 (en) 2005-03-18 2012-08-14 Metacure Limited Pancreas lead
US20070060956A1 (en) * 2005-09-09 2007-03-15 Nassif Rabih C Method and apparatus for variable capacitance defibrillation
US20090076558A1 (en) * 2005-09-09 2009-03-19 Nassif Rabih C Method and apparatus for variable capacitance defibrillation
US7457662B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2008-11-25 Cardiac Science Corporation Method and apparatus for variable capacitance defibrillation
US7962207B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2011-06-14 Cardiac Science Corporation Method and apparatus for variable capacitance defibrillation
US20080121510A1 (en) * 2006-03-13 2008-05-29 Von Kruchten Markus Switchable blower motor resistor for hvac application
US8154853B2 (en) 2006-08-03 2012-04-10 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Method and apparatus for partitioned capacitor
US20080030927A1 (en) * 2006-08-03 2008-02-07 Sherwood Gregory J Method and apparatus for partitioned capacitor
US8170662B2 (en) 2006-08-03 2012-05-01 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Method and apparatus for charging partitioned capacitors
US20080029482A1 (en) * 2006-08-03 2008-02-07 Sherwood Gregory J Method and apparatus for selectable energy storage partitioned capacitor
US20080032473A1 (en) * 2006-08-03 2008-02-07 Bocek Joseph M Method and apparatus for charging partitioned capacitors
WO2008019141A1 (en) * 2006-08-03 2008-02-14 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Selectable energy storage partitioned capacitor for defibrillation and method for pulse generation
US8761875B2 (en) 2006-08-03 2014-06-24 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Method and apparatus for selectable energy storage partitioned capacitor
US8934975B2 (en) 2010-02-01 2015-01-13 Metacure Limited Gastrointestinal electrical therapy
US20110212721A1 (en) * 2010-02-16 2011-09-01 Hsiao-Tse Chang Methods and system for detecting roaming location of mobile network
US9295850B2 (en) * 2012-04-24 2016-03-29 Medtronic, Inc. Charge-balancing during electrical stimulation
US20130282079A1 (en) * 2012-04-24 2013-10-24 Medtronic, Inc. Charge-balancing during electrical stimulation

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
DE1234339B (en) 1967-02-16
GB976993A (en) 1964-12-02

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3251216A (en) Method and apparatus for applying electrical connectors to conductors
US1813902A (en) Electrosurgical apparatus
US4823796A (en) Defibrillator circuit for producing a trapezoidal defibrillation pulse
US4524289A (en) Flash lamp power supply with reduced capacitance requirements
US3259769A (en) Electrical pulse generator
US2087783A (en) Means for testing electric insulation
US3345546A (en) Electric stapler and stapler trigger circuit
US2561122A (en) Livestock prod
JPH05131160A (en) Electrostatic spraying device
GB2108785A (en) Capacitor discharge circuit
US3851209A (en) Discharge lamp starting apparatus
US2208852A (en) Electric prodder
US4023573A (en) Defibrillator
US2331058A (en) Firing apparatus for gun perforators
US3513850A (en) Direct current defibrillator with voltage-controlling means
US2509005A (en) Flashtube triggering circuits
US2725488A (en) Series-parallel switch and battery circuit
US4209730A (en) Starting circuit for gaseous discharge lamps
US3093136A (en) Ventricular defibrillator
US2622229A (en) Flash tube circuit
US2538577A (en) Sparkless camera shutter and flash tube synchronizer
US2433254A (en) Electrical timing system
US2349849A (en) Gas tube relay circuits
US2901671A (en) Controlled flash lamp power supply
US2836735A (en) Impulse generator for electric fishing