US3172573A - Retractable pouring spouts and combinations - Google Patents

Retractable pouring spouts and combinations Download PDF

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US3172573A
US3172573A US240020A US24002062A US3172573A US 3172573 A US3172573 A US 3172573A US 240020 A US240020 A US 240020A US 24002062 A US24002062 A US 24002062A US 3172573 A US3172573 A US 3172573A
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spout
groove
nozzle
cylindrical
extending
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US240020A
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Jr Richard L Parish
Herbert F Wheaton
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American Flange and Manufacturing Co Inc
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American Flange and Manufacturing Co Inc
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D47/00Closures with filling and discharging, or with discharging, devices
    • B65D47/04Closures with discharging devices other than pumps
    • B65D47/06Closures with discharging devices other than pumps with pouring spouts or tubes; with discharge nozzles or passages
    • B65D47/061Closures with discharging devices other than pumps with pouring spouts or tubes; with discharge nozzles or passages with telescopic, retractable or reversible spouts, tubes or nozzles

Description

March 1955 R. L. PARISH, JR, ETAL 3,172,573
0 L.PA
and
Filed Nov. 26, i962 RETRACTABLE POURING SPOUTS AND COMBINATIONS 1Q S H Jr. INVENI'ORS.
Q/CHA HERBERT F M/Hf/l ro/v W ATTORNEY.
United States Patent 3,172,573 RETRACTABLE POURING SPOUTS AND COMBKNATIONS Richard L. Parish, Jan, North Sflem, N.Y., and Herbert F. Wheaten, Summit, NJ., assignors to American Flange & Manufacturing Co. Inc, New York, N.Y., a
corporation of Delaware Filed Nov. 26, 1962, Ser. No. 240,020 7 Claims. (Cl. 222-153) This invention relates to closure assemblies for containers and is particularly concerned with the provision of retractable pouring spouts and closure assemblies embodying such spouts.
The type of spout with which this invention is concerned is that which is carried by a nozzle surrounded by a container wall opening, is suspended by means of that nozzle Within the container during shipment and otherwise when not in use, and is pulled up to project out of the container while still retained by the nozzle to position it for use in pouring. These have been variously characterized as push pull spouts or pull up spouts and the latter designation will be employed in reference to the spout of the invention.
In the past certain push pull spouts have been made of metal but they had various drawbacks inherent in them and these have become more pronounced as the range of products carried in containers calling for spouts for dispensing the contents increased. Metal spouts were difficult to assemble with nozzles. It was difficult without expensive gasketing to prevent substantial leakage of the contents from around the spouts as they were used for pouring. Furthermore as the demand for distribution of corrosive and other chemically active products in containers equipped with spouts increased the need for material to be replaced by metal attacked by such contents likewise increased. Finally, to make such spouts and combinations of the same with nozzles effective, was too expensive.
By turning to the so-called plastic materials for their answer to this problem, as the development of those materials proceeded, industry sought to overcome some of the drawbacks of metal spouts. Some improvement was achieved but until the advent of the instant invention definite drawbacks remained to be overcome. For one thing if the plastic material, of which polyethylene is an example, was resilient enough to be engaged with a nozzle after being fully formed, it was at the same time, soft enough to be collapsed and the spout, though set up in pouring position, could not be used as a rest or even a guide for the container While pouring was being effected. If this was attempted the spout would either collapse or become unseated from its nozzle. Also the materials tried were subjected to attack by certain of the chemicals, resulting in such drawbacks as dimensional changes of the spout, in particular, substantial swelling of it when immersed in the chemicals. When swelling took place the spout could not be moved into proper interengaging relationship with the nozzle for pouring.
The spout of the instant invention and the combination thereof with the particular nozzle formed to receive it eliminates the foregoing and other drawbacks of the prior art and introduces improvements into this particular art going well beyond anything heretofore contemplated. While taking advantage of all the desirable aspects of socalled plastic materials, the spout of the invention eliminates the drawbacks thereof and for the first time presents a fully effective pull-up plastic spout. Though it is formed of one of the harder plastics of which polypropylene is an example, it is, nevertheless, formed in such a manner that it may be assembled with the nozzle with substantially the same facility as can be done with the softer plastics heretofore tried. Nevertheless the formation of the spout for maintaining it in pull up position and the relationship of the same to the particular nozzle formation gives positive assurance against the messy leakage between spout and nozzle which has heretofore plagued spout and nozzle combinations. The particular spout formation of the invention, when taken in conjunction with the particularly formed nozzle provides a rigidity of assembly in pouring position which goes much further than anything heretofore thought possible in this art.
The spout of the invention is also inert with respect to the action of a much greater range of chemicals, commercial solvents, etc., than was true with the so-called plastic materials heretofore attempted. Accordingly when used with its particular form of metal nozzle, wherein the metal is given a coating resistant to the container contents or, if needed, the nozzle may be made of comparable plastic material, a fully effective spout and nozzle combination is provided having a wide range of utility.
Even though the spout hereinafter described be made in the most economical manner presently devised, that is in split cavity molds, it is, due to its particular construction, fully effective. The use of such molds commonly results in leaving flash in the form of a narrow rib extending longitudinally down the exterior of the spout. This can,
- of course, be removed if suitable steps are taken to do so but, right away, this would cut into the economy of forming spouts in this manner. The formation of the spout of the invention and the manner in which it is engaged by the nozzle eliminates any need for removing the flash so the full economy of forming spouts in such molds is retained.
It is accordingly a principal object of the invention to provide improved retractable pouring spouts for containers and mountings therefor.
Another object is to provide improved retractable pouring spouts formed of plastic material.
Still another object is to provide plastic retractable pouring spouts and mountings therefor which will function properly when used with a wide range of solvents.
A further object is to provide for the ready assembly of retractable pouring spouts with their nozzles.
A still further object is to provide for such ready assembly through resiliency imparted to the spout base while at the same time providing for an adequate seal between spout and surrounding nozzle when in the spout extended pouring position.
A still further object is to provide spout and nozzle assemblies wherein a continuous tight leakproof seal is effected between spout and nozzle with the spout in extended pouring position in spite of projections on the spout invention.
of a closure assembly, including a spout, in accordance with the FIG. 2 is a top plan view partly broken away taken on line 22 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows.
FIG. 3 is a part sectional-part elevational view of the nozzle and spout assembly of the invention showing the spout in extended pouring position.
FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary radial section taken within a castellation showing the engagement between the spout and the nozzle.
FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but taken through the rib left in the spout at the parting line of the mold used in forming the spout.
FIG. 6 is a further enlarged fragmentary section taken on line 66 of FIG. 5.
FIG. .7 is a part sectional-part elevational view of the spout and nozzle showing the spout member being -as sembled with the nozzle.
FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectioal view of a modified form of nozzle and,
. FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 of a further modified form of nozzle.
While incorporating many of the advantages of spout heretofore made out of synthetic plastic material, the spout of the invention eliminates various of their disadvantages. Being of a tougher, somewhat less resilient material than those previously used and being resistant to solvent and other chemical action to a high degree, its advantages over prior materials will, from the foregoing discussion, be notable as being quite outstanding. It remained for applicants then to devise a way of forming such spout, of forming effective slidable and fixed relationships of it with a suitable nozzle and of initially inserting it into a nozzle. This they have done utilizing tougher, stronger plastic material 'of which polypropylene is a non-limiting example. How these things have been accomplished will be readily apparent from the following detailed description.
The pull-up retractable pouring spout 0f the invention as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3 and generally indicated by the numeral 1 comprises an elongated cylindrical body member 2 which has its lower end a securing portion adapted to cooperate with a surrounding nozzle generally indicated at 3. i
The nozzle 3 is preferably formed of sheet metal to impart maximum structural rigidity to the assembly but is not necessarily limited thereto. For chemical resistance, the nozzle could be also formed of a plastic material or be of metal suitably coated for chemical resistance. The nozzle is secured within a performed opening in a container wall and has a well known securing formation 4' at its outer periphery for this purpose. Extending radially inwardly of the securing formation 4 is an annular web 5 which may be of any'desired width depending onthe size of the dispensing opening desired and the spout to be employed therewith. Extending upwardly from the web 5 is a screw threaded neck 6 adapted to receive an internally threaded cap 11. The upper end of the neck 6 is rounded inwardly at 7 and continues downwardly to form an upper cylindrical wall. 8. The lower edge of the wall 8 then turns radially inwardly to form an annular shelf 9 which-terminates in a downwardly extending lower cylindrical wall 10.
The lowerend of the spout 1 is outwardly thickened at-12 and that thickened portion has an exterior circumferentialgroove 12a therein formed for securing the spout in upright position for pouring and in leakproof relationship with respect to the nozzle. The circumferential groove 12a is formed with a base 13 which base has a continuous cylindrical upper portion 13a, a continuous circumferential upper side wall 14 and an interrupted lower wall 15. Looking-at FIG. 3, it can be seen that with the spout in raised or pouring position the groove base 13, which prior to the engaging of the groove 12a with the nozzle for pouring has a diameter slightly larger than the lower cylindrical wall 10, tightly engages about the latter providing a seal therewith. The side wall 14, which is protected against destruction by the slight cylindrical bordering wall 16, is backed up by the portion 17 which tapers radially inwardly towards the body 2 so that the spout can be easily urged into its extended position and there held against accidental retraction.
The lower interrupted wall 15 projects radially outwardly to a diameter slightly greater than that of the up per wall 14 and engages the end edge 26 of the nozzle wall 10 so that the spout becomes positively locked at this position against any further movement which might tend to pull the spout completely out of the nozzle. From the outer extremity of the wall 15, the enlargement 12 is beveled inwardly at 18 to facilitate insertion of the spout in the nozzle as shown in FIG. 7. To further aid in the assembly operation, the bottom end of the spout is castellated by having a plurality of spaced recesses 19 formed upwardly thereinto from the bottom edge thereof. As clearly illustrated in FIG. 7, this castellated formation provides sufiicient resiliency for the securing formation to allow the spout to be easily assembled with the nozzle even though relatively rigid plastic materials are employed formed to close tolerances. It has been found that to achieve the desired spout flexibility while maintaining a sufficiently rigid permanent assembly, a castel lated formation having four equally spaced recesses 19 is necessary. The recesses 19 are so formed as to extend upwardly of the spout body to a position approximately one-third the way across width of the groove base 13.
FIG. 4 shows in detail the relationship between the groove 13 and the lower cylindrical nozzle wall It The base of one of the recesses 19 is indicated by numeral 20 and as can be seen, it is positioned upwardly approxi mately one-third the width of the groove base 13. Also it is about onethrid of the way up the nozzle wall 10. This provides ample contact for a tight leak-proof seal to be effected between the cylindrical portion 13a, or the re maining twothrids of the groove base 13, and inner surface of the nozzle wall 10 engaged by the portion 13a. The projections 21 of the spout remaining between the recesses 19 have as their upper surfaces the interrupted lower side wall 15 of the groove 12a and cooperate with the groove base 13 and the upper groove side wall 14 to tightly engage about the outer sealing surfaces of the nozzle wall 10. FIG. 7 clearly illustrates how the end per tions 21 are radially contracted so as to allow the projections carrying the lower side wall 15 to pass through the smaller diameter lower cylindrical wall 10. The par ticular spout end securing formation herein disclosed allows a spout molded of a relatively rigid plastic chemical ly resistant to solvents and other liquids to be easily and permanently assembled with its supporting nozzle while at the same time effecting a tight leakproof joint between the spout and nozzle when in extended pouring position.
Having in mind the propensity for leakage that solvents, other low viscosity and unctuous liquids possess, the problems involved in providing a tight seal between the spout and nozzle become extremely acute. The most practical and economical method of manufacturing plastic spouts as herein described is by using split cavity molds. Plastic spouts formed in this manner, of necessity, have two diametrically opposing ridges extending longitudinally thereof along their exterior surfaces. These become more and more pronounced. Though thisinterruption in the surface of the spout securing formation appears rather insignificant, it nevertheless provides quite a leakage path for liquids of low viscosities. Not only is the accumulated leakage of many containers a substan-' tial waste volumetrically but the damage often done to the finish on the Container top presents an unsightly nuisance. Also the hazard involved in having a highly volatile fluid dripping on the floor while pouring is of substantial concern. The invention eliminates this problem without going to the effort and expense of having the ridge trimmed oiT.
The showing in FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrates the flash left by the cavity parting line in the form of a ridge 22 on the spout extending the full length thereof including the end portion 21. The size of this ridge is determined by the amount of flash back at the parting line of the mold and although variations will occur due to normal wear of the die over extended periods of production, it will always present to some degree an interruption in what would otherwise be a smooth gasketing surface provided by the cylindrical portion 13a. The portion of the ridge 22. formed on the groove base 13 is indicated at 23 and the portion formed on the lower side wall of the groove 15 is indicated at 24. Looking at FIG. 6, it can be seen that a slight deformation occurs in the spout securing portion due to the confinement of the ridge portion 23 within the lower cylindrical nozzle wall 10. This deformation results in a slight opening 25 (here materially exaggerated for purposes of illustration) on either side of the ridge portion 23. However the lower end edge 26 of the cylindrical wall bites all the way into the ridge portion 24 to engage the surface hence sealing off any leakage which may occur through the openings 25. Comparing FIG. 4 with FIG. 5 it is obvious that if the diametrically opposing ribs 22 were so located as to terminate at the base of a recess 19, leakage through the openings would result. By properly locating the ribs 22, in alignment with one of the projections between the recesses 19, this condition cannot arise.
Looking again at FIGS. 1 and 3 numeral 30 indicates U a metal seal 34 is frictionally engaged within the upper 4,
cylindrical nozzle wall 8 so as to lie between the spout lip 30 and the gasket 35 of the screw cap 11. To gain access to the contents of the container, the seal 34 must be punctured and pried out.
FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate two modified forms of nozzle securing portions. In FIG. 8 the nozzle is secured to the container wall opening by means of a solder joint 41. In FIG. 9 the nozzle is clinched onto the container wall opening at 51 from the inside instead of from the outside as provided for in the FIG. 1 embodiment.
Since numerous variations and modifications of the pull-up spout and closure assembly combination herein shown and described will readily suggest themselves to those skilled in the art, it is to be understood that changes may be made in the construction described and shown and various embodiments of the invention can be made without departing from the scope thereof. It is accordingly intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.
Having described our invention what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: p
1. A one piece retractable pouring spout for containers molded of synthetic plastic material comprising a cylindrical body member, one end of said body member terminating in a circumferentially enlarged securing portion, said securing portion being formed with a radially outwardly opening circumferential groove therein, the base of said groove having a cylindrical surface of slightly greater diameter than that of said body member, the
6 periphery of the upper side wall of said groove having a diameter slightly greater than that of said groove base, a radially tapered annular portion extending from said periphery of said upper side wall radially inwardly to said body member away from said groove, the lower side wall of said groove having a peripheral diameter slightly greater than that of said upper side wall, the outer end surface of said enlarged portion extending away from the periphery of said lower side wall being beveled radially inwardly, said one end of said body member being castellated with a plurality of circumferentially spaced recesses extending therethrough and extending longitudinally upwardly into and part way across said groove base, and a circumferential lip at the other end of said body extending radially outwardly to a diameter slightly greater than said peripheral diameter of said lower side wall.
2. In a retractable pouring spout as in claim 1, wherein a vent opening is formed in the wall of said cylindrical body member closely adjacent said other end thereof.
3. In spout construction, a metal nozzle including an upstanding threaded side wall, the upper edge of said side wall being turned inwardly and downwardly so as to form an upper cylindrical wall lying within and spaced from said side wall, the lower edge of said upper cylindrical wall being turned radially inwardly and then downwardly into a lower cylindrical Wall terminating in a free edge thereby imparting a stepped configuration to the interior of said nozzle, said upper cylindrical wall being of greater diameter than said lower cylindrical wall, a retractable pouring spout including a cylindrical body member terminating at one end in a circumferentially enlarged securing portion, said securing portion being formed with a radially outwardly opening circumferential groove therein, the base of said groove having a cylindrical surface of slightly greater diameter than that of said body member, the periphery of the upper wall of said groove having slightly greater diameter than that of said groove base, a radially tapered annular portion extending from said periphery of said upper side wall radially inwardly to said body member away from said groove, the lower side wall of said groove having a peripheral diameter slightly greater than that of said upper side wall, the outer end surface of said enlarged portion extending away from the periphery of said outer side wall being beveled radially inwardly, said one end of said body member being castellated with a plurality of circumferentially spaced completely open recesses extending longitudinally upwardly and part way across said groove base, and a circumferential lip at the other end of said body extending radially outwardly to a diameter slightly greater than said peripheral diameter of said lower side wall, said retractable spout cooperating with said nozzle so that in retracted position said spout lip rests on the step formed between said nozzle upper and lower cylindrical walls and in extended pouring position said groove in said spout securing means tightly engages about said lower cylindrical wall with said nozzle free edge tightly seated on said groove lower side wall and the lower portion of said lower cylindrical nozzle wall overlying the upper portions of said recesses.
4. In spout construction as in claim 3, including a tamperproof seal secured within said upper cylindrical wall and a closure cap threadedly secured to said neck.
5. In spout construction as in claim 3, wherein a vent opening is formed in the wall of said cylindrical body member closely adjacent said other end thereof.
6. A one-piece retractable pouring spout as in claim 1, said spout having a pair of diametrically opposed longitudinally outwardly extending ribs formed thereon, said ribs extending throughout the entire length of said body member including said beveled outer end surfaces on diametrically opposed castellations.
7. In spout construction as in claim 3, said retractable pouring spout comprising a one-piece molded synthetic plastic member having a pair of diametrically opposed 7 longitudinally outwardly extending ribs formed thereon, said ribs extending throughout the entire length of said body member including said beveled outer end surfaces on diametrically opposed castellations so as to extend underneath said lower free nozzle edge with said spout in 5 extended position.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,140,295 Tamagno May 18, 1915 Shore JanLl, 1952 Henchert et a1 Dec. 30, 1952 Punte Nov. 30, 1954 Rieke Nov. 27, 1956 Rieke Dec. 18, 1956 Gray Dec. 24, 1957 Drennan June 9, 1959 Malpas Nov. 13, 1962

Claims (1)

1. A ONE PIECE RETRACTABLE POURING SPOUT FOR CONTAINERS MOLDED OF SYNTHETIC PLASTIC MATERIAL COMPRISING A CYLINDRICAL BODY MEMBER, ONE END OF SAID BODY MEMBER TERMINATING IN A CIRCUMFERENTIALLY ENLARGED SECURING PORTION, SAID SECURING PORTION BEING FORMED WITH A RADIALLY OUTWARDLY OPENING CIRCUMFERENTIAL GROOVE THEREIN, THE BASE OF SAID GROOVE HAVING A CYLINDRICAL SURFACE OF SLIGHTLY GREATER DIAMETER THAN THAT OF SAID GROOVE BASE, PERIPHERY OF THE UPPER SIDE WALL OF SAID GROOVE HAVING A DIAMETER SLIGHTLY GREATER THAN THAT OF SAID GROOVE BASE, A RADIALLY TAPERED ANNULAR PORTION EXTENDING FROM SAID PERIPHERY OF SAID UPPER SIDE WALL RADIALLY INWARDLY TO SAID BODY MEMBER AWAY FROM SAID GROOVE, THE LOWER SIDE WALL OF SAID GROOVE HAING A PERIPHERAL DIAMETER SLIGHTLY GREATER THAN THAT OF SAID UPPER SIDE WALL, THE OUTER END SURFACE OF SAID ENLARGED PORTION EXTENDING AWAY FROM THE PERIPHERY OF SAID LOWER SIDE WALL BEING BEVELED RADIALLY INWARDLY, SAID ONE END OF SAID BODY MEMBER BEING CASTELLATED WITH A PLURALITY OF CIRCUMFERENTIALLY SPACED RECESSES EXTENDING THERETHROUGH AND EXTENDING LONGITUDINALLY UPWARDLY INTO AND PART WAY ACROSS SAID GROOVES BASE, AND A CIRCUMFERENTIAL LIP AT THE OTHER END OF SAID BODY EXTENDING RADIALLY OUTWARDLY TO A DIAMETER SLIGTLY GREATER THAN SAID PERIPHERAL DIAMETER OF SAID LOWER SIDE WALL.
US240020A 1962-11-26 1962-11-26 Retractable pouring spouts and combinations Expired - Lifetime US3172573A (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US240020A US3172573A (en) 1962-11-26 1962-11-26 Retractable pouring spouts and combinations

Applications Claiming Priority (9)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US240020A US3172573A (en) 1962-11-26 1962-11-26 Retractable pouring spouts and combinations
GB2176263A GB982057A (en) 1962-11-26 1963-05-30 Improvements relating to pouring spouts for containers
NO14916863A NO115282B (en) 1962-11-26 1963-06-25
CH785263A CH402635A (en) 1962-11-26 1963-06-25 Pouring spout for one container
ES0289886A ES289886A1 (en) 1962-11-26 1963-07-10 Retractable pouring spouts and combinations
DK352963A DK119044B (en) 1962-11-26 1963-07-24 Container with retractable pouring spout.
FI145163A FI47319C (en) 1962-11-26 1963-07-24 Tank equipped with a plastic spout.
AT836663A AT252110B (en) 1962-11-26 1963-10-18 Filler neck
BE640364D BE640364A (en) 1962-11-26 1963-11-25

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US3172573A true US3172573A (en) 1965-03-09

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US240020A Expired - Lifetime US3172573A (en) 1962-11-26 1962-11-26 Retractable pouring spouts and combinations

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US (1) US3172573A (en)
AT (1) AT252110B (en)
BE (1) BE640364A (en)
CH (1) CH402635A (en)
DK (1) DK119044B (en)
ES (1) ES289886A1 (en)
FI (1) FI47319C (en)
GB (1) GB982057A (en)
NO (1) NO115282B (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3268125A (en) * 1964-07-24 1966-08-23 John E Waldrum Container closures
US3776434A (en) * 1970-12-11 1973-12-04 B Christensen Can with an extensible pouring spout with sealing plug
US3934760A (en) * 1974-01-22 1976-01-27 Edsel Le Gresley Retractable and vented pouring spout
US4076151A (en) * 1975-02-19 1978-02-28 Polyproducts Corporation Combined sealing and pouring spout assembly
US5607086A (en) * 1995-05-23 1997-03-04 Gooch; Joel S. Container assembly with movable spout
WO2009121192A1 (en) * 2008-04-02 2009-10-08 Macdougall Kenneth L Dispensing device
US9227766B2 (en) 2014-02-18 2016-01-05 Sonoco Development, Inc. Pouring spout for container
US10870516B1 (en) * 2018-06-22 2020-12-22 Gregory Harrison Worley Pouring assembly for a container

Families Citing this family (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2454974B1 (en) * 1979-04-27 1983-12-16 Bouchons Plastiques
FR2492857B1 (en) * 1980-10-24 1986-05-23 Esswein Sa LAUNDRY BOX HAVING AN INTEGRATED TELESCOPIC FUNNEL AND LAUNDRY WASHING MACHINE COMPRISING AT LEAST ONE BOX OF THIS TYPE

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1140295A (en) * 1913-08-02 1915-05-18 Lydie Tamagno Can-closure.
US2581150A (en) * 1946-03-06 1952-01-01 Roscoe W Shore Retractable spout for container, with protective cover for said spout in its retracted position
US2623664A (en) * 1950-06-20 1952-12-30 Continental Can Co Swivel disappearing spout
US2695736A (en) * 1950-09-25 1954-11-30 Continental Can Co Container structure with antigurgle pouring spout
US2772037A (en) * 1954-02-16 1956-11-27 Rieke Metal Products Corp Pour spout closure for containers
US2774523A (en) * 1953-06-08 1956-12-18 Rieke Metal Products Corp Pull spout closure for containers
US2817465A (en) * 1953-06-18 1957-12-24 Harold P Gray Pouring lip for paint cans
US2889967A (en) * 1958-02-17 1959-06-09 Owens Illinois Glass Co Condiment containers
US3063604A (en) * 1960-04-08 1962-11-13 American Flange & Mfg Pouring spout

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1140295A (en) * 1913-08-02 1915-05-18 Lydie Tamagno Can-closure.
US2581150A (en) * 1946-03-06 1952-01-01 Roscoe W Shore Retractable spout for container, with protective cover for said spout in its retracted position
US2623664A (en) * 1950-06-20 1952-12-30 Continental Can Co Swivel disappearing spout
US2695736A (en) * 1950-09-25 1954-11-30 Continental Can Co Container structure with antigurgle pouring spout
US2774523A (en) * 1953-06-08 1956-12-18 Rieke Metal Products Corp Pull spout closure for containers
US2817465A (en) * 1953-06-18 1957-12-24 Harold P Gray Pouring lip for paint cans
US2772037A (en) * 1954-02-16 1956-11-27 Rieke Metal Products Corp Pour spout closure for containers
US2889967A (en) * 1958-02-17 1959-06-09 Owens Illinois Glass Co Condiment containers
US3063604A (en) * 1960-04-08 1962-11-13 American Flange & Mfg Pouring spout

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3268125A (en) * 1964-07-24 1966-08-23 John E Waldrum Container closures
US3776434A (en) * 1970-12-11 1973-12-04 B Christensen Can with an extensible pouring spout with sealing plug
US3934760A (en) * 1974-01-22 1976-01-27 Edsel Le Gresley Retractable and vented pouring spout
US4076151A (en) * 1975-02-19 1978-02-28 Polyproducts Corporation Combined sealing and pouring spout assembly
US5607086A (en) * 1995-05-23 1997-03-04 Gooch; Joel S. Container assembly with movable spout
WO2009121192A1 (en) * 2008-04-02 2009-10-08 Macdougall Kenneth L Dispensing device
US9227766B2 (en) 2014-02-18 2016-01-05 Sonoco Development, Inc. Pouring spout for container
US10870516B1 (en) * 2018-06-22 2020-12-22 Gregory Harrison Worley Pouring assembly for a container

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
FI47319C (en) 1973-11-12
BE640364A (en) 1964-03-16
AT252110B (en) 1967-02-10
ES289886A1 (en) 1963-11-01
NO115282B (en) 1968-09-09
GB982057A (en) 1965-02-03
CH402635A (en) 1965-11-15
DK119044B (en) 1970-11-02
FI47319B (en) 1973-07-31

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