US3158950A - Firing mechanism for revolvers - Google Patents

Firing mechanism for revolvers Download PDF

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US3158950A
US3158950A US145258A US14525861A US3158950A US 3158950 A US3158950 A US 3158950A US 145258 A US145258 A US 145258A US 14525861 A US14525861 A US 14525861A US 3158950 A US3158950 A US 3158950A
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trigger
hand
movement
cylinder
hammer
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US145258A
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George H Freed
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George H Freed
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41CSMALLARMS, e.g. PISTOLS, RIFLES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • F41C3/00Pistols, e.g. revolvers
    • F41C3/14Revolvers

Description

Dec. 1, 1964 G. H. FREED FIRING MECHANISM FOR REvoLvERs 5 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Dot. 16, 1961 l N VEN TOR. 650/965 /7' /Leff Dec. l, 1964 G. H. FREED 3,158,950
' FIRING MECHANISM FOR REvoLvERs Filed Oct. 16, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Tia. 4l-
I NVEN TOR. 650,965 /m-'o Dec. 1, 1964 G. H. FRr-:ED
FIRING MECHANISM FOR REVOLVERS 5 Sheets--Sheei'l 5 Filed Oct. 16, 1961 INVENTOR. @fo/865 /C/Qff Dec. 1, 1964 G. H. FREE-D 3,158,950
FIRING MECHANISM FOR REVOLVERS Filed Oct. 16, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 I NVENTOR. 650/565 H. F/efi Arron/Ef.;
Dec. l, 1964 G. H. FREED 3,158,950
FIRING MECHANISM FOR REVOLVERS Filed Oct. 16. 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 $53.15. Til.
INVENTOR. 650,965# Eef-5@ United States Patent O 3,153,950 FG MeenANrsM non navoivnns George H. Freed, Bioomiield Ave., Pine Brook, Nl.
Filed oct. 16, 1961, ser. Ns. 145,258
30 Claims. (Cl. i2-65) This invention relates to iiring action mechanisms in iirearms and similar cartridge iiring devices which include a magazine for containing usually a plurality of cartridges to be indexed in sequence into firing position. More particularly, the invention relates to the means conventionally incorporated within such tiring mechanisms for automaticallyand successively indexing each cartridge within the magazine into tiring alignment with the barrel element of the device. f
This application is a continuation-impart of my application Serial No. 75,947, iiled December 15, 1960, now abandoned.
Although the invention was achieved upon adaptation of a Colt model revolver type pistol to incorporate the invention and therefore its presently preferred embodiments will be described in connection with such Colt rearms, itr will be understood that the invention in its broader aspects may be applicable 'to iirearms and other cartridge iiring devices which are, or may be manufactured by others than Colt. Accordingly, the true scope of the invention should not be considered as being limited to the particular embodiments herein described, but rather only by the appended claims.
Conventional revolver type pistols, such as the Colt o revolvers, include a rotatable cylinder having a plurality of axially aligned cartridge chambers in annularly spaced relationship for holding a corresponding plurality of oartridges, each of which may be brought into ring alignment with the barrel and hammer of the gun by rotation of the cylinder. Cooking and subsequent releasing of the hammer, to strike and lire the cartridge which is in such ring position, is elected by actuation of the trigger of the pistol.
It is well known that, in conventional revolvers, the chamber containing the cartridge to be iired is brought into firing position coincidentally with lthe cooking and releasing action of the hammer. That is, under ordinary conditions, the cartridge chamber which is in alignment with the gun barrel and hammer prior to cooking the hammer for firing does not contain the cartridge which will be fired in response to the next action of the hammer. Rather, the chamber which is next in sequence around the cylinder contains the cartridge to be ired in response to the hammer action. v
To eiieotuate the necessary chamber indexing rotation of the cylinder coincidentally with hammer action, the cylinder is appropriately provided with a ratchet element to be intermittently engaged by a ratchet pawl (more commonly referred to as the hand), the pawl conventionally being mounted on the trigger element. The pawl or hand moves with generally slidable movement, with respect to the gun frame, in response to successive actuations of the trigger, each engagement of the hand with the cylinder ratchet being contemporaneous with the `total period of movement of the hammer in cooking and release. The cylinder is further provided with a plurality of peripherally spaced detents, corresponding with the number of cartridge chambers. These detents are successively engaged by a cylinder stop (sometimes referred to as the bolt) to lock the respective chambers in firing position at the iinal stage of each such chamber indexing movement of the cylinder in response to the aforesaid successive actuations of the trigger. Each release of the trigger after firing permits the hand to disengage the cylinder ratchet, and further causes the hand to be repositioned for 3,158,950 Patented Dec. l, 1964 lCe engaging the next lug of the cylinder ratchet upon the next firing of the p istol. In Colt revolvers, this disengagement and repositioning of the hand is conventionally effectuated by the action of a rebound lever which is biased by the pistol mainspring in engagement with the hand. Of course, some conventional pistol types include a simple spning arrangement, rather than a rebound lever, for repositioning the trigger and hand to their normal, preiiring position.
` In most preferred types of conventional revolvers, the firing mechanism includes sear arrangements of the trigger and hammer elements which provide the familiar double action feature of the mechanism which permits the pistol to be fired repeatedly solely in response to successive trigger actuations, thereby eliminating the necessity for manually cooking the hammer element prior to squeezing the trigger for iiring, as is required by alternative single action sear arrangements which are usually also included in the same tiring mechanism for optional use. It should be noted, however, that whether such conventional pistols be fired either by single or double action, the chamber containing the cartridge next to be fired will not be moved fully into alignment with the barrel and hammer during the cooking movement of the hammer, but rather will be moved fully into such position only in response to that small amount of additional movement of the trigger, upon firing the pistol, beyond its position Whereat the trigger and hammer sear elements are about to ride out of engagement in releasing the hammer to lire the cartridge. Of course, in manually cocking the hammer for single action iiring, full cartridge chamber alignment may occur due to seating engagement of the cylinder stop element with a cylinder detent, which tends naturally Ito occur by reason of the close tolerances between these parts. But it may be generally stated that full positioning of the cartridge chamber into its firing position actually is elected upon slight additional rotative movement of the cylinder within that fraction of time which elapses between the moment of release of the hammer and the moment of its impact upon the cartridge to iire the same.
It becomes apparent that there inherently exists in such conventional mechanisms certain conditions whereby exact alignment between an indexed cartridge chamber and the gun barrel might not always be attained by the time the hammer strikes the cartridge Within such chamber in ining the cartridge. It is intended by the present invention to provide means whereby such possibility for misalignment is substantially eliminated.
It is also known that the amount of hammer throw, or its distance of movement in pivoting to iire a cartridge will aiect both the rapidity with which the pistod may b e repeatedly iired and,'more importantly, the tir-ing accuracy attainable. If the hammer can be provided with a very short throw in cooking the same, especially during double action firing of the pistol, firing accuracy and firing rate are improved. Yet, for reasons principally associated with the cartridge indexing mechanism, it has not been possible or practical to substantially shorten the extent of hammer throw in conventional revolver type pistols. Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide cartridge indexing means which makes practical such shortened hammer throw in pistols of the type, the distance of movement of the ham-mer in cooking being reduced to about one-half of that provided in known pistols.
In addition, it becomes apparent that, of itself, the aforementioned problem of fully aligning the indexed cartridge With the barrel contemporaneously with the indexing movement of the cartridge becomes more acute and diicult of solution where the distance of movement of the hammer is signiiicantly reduced by provision of a short throw, as aforesaid. Accordingly, it is anlobject of the invention to provide a repeater type pistol which has a relatively short throw hammer, as compared with conventional pistols of the type, as well as means for fully indexing a cartridge chamber into tiring position contemporaneously with the cycle of movement of the short throw hammer in cooking, and before its release.
Considering the problems attending cartridge and barrel misalignment more specifically, and assuming the barrel and cylinder chambers to be of substantially equal diameters, as is conventional, any misalignment between a cartridge and the barrel of the gun at the instant of ring the cartridge causes the propelled projectile and/ or the cartridge explosion gases) to impinge upon the end portion of the barrel section which lies within the path of projection of the perimeter of the cartridge chamber, in which path the projectile and explosion gases are normally intended to travel. Such impingement on the end of the barrel interferes with proper entry of the projectile and gases into the barrel and often causes shaving or splatter of the projectile within, and out from the spacing between the confronting respective ends of the barrel and cylinder. lt is well known that such splattering presents a hazardous condition to the operator who is exposed to injury by such shavings in light, Moreover, the accuracy of release and travel of the projectile is impaired by i-ts deliection and deformation upon striking the barrel end. Such spurious splattering of particles is further known to be one of the primary causes of jamming of the tiring mechanism. Again, the problem becomes more pronounced in instances where an attempt is made towards shortening the distance of hammer throw in the pistol, as aforesaid.
ln order to minimize the possibilities for occurrence of such cartridge misalignrnent, and even in conventional pistols wherein no provision has been made to shorten the throw of the hammer in cooking and release, it has heretofore been believed necessary that exceedingly close tolerances be maintained in the manufacture of the relevant pistol parts ii full alignment of each successive cartridge with the barrel of the gun is to bc assured at the instant of discharge. Moreover, if further movement of the trigger in eiecting release of the hammer is not to be restrained by the cylinder stop element (which element, upon engaging a cylinder detent, restrains further movement of the cylinder and its attached ratchet and, hence, of the hand which is then in engagement with both the cylinder ratchet and the trigger), it is apparent that any amount of oversize in the parts as might tend to insure that any indexed chamber will be fully aligned with the gun barrel prior to release of the hammer, is prohibited. For example, oversize in the length of the hand, or in the annular distance of protrusion of the lugs of the cylinder ratchet, would prevent the additional movement of the trigger as is necessary to move the trigger sear oil" the hammer scar in permitting the hammer to spring into contact with the cartridge. Thus, manufacturing tolerances as have heretofore been believed permissible in the ratchet, hand, and cylinder stop elements have of necessity always been such as tend to aggravate the conditions for misalignrnent or lack of proper alignment between any given cartridge chamber and the barrel of the gun, rather than such as would tend to compensate for the same. in addition, upon repeated use of the pistol, it is apparent that the engagement surfaces of the ratchet, hand, and cylinder stop elements will sooner or later become worn to an extent requiring their replacement if proper chamber alignment with the barrel is to be assured.
Accordingly, it is further intended by the invention to improve the tiring action mechanism of such conventional rearrns and devices, even of those wherein a conventional distance of hammer throw is incorporated, in a manner providing assured, substantially perfect aiignment between each successive cartridge and the gun barrel during repeated rings of the device, and in a manner whereby the aforesaid close tolerances of manufacture in producing many of the firing action elements will be unnecessary, and whereby the consequences in these respects of wear between the relevant parts will be negligible. As a result, it is expected that the cost of manufacturing such irearms and devices, as well as the frequency of replacement of worn elements, will be reduced. Thus, as will be later more fully understood, it is also inten-led by the invention to provide means which will automatically compensate for wear of the ratchet, hand and similarly pertinent parts, and for certain inaccuracies in the size of such parts as might occur during initial manufacture or by misfit upon replacement of only one of the same.
Still further objects of the invention are the elimination of the aforesaid safety hazards to the operator, and of the aforesaid causes or" jamming of the firing mechanism as are attributable to splatter of the projectile and explosion gases, and to improve the tiring accuracy of rearms.
Another object of the invention is to provide a trigger for attachment in a conventional revolver type firearm or device, such as that of the Colt model revolver, whereby only the trigger element of such conventional device need be replaced by a trigger made in accordance with the invention to achieve many of the aforesaid objects, and whereby easy and inexpensive conversion of such a conventional pistol or device may be effected. Such trigger made in accordance with the invention will impro-ve the operation of the chamber indexing mechanism of the tirearm to assure full alignrnent between any cartridge chamber and the barrel of the firearm at, or before the time of release of the hammer element to tire a cartridge within ysuch chamber.
in addition, it is another object of the invention to insure tighter positioning of each successive cartridge receiving chamber in alignment with the barrel by improving the cylinder locking mechanism to compensate for any slack as may normally exist between the several elements or" the chamber indexing mechanism at the time the cartridge is iired. It is intended that such will be accomplished by providing means whereby constant chamber indexing pressure is maintained on the cylinder at the time of tiring the pistol.
Brietiy and generally describing the invention in its preferred embodiment, it should first be noted that the conventional hand, or ratchet pawl is normally pivotally mounted on the trigger element of, for example, a Colt model revolver. For this purpose, a laterally protruding. axle, yat the end of the hand which is opposite its ratchetengaging free end, normally only pivotally engages a simple bearing aperture in the trigger element. By contrast, it is proposed by the present invention to provide means whereby the hand, during normal chamber indexing operation, will be moved with generally rectilinear movement, rather than only pivotal movement, relative to the trigger element. Thus, it is intended that the movement of the hand in indexing the cartridge cylinder will be accelerating with respect to the movement of the trigger during the tiring action, rather than moving with simple responsive movement with respect to the trigger.
In its preferred embodiment, the bearing aperture of the trigger element wherein the hand axle normally resides is elongated, in the `direction of the normal movement of the hand upwardly towards the cylinder ratchet, so that the hand axle will be displaceable within the trigger slot provided by such elongation to permit the hand to slide, with rectilinear movement relative to the triggerclement, in the direction of cylinder rotation during the trigger movement.
slot, engages the hand axle to urge the same in the referred to direction of its movement within the aperture. lt will be noted that the normal limited pivotal movement A spring, preferably attached to the. trigger element land residing within the aforesaid elongatedl of the hand` with respect to the trigger, which occur-s during trigger movement to facilitate the chamber indexing -action of the hand, is not interfered with. Now, conventionally, for example in the Colt revolver, a spring biased rebound lever rides on the hand axle, slidably engaging the same at a location between the confronting respective side surfaces of the hand and trigger element, in manner such that it normally urges the hand away from engagement with the cylinder ratchet. Thus, the rebound lever would normally prevent the aforesaid desired rectilinear movement of the hand as it is intended to` take place during its chamber indexing movement in response to actuation of the trigger because the pressure of the rebound lever on the hand lwould compress the aforesaid. spring within the elongated trigger slot. Accordingly, and torperrnit the hand to respond to the bia-s of this trigger spring at la desired time, but :also to permit the normal hand and trigger repositioning action of the rebound lever -at the end of the firing actuation cycle, means are provided to relieve the action of the rebound lever on the hand only during the chamber indexing movement of the hand. These means are preferably in the form of a trigger portion which projects at a location such that, upon firing :actuation movement of the trigger, the
projecting portion will engagethe rebound lever to lift the same andV relieve the normal pressure of the latter on the hand during lan appropriate period in the cycle of trigger movement. Of course, the trigger spring, which may be of `a coil, leaf or other type, normally exerts a bia-s on the hand axle which is less than that exerted on the hand by the rebound lever.
The rectilinear movement between the hand and trigger elements, as is provided by the invention, may be utilized to provide a shortened throw hammer action, as aforesaid. This short throw hammer feature is provided by a modified form of the invention in which the rebound lever, or an associated pivotal follower element, positively engages the hand to impart the rectilinear movement thereto during at least a porti-on of the cycle of movement of the trigger, the aforementioned projecting portion of the trigger urgingthe rebound lever and the .follower element if provided) in such engagement. In effect, such mechanism simulates the positive engagement between the trigger and hand as found in conventional tiring action mechanisms of the type, yet causes the pivotally mounted rebound lever to promote the desired accelerated rate at which the hand is intended to move upwardly in engagement with the cylinder to move the cylinder through a cartridge indexing cycle. Of course, in this connection the term rebound lever has been usedl to connote the conventional lever as well as pivotal movement between the hand and trigger element. In the preferred short throw hammer embodiment, it has been found desirable to elongate the aforementioned conventional bearing aperture of the trigger in `direction 'both :above and below the conventional central axis of the aperture, as will later be more fully understood. By adjusting the sizes or relationships of the various sear elements between the trigger and hammer elements in the mechanism, it will be found that the cartridge containing cylinder can be more rapidly indexed during trigger actuation, :and that the distance of movement, or throw of the hammer in cooking and release canbe significantly reduced substantially to the very minimum throw which is required for sharply striking the cartridgeffor firing. In adidtion, the same positive action of the hand on the cylinder ratchet by the aforementioned trigger spring element may be incorporated to final-ly urge the cartridge chamber int-o precise alignment, and to maintain constant bias .pres-sure on the cylinder during the period of release lof the hammer so to insure that the precise alignment as is obtainable between the indexed cartridge chamber and the gun barrel is maintained at the instant the cartridge is fired. Where the trigger spring is so incorporated, the end of the trigger projecting portion, which engages and thereby lifts the rebound lever to permit the action of the trigger spring as aforesaid, may be so contoured, in relation to the rebound lever surface on which it rides, as to halt the upward movement of the rebound lever at an appropriate time. in the cycle of movement of the elements to insure that only the trigger spring inliuences the upward pressure of the hand on the cylinder ratchet at the final stage of the indexing.
The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention willl become apparent from the following detailed desoription thereof in which reference is made to the accompanying drawings.
In the drawings:
FIGURE l is a fragmentary side elevation of a pistol embodying one form of the invention as the pistol would appear prior to actuating its trigger for firing, the pistol being shown with its handle grip plates removed and with certain other portions partially cut away for a better understanding of the tiring action mechanism;
FIGURE lA is an enlarged side elevation of a trigger made in accordance with the invention, and which is incorporated in the FIGURE 1 showing, a portion of the trigger being shown in cross-section to illustrate cer-tain details;
FIGURE 2 is a sectional View of the pistol of FIGURE l, the section taken at line 22 of that figure;
FIGURE 3 is a sectional view similar to that of FIG- URE 2, bu-t showing the position of the parts upon actuating the trigger to its position immediately prior to release of the hammer element for firing the pistol;
FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary side elevation of a modified form of trigger made in accordance with the invention;
FIGURE 5 is a similar fragmentary side elevation of still another modified form of trigger made in accordance with the invention;
FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation of the firing action mechanism of the pistol of FIGURE l to show the features of the mechanism in greater detail;
FIGURE 7 is a similar view of the firing action mechanism shown in FIGURE 6, but as it would appear upon actuating the trigger to its position immediately prior to release of the hammer element for firing the pistol;
FIGURE 8 is a similarly enlarged but fragmentary side elevation of the firing action mechanism of the pistol of FIGURE l, as seen from the reverse side thereof, the parts being positioned as shown in FIGURE 6;-
FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary side elevation of only the vhand and a portion of the rebound lever element as seen in FIGURE 8, to show these elements in greater detail; FIGURE 9A is an end elevation of the FIGURE 9 showing;
FIGURE l0 is a fragmentary side elevation of a modied form of firing action mechanism in accordance with the invention, as `it would appear prior to actuating the trigger for firing a pistol `in which it is incorporated;
FIGURE ll is a similar view of the firing action mechanism of FIGURE l0 as it would appear upon actuating the trigger to its position immediately prior to release of the hammer element for firing the pistol;
FIGURE l2 is a fragmentary side elevation of only the hand and a portion of the rebound lever element as viewed from the reverse sides thereof as shown in FIG- URE l0 to show these elements in greater detail; FIG- 7 URE 12A is an end elevation of the FIGURE 12 showing;
FIGURE 13 is a fragmentary side elevation of still another modified form of firing action mechanism in accordance with the invention as it would appear prior to actuating the trigger for firing a pistol in which it is incorporated;
FIGURE 14 is a View of the firing action mechanism of FIGURE 13 as it would appear upon actuating the trigger to its position immediately prior to release of the hammer for tiring the pistol; and
FIGURE 15 is a fragmentary View of a firing action mechanism in accordance with the invention which incorporates still another modified form of ycertain elements thereof.
Referring first to FIGURE 1, the invention is shown as embodied in a revolver type pistol 2f?, such as a Colt revolver, which has a frame, generally indicated by reference numeral Z1, to which is attached a barrel element 22 and a pivotable cylinder crane 23. A cartridge chamber cylinder 24 is rotatably mounted `on a spindle of the crane 23 in conventional manner. Referring briefly to FIG- URE 2, it will be understood that the cylinder 24 has a plurality of annularly spaced and axially aligned cartridge receiving chambers 25 formed within the cylinder for receiving a corresponding plurality of cartridges (not shown), each of which may be brought into alignment with the barrel 22 of the gun by rotation of the cylinder, as is well known.
The pistol 2d has a tiring action mechanism, generally indicated by reference numeral 26 (FIGURE 6), for firing in sequence the cartridges contained in cartridge receiving chambers 25. The firing action mechanism includes a trigger 27 which is pivotally mounted to the frame 21 by a trigger pin 2S, a hammer 29 which is pivotally mounted to the frame 2l by a hammer pin Sti, a -rebound lever 31 which is pivotally mounted at one of its ends 31a to frame 21 by a pin 32., a pistol mainspring 33, and a ratchet pawl or hand 3d for rotating the cylinder 24 substantially contemporaneously with trigger actuation to index one of the cartridge receiving chambers 25a (see FIGURES 2 and 3) into firing alignment with the barrel Z2. ,ln rotating the cylinder 24, lthe hand 34 engages a ratchet element 35 which is attached to the cylinder.
A hammer stirrup 36 is pivotally mounted on the hammer 2i# by hammer stirrup pin 37, and it will be understood that the free end of one of the leaf portions 33a of mainspring 33 is in bias pressure engagement with the end 36a of the hammer stirrup in manner urging hammer 29 toward its released position as shown in FIGURE 6. The other leaf portion 33h of mainspring 33 is in bias pressure engagement with rebound lever 31 in a manner normally urging the hand 34 and trigger 27 into their initial, pre-firing positions as also shown in FIGURE 6. The two leaf portions 33a and 3311 merge at the mainspring end 33e which is received in a recess 38 of the frame 21, as shown.
In the embodiment of FIGURES 1, 6 and 7, the free end 31h of the pivctable rebound lever 31 is tapered in the illustrated conventional manner and, in the pre-firing position of the firing action mechanism 26, engages a protruding axle housing portion 34a of hand 34 (see FIG- URES 9 and 9A) in which a hand axle 39 is received in fixed relation. The laterally protruding hand axle 39 is received within a trigger slot 4@ for both pivotal and rectilinear movement with respect to the trigger 27. The pivotal portion of the movement is that which is conventional in pistols of the type during chamber indexing movement of the hand 34 towards the cylinder Z4. I-lowever, in the embodiment presently being described, the rectilinear portion of the hand movement with respect to the trigger is slidable in nature, and is best understood upon a consideration of the construction of trigger 27 which is incorporated in such embodiment, as will now be explained.
Referring to FIGURE 1A, the trigger Z7 may be considered as having a main body portion 27a, a trigger sear portion 41, and a projecting portion 42, the latter for engagement with rebound lever 31 as will presently be described. In the embodiment shown, the projecting portion 42 is in the form of a lug which is attached, as by welding or brazing, to the side of the body portion 27a so that it protrudes laterally therefrom (see FIGURES 2 and 3) into the plane of pivotal movement of rebound lever 31 which is conventionally adjacent such side of the trigger. The lug is more fully shown in side elevation in FIGURE l, it being shown partly cut away in FIGURE 1A.
As previously mentioned, the trigger 27 is provided with a trigger slot 4@ which serves as a guide track for guiding the hand axle 39, which is therein received as a follower, for slidable displacement movement with respect to trigger 27. The hand axle 39 is indicated by dotted lines in FIGURE 1A, and it should here be noted that in this embodiment of the invention the slot 40 need only be of slightly elongated configuration to provide only a modicum of displaceable movement of the hand 34 with respect to the trigger 27 during actuation of the mechanism. The direction of elongation of the slot 40 is generally in the direction of the conventional movement of the hand 34, during trigger actuation, towards cylinder 24 for the purpose of engaging ratchet 35 to index a cartridge receiving chamber 25 into alignment with barrel 22. Thus, in this embodiment of the invention, the lower end lila of slot 4@ (the end which is opposite that towards the aforementioned direction of movement of hand 34) may be considered as substantially coinciding with the simple bearing type aperture (not shown) which is provided in a conventional trigger of the type for receiving the hand axle 39, the distance of the slot 4) from the trigger pin aperture 28a also being the same as in such a conventional trigger.
To promote the slidable displacement movement of the hand axle 39 Within the trigger slot 40 during actuation of the mechanism, the trigger embodiment shown in FIG. 1A includes a spring receiving orifice 43 formed within body portion 27a in communication with the lower end 40a of the slot and having a coil type spring 44 disposed therewithin. The spring 44 is biased towards the aforementioned direction of movement of the hand, the spring 44 being retained Within orifice 43, as by a set screw 45 in threaded engagement with orifice internal threads 43a which are formed at the open end of the orifice adjacent an edge of trigger body portion 27a. A button head 46 or the like may be provided at that end of the spring 44 which projects into the slot tti for bias engagement with hand axle 39. Thus, the bias of spring 44 on hand axle 39 will normally urge the latter against the upper end of the slot 4t), as shown.
Modified forms of trigger 27 are illustrated in FIG- URES 4 and 5, and it will be understood that either of these might be used in the firing action mechanism presently being described, as an alternative to the trigger form shown by FIGURE 1A. Each of these alternative trigger forms may also be considered as having a body portion 27u, a trigger sear 41, a trigger pin aperture 23a, a projecting portion 42, and a trigger slot 4t), all of which are arranged and constructed in accordance with the FIG- URE 1A showing. Of course, it will be observed that the reverse side of the trigger 27 is shown in FIGURES 4 and 5, as compared with the side thereof which is shown in FIGURE 1A, such being for clarity of description.
The trigger form of FIGURE 4 is somewhat similar to that shown in FIGURE 1A in that the body portion 27a is also provided with a spring receiving orifice 43 in communication with the lower end 46a of the slot 40 and having an open end at an edge of the body portion 27a. Moreover, a coil spring 44 is retained within the orifice 43, as by a set screw 45, the spring being biased towards the slot 4d. However, rather than being disposed substantially in alignment, more or less, with the direction 9 of elongation of slot 4l) as in the FIGURE lA modification, the spring receiving oriiice 43 is disposed at a significantly greater angle of inclination with respect to the direction of slot elongation, and the spring v44 has a charnfered type button head 47 attached at the end thereof which isbiased towards the slot 40. As` indicated in FIGURE 4, the chamfered type button head 47 will be urged by the bias of spring 44 into engagement with the underside of hand axle 39 (indicated by dotted lines) to press it upwardly against the upper end of the slot 40 as in the previously described embodiment, the chamfered portion creating a force component in such direction of displaceable movement of the hand axle 39, as is well understood. By terminating the orice 43, at its slot communicating end, just short of the adjacent extreme outer edge of the trigger body portion 27a, a stop 4S for the button head 47 is provided to prevent its emerging from the trigger body portion responsive to the bias of spring 44.
Of course, it will be understood that the' spring receiving orice 43 of either the FIGURE 1A or FIGURE 4 trigger embodiments may have either round, or square, or other cross-sectional configuration.
The trigger form of FIGURE includes a spring receiving channel 49 which communicates with the lower end 40a of slot 40 and which is disposed substantially at right angles to the direction of elongation of the slot 40, as shown. The channel 49 is in depth about half the thickness of the trigger body portion 27a. A leaf spring 50 resides within channel 49 and extends into the slot 40 at its lower end 40a, the bias of the spring normally urging it towards the upper edge 49a of the channel 49 and thus into bias pressure engagement with the underside of the hand axle A39 (indicated by dotted lines) for the aforementioned purpose. The channel upper edge 49a has angular relation with respect to the channel lower edge 4917, as shown, to provide a sector area for arcuate movement of the leaf spring 50 about its xed end 50a whereat it is attached to trigger body portion 27a. As indicated, the spring end 50a may have enlarged conliguration to be received in press fitted relation within an appropriate recess 51 of channel 49.
Continuing with the description of the firing action mechanism 26, its generali arrangement is similar to that Vof conventional mechanisms in pistols of the type as regards the interacting relationships between the trigger 27 andV hammer 29, and it will be understood that upon pivoting of the trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A (FIGURE 7 or of the hammer 29 in the direction of arrow B (FIGURE 7), and depending upon whether the hammer is manually cocked for single action tiring or is cocked coincidentally with trigger actuation for double action tiring of the pistol, the trigger ysear 41 will engage either the single action hammer sear 52 or the double action hammer sear 53. The double action hammer sear 53 is formed by a surface of a hammer sear strut 54 which is pivotally mounted on hammer 29 as by a strut pin 55. The sear strut 54 has a stop 56 which engages a coacting stop 57 of hammer 29 in response to the bias of a strut spring 5S, as shown.
As more clearly indicated by FIGURES 6, 7 and 8, the
Vtiring action mechanism arrangement conventionally includes a cylinder stop element, or bolt 59, which is pivotally mounted for rocking type movement on a bolt pin 60 attached to frame 21. The bolt S9'1has an end 61 which is adapted to sequentially engage and disengage each Vof the peripherally spaced cylinder detents 62 within the cycle of each chamber indexing rotative movement of the cylinder 24. Bolt 59 has an opposite end 63 adapted to engage a laterally projecting lug 64 of rebound lever 34. As previously mentioned, the rebound lever 3i is Vbiased into engagement at its free end 31h with the hand 34 (through its housing portion 34a) by the urging of mainspring 33. As will later be more fully understood, pivotal movement of trigger 27 in the direction of arrow -A (FIGURE 7) moves its attached projecting portion 42 l@ into pressure engagement with the underside of the rebound lever 31, whereupon the trigger movement lifts the rebound lever 31 by causing it to pivot in the direction of arrow C (FIGURE 7). Referring to FIGURE 6, it will be understood that during such pivotal movement of the rebound lever 31, the end 63 of bolt S9 will also be urged upwardly by engagement of the laterally projecting rebound lever lug 64. The bol-t 59 is thereupon pivoted about the axis of its bolt pin 60 so that its end 61 moves downwardly out of engagement with one of the cylinder detents 62, into which-the end 61 has previously been biased by the urging of the bolt spring 65. Upon further movement of the rebound lever in the direction of arrow C in response to continued tiring actuation movement of trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A, the bolt end 63 rides off the rebound lever lug 64, thereby permitting the bolt 59 to pivot in opposite direction, responsive to the urging of the bolt spring 65, so that its end 51 may thereupon be biased irst into contact with cylinder 24 at a location between two adjacently spaced cylinder detents 62, but in any event into seating engagement within the cylinder detent 62 which is next in sequence around the cylinder upon the chamber indexing movement of the cylinder 24 having been completed. Such engagement of the bolt end o1 within any cylinder detent 62 will limit the rotativev movement of the cylinder 24 in indexing one of its cartridge receiving chambers 25 into alignment with barrel 22 of the pistol, as is understood by those having skill in the art. As is also well understood, upon the trigger and hammer sear elements riding apart in response to the aforementioned additional movement of trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A (FIGURE 7) to tire the pistol, and upon the trigger 27 being released by the nger, the urging of mainspring 33 will cause the rebound lever 31 to pivot in direction `opposite to that shown by arrow C, whereupon the rebound lever lug d4 will drop past the bolt end 63 to position the lug 64 therebelow Afor initiating another cycle of rocking movement of bolt 59 in response to a subsequent tiring actuation of the trigger. For this purpose, the bolt 59 is made of thin stock towards its end 63 so that, due to the respective confronting configurations of bolt end 63 and the side edge of the rebound lever lug 54, the bolt end 63 will resiliently deform in lateral direction, with respect to its plane of pivotal movement, to permit such repositioning of the rebound lever lug 64 wit-h respect to the bolt end 63 at the end of the tiring actuation cycle.
Referring to FlGURES 2, 3, 6 and 7, it -is seen that during firing actuation movement of trigger 27 the hand 34 moves slidably with respect to the pistol frame 21 in direction towards the cylinder ratchet 35 for the purpose of appropriately engaging the ratchet to cause cartridge indexing rotation of cylinder 24 contemporaneously with the movement of the trigger. The hand 34 has a free end 34h and a notched shoulder 34C, and is in laterally offset relation with respect to the axis of rotation of cylinder 24. Upon pivotal `movement of trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A (FIGURE 7), the hand sequentially engages iirst the ratchet lug 35a by its free end 341:', and thence the ratchet lug 35b -by its notched shoulder 34C, to cause rotation of the cylinder fully to the extent necessary for indexing one of the cartridge receiving chambers 25a into tiring alignment with the barrel 22 in well known manner. During such slidable movement the hand 34 rides between, and is guided Vby the ixed guide element 66, which is attached to the frame 21, and the xed guide element 67, which is formed by an interior surface of a removable side plate 68 of the frame. The side plate 68 is attached to the frame 21 by side plate screws 69 and 70 (FGURE l) and encloses and conceals the major portions Vof the tiring action mechanism 2d within the frame 21, its removal permitting access to the firing action mechanism. As previously mentioned, after hammer 29 has been released to iire a cartridge, and Aupon release of the trigger by the linger, the mainspring biased rebound lever 31 also returns the hand 34, as well as trigger 27, to normal, pre-tiring position thereby completing the chamber indexing cycle.
Thus, it will be understood that chamber indexing action, to bring a cartridge receiving chamber 25a from its annularly displaced location (FIGURE 2) to its position of alignment (FIGURE 3) with respect to the barrel of the pistol for the firing of a cartridge therein contained, accompanies the tiring actuation movements of the trigger 27 and hammer Z9 to re such cartridge as will now be more fully explained.
A double action movement of the firing action mechanism 26 is illustrated by comparison of FIGURES 6 and 7. FIGURE 6 shows the mechanism as its parts will appear both prior to their actuation for tiring a cartridge (not shown) within cartridge receiving chamber 25a and immediately after completion of the tiring actuation cycle. FIGURE 7 shows an intermediate disposition of the parts during their movement, the hammer 29 being now in its fully cocked position and immediately prior to its release to move under the urging of mainspring 33 into firing contact with the cartridge within chamber 25a. The position of the hammer 29 when in such tiring contact with the cartridge is referred to herein as the released position of the hammer 29. The pistol is grasped by the handle portion in conventional manner with the forenger applied to trigger 2'7. Squeezing of the trigger causes its pivotal movement, about trigger pin Z8, in the direction of arrow A in FIGURE 7. The trigger movement brings the trigger sear 41 into pressure engagement with the double action hammer sear 53 as aforementioned, and also brings the laterally protruding and outwardly projecting portion 42 of the trigger into pressure engagement with the underside of rebound lever 31 yat its free end 31h. Further pivotal movement of the trigger lifts the sear stmt 54 and hence, by the interaction of the strut and hammer stops S6, 57, causes the hammer 29 to pivot in the direction of arrow B (FIGURE 7) towards its double action fully cocked position, and further causes the trigger projecting portion 42 to lift and pivot the rebound lever 31 in the direction of arrow C (FIG- URE 7) out of its pressure engagement with the hand housing portion 34a (note FIGURE 9) as was its initial, preliring condition. Such lifting of the rebound lever 31 out of pressure engagement with hand 34 permits the slidable displacement movement of hand axle 39, within trigger slot 40 and with respect to trigger 27, in response to the bias of the trigger spring 4d. Thus, the spring 44 urges the hand 34 upwardly towards cylinder 24 by litting the hand axle 39 within slot 4t), pressing the axle towards the top end of the slot. It becomes apparent that this action of the trigger spring 44 causes an accelerating of the otherwise normal, upward slidable movement of the hand 34 with respect to pistol frame 21 and towards cylinder 2d as would occur by reason of the simple connection of its axle 39 to trigger 27 in the absence of such spring 44. The upward, slidable movement of hand 3d with respect to frame 21 is guided by xed guide elements 66 and 57 and, by reason of the action of the angulated guide element 6'7 on the hand edge which faces laway from cylinder 2li, it will be understood that the hand 34 will also pivot with respect to trigger Z7 about the axis of hand axle 39 during its course of slidable movement towards cylinder 24. As previously mentioned, during the continued pivotal movement of trigger 27 the hand 3d will cause rotative movement lof the cylinder Z4- and thereby cause indexing of the cartridge a from its position as shown in FIGURE 2 to its position fully in alignment with barrel 22 as shown in FIGURE 3 by the time the hammer 29 has been rotated to its double action fully cocked position as shown in FIGURE 7.
Also, as previously mentioned, after the trigger 27 has attained its location :as shown in FIGURE 7 its continued pivotal movement in the direction of arrow A will cause the trigger sear 41 to disengage the double action hammer sear S3, thereby releasing the hammer 29 to swing towards its released position of FIGURE 6. However, it will be noted that the trigger lug, or projecting portion 42 is still in engagement with rebound lever 31, thereby permitting the hand 34 to remain under the bias influence of trigger spring 44. Thus, upon the release of the hammer Z9, and until the pistol has been fired, substantially constant pressure of the hand 34 on the cylinder 24 and, in turn, constant pressure of the cylinder 24 against the cylinder stop or bolt 59, is maintained, thereby assuring continued substantially perfect alignment of the cartridge receiving chamber 25a with barrel 22 at the moment its contained cartridge (not shown) is tired.
Upon release of the foreinger from the trigger 27 after the pistol has been tired, the upward pressure of trigger projecting portion 4Z on rebound lever 31 is relieved, thereby permitting the rebound lever to pivot downwardly, in direction opposite to arrow C, responsive to the bias of mainspring 33. Initially, this bias responsive movement of the rebound lever causes the trigger 27 to begin its return pivotal movement, towards its FIGURE 6 position, by reason of the engagement of rebound lever end 3lb with trigger projecting portion 42. At about the same time, the hand 34 may begin to move downwardly upon the top end of the trigger slot iti coming into engagement with hand axle 39. In any event, as the rebound lever continues to move downwardly, it will again engage the hand housing 34a to continue the return movement of both the hand 34 and trigger 27, the hand axle 39 being contemporantously urged downwardly within the trigger slot itl until it is in contact with the bottom end 40a thereof, the bias pressure of mainspring 33 overcoming the opposed bias pressure of the trigger spring 44. Of course, during the return pivotal movement of the trigger 27, trigger sear 41 will engage and pivot the hammer sear strut 54 against the bias of its spring 58, so that all of the parts of the ring action mechanism 26 will return to their positions as shown in FIGURE 6.
While a single action ring of the pistol 20 is not specifically illustrated, the action of the mechanism 26 is similar. It is well known that such action is initiated by manually pivoting the hammer 29 in the direction of arrow B (FIGURE 7) from its released position, as shown in FIGURE 6, to its single action fully cocked position (not shown) whereat the trigger sear 41 is in engagement with a notched portion 71 (FIGURE 6) of the single action hammer scar 52. During such single action cocking movement of the hammer the single action hammer sear S2 will be in engagement with the underside 41a of trigger sear 41, thereby lifting and causing pivotal movement of the trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A (FIGURE 7). The trigger projecting portion 42 promptly engages and lifts the rebound lever 31, whereupon the hand 34 is free to move upwardly a distance approximately equal to the length of trigger slot 40 in response to the urging of trigger spring 44, the hand being inhibited in this movement only by its contact with ratchet 35 in the event there is abnormal resistance to cylinder rotative movement (as will be explained) or by any momentarily continued contact of its housing portion 34a with the end 3111 of the rebound lever as also may occur due to the bias action of trigger spring 44. Continued cocking movement of hammer 29 continues the upward movement of the hand 34 in, or into chamber indexing engagement with the ratchet 35 of cylinder 2d, such being accompanied by continued pivotal movement of trigger Z7 which is, of course, of a following nature. Thus, cartridge chamber indexing is completed by the time the hammer has arrived in its single `action fully cocked position (not shown), the cylinder 24 then being maintained under constant pressure in the direction of its indexing rotation and against the bolt 59 by the continued pressure engagement of hand 34 responsive to the 13 urging of spring 44. As is wellunderstood, the parts will remainfin such cocked position until trigger 27 is squeezed to re the pistol. Squeezing of the trigger pivots the same a slight additional amount in the direction of arrow A, whereupon the trigger Sear 41 rides out of engagement with the notched portion 71 of the single action hammer sea'r 52, thereby permitting release of the hammer 29 to move sharply under the urging of mainspring 33 to its released, cartridge-red position, as shown in FIGURE 6, whereat the hammer ring pin 72 would be in ring contact with a cartridge within a cartridge receiving chamber 25a. Finger release of the trigger then permits the return action of the rebound lever in the same manner as previously described in connection with a double action tiring of the pistol, and all of the parts of the mechanism are thus repositioned as shown in FIGURE 6.
Whether the mechanism is operated single action or double action, it should be noted that if abnormal resistance to rotative movement of cylinder 24 is encountered, as by a cartridge being oversize in length or not being fully seated within chamber 25a such as would cause its head to bind within the cylinder headspace by friction'al contact with the headspace end of frame 21, such resistance may prevent prompt upward displaceable movement of hand axle 39 Within trigger slot 40 Vin response tothe bias of spring 44. .If such resistance is encountered, the hand axle 39 will be in contact with the lower end 40a of the trigger slot so that the movement of the trigger 27 will positively urge the hand upwardly in a manner overcoming such resistance. This positive action, of course, momentarily approximates such similar positive action in conventional mechanisms. Thus, in all of the embodiments and generally speaking, it will be noted that the bias of the trigger spring, such as springs 44 (FIGURES 1A and 4) and spring 50 (FIG- URE need only be such as will overcome the inertia resistance of cylinder 24 to its rotative movement, considering that all, or only some of its cartridge receiving chambers may be lled with cartridges.
The invention as it incorporates a short throw hammer in the tiring action mechanism will now be described.
The extent of hammer throw is determined by the relative lengths of the hammer and trigger sear elements in any given mechanism. That is, in any given pistol where the respective relative sizes and the locations of pivotal mounting of the hammer and trigger elements are fixed, the length of the trigger sear 41 will determine the arcuate distance of movement of hammer 29 during which the sear 41 will be in engagement with hammer sear 53. Thus, the hammer 29 will pivot to a greater or less extent prior to the time the scar elements lride apart to permit release of the hammer. Similar results can be obtained in a variety of other ways as is well known such as by extending or shortening the length of the hammer sear strut 54, or by altering the lengths or other relationships of both the trigger sear 41 and the hammer sear strut 54. In general, the same may be said in respect of the coacting sear elements which pro- Vide single action movement of the mechanism. However, as previously noted, a diiiiculty attending any attempt to modify the mechanism to incorporate such a shortened throw hammer involves the elements which are intended to promote full cartridge chamber indexing coincident with the action of the mechanism. The
'present invention overcomes these difficulties as, for extrigger 74, hammer 75, and rebound lever 76 are pivotable, respectively, about the trigger pin 2S, hammer pin 30, and pin 32 of the pistol frame 21, and the mainspring end '77c is received in recess 38 of frame 21, as in the other embodiments. Similarly,- the hammer 75 includes afstirrup 36 which is pivotable about hammer stirrup pin 37 and which has an end 36a engaging the mainspring leaf portion 77a sothat the mainspring77 urges the hammer towards its released position as shown in FIGURE 10. The other mainspring leaf portion 77b engages rebound lever 76, urging itdownwardly in the manner previously discussed. However, it may be necessary that leaf portion 77b have relatively short length as indicated in FIGURES 10 and 1l. Bolt 59 operates in the same manner as described in connection with the other embodiments, the bolt 59 having an end 61 forsequentially engaging the peripherally spaced detents 62 of the rotatable cylinder 24, and an opposite end 63 for engaging the rebound lever lug 64. The cylinder 24 has a cylinder ratchet 35 which has ratchet lugs, indicated at 35a and 35h, to be respectively engaged by the free end 78b and the notched shoulder 78o of the handy 7S during chamber indexing movement of the hand in rotating cylinder 24 to bring a cartridge receiving chamber into alignment with the barrel and hammer ring pin 72 of the pistol as previously described. In this movement of the hand 7S, it rides between and is guided' by the iixed guide element 66, which is attached to frame 21, and the -xed guide element 67, which is attached to the removable side plate 68 of the trame, as in the other embodiments.
The trigger 74 may be considered as having a main Vbody por-tion 74a, la trigger sear portion 79, and a projecting portion 80, 'die latter for engaging and relieving the downward, mainspring bias pressure engagement of the rebound lever 76 on hand 78 as will presently be described. The trigger 74'` also has an elongated slot 81 which is similarly disposed but has considerably greater length than the trigger slot 40 of the previously described embodiments, thereby providing a considerably greater distance `of slidable displacement movement of the hand '78 with respect to trigger 74 during operation of the mechanism 7.3. In this connection, it should be noted that the slot 81 may be elongated in direction both above Iand below the contines .of the conventional trigger aperture, previously mentioned but not shown, for receiving the'laterally protruding axle of a hand element. This will depend upon the Iinal relationships of the parts, including consideration of whether a hand element that is slightly longer than normal for the mechanism is used, as may in some cases be desirable in a short throw hammer mechanism. While a trigger spring 82 is diagramatically shown in FIGURE 1l as being associated with the trigger slot 81 (it being understood that the spring 82 may be arranged or constructedv in accordance with the FIGURES 1A, 4 and 5 embodiments), it will later be shown that it is not essential to include such a Vtrigger spring 82 in order to obtain full chamber indexing within a short throw hammer mechanism, unless certain additional beneiits fas are provided by spring 82 are desired. The essential elements providingfull chamber indexing in a short throw hammer mechanism are means, such as slot l, permitting greatly accelerated movement of a hand element with respect to the. trigger element, and means, such as trigger projecting portion 80, urging the rebound lever 76 upwardly against the bias of mainspring 77.
The hammer 75 has a sear strut 83 pivotable on a strut pin 84 and which is biased by a strut spring 85, as previously described, so that the strut stop 86 engages a coacting stop 87 of vthe. hammer 75. vThe strut 83 provides a double action hammer sear -88 which functions in association with trigger sear 79 in basically the same manner as the other embodiments. However, the hammer sear strut 83 is shown in FIGURES V10 and 11 as having considerably shorter length than -the conventional alsace@ sear strut 54 of the embodiment shown in FIGURES 6 and 7, for example, this for the purpose of reorienting the relative positions of the hammer and trigger sear elements such as will permit these elements to ride apart after the hammer has pivoted only 1a comparatively short distance along its arcuate path of movement toward its cocked position. Thus, as indicated in FIGURE 1l by the solid lines, a new fully cocked position of the hammer is effected, as compared with the conventional fully cocked position thereof as indicated by dotted lines CFC (conventional fully cocked). The released position of the hammer '75, indicated by solid lines in FIG- URE and by dotted lines R in FIGURE l1, is of course the same as that shown in FIGURE 6. Of course, it will be understood that the length of trigger sear 79 might be shortened, or the lengths of both the trigger sear 79 and the hammer sear strut 83 might be adjusted relative to each other, for the purpose of shortening the throw of the hammer 75, and that the relationship between trigger sear 79 and the hammer single action sear 89 should be similarly altered to provide for shortened hammer throw when firing the pistol single action. The single action sear 89 has been eliminated in FIGURE l1 for clarity. A hammer stop 9h prevents hammer 75 from pivoting beyond its fully cocked position, and it will be understood that stop 9u is attached to frame 2l as in conventional mechanisms.
Referring briefly to FIGURES 12 and 12A, which are views similar to FIGURES 9 and 9A, it is seen that the hand 78 has an axle housing portion 78a which is engaged by the rebound lever 76 in the same manner and for the same purpose as was the axle housing portion 34a by the rebound lever 31 of the earlier described embodiment. Similarly, a hand axle 91 is attached in the axle housing portion 78a, projecting laterally therefrom for engaging the trigger slot 81 as indicated in FIGURES 10 and ll. However, note that the hand 78 has a shoulder 92, at the upper end of the recess wherein the rebound lever resides, which is angulated upwardly in the direction toward cylinder 24, as more clearly indicated in FIG- URES l() and 1l. The disposition of shoulder 92 is such that the upper edge '76e of the rebound lever can be in engagement with it during the pivotal, upward movement of the rebound lever in response to the urging of trigger projecting portion S0 for purposes as will be described.
In view of the possible or intended engagement of the hand shoulder 92 by the rebound lever edge 76C during at least a por-tion of, or substantially the entire period (as will hereinafter be explained) of chamber indexing movement of the hand 78, and considering the limited pivotal movement of hand 78 as it slides upwardly with respect to frame Z1 between xed guides 66 and 67, and further considering the pivotal movement of the rebound lever, the extreme end of the rebound lever upper edge 76C is preferably relieved, or rounded downwardly, fas shown, generally in accordance with the locus of points of contact between the rebound lever edge and shoulder 92 during the movement. Of course, the angle of inclination of shoulder 92 is appropriately selected also to permit such contact engagement. However, it will be understood that other similarly conforming configurations of the rebound lever upper edge 76C and the hand shoulder 92 may be provided for the purpose.
Turning now to a description of the double action movement of iring action mechanism 73 as illustrated in FIGURES l0 and ll, the parts are initially at rest in their pre-tiring positions as shown in FIGURE l0. In this view, the hammer 75 is shown in its released position, whereat its firing pin 72 would be in firing contact with a cartridge (not shown) within that cartridge receiving chamber (not shown) which is then in alignment between the barrel and hammer of the pistol. The trigger projecting portion 8l) may be longer, or may be of somewhat modified shape as compared with the trigger projecting portion 42 of the previously described embodiments, but in any event is substantially in contact with the underside edge 76d of rebound lever 76. Note, also, that the mainspring 77 biases the rebound lever 76 into pressure engagement with the portion 73a of hand 7S, thereby to retain the hand 7S and trigger 74 in their pre-tiring positions.
When trigger 74 is squeezed, it will pivot in the direction of arrow A (FIGURE 11) about the axis of trigger pin 28, and its sear 79 will be lirted into engagement with the hammer Sear S8 to cause pivotal movement of hammer 7S in the direction of arrow B, as has been previously explained. The trigger projecting portion 3b simultaneously engages the rebound lever 76, and the pivotal movement of the trigger 74 thus causes the rebound lever to pivot, in the direction of arrow C, against the bias of mainspring 77.
As previously mentioned, the end 76a of the rebound lever is initially in engagement with the hand shoulder 92 and, responsive to the upward pivotal movement of the rebound lever 76, the hand 73 may be urged upwardly toward its intended engagement with the cylinder ratchet 35.
At this point in the description it should be noted that, by reason of the length of rebound lever 76 and therefore the distance between its pivot pin 32 and the location of its contact with trigger projecting portion 3%, and by reason of the extension of the rebound lever end 76a beyond such location of contact between trigger projecting portion 3@ and the rebound lever, the end 76a of the rebound lever will be moving upwardly towards cylinder ratchet 35 at a faster rate than is the slot Sl of trigger '74. As a consequence, and if the rebound lever lis in engagement with the hand shoulder 92, the rebound lever 76 will move the hand 78 upwardly towards ratchet 35 at a correspondingly accelerated rate, the hand axle 91 moving displaceably in the trigger slot 8l. Thus, simply by such engagement of the rebound lever therewith, it is possible to move the hand 73 in its chamber indexing movement at an accelerated rate as will promote full cartridge chamber indexing by the time the hammer has attained its double action fully cocked position as shown in FIGURE ll. In such arrangements of the mechanism, it may be found preferable to lengthen the height of the hand, greater than its length as would normally be provided in a corresponding conventional mechanism, and to elongate the trigger slot Si in direction below the conventionally provided hand axle aperture fof the trigger in such corresponding conventional mechanism, as previously alluded to, to accommodate the elongated hand element, In any event, the mechanism 73, as is presently being described, would be operable in the absence of provision of the trigger spring 82.
However, the provision of a trigger spring 72 is desirable for its purposes as mentioned in connection with the previously described embodiments as, for example, to promote the positive action of the hand 7S on the cylinder ratchet 35 to assure continued chamber alignment with the barrel at the time of tiring the cartridge which is in such chamber. Thus, and now returning to the description or" the firing action of the mechanism 73, as the trigger projecting portion Sti engages and lifts the rebound lever 76, the hand 73 will move upwardly in response to the bias of trigger spring 52 acting on the hand axle 91, as in the other embodiments. Note that such hand movement will occur, in the embodiment shown by FIGURES l0 and 1l, in view of the rather sharp angle of upward inclination of the rebound lever lower edge 76d at its location in the path of such movement of the hand 73, as will be apparent from a study of FIGURE l0. By reason of such spring responsive movement of the hand 78, it will be observed that the hand shoulder 92 Will, during at least a part, if not all, of the period `of upward movement of the hand, move out of engagement with the upper edge 76C of the rebound lever.
However, and as previously alluded to, it is possible 24 may not freely rotate responsive to the urging of hand 78, and in such instance the hand 78 would normally halt momentarily in its upward movement, the spring 82 thereupon compressing against its bias as the trigger 74 continues its pivotal movement, until the trigger 74 would pivot sufficiently to bring the lower end 81a of trigger slot 81 into positive engagementV with hand axle 91 so as to overcome such resistance to hand and cylinder movement. But, in a short throw hammer mechanism this condition would be intolerable since the trigger sear '79 might ride off the hammer sear 83 and permit release of the hammer to swing toits released position prior to the time when such resistance would be overcome and therefore prior to the time when the cartridge intended to be red has been fully indexd. To yovercome such possibility, and as previously noted, the rebound lever end'lna will be moving upwardly responsive to the urging of trigger projecting portion 8i) thereby monitoring the upward movement of the hand 78 by reason of its closely following proximity to the hand shoulder 92. Thus, if resistance to Icylinder and hand movement is encountered, which is greater than that which can be overcome by the bias pressure of trigger spring 82, the rebound lever will engage the hand to positively urge -it upwardly against such resistance. In this manner a safety feature is built into the mechanism which prevents release of the harnmer prior to the time when the appropriate cartridge has been indexed into itsl tiring position.
But, so that the hand will be exerting the aforementioned positive action on-cylinder 24 at the time when the cartridge is fired, and so that such may be accomplished without dependence upon the manufacturing toleranccs between the rebound lever end 76a and hand shoulder 9?. and similar factors, it is desirable to `provide means to halt the upward movement of the rebound lever 76 at, or just prior to the time when the hammer 75 has arrived at its fully cocked position. This is to insure that only the'trigger'spring S2 isurging the hand 7d upwardly in theV final stage of its movement, rfor the purposes as explained in connection with the earlier described embodiment. Such means are provided as follows: v
By comparing FIGURES 1() and `11, it will be understood that trigger projecting portion 86 is in engagement with the rebound lever 76 at allVv times during the pivotal movement of trigger 74. To halt the upward movement of the reboundV lever at a time prior to when the hammer 75 is in its fully cocked position, yet to permit continued pivotal movement of the trigger 74 so askto cause the release of the hammer by a riding apart of the Sear elements, at the appropriate location along the length of the rebound lever lower `edge 7nd there is provided a notch 93 (see FIGURES 11 and 12) for receiving the trigger projecting portion 80 when the rebound lever has arrived at. the desired extent of its upward movement. The notch 93 has an arcuate surface portion 93a, generated in accordance with the locus of points of further movement of the end of the trigger projecting portion 30, by which the rebound lever will rest on an edge portion 94 of the trigger projecting portion Sti, yet will remain stationary as` the trigger projecting portion 86 slides thereover during its continued movement in releasing the hammer 75V to fire the pistol. As shown in FIGURES 1() and 11, note that the rebound lever upper edge 76c may require a notch, as indicated at 95, for clearance of the hammer pin 36 of conventi-canal mechanisms when the rebound lever has attained the farthest `extent of its upward pivotal movement.
As perhaps partially suggested by FIGURE 11, it may be diiicult in conventional firing action mechanisms to adjust the length and free end configuration of the rebound lever so that it will always be disposed beneath the hand shoulder 92 for engagement therewith, even at the farthest extent of upward movement of the parts. One means of overcoming this problem is suggested by FIGURE 15 wherein the hand 98 is shown as being widened at its edge 9&1 which faces toward the hammer 75. Of course, the fixed guide 67 of the frame side plate 63 would then require adjustment of its orientation for coactionwith such widened edge of the hand.
However, an alternative embodiment of the short throw hammer firing action mechanism 73, as is shown by FIGURES 13 and 14, incorporates a conventionally configured rebound lever E6 (which may be compared with that shown in FIGURES 6 and 7) yand a rebound lever follower element 97 which is freely mounted for pivotal movement on hammer pin Si), which conventionally projects laterally of the side surface of hammer 75. It is seen that the element 97 is in the form of a lever having a free end 97a which is intended to engage the hand shoulder 92 for the aforesaid purposes. Of course, the inclination of hand shoulder 92 is adjusted, as previously mentioned, to permit such engagement dur ing the upward movement of the parts. The follower element 97 has a lower edge 97b which normally rests on the rebound lever upper edge 96e, and it will be observed from a comparison of FIGURE 13 (which shows the hammer 75 in its released position) with FIGURE 14 (which shows hammer 75 in its double action fuliy cocked position) that, during the action of the mechanism, the upward movement of rebound lever 9d will cause pivoting of the follower element 97 in the direction of arrow D (FIGURE 14) so that its upper edge 97C may engage the hand shoulder 92 as desired in manner effecting the same purposes of the embodiments described in connection with FIGURES l0 and 11.
Referring now to FIGURE 15, further modications of various elements are Vshown as may in some instances be found more desirable. The hand 98 is shown to be widened at its edge 9&1?, as previously mentioned. The view also shows a modified form of trigger projecting portion 99 which has substantially straight configuration, as may be useful in effecting a relocation of notch 93 and its arcuate surface 93a along the rebound lever length. In addition, there -is shown a trigger spring 14N) which is located exterior of the trigger slot 4t?. Of course, trigger spring ltt serves the same purposes as do the trigger springs 44 (FIGURES 1A and 4), 50 (FIGURE 5) and 82 (FIGURES 10-14). To retain the spring itl!) in a position laterally displaced from the plane of movement of trigger projecting portion 99 and rebound lever 31, a pin 101 is attached, as by brazing, to the side of trigger projecting portion 99, and a pin 102 is attached to the side of hand 93 at its edge 98d, as shown. The spring is shown as being of the coil type which is subject to compression a distance corresponding to the spacing betwen the pins 101 and 192.
Thus, a firing action mechanism has been described which .achieves all of the objects of the invention.
I claim:
1. La a cartridge firing device having a barrel element,
and cartridge chamber means mounted for movement to a position thereof aligning a contained cartridge with the barrel element: a tiring action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for movement towards a position thereof triggering the firing action mechanism to re said cartridge, a hand element mounted for movement in engag ment with said cartridge `chamber means to move the latter to its said position, means mounting said handelement on said trigger for rectilinear movement relative to said trigger, and means engaging said hand element responsive to said movement of the trigger to move the hand element in said engagement with said cartridge chamber mean-s Iand to promote said rectilinear move- Y ment of the hand element at a rate accelerating with respect to the rate of said movement of the trigger to move said cartridge chamber means into its said position prior to said triggering of the tiring action mechanism.
2. Ina cartridge ring device having a barrel element, and a cartridge receiving cylinder mounted for rotatable movement to a position thereof aligning a contained cartridge with the barrel element: a ring action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement towards a position thereof triggering the tiring action mechanism to re said cartridge, a hand element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder to its said position, slide connection means between said hand element and said trigger permitting rectilinear movement of the hand element relative to the trigger during said cylinder engagement movement of the hand element, and means engaging said hand element responsive to said movement of the trigger to move the hand element in said engagement with the cylinder to rotate said cylinder into its said position prior to said triggering of the firing action mechanism.
3. In a cartridge firing device, a tiring action mechanism according to claim 2 wherein said means engaging the hand element comprises a lever mounted for pivotal movement and having a free end engaging said hand element during said cylinder engagement movement of the hand element, and means on said trigger engaging and pivoting said lever responsive to said movement of the trigger.
4. In a cartridge tiring device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 2 wherein said slide connection means comprises means deiining an elongated slot on said trigger, said hand element having a slide follower portion engaging said slot on the trigger.
5. In a cartridge tiring device having a barrel element, and a cartridge receiving cylinder mounted for rotatable movement to a position thereof aligning a contained cartridge with the barrel element: a firing action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement towards a position thereof triggering the tiring action mechanism to re said cartridge, a hand element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder to its said postion, slide connection means between said hand element and said trigger permitting rectilinear movement of the hand element relative to the trigger during said cylinder engagement movement of the hand element, spring means biasing said hand element in the direction of its said rectilinear movement, movable means normally urging said spring means against its bias, and means relieving said urging of s-aid movable means during said movement of the trigger to permit bias responsive movement of said spring means to rotate said cylinder into its said position prior to said triggering of the firing action mechanism.
6. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 5 wherein said means relieving said urging of said movable means comprises a projecting portion on said trigger.
7. In a cartridge tiring device, a tiring action mechanism according to claim 5 wherein said slide connection means comprises means defining an elongated slot on said trigger, said hand element having a slide follower portion engaging said slot on the trigger.
8. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 5 wherein said slide connection means comprises means defining an elongated slot on said trigger, said hand element having a slide follower portion engaging said slot on the trigger, and wherein said spring means is mounted on said trigger and in bias pressure engagement with said hand element.
9. In a cartridge tiring device, a tiring action mechanism according to claim 8 wherein said spring means is mounted within said elongated slot on the trigger and in bias pressure engagement with said slide follower portion of the hand element.
10. In a revolver type pistol having a barrel element, and a rotatable cylinder having a plurality of annularly spaced cartridge receiving chambers therein whereby rotation of the cylinder sequentially aligns each Of Said chambers with said barrel element: a tiring action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement from a released position thereof towards a position thereof triggering the tiring action mechanism to tire a cartridge contained in one of said chambers when -so aligned with the barrel element, a hand element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder responsive to said pivotal movement of the trigger for indexing said one of the chambers into alignment with said barrel element, cylinder stop means mounted for movement responsive to said pivotal movement of the trigger to stop said indexing rotation of said cylinder when said one chamber is in alignment with said barrel element, means defining an elongated slot on said trigger, said trigger slot having its direction of elongation substantially in the direction of such cylinder engageent movement of said hand elements, said hand element having a portion slidable in said trigger slot whereby said hand element is mounted for rectilinear movement with respect to said trigger, spring means biasing said hand element for slidable movement of its said portion within said trigger slot in said direction of said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element, a rebound lever mounted for pivotal movement and having a free end in normal engagement with said hand element when said trigger is in its said released position, a mainspring biasing said rebound lever for pivotal movement in a direction towards its said normal engagement with the hand element whereby when said rebound lever so engages said hand element the rebound lever opposes and prevents said slidable movement of said hand element portion responsive to the bias of said spring means and urges said trigger towards its said released position, and a projecting portion on said trigger for engaging said rebound lever to pivot the rebound lever in a direction opposite to its said direction of mainspring bia-sed pivotal movement and out of its said normal engagement with the hand element to thereby permit said slidable movement of said hand element portion responsive to the bias of said spring means during said pivotal movement of the trigger, whereby during said pivotal movement of the trigger the said onechamber is fully indexed into alignment with said barrel element prior to said trigger attaining its said position triggering the firing action mechanism.
11. In a revolver type pistol, a firing action mechanism according to claim 10 wherein said hand element and said free end of the rebound lever are also adapted substantially for following engagement during at least a portion of said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element, whereby during said portion of said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element the said pivoting of the rebound lever in said direction opposite to its said direction of mainspring biased pivotal movement as-sures uninterrupted movement of said hand element.
l2. In a revolver type pistol, a firing action mechanism according to claim 11 wherein said rebound lever and said trigger projecting portion have slidable engagement therebetween to terminate said pivoting of the rebound lever in said direction opposite to its said direction of mainspring biased pivotal movement when said hand element has moved a distance equal to said portion of its cylinder engagement movement.
13. In a revolver type pistol having a barrel element, and a rotatable cylinder having a plurality of annularly spaced cartridge receiving chambers therein whereby rotation of the cylinder sequentially aligns each of said chambers with said barrel element: a tiring action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement from a released position thereof towards a position thereof triggering the tiring action mechanism to iire a cartridge contained in one of said chambers when so aligned with the barrel element, a hand element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder responsive to said pivotal movement of the trigger for indexing said one of the chambers into alignment with said barrel element, cylinder stop means mounted for movement responsive to said pivotal movement of the trigger to stop said indexing rotation of said cylinder when said one chamber is in alignment with said barrel element, means defining an elongated slot'on said trigger, said trigger slot having its direction of elongation substantially in the directionof said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element, said hand element having a portion slidable in said trigger slot whereby said hand element is mounted for rectilinear movement with respect to said trigger, a rebound lever mounted for pivotal movement and having a free end in normal engagement with said hand element when said trigger is in its said released position, a mainspring biasingsaid rebound lever for pivotal movement in direction towards its said normal engagement with Vthe hand element whereby the rebound lever urges said trigger towards its said re` leased position, and a projecting portion on said trigger for engaging said rebound lever to pivot the rebound lever in a direction opposite to its said direction of mainspring biased pivotal movement to thereby relieve the bias pressure of said normal engagement of the rebound lever with said hand element during said pivotal movement of the trigger, said hand element and said free end of the rebound lever being shaped with respect to each other for engagement during said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element so that the said rebound lever urges said hand element in its said cylinder engagement movement, whereby during said pivotal movement of the trigger the said one chamber is fully indexed into alignment with said barrel element prior to said trigger attaining its said position triggering the tiring action mechanism.
14. In a revolver type pistol having a barrel element, and a rotatable cylinder having a plurality of annularly spaced cartridge receiving chambers therein whereby rotation of the cylinder sequentially aligns each of said chambers with said barrel element: a ring action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement from a released position thereof towards a position thereof triggering the tiring action mechanism to fire a cartridge contained in one of said chambers when so aligned with the barrel element, said trigger having a trigger sear, a hammer element mounted for pivotal movement from a released position thereof in tiring engagement with a cartridge contained in said one chamber to a cocked position thereof spaced away from said released position, said hammer element having a hammer scar engaging said trigger sear during said pivotal movements of said trigger and hammer element whereby pivotal movement imparted to one imparts pivotal movement to the other, said trigger sear and said hammer sear having length with respect to each other to provide a short distance of said pivotal movement of the hammer element whereby said liring action mechanism is characterized las providing a short throw hammer, a hand element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder responsive tosaidpivotal movement of the trigger for indexing saidv one of the chambers into alignment with said barrel element, cylinder stop means mounted for movement responsive to said pivotal movement of the trigger to stop said indexing rotation of said cylinder when said one -chamber is in alignment with said barrel element, slide connection.
trigger towards its said released position, and a projecting portion on said trigger for engaging said lever to pivot the lever in a direction opposite to the direction of its said bias to thereby relieve the bias pressure of said normal engagement of the lever with said hand element during said pivotal movement or" the trigger, said hand element .and said lever being shaped with respect to each other for engagement during said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element so that the said lever urges said hand element in its cylinder engagement movement, whereby during said pivotal movement of the trigger the said one chamber is fully indexed into alignment with said barrel element prior to said trigger attaining its said position triggering the firing action mechanism.
l5. In a revolver type pistol, a tiring action mechanism according to claim 14 wherein said slide connection means between said hand element and said trigger comprises means deiining an elongated slot on said trigger, said trigger slot having its direction of elongation substantially in the direction oi said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element, said hand element having a portion slidable in said trigger slot.
16. In a revolver type pistol, a ring action mechanism according -to claim l5 wherein said slide connection means between said hand element and said trigger further comprises spring means mounted on said trigger and engaging said hand element to thereby exert biasing pressure on said hand element in the direction of its said rectilinear movement with respect to said trigger.
17. In a revolver type pistol, a tiring action mechanism according to claim 16 wherein said spring means is mounted on said trigger projecting portion.
18. ln a revolver type pistol, a tiring action mechanism according to claim 16 wherein said lever and said trigger projecting portion are shaped Vwith respect to each other for slidable engagement therebetween` during said pivotal movement of the trigger to terminate said pivoting of the lever in said direction opposite to the direction of its said bias when said hand element has moved a distance equal to a major portion of its cylinder engagement movement, whereby said spring means mounted-on said trigger determines the remaining portion of said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element. p
19. In a revolver type pistol having a barrel element, and a rotatable cylinder having a plurality of annularly spaced cartridge receiving chambers therein whereby rotation'of the cylinder sequentially aligns each of said chambers with said barrel element: a tiring action-mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement from a released position thereof towards a position thereof triggering the tiring action mechanism to lire a cartridge contained in one of said chambers when so aligned with the barrel element, a hammer element mounted for pivotal movement and adapted for engaging said trigger during said pivotal movement of the trigger, a hand' element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder responsive to said pivotal movement of the trigger for indexing said one of the chambers into alignment with said barrel element, slide connection means between said hand element and Vsaid trigger permitting rectilinear movement of the hand element relative to the trigger during said cylinder engagement movement of said hand element, a rebound lever mounted for pivotal movement and having a free end slidably engaging said hand element, a mainspring biasing said rebound lever for pivotal movement in direction towards the location of its said slidable engagement with the hand element whereby the rebound lever urges said trigger towards its said released position, a follower lever mounted for pivotal movement about the axis of said pivotal movement of the hammer element and having a free end slidably engaging said hand element, and a projecting portion on said trigger for engaging said rebound lever to pivot the rebound lever in a directio-n opposite to its said direction of mainspring biased pivotal movement to thereby relieve bias pressure of the rebound lever on said hand element during said pivotal movement of the trigger, said follower lever also slidably engaging said rebound lever during said pivoting of the rebound lever in response to its said engagement by the trigger projecting portion so that the rebound lever pivots said follower lever to urge said hand element in its said cylinder engagement movement, whereby during said pivotal movement of the trigger the said one chamber is ful-ly indexed into alignment with said barrel element prior to said trigger attaining its said position triggering the iiring action mechanism.
20. In a revolver type pistol, a firing action mechanism according to claim 19 wherein said hammer element is pivotal between a released position and a cocked position thereof, and said hammer element and said trigger are adapted with respect to each other to provide a short distance of said piovtal movement of the hammer element whereby said firing action mechanism is characterized as providing a short throw hammer.
21. In a cartridge ring device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 2 wherein said means engaging said hand element comprises a first lever mounted for pivotal movement about a rst axis `and having a free end slidably engaging said hand element, a follower lever mounted for pivotal movement about a second axis and having a free end slidably engaging said hand element, and means on said trigger for engaging and pivoting said rst lever responsive to said movement of the trigger, said follower lever also slidably engaging said rst lever during said pivoting of the first lever, whereby said follower lever urges said hand element in its said movement in engagement with the cylinder.
22. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 21 wherein said follower lever is considerably shorter than said first lever.
23. A trigger for mounting in a revolver type cartridge firing device wherein a hand element moves in response to pivotal movement of the trigger to index a cartridge into position to be fired, said trigger comprising a body portion, pivot means of said body portion for pivotally mounting said trigger' in said device, an upwardly facing surface of said body portion in radially spaced relation with respect to said pivot means and extending generally towards and terminating at that end of said trigger which moves upwardly during its pivotal movement, a scar portion dened by said end terminus of said upwardly facing surface, and means for mounting said hand element for rectilinear movement on the trigger, said hand element mounting means consisting essentially of substantially vertical slide means on said body portion disposed substantially V'adjacent to said upwardly facing surface of the latter.
24. A trigger according to claim 23 wherein said vertical slide means comprises means dening an elongated, substantially vertical slot of said body portion.
25. A trigger according to claim 23 wherein said vertical slide means includes spring bias means for biasing said hand element in upward direction with respect to said trigger when the hand element is mounted on the trigger.
26. A trigger according to claim 25 wherein said spring bias means comprises a coil type spring.
27. A trigger according to claim 25 wherein said spring bias means comprises a leaf type spring.
28. A trigger according .to claim 23 wherein said vertical slide means comprises means defining an elongated, substantially vertical slot of said body portion disposed below said upwardly facing surface of the latter, means defining a spring receiving channel communicating with said elongated slot, and spring bias means mounted within said spring receiving channel and projecting into said elongated slot for biasing said hand element in upward direction with respect Vto said trigger when the hand element is mounted on the trigger.
29. A trigger for mounting in a revolver type cartridge firing device wherein a hand element moves in response to pivotal movement of the trigger to index a cartridge into position to be fired, said trigger comprising a body portion, pivot means of said body portion for pivotally mounting said trigger in said device, an upwardly facing surface of said body portion in radially spaced relation with respect to said pivot means and extending generally towards and terminating at that end of said trigger which moves upwardly during its pivotal movement, a Sear portion deiined by said end terminus of said upwardly facing surface, means for mounting said hand element for rectilinear movement on the trigger, said hand element mounting means consisting essentially of substantially vertical slide means on said body portion disposed `substantially adjacent to said upwardly facing surface of the latter, and a rebound lever engagement lug on said body portion below said upwardly facing surface, said lng projecting a distance outward from an edge of said body portion and generally in the direction of said upwardly moving end of the trigger.
30. A trigger according to claim 29 wherein said vertical slide means includes spring bias means mounted on said rebound lever engagement lug for biasing said hand element in upward direction with respect to said trigger when the hand element is mounted on the trigger.
References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 520,468 Wesson May 29, 1894 733,101 Wesson July 7, 1903 763,581 Wesson June 28, 1904 881,374 Call Mar. 10, 1908 2,655,755 Nichols Oct. 20, 1953 2,866,287 Roy Dec. 30, 1958 OTHER REFERENCES American Rifleman, March 1939, pp. l821 and 36.

Claims (1)

19. IN A REVOLVER TYPE PISTOL HAVING A BARREL ELEMENT, AND A ROTATABLE CYLINDER HAVING A PLURALITY OF ANNULARLY SPACED CARTRIDGE RECEIVING CHAMBERS THEREIN WHEREBY ROTATION OF THE CYLINDER SEQUENTIALLY ALIGNS EACH OF SAID CHAMBERS WITH SAID BARREL ELEMENT: A FIRING ACTION MECHANISM COMPRISING A TRIGGER MOUNTED FOR PIVOTAL MOVEMENT FROM A RELEASED POSITION THEREOF TOWARDS A POSITION THEREOF TRIGGERING THE FIRING ACTION MECHANISM TO FIRE A CARTRIDGE CONTAINED IN ONE OF SAID CHAMBERS WHEN SO ALIGNED WITH THE BARREL ELEMENT, A HAMMER ELEMENT MOUNTED FOR PIVOTAL MOVEMENT AND ADAPTED FOR ENGAGING SAID TRIGGER DURING SAID PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF THE TRIGGER, A HAND ELEMENT MOUNTED FOR MOVEMENT IN ENGAGEMENT WITH SAID CYLINDER TO ROTATE THE CYLINDER RESPONSIVE TO SAID PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF THE TRIGGER FOR INDEXING SAID ONE OF THE CHAMBERS INTO ALIGNMENT WITH SAID BARREL ELEMENT, SLIDE CONNECTION MEANS BETWEEN SAID HAND ELEMENT AND SAID TRIGGER PERMITTING RECTILINEAR MOVEMENT OF THE HAND ELEMENT RELATIVE OF THE TRIGGER DURING SAID CYLINDER ENGAGEMENT MOVEMENT OF SAID HAND ELEMENT, A REBOUND, LEVER MOUNTED FOR PIVOTAL MOVEMENT AND HAVING A FREE END SLIDABLY ENGAGING SAID HAND ELEMENT, A MAINSPRING BIASING SAID REBOUND LEVER FOR PIVOTAL MOVEMENT IN DIRECTION TOWARDS THE LOCATION OF ITS SAID SLIDABLE ENGAGEMENT WITH THE HAND ELEMENT WHEREBY THE REBOUND LEVER URGES SAID TRIGGER TOWARDS ITS SAID RELEASED POSITION, A FOLLOWER LEVER MOUNTED FOR PIVOTAL MOVEMENT ABOUT THE AXIS OF SAID PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF THE HAMMER ELEMENT AND HAVING A FREE END SLIDABLY ENGAGING SAID HAND ELEMENT, AND A PROJECTING PORTION ON SAID TRIGGER FOR ENGAGING SAID REBOUND LEVER TO PIVOT THE REBOUND LEVER IN A DIRECTION OPPOSITE TO ITS SAID DIRECTION OF MAINSPRING BIASED PIVOTAL MOVEMENT TO THEREBY RELIEVE BIAS PRESSURE OF THE REBOUND LEVER ON SAID HAND ELEMENT DURING SAID PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF THE TRIGGER SAID FOLLOWER LEVER ALSO SLIDABLY ENGAGING SAID REBOUND LEVER DURING SAID PIVOTING OF THE REBOUND LEVER IN RESPONSE TO ITS SAID ENGAGEMENT BY THE TRIGGER PROJECTING PORTION SO THAT THE REBOUND LEVER PIVOTS SAID FOLLOWER LEVER TO URGE SAID HAND ELEMENT IN ITS SAID CYLINDER ENGAGEMENT MOVEMENT, WHEREBY DURING SAID PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF THE TRIGGER THE SAID ONE CHAMBER IS FULLY INDEXED INTO ALIGNMENT WITH SAID BARREL ELEMENT PRIOR TO SAID TRIGGER ATTAINING ITS SAID POSITION TRIGGERING THE FIRING ACTION MECHANISM.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3381404A (en) * 1966-10-12 1968-05-07 William T. Quinn Spring-urged ratchet advance element for revolvers
US3701213A (en) * 1969-03-18 1972-10-31 Colt Ind Operating Corp Revolver firing mechanism with single action and double action movement
US4619064A (en) * 1981-04-25 1986-10-28 Yves Stolz Miniature firearm
US4791747A (en) * 1987-02-03 1988-12-20 Walter Pastor Safety assembly for a hand gun

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US520468A (en) * 1894-05-29 Revolver-lock mechanism
US733101A (en) * 1902-05-19 1903-07-07 Daniel B Wesson Revolver.
US763581A (en) * 1903-12-10 1904-06-28 Daniel B Wesson Revolver.
US881374A (en) * 1907-05-08 1908-03-10 Joseph H Wesson Revolver
US2655755A (en) * 1950-03-31 1953-10-20 Talley W Nichols Toy cap pistol and cartridge
US2866287A (en) * 1957-03-11 1958-12-30 John W Ryan Toy fanner pistol

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US520468A (en) * 1894-05-29 Revolver-lock mechanism
US733101A (en) * 1902-05-19 1903-07-07 Daniel B Wesson Revolver.
US763581A (en) * 1903-12-10 1904-06-28 Daniel B Wesson Revolver.
US881374A (en) * 1907-05-08 1908-03-10 Joseph H Wesson Revolver
US2655755A (en) * 1950-03-31 1953-10-20 Talley W Nichols Toy cap pistol and cartridge
US2866287A (en) * 1957-03-11 1958-12-30 John W Ryan Toy fanner pistol

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3381404A (en) * 1966-10-12 1968-05-07 William T. Quinn Spring-urged ratchet advance element for revolvers
US3701213A (en) * 1969-03-18 1972-10-31 Colt Ind Operating Corp Revolver firing mechanism with single action and double action movement
US4619064A (en) * 1981-04-25 1986-10-28 Yves Stolz Miniature firearm
US4791747A (en) * 1987-02-03 1988-12-20 Walter Pastor Safety assembly for a hand gun

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