US3158948A - Revolver firing action means - Google Patents

Revolver firing action means Download PDF

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US3158948A
US3158948A US176224A US17622462A US3158948A US 3158948 A US3158948 A US 3158948A US 176224 A US176224 A US 176224A US 17622462 A US17622462 A US 17622462A US 3158948 A US3158948 A US 3158948A
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hammer
trigger
hand
movement
cylinder
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George H Freed
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George H Freed
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A19/00Firing or trigger mechanisms; Cocking mechanisms
    • F41A19/06Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms
    • F41A19/42Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having at least one hammer
    • F41A19/52Cocking or firing mechanisms for other types of guns, e.g. fixed breech-block types, revolvers
    • F41A19/53Double-action mechanisms, i.e. the cocking being effected during the first part of the trigger pull movement
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41CSMALLARMS, e.g. PISTOLS, RIFLES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • F41C3/00Pistols, e.g. revolvers
    • F41C3/14Revolvers

Description

Dec. 1, 1964 e. H. FREED REVOLVER FIRING ACTION MEANS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 28, 1962 INVENTOR. 550R6 fl' @550 BY v MM, #flcMamzm Dec. 1, 1964 G. H. FREED 3,
REVOLVER FIRING ACTION MEANS Filed Feb. 28, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.
GEO/P65 5 1 550 United States Patent 3,158,948 REVQLVER FIRING ACTIGN MEANS George H. Freed, Bloomfield-Ave, Pine Brook, NE.
Filed Feb. 28, 1962, Ser. No. 176,224.
'15 Claims. (.Cl. 42-65) This invention relates to firing action mechanisms in firearms andsimilar cartridge firing devices which include a magazine for containing usually a plurality of cartridges to be indexed in sequence into' firing position. More particularly, the invention relates to the means conventionally incorporated within such firing mechanisms for automatically and successively indexing each cartridge within the magazine into firing alignment with the barrel element of the device.
This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Serial No. 145,258, filed October 16, 1961 which is, in turn, a continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 75,947 filed December 15, 1960, now abandoned. g i
Although the invention was achieved upon adaptation of a Colt model revolved type pistol to incorporate the invention and therefore its presently preferred embodie ment will be described in connection with such Colt firearms, it will be understood that the invention in its broader aspects may be applicable to firearms and'other cartridge firing devices which are, or may be manufactured by others than Colt. Accordingly, the true scope of the invention should not be considered as being limited to the particular embodiment herein described, but rather only by the appended claims.
As more fully explained in the referred to copending application, an inadequacy is found in firing action mechanisms of conventional revolver type pistols in that, upon actuation, the cartridge receiving chamber which contains the cartridge next to be fired is not always properl indexed by the mechanism into full alignment with the pistol barrel by the time the hammer is released from its cocked position to fire the cartridge. If the cartridge chamber is not so aligned at the time the contained cartridge is fired, the bullet or slug in travelling from the chamber into the barrel will partially strike andshave itself on the barrel end, thereby causing dangerous splattering of lead, possible jamming of the mechanism, and distortion of the head of the slug which, in turn, causes inaccuracy in the flight of the projectile after it leaves the barrel.
The referred to copending application describes in detail what are believed to be the causes, as well as effective means for eliminating such malfunctioning in firing action mechanisms, and it is an object of the present invention to also provide means whereby the possibility for such cartridge chamber misalignment, at the time of firing the contained cartridge, is substantially eliminated. Accordingly, the portions of that specification which are relevant to such objects of the present invention are hereby incorporated in this specification by reference.
In general, the preferred embodiment of the invention of the referred to copending application provides means for accelerating the upward movement of a conventional type hand element, in engagement with the rotatable cylinder of the pistol, in conjunction with the movement of the trigger and'hammer when bringing the latter to its cocked position. The cartridge receiving chamber of the cylinder, which contains the cartridge next in sequence to be fired, is indexed by the mechanism into full alignment with the pistol'barrel by the time the hammer has'pivoted to its fully cocked position, and thesame results are intended by the present invention. By that invention, rectilinear movement of the hand element with respectto the trigger is permitted by means 3,158,948 Patented Dec. 1, 1964 ice such as an elongated slot of the trigger in which the hand element is displaceably mounted, and such slidable connection or its equivalent is also Within the contemplation of the present invention. The'hand element is urged in its upward accelerated movement by a trigger spring mounted in the trigger slot. 7 g
' However, it is pointed out in that earlier specification that abonormal resistance to rotative movement of the cylinder is sometimes encountered, as by a cartridge being oversize in length or not being fully seated within the cartridge chamber such as would cause its head to bind Within the cylinder headspace by contact with the headspace end of the pistol frame, which resistance might depress or resist the action of the trigger spring and thus prevent the desired prompt upward movement of the hand element. In certain embodiments of that invention, means are provided for overcoming such-resistance to hand movement.
It is an object of the present invention to provide still more effective means to cope with such resistance to cylinder rotative movement, yet promote similar accelerated upward movement of the hand element for the aforesaid purpose. Specifically, the present invention is intended to provide means for overcoming such resistance to cylinder movement as it occurs or, alternatively, for causing the mechanism to jam so as to prevent'firing of the cartridge in the event such resistance is so great as to prevent the cartridge chamber from attaining full alignment with the barrel, as when such resistance is greater than that as the mechanism of the present inventoin would normally overcome. In respect of this alternative, it is seen that a further object of the invention is to provide a safety means in the firing action mechanism of such firearms and similar devices as will prevent firing of a cartridge therein when such cartridge is not fully in alignment with the barrel of the device.
A conventional firing action mechanism, such as is found in Colt model revolvers, includes a hammer which is mounted for pivotal movement on a hammer pin which is attached to the frame of the gun. The hammer element incorporates both a single action scar and a double action sear, either of which may be engaged by the trigger sear depending respectively on whether the hammer is cocked manually or by the trigger, as is well understood. The pivotal trigger mounts a hand element which moves with generally slidable movement in engagement with the cartridge containing cylinder responsive to movement of the trigger so as to contemporaneously index a cartridge chamberinto alignment with the barrel of the gun. The firing action mechanism also conventionally includes a so-called rebound lever which is mounted for pivotal movement about one of its ends and been fired.
In one embodiment of the invention disclosed and illustrated in the referred to copending application, a rebound lever follower element is freely mounted for pivotal movement on the hammer pin which, conventionally, projects laterally of the side'surface 0f the hammer. This follower lever element was shown as being in the form of a lever having but one free end which engages a shoulder portion of the hand element for promoting the slidable movement of the hand element in engagement with the cylinder responsive to the upward pivotal movement of the rebound lever or, alternatively, to simply follow the upward movement of the hand element when such movement of the handelement is made responsive to the action of the aforementioned trigger spring mounted in the trigger slot within which a laterally projecting axle of the hand element is also mounted. In either of these alternative modifications of such embodiment of the referred to previous invention, the follower element is pivoted by engagement therewith of the conventional rebound lever, the rebound lever in turn being urged in its upward pivotal movement by a laterally projecting portion, or' lug of the trigger, as more fully described in the copending application. It becomes apparent that, in that invention/no direct cooperative action of the hammer was involved in the chamber indexing action, and that it is therefore possible, under some conditions, that the hammer might attain its fully cocked position and perhaps be released at a time when a cartridge, having stuck or become otherwise jammed, has not been fully indexed into alignment with the barrel.
By the present invention, the aforementioned follower element of the earlier invention is extended to provide a second free end thereof either for engagement or for following association with a rearward end portion of the hammer of the pistol so as to introduce cooperative action by the hammer during the chamber indexing action and thereby eliminate the aforementioned undesirable possibilities in the operation of the firing action mecha nism. Thus, in its preferred embodiments the present invention contemplates provision of a lever which is freely mounted for pivotal movement about the hammer pin as an axis, the lever extending outwardly in both directions from the hammer pin for engagement or following association with both the hand element and the pivotal hammer of the pistol.
It will become apparent that upward movement of the hand element, in indexing the cylinder, may be promoted by direct engagement of the hammer with the second free end of the follower lever, if desired, the consequent pivoting of the follower lever positively urging the hand element in its upward movement by the engagement therewith of the first free end of the follower lever. Alternatively, the upward movement of the hand element may be promoted by the trigger means of the referred to copending application, or' by the positive urging of the rebound lever on the first free end of the follower lever as such mode of operation is set forth in the referred to copending application. In these latter instances, the second free end of the follower lever is adapted for closely following association with the rearward end of the hammer to be more positively engaged by the hammer, or to jam the hammer movement only in the event that resistance to cylinder movement is encountered. As still another alternative, the major portion of the upward movement of the hand element may be promoted by the conventional urging of the trigger thereon, the hand axle remaining at the bottom of the aforementioned elongated trigger slot during such initial hand element movement, whereupon more positive engagement of the hand element by the follower lever which, in turn, becomes engaged by the hammer in the final stage of the hand element movement causes the requisite rectilinear movement of the hand element with respect to the trigger, the hand axle then sliding to the top of the trigger slot. These alternative modes of operation are available by adaption of the fit of the engaging elements, as will be more fully understood as the description proceeds.
The presently preferred mode of operation is the first of those aforementioned. That is, the upward, accelerated movement of the hand element is effected by the pressure of engagement therewith of the referred to pivotal follower lever, the pivotal movement of the follower lever being promoted by engagement of the hammer with the second free end of the lever as the former pivots towards its fully cocked position.
It will later become apparent that, if the follower lever is mounted for free pivotal movement, upon release of the hammer from its cocked position to swing towards its released position to fire a cartridge, the pressure of its engagement with the follower lever will at once be relieved whereupon the rebound lever element of the mechanism which is intended to return the hand element to its initial, deactuated position will be free to act upon the hand element during the period of firing swing of the hammer so that the hand element would for that moment of time be out of engagement with the cylinder ratchet element. Because of the capability of the mechanism to fully index the cartridge cylinder prior to the time the hammer is released, and considering the conventional cylinder stop arrangement, it will be understood that such disengagement will not permit the cylinder to fall away, or otherwise be moved out of its indexed position. However, to avoid any likelihood of improper action in this respect, such disengagement of the hand element with the cylinder during the period of hammer release is prevented by inclusion in the mechanism of means to restrain the return action of the rebound lever during the hammer release period. In the presently preferred embodiment of the invention as is intended for use in Colt model revolvers, such restraining means takes the form of a projecting portion or lug of the trigger which relieves the pressure of the rebound lever on the hand element during such period.
In a modified form of the invention, the aforementioned trigger spring of the previous invention is also included to effect a positive upward pressure of the hand element on the cylinder during the period of hammer release, as may be desirable for example to take up any slack between the cylinder and cylinder stop elements as may be attributable to wear between the parts, or for other reasons as pointed out in the referred to previous patent application.
As will later be more fully explained, the aforementioned trigger projecting portion, or the aforementioned trigger spring where included, also serves to prevent what may be termed a free floating condition of the trigger as would otherwise occur at certain times duringthe action.
In any adaptation of the present invention, should the chamber indexing movements of the cylinder and hand element be halted by the presence of a sticky cartridge or the like, the newly included second free end of the follower element will be either already in engagement with, or will promptly become engaged by the hammer so as to interrupt the movement of the hammer towards its cocked position and thereby prevent the triggering of the hammer at a time when the cartridge chamber being indexed has not been moved fully into alignment with the barrel. Alternatively, if the sticky cartridge merely presents increased resistance to hand element and cylinder rotative movement, and is not sufliciently great as to cause jamming of the hammer action in this manner, further pivotal movement of the hammer towards its cocked position will assist the hand element in overcoming such resistance by imparting additional leverage force to the follower lever which will then be in engagement with the hand element.
It is still a further object of the invention to provide a firing action mechanism which includes all of the aforementioned features and advantages whether the mechanism be actuated either by single action movement or double action movement. In addition, it is intended that the mechanism in its preferred embodiment will be further adapted to provide a relatively short throw movement of its hammer element in moving to its fully cocked position during the action.
These and other objects and features of the invention will become more fully apparent from the following de tailed description thereof, when taken together with the accompanying drawings in which:
FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary side elevation of a pistol embodying the invention as the pistol would appear prior to actuating the action mechanism for firing, the pistol It) being shown with its handle grip plates removed and with certain other portions partially cut away for a better understanding of the firing action mechanism;
FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary view of certain portions of the firing action mechanism illustrated in FIGURE 1, the parts also being shown in their positions as they would appear prior to actuation; while FIG- URE 2A shows the same parts as they would appear upon a double action actuation of the mechanism to the extent coincident with the hammer element having been moved to its fully cocked position, just prior to its release for firing the pistol;
FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of the firing action mechanism as illustrated in FIGURE 2, the section taken at lines 33 of that figure; while FIG- URE 3A is a fragmentary sectional view of the firing action mechanism as illustrated in FIGURE 2A, the section taken at lines 3A-3A of that figure;
FIGURE 4 is a similarly enlarged side elevation of only the follower lever and hand elements of the firing action mechanism in its position as illustrated in FIG- URES 2A and 3A,-the view being taken, however, from the reverse side of these elements as will be apparent; while FiGURE 4A is a sectional top view of the FIG- URE 4 showing, the section taken at lines 4A4A of that figure; and
FIGURE 5 is an enlarged side elevation of a modified form of trigger element which might be incorporated in the invention as illustrated in FIGURES 1-3.
Referring first to FIGURE 1, the invention is shown as embodied in a revolver type pistol 26, such as a Colt revolver, which has a frame, generally indicated by reference numeral 21, to which is attached a barrel element 22 and a pivotable cylinder crane 23. l A cartridge chamber cylinder 24 is rotatably mounted on a spindle of the crane 23 in conventional manner. Referring briefly to FIGURE 3, it will be understood that the cylinder 24 has a plurality of annularly spaced and axially aligned cartridge receiving chambers 25 formed within the cylinder for receiving a corresponding plurality of cartridges (not shown), each of which may be'brought into alignment with the barrel 22 of the gun by rotation of the cylinder, as is well known.
As is also well known by those familiar with the art, itwill be understood that in loading the cartridge receiving chambers 25 with cartridges, the cartridges are inserted bullethead first intothe chambers, from the rearward side 24a of the cylinder 24, and that the peripheral-.
ly projecting base flange of each cartridge is normally intended to lie flush against the rearward end 24a of the cylinder such that the flange will reside within the headspace H of the pistol, the headspace H being the open area defined by the spacing between the cylinder rearward end 24a and the headspace end 21a of the frame 21. If each cartridge is not properly seated, or if too much grease is on the cartridge, or if-the cartridge is slightly oversize, etc., it may protrude too far into the headspace H and, when the cylinder 24 is rotated, may stick or bind against the headspace end21a of frame 21, thereby causing resistance to proper rotative' movement of the cylinder24. The cylinder rotative movement is caused by the action of the firing action mechanism which operates to cock and fire the pistol,'as will now be described.
The pistol 20 has a firing action mechanism, generally indicated by reference numeral 26 (FIGURES 2 and 2A) for firing in sequence the cartridges contained in cartridge receiving chambers 25. The firing action mechanism includes a trigger 27 which is pivotally mounted to the frame 21 by a trigger pin 28, a hammer 29 which is pivotally mounted to the frame 21 by a hammer pin 30,
6 trigger actuation to index one of the cartridge receiving chambers 25a into firing alignment with the barrel 22. In rotating the cylinder 24, the hand element 34 engages a ratchet element 35 which is attached to the cylinder.
A hammer stirrup 36 is pivotally mounted on the hammer 29 by hammer stirrup pin 37, and it will be understood that the free end of one of the leaf portions 33a of mainspring 33 is in bias pressure engagement with the end 36a of the hammer stirrup in manner urging hammer 2h toward its released position as shown in FIG- URE l. The other leaf portion 33b of mainspring 33 is in bias pressure engagement with rebound lever 31 in a manner normally urging the hand element 34 and trigger 27 into their initial, prefiring positions as shown in FIGURE 1. The two leaf portions 33a and 33b merge at the mainspring end 330 which is received in a recess 38 of the frame 21, as shown.
The free end 31b of the pivotable rebound lever 31 is tapered in the illustrated conventional manner and, in the pre-firing position of the firing action mechanism 26, engages a protruding axle housing portion 34a of hand 34 in which a hand axle 35 is attached. The laterally protruding hand axle'39 is received within a trigger slot 40 for both pivotal and rectilinear movement with respect to the trigger 27. The pivotal portion of the movement is that which is conventional in pistols of the type during chamber indexing movement of the hand 34 towards the cylinder 24. However, the rectilinear portion of the hand movement with respect to the trigger is that which is necessary to permit the hand 34 to move toward the cylinder at the requisite rate, for purposes as will be apparent, which rate is greater than that with which the trigger itself will move in the same direction.
The trigger slot- 40 serves as a guide track for guiding the hand axle 39, which is therein received as a follower, in its slidable movement with respect to trigger 27. The direction of elongation of the slot 46 is generally in the direction of the conventional movement of the hand element 34, during trigger actuation, towards cylinder 24 for the purpose of engaging ratchet 35 to index a cartridge receiving chamber 25 into alignment with barrel 22. Thus, the lower end 40a, of slot 46 (the end which is opposite that towards the aforementioned direction of movement of hand 34) may, for the purposes of the present description, be considered as substantially coinciding with the simple bearing type aperture (not shown) which is provided in a conventionaltrigger of the type for receiving the hand axle 3, the distance of the slot 40 from the trigger pin aperture 28:: also being the same as in such a conventional trigger. The trigger 27 also includes a trigger sear 41 and, in the preferred embodiment, is further provided with a trigger projecting portion 42 adapted for engaging rebound lever 31 during the action of the mechanism as will be described. 7 The projecting portion 42 is in the form of a lug which is attached, as by welding or brazing, to the side of the body portion of the trigger so that it protrudes laterally therefrom (see FIGURES 3 and 3A) into the plane of pivotal movement of rebound lever 31 which is conventionally adjacent such side of the trigger.
Continuing with the dmcription of the firing action mechanism 26, its general arrangement is similar to that of conventional mechanisms in pistols of the type as regards the interacting relationships between the trigger 27 and hammer 29, and it will be understood from FIGURE 2A that upon pivoting of the trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A, or of the hammer 29 in the direction of arrow B, and depending upon Whether the hammer is manually cocked for single action firing or is cocked coincidentally with trigger actuation for double action firing of the pistol, the trigger sear 41 will engage either the single action hammer sear 52 or the double action hammer sear 53. The double action hammer sear 53 is formed by a surface of a hammer sear strut 54 which is pivotally mounted on hammer 29 as by a strut pin 55.
The scar strut 54 has a stop 56 which engages a coacting stop 57 of hammer 29 in response to the bias of a strut spring 58, as shown.
Referring to FIGURES 2 and 2A, the firing action mechanism arrangement conventionally includes a cylinder stop element, or bolt 59, which is pivotally mounted for rocking type movement on a bolt pin 60 attached to frame 21. The bolt 59 has an end 61 which is adapted to sequentially engage and disengage each of the peripherally spaced cylinder detents 62 within the cycle of each chamber indexing rotative movement of the cylinder 24. Bolt 59 has an opposite end 63 adapted to engage a laterally projecting lug 64 of rebound lever 31. The rebound lever 31 is biased into engagement at its free end 31b with the hand element 34 (at its housing portion 34a) by the urging of mainspring 33 for the purpose of returning the hand element 34 and trigger 27 to their prefiring positions after hammer 29 has been released to fire a cartridge. But, it will be seen that the rebound lever 31 will pivot against its bias, in the direction of arrow C, as hand element 34 moves upwardly in engagement with the cylinder ratchet 35. During such upward pivotal movement of the rebound lever 31, the end 63 of bolt 59 will also be urged upwardly by engagement of the laterally projecting rebound lever lug 64. The bolt 59 is thereupon pivoted about the axis of its bolt pin 60 so that its end 61 moves downwardly out of engagement with one of the cylinder detents 62, into which the end 61 has previously been biased by the urging of the bolt spring 65. Upon further movement of rebound lever in the direction of arrow C in response to continued upward movement of the hand element, the bolt end 63 rides off the rebound lever lug 64, thereby permitting the bolt 59 to pivot in opposite direction, responsive to the urging of the bolt spring 65, so that its end 61 may thereupon be biased perhaps first into contact with cylinder 24 at a location between two adjaoently spaced cylinder detents 62, but in any event into seating engagement within the cylinder detent 62 which is next in sequence around the cylinder upon the chamber indexing movement of the cylinder 24 having been completed. Such engagement of the bolt end 61 within any cylinder detent 62 Will limit the rotative movement of the cylinder 24 in indexing one of its cartridge receiving chambers 25 into alignment with barrel 22 of the pistol, as is understood by those having skill in the art. As is also well understood, upon the trigger and hammer sear elements riding apart in response to additional movement of trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A to fire the pistol, andupon the trigger 27 being released by the finger, the urging of mainspring 33 will cause the rebound lever 31 to pivot in direction opposite to that shown by arrow C, whereupon the rebound lever lug 64 will drop past the bolt end 63 to position the lug 64 therebelow for initiating another cycle of rocking movement of bolt 59 in response to a subsequent actuation of the mechanism. For this purpose, the bolt 59 is made of thin stock towards its end 63 so that, due to the respective confronting configurations of bolt end 63 and the side edge of the rebound lever lug 64, the bolt end 63 will resiliently deform in lateral direction, with respect to the bolt end 63 at the end of the cycle of actuation.
It will be understood from a comparison of FIGURES 3 and 3A that, during firing actuation movement of the mechanism 26 the hand element 34 is intended to move slidably with respect to the pistol frame 21 in direction towards the cylinder 24 for the purpose of appropriately engaging the ratchet 35 thereof to cause cartridge indexing rotation of the cylinder contemporaneously with the movements of the trigger and hammer. The hand element 34 has a free end 34b and a notched shoulder 34c, and is in laterally oiiset relation with respect to the axis of rotation of cylinder 24. Upon pivotal movement of trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A (FIGURE 2A), or of hammer 29 in the direction of arrow B, the hand will 8 sequential-1y engage first the ratchet lug 35a by its free end 34b, and thence the ratchet lug 35b by its notched shoulder 340, to cause rotation of the cylinder fully to the extent necessary for indexing one of the cartridge receiving chambers 25a into firing alignment with the barrel 22 in well known manner.
During such slidable movement the hand element 34 rides between, and is guided by the fixed guide element 66 which is attached to the frame 21, and the fixed guide element 67 which is formed by an interior surface of a removable side plate 63 of the frame. The side plate 68 is attached to the frame 21 by side plate screws 69 and 70 (FIGURE 1) and encloses and conceals the major portions or" the firing action mechanism 26 within the frame 21, its removal permitting access to the firing action mechanism. As previously mentioned, after hammer 29 has been released to fire a cartridge, and upon release of the trigger by the finger, the mainspring biased rebound lever 31 returns the hand element 34, as well as trigger 27, to their normal, prefiring positions thereby completing the chamber indexing cycle.
A follower lever 75, which has a first free end 76 and a second free end 78, is mounted for free, pivotal movement on hammer pin 30 which conventionally projects laterally of the side surface of hammer 29. During mechanism action in accordance with the preferred mode of its operation as will be described, the follower lever first free end '76 will slidably engage a notched slide surface '77 of hand element 34, and the follower lever second free end 78 will be engaged by the hammer element rearward end 29a. Referring briefly to FIGURES 4 and 4A, in view of the conventional construction of hand element 34 as it includes a rebound lever clearance notch 34d, and because follower lever is mounted within the plane of movement of rebound lever 31, the first free end 76 of follower lever 75 is adapted, as by a lateral protrusion 76b, to extend across the thickness of hand element 34 so as to engage the same during the action. Similarly, since the follower lever 75 is mounted in a plane of movement which is parallel to that of hammer element 29, the follower lever free end 78 is adapted, as by a laterally projecting bend 78b of its extreme end so as to engage the rearward end 29a of hammer 29.
Before describing the further adaptions as are made to follower lever 75, it should be first noted that, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, the fully cocked position of hammer 29, as indicated by the full line showing thereof in FIGURE 2A, is such as provides a relatively short distance of hammer fall upon its release to strike a cartridge, as compared to the distance of hammer fall in a conventional firing action mechanism having generally the same basic mode of operation. Such shortened throw of the hammer 29 is achieved by adaptation of the trigger and hammer sear elements as, for example, by shortening the length of trigger sear 41, or the length of hammer sear strut 54, or by otherwise adjusting the lengths thereof relative to each other, as is well known to those familiar with the art. For purposes of comparison, the distance of hammer throw in such conventional mechanism is indicated by dotted lines CFC (conventional full cock), the released position of hammer 29 being indicated by dotted lines R. It will be noted that the throw of the hammer in withdrawing the same from its released position to its fully cocked position in the pre ferred embodiment of the present invention is approximately one-half of that in the basic conventional mechanism, yet the invention is intended to achieve complete and full chamber indexing by the time the hammer 29 has attained its short throw fully cocked position.
The rate of movement of the hand element 34 towards cylinder 24 during the action is such as will cause the hand element to have moved from its position as shown in FIGURE 3 to that as shown in FIGURE 3A within the period of movement of hammer 29 from its released position as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 to its fully cocked position. Because of the fixed interrelationships of the hammer and trigger sear elements, it becomes apparent that, if the rate of movement of hand element 34 is to be appropriate for the purpose where certain given conditions of operation are imposed (such as the illustrated short throw hammer condition, for example), the hand element 34 must move relative to trigger 27. Such relative movement of the hand element 34 is permitted by the trigger slot 40' in which its axle 39 is mounted,
"and the preselected proper rate of its movement is determined by proper adaptation of follower lever 75 and of the elements with which it will be in engagement.
Thus, for the purpose of promoting the desired rate of upward movement of hand element 34, the end surface 76a of follower lever first free end 76 is adapted, substantially as shown, for cam-like action in its slidable engagement with the hand element notched slide surface 77, and the upper edge 78a of follower lever second free end 78 is adapted, substantially as shown, for proper engagement with hammer element rearward end 29a. It is believed that adaption of the engagement interface between upper edge 78a of the follower lever and rearward end 2% of the hammer will affect the rate of pivotal movement of follower lever 75 responsive to engagement by hammer element rearwardend 2%. However, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, and as is desirable to reduce the number of elements of a conventional firing action mechanism which would require modification, the hammer element rearward end 29a is substantially flat and straight as is conventional. Accordingly, the upper edge 78w of follower lever free end 78 is tapered as shown to provide correct contact for a proper rate of pivotal movement, the taper being arcuate and downward in direction towards the longitudinal centerline of the lever which passes through its centrally located hammer pin mounting aperture 89. In accordance with such rate of pivotal movement of follower lever 75 as is thereby provided, the follower lever end surface 76a and the hand element notched slide surface 77 are adapted with respect to each otherto provide a locus of points of contact therebetween such as will induce the desired rate of upward movement of the hand element.
Continuing with a description of the operation of firing action mechanism 26, a so-called double action movement thereof is illustrated by FIGURES 2 and 2A. FIG- URE 2 shows the mechanism as its parts will appear prior to their actuation for firing a cartridge (not shown) within cartridge receiving chamber 25a (see FIGURE 3). FIGURE 2A shows an intermediate disposition of the parts during their movement, the hammer 2% being now in its double action fully cocked position and immediately prior to its release to move under the urging of mainspring 33 into firing contact with the cartridge within chamber 25a. The position of the hammer 2? when in such firing contact with the cartridge (FIGURE 2) is referred to herein as the released position of the hammer 29. In actuating the mechanism between its positions as shown in FIGURES 2 and 2A, the pistol 29 is grasped by the handle portion in conventional manner with the forefinger applied to trigger 27. Squeezing of the trigger causes its pivotal movement, about trigger pin 28, in the direction of arrow A in FIGURE 2A. The-trigger movement brings the trigger sear 41 into pressure engagement with the underside of the double action hammer sear 53.
Further pivotal movement of the trigger lifts the sear strut 54 and hence, by the interaction of the strut and hammer stops 56, 57, causes the hammer 29 to pivot, in the direction of arrow B, to its fully cocked position as shown.
Continued finger pressure outrigger 27 causes a slight additional amount of trigger pivotal movement such that the trigger sear 41 rides off of the double action sear 53 of the hammer, whereupon the bias pressure of the pistol main spring 33 on the hammer stirrup 36 causes hammer 29 to swing sharply in directionopposite to that shown by arrow B to its released position as indicated by dotted lines R. The action of the mechanism as thus far described is well known to those familiar with the art.
Referring now to the action of follower lever 75 and hand element 34, it is seen from FIGURE 2 that in the initial pre-firing condition of the mechanism 26, the laterally projecting hand axle 39 rests against the lower'end 40a of the trigger slot 46, the hand element 34 being maintained in this position relative to trigger 27 by the urging of rebound lever 31 against axle housing portion 34a of the hand element, the rebound lever 31 being urged, in turn, by the bias of main spring 33.
In accordance with a preferred mode of operation of the mechanism, the first free end 76 of the follower lever '75 is in contact engagement with hand element 34, its end surface 76a engaging the notched slide surface 77 of the hand element 34. The second free end 78 of the follower lever 75 is in contact engagement with its upper edge 78a engaging the flat surface of hammer 29 at the rearward end 29a of the latter. It will be understood that, by reason of its engagement with the hammer element rearward end 29a, the freely mounted follower lever 75 will follow the movement of hammer 29 as the latter pivots in the direction of arrow B responsive to the pivoting of trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A; and that, by reason of the slidable engagement of its first free end 76 with hand element 34, the follower lever 75 will urge the hand element 34 upwardly in its intended rectilinear movement, between guides 66 and 67, towards cylinder ratchet 35. As previously mentioned, the hand element 34 will be urged upwardly towards cylinder 24 at a greater rate than is the lower end 40a of trigger slot 40 whereat the hand element axle 39 is initially in contact, and therefore the hand element 34 will be displaced, with slidable movement, upwardly within the trigger slot 40.
The adaption of follower lever first free end 76 with respect to its engagement with hand element 34 and the adaption of follower lever second free end 78 with respect to its engagement with hammer 29, together with adaption of the length of trigger slot 40, will provide upward movement of hand element 34 in contact with cylinder ratchet 35 at a rate such as will provide the requisite chamber indexing rotative movement of cylinder 24 within the period of movement of hammer 29 from its released position (FIGURE 2) to its fully cooked position (FIGURE 2A). Thus, by adaption of the hammer and trigger sear elements, as previously mentioned, any distance of hammer throw may be predetermined, and the mechanism wi l provide completed chamber indexing commensurate with any such distance of hammer movement.
The rebound lever 31 would normally follow such upward movement of the hand element 34 by reason of its slidable engagement with axle housing 34a of the latter. However, upon the riding apart of the hammer and trigger sear elements as causes release of the hammer as aforesaid, the downward urging of rebound lever 31 on hand element 34 would, under such normal conditions,
cause the hand to promptly, upon release of the hammer, move downwardly within trigger slot 40 and away from its engagement with cylinder ratchet 35. Such reaction would be expected by reason of the instantaneous release of the pressure of engagement between hammer 29 with follower lever second free end '78. But, by reason of the full amount of chamber indexing movement of the cylinder 24 as it attainable by the mechanism commensurate with hammer cocking movement, such downward movement of the hand element during the period of release of the hammer does not appear to affect the proper positioning of cartridge receiving chamber 25a at the time its contained cartridge is struck by the hammer in fining the same. It may therefore be said that the invention in one of its modified forms may be achieved upon inclu sion in the mechanism of a trigger having merely the elongated slot 40, but which does not include a trigger projecting portion, such as projecting portion 42. Such will be greases l l apparent upon a consideration of the functioning of trigger projecting portion 42 as will now be described.
The trigger projecting portion 42 is adapted to slidably engage the underside of rebound lever end 311) during the hammer cocking movement of the mechanism. At least, it is intended that the projecting portion 42 will be in engagement with rebound lever 31 at the time of release of the hammer 29 from its cocked position in firing a cartridge, and that the portion 42 will therefore, in view of finger pressure being exerted at the time on trigger 27, prevent rebound lever 31 from exerting its downward bias pressure on axle housing 34a of hand element 34 until release of the trigger by the finger. When finger pressure on trigger 27 has been released, it will of course be apparent that rebound lever 31 will exert its bias pressure at least initially on trigger projecting portion 42 so as to cause the trigger 27 and hand element 34 to return to their refiring positions as shown in FIG- URES l and 2. But prior to such release of the trigger by the finger, the rebound lever 31 will not exert its downward pressure on hand element 34 which would cause hand element 34 to move away from its engagement with cylinder ratchet 35.
Moreover, from FIGURE 2A it will be understood that follower lever first free end 76 may be adapted at its lower edge 760 in manner such that it will be positively engaged by rebound lever 31 during the referred to small additional amount of movement of trigger 27 as is required to cause release of the hammer 29, the rebound lever 31 being in turn engaged by the trigger projecting portion 42 as aforesaid. In this manner .and by reason of the engagement of follower lever first free end with hand element 34, a positive pressure on hand element 34 is maintained, urging it in engagement with cylinder ratchet 35 during the period of release of the hammer.
Where trigger projecting portion 42 is adapted to engage rebound lever 31 at substantially all times during the hammer cocking movement of the mechanism, not only that as has been described, but an additional benefit will be obtained during a single action movement of the mechanism.
The single action actuation of the mechanism has not been illustrated since it is believed that the movement of the elements during such action will be readily apparent to those having skill in the art from the foregoing description of a double action actuation thereof. Moreover, by reason of the small tolerances between the parts, a drawing of the mechanism in its single action movement would probably be inadequate to indicate that, during the initial, manual moving of the hammer 29 towards its single action cocked position, the trigger 27 will be freely and loosely pivotable about trigger pin 28 within a range of such pivotal movement as determined by the length of trigger slot 44} and the position therein of hand axle 39. Specifically, the hand axle 39 will initially tend to move off the lower end Aida of the slot in response to the pivotal upward urging of follower lever 75 whereupon, upon engagement of the trigger sear 41 by hammer single action sear 52, the trigger sear 41 will be simply resting upon the hammer sear 52 which is carrying the former in its pivotal movement in the direction of arrow A. Because of this looseness, or play between the trigger 27 and hand axle 39 during the single action cocking movement, the operator may experience a loss of trigger feel, and it may be possible that the trigger and hammer single action sear elements may not properly engage and interlock with each other in the conventionally known manner.
To overcome this tendency, it will be noted that contact during the cocking movement between trigger projecting portion 42, and rebound lever 31 serves to maintain a bias pressure on trigger 27, effectively urging it downwardly and away from hand axle 39. Thus, positive control over the trigger and its engagement with the hammer single action sear is assured.
An alternative means for maintaining pressure on hand element 34 during the period within which the hammer 2 9 is swinging towards its released position is provided by the modified form of trigger 27 illustrated in F1"- URE 5. In addition to the trigger projecting portion 42, the trigger 27 includes a spring receiving orifice 43 formed within body portion 27a of the trigger, orifice 43 communicating with the lower end 40a of the trigger slot 4% and having a coil type spring 44- disposed therewithin. The spring 44 is biased towards the aforementioned upward direction of movement of the hand element, and is retained within orifice 43 as by a set screw 45 in threaded engagement with orifice internal threads 43a which are formed at the open end of the orifice adjacent an edge of trigger body portion 27a. A button head 46 or the like may be provided at that end of the spring 44 which projects into the slot 4% for bias engagement with hand axle 39. Thus, the bias of spring 44 on hand axle 39 will normally urge the latter away from the lower end 49a of the slot 40.
Similar modified forms of trigger 27 are described in my aforementioned copending application, and it will be understood that any of the same might be used as an alternative to the trigger shown by FIGURE 5.
The mode of operation of a firing action mechanism as which includes the trigger modification shown by FIGURE 5 is not illustrated inasmuch as it is believed that such drawings could not adequately show the contemplated retained pressure on hand element 34 or the very small differences of clearance between the parts as compared to the positions thereof as illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 2A. However, in view of the foregoing description of the mechanism in its embodiments as shown by those figures, those having skill in the art will understand that upon slight additional movement of trigger 27 in the direction of arrow A (FIGURE 2A) as will cause the hammer and trigger sear elements to ride apart and thus release the hammer 29, although the pressure of hammer 29 on follower lever is relieved as aforesaid, the trigger projecting portion 42 of a modified trigger as shown in FIGURE 5 will continue to prevent any bias pressure of rebound lever 31 from acting on hand element 34 and, therefore, the spring 44 which is included in such trigger will at the time be exerting bias pressure on the underside of hand axle 39, thereby maintaining the hand axle 3? at the top of the trigger slot 40 and, consequently, the hand element 34 in pressure engagement with cylinder ratchet 35 during the period of release of the hammer. Of course, where such trigger is employed, it is unnecessary to adapt the lower edge 76c of follower lever free end 76 for engagement with the top edge of rebound lever 31 for the same purpose, as aforesaid.
By slight adaptions to the follower lever free ends '76, 78 as they engage, or not, the hand element 34, hammer rearward end 29a or rebound lever 31, other modes of operation of the mechanism 26 are possible.
For example, it may be preferred that the hammer have a conventional distance of throw upon actuation, and it will be understood that by adaption of the follower lever and hand element to provide only slightly accelerated movement, full chamber indexing may be achieved in a mechanism having such conventional hammer throw.
Alternatively, the first free end 76 of follower lever 75 may be adapted so as not to be in contact with notched slide surface 77 of hand element 34 during the initial stage of hand element upward movement, but to come into slidable engagement with notched slide surface 77 at a later time during such hand element movement so as to impart the accelerated rate of movement to the hand element only within the final stage of its upward movement. In such case, the initial upward movement of the hand element 34 will be imparted directly by trigger 27, the hand element axle 3? remaining in contact with the lower end 4% of the trigger slot 40 during such initial stage of movement or, alternatively, in the case where a trigger spring such as spring 44 is included, the initial upward movement of the hand element 34 will be imparted by such spring.
Still another alternative is provided as set forth in my aforementioned copending application. In such mode of operation, a trigger having a projecting portion 42 is utilized to lift the rebound lever 31 out of pressure engagement with hand axle housing 34a at all times during the hammer cocking and release movements and to urge the rebound lever 31 into continuous slidable engagement with the underside 760 of follower lever first free end 76, these parts being adapted for the purpose.
The follower lever second free end surface 78a is adapted for only slidable following association with hammer rearward end 29a so that the impetus for pivotal movement of follower lever 75 is normally received at all times from the rebound lever 31. Of course, the upward movement of hand element 34 is due to the engagement with its notched slide surface 77 of follower lever free end 76. In the event a sticky cartridge is encountered, the play in the mechanism 26 is sufiicient to cause the hammer rearward end 29a to exert pressure on follower lever second free end 78 to overcome the resistance thereof, or for the hammer 29 to become jammed so as to prevent its attaining its fully cocked position, as aforesaid.
Thus, a firing action mechanism has been described which achieves all of the objects of the invention.
What is claimed is:
1. In a cartridge firing device having a barrel element and a cartridge receiving cylinder mounted for rotatable movement to a position thereof aligning a contained cartridge with the barrel element: a firing action mechanism comprising a hammer mounted for pivotal move ment from a released position thereof infiring engagement with such cartridge when so aligned to a cocked position thereofspaced away from said released position, a trigger, a hand element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder to its said position, said hand element being rectilinearly movable with respect to said trigger during and in the direction of said cylinder engagement movement of the hand element, and a follower lever mounted for pivotal movement about an axis located centrally of its length, said follower lever having a first free end engaging said hand element during said pivotal movement of said hammer and a second free end engaging said hammer whereby said pivotal movement of the hammer so moves said hand element.
2. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 1 wherein said axis of pivotal movement of said follower lever coincides with the axis of said pivotal movement of said hammer.
3. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 2 wherein said follower lever slidably engages said hand element and said hammer.
4. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim. 3 whereinv said hammer has a rearward end facing in the direction of its said pivotal movement, and said second free end of the follower lever slidably engages said rearward end of the hammer.
5. In a cartridge firing device having a barrel element and a cartridge receiving cylinder mounted for rotatable movement to a position thereof aligning a contained cartridge with the barrel element: a firing action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement in direction towards a position thereof triggering the firing action mechanism to fire such cartridge, a hammer mounted for pivotal movement from a released position thereof in firing engagement with such cartridge when so aligned to a cocked position thereof spaced away from said released position, means on said trigger and said hammer providing said pivotal movement of the trigger and said pivotal movement of the hammer responsive to such pivotal movement of one of the same, a hand element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder to its said position, slide connection means between said hand element and said trigger permitting rectilinear movement of the hand element relative to the trigger during, and in the direction of, said cylinder engagement movement of the hand element, and a follower lever mounted for pivotal movement, said follower lever engaging said hand element and said hammer during such pivotal movement of said hammer and said trigger to so move said hand element and thereby rotate said cylinder to its said position prior to such triggering of the firing action mecha- I11S1'I1.
6. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 5 wherein said slide connection means between said hand element and said trigger comprises means defining an elongated slot in said trigger, the direction of elongation of said trigger slot being that of said movement of the hand element, and a laterally projecting axle of said hand element, said hand element axle being slidable within said trigger slot.
7. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 6 wherein said slide connection means further comprises a spring disposed within said trigger slot and normally urging said hand element axle in said direction of cylinder engagement movement of the hand element.
8. In a cartridge firing device having a barrel element and a cartridge receiving cylinder mounted for rotatable movement to a. position thereof aligning a contained cartridge with the barrel element: a firing action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement in direction towards a position thereof triggering the firing action mechanism to fire such cartridge, a hammer pin, a hammer mounted for pivotal movement on said hammer pin from a released position of the hammer in firing engagement with such cartridge when so aligned to a cocked position thereof spaced away from said released position, means on said trigger and said hammer providing said pivotal movement of the trigger and said pivotal movement of the hammer responsive to such pivotal movement of one of the same, a hand element mounted for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder to its said position, slide connection means between said hand element and said trigger permitting rectilinear movement of the hand element relative to the trigger during, and in the direction of, said cylinder engagement movement of the hand element, said hand element having a notched slide portion, and a follower lever mounted for pivotal movement on said hammer pin, said follower lever having a first free end slidably engaging said notched slide portion ofthe hand element and a second free end slidably engaging said hammer during said pivotal movement of said hammer and said trigger to so move said hand element and thereby rotate said cylinder to its said position prior to such triggering of the firing action mechanlsm.
9. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 8 wherein said hammer has a rearward end edge portion, and said follower lever second free end includes a laterally bent portion in slidable engagement with said rearward end edge portion of the hammer.
10. In a cartridge firing device having a barrel element and a cartridgereceiving cylinder mounted for rotatable movement to a position thereof aligning a contained cartridge with the barrel element: a firing action mechanism comprising a trigger mounted for pivotal movement in direction towards a position thereof triggering the firing action mechanism to fire such cartridge, a hammer pin, a hammer mounted for pivotal movement on said hammer pin from a released position of the hammer in firing engagement with such cartridge when so aligned to a cocked position thereof spaced away from said released position, means on said trigger and said hammer providing said pivotal movement of the trigger and said pivotal movement of the hammer responsive to such pivotal movement of one of the same, a hand element mounted on said trigger for movement in engagement with said cylinder to rotate the cylinder to its said position, slide connection means between said hand element and said trigger permitting rectilinear movement of the hand element relative to the trigger during, and in the direction of, said cylinder engagement movement of the hand element, a follower lever mounted for pivotal movement on said hammer pin, said follower lever having a first free end engaging said hand element and a second free end engaging said hammer during said pivotal movement of said hammer and said trigger, and a pivotally mounted rebound lever normally engaging said hand element and biasing the same in direction opposing its said cylinder engagement movement, said trigger having a projecting portion engaging said rebound lever to pivotthe latter to thereby relieve its said biasing engagement of the hand element during said pivotal movement of the trigger, whereby said pivotal movement of said hammer and said trigger so moves said hand element to rotate said cylinder to its said position prior to such triggering of the firing action mechanism.
11. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim wherein said slide connection means includes spring bias means normally urging said hand element and said trigger in the direction of said relative slid-able movement therebetween.
12. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 10 wherein said follower lever 3 first free end and said rebound lever are in slidable engagement during said pivotal movement of the trigger, whereby said pivoting of the rebound lever pivots said follower lever whereupon the latter urges said hand element in its said cylinder engagement movement.
13. In a cartridge firing device, a firing action mechanism according to claim 12 wherein said follower lever first free end and said rebound lever are in said slidable engagement during only that portion of said hand element movement which is just prior to such triggering of the firing action mechanism, and at all times when said trigger is in its said triggering position.
14. For a conventional revolver type pistol including a hammer having a downwardly facing rearward end edge, a hammer pin mounting said hammer for pivotal movement, and a hand element for sequentially indexing cartridges into alignment with the barrel of the pistol: a follower lever having length to extend between said hand element and said rearward end edge of the hammer and comprising, means centrally of said length of the follower lever for pivotally mounting the follower lever on said hammer pin, a first free end for slidably engaging said hand element during cocking movement of the hammer, and a second free end including a laterally projecting portion for slidably engaging said hammer during its cocking movement.
15. A follower lever according to claim 14 wherein said first free end includes a lateral protrusion for engaging said hand element.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 314,067 Smith Mar. 17, 1885 763,581 Wesson June 28, 1904 2,324,674 Buchanan July 20, 1943 2,927,390 Lewis Mar. 8, 1960

Claims (1)

  1. 5. IN A CARTRIDGE FIRING DEVICE HAVING A BARREL ELEMENT AND A CARTRIDGE RECEIVING CYLINDER MOUNTED FOR ROTATABLE MOVEMENT TO A POSITION THEREOF ALIGNING A CONTAINED CARTRIDGE WITH THE BARREL ELEMENT: A FIRING ACTION MECHANISM COMPRISING A TRIGGER MOUNTED FOR PIVOTAL MOVEMENT IN DIRECTION TOWARDS A POSITION THEREOF TRIGGERING THE FIRING ACTION MECHANISM TO FIRE SUCH CARTRIDGE, A HAMMER MOUNTED FOR PIVOTAL MOVEMENT FROM A RELEASED POSITION THEREOF IN FIRING ENGAGEMENT WITH SUCH CARTRIDGE WHEN SO ALIGNED TO A COCKED POSITION THEREOF SPACED AWAY FROM SAID RELEASED POSITION, MEANS ON SAID TRIGGER AND SAID HAMMER PROVIDING SAID PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF THE TRIGGER AND SAID PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF THE HAMMER RESPONSIVE TO SUCH PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF ONE OF THE SAME, A HAND ELEMENT MOUNTED FOR MOVEMENT IN ENGAGEMENT WITH SAID CYLINDER TO ROTATE THE CYLINDER TO ITS SAID POSITION, SLIDE CONNECTION MEANS BETWEEN SAID HAND ELEMENT AND SAID TRIGGER PERMITTING RECTILINEAR MOVEMENT OF THE HAND ELEMENT RELATIVE TO THE TRIGGER DURING, AND IN THE DIRECTION OF, SAID CYLINDER ENGAGEMENT MOVEMENT OF THE HAND ELEMENT, AND A FOLLOWER LEVER MOUNTED FOR PIVOTAL MOVEMENT, SAID FOLLOWER LEVER ENGAGING SAID HAND ELEMENT AND SAID HAMMER DURING SUCH PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF SAID HAMMER AND SAID TRIGGER TO SO MOVE SAID HAND ELEMENT AND THEREBY ROTATE SAID CYLINDER TO ITS SAID POSITION PRIOR TO SUCH TRIGGERING OF THE FIRING ACTION MECHANISM.
US176224A 1962-02-28 1962-02-28 Revolver firing action means Expired - Lifetime US3158948A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3903630A (en) * 1973-06-18 1975-09-09 John T Dirstine Firing mechanism for a cartridge firing device
US4067131A (en) * 1977-03-24 1978-01-10 Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. Firing mechanism for a revolver
US4581835A (en) * 1983-03-04 1986-04-15 Brouthers Paul E Ratchetless gun
US20150047243A1 (en) * 2012-08-20 2015-02-19 Ironmonger Arms LLC Ratcheting Mechanism for a Revolver
USD786385S1 (en) * 2016-01-18 2017-05-09 Kimber Ip, Llc Trigger guard for a revolver

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US314067A (en) * 1885-03-17 Lock for revolvers
US763581A (en) * 1903-12-10 1904-06-28 Daniel B Wesson Revolver.
US2324674A (en) * 1939-07-03 1943-07-20 J D Buchanan Firearm action
US2927390A (en) * 1955-01-31 1960-03-08 Karl R Lewis Single and double action revolver firing mechanism

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US314067A (en) * 1885-03-17 Lock for revolvers
US763581A (en) * 1903-12-10 1904-06-28 Daniel B Wesson Revolver.
US2324674A (en) * 1939-07-03 1943-07-20 J D Buchanan Firearm action
US2927390A (en) * 1955-01-31 1960-03-08 Karl R Lewis Single and double action revolver firing mechanism

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3903630A (en) * 1973-06-18 1975-09-09 John T Dirstine Firing mechanism for a cartridge firing device
US4067131A (en) * 1977-03-24 1978-01-10 Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. Firing mechanism for a revolver
US4581835A (en) * 1983-03-04 1986-04-15 Brouthers Paul E Ratchetless gun
US20150047243A1 (en) * 2012-08-20 2015-02-19 Ironmonger Arms LLC Ratcheting Mechanism for a Revolver
US9080825B2 (en) * 2012-08-20 2015-07-14 Paul A. Tusting Ratcheting mechanism for a revolver
USD786385S1 (en) * 2016-01-18 2017-05-09 Kimber Ip, Llc Trigger guard for a revolver

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