US3141700A - Seat control means for chair of the tall-cushion type - Google Patents

Seat control means for chair of the tall-cushion type Download PDF

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US3141700A
US3141700A US79418A US7941860A US3141700A US 3141700 A US3141700 A US 3141700A US 79418 A US79418 A US 79418A US 7941860 A US7941860 A US 7941860A US 3141700 A US3141700 A US 3141700A
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seat
chair
body
rest
link
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US79418A
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Peter S Fletcher
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ANTON LORENZ
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ANTON LORENZ
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C1/00Chairs adapted for special purposes
    • A47C1/02Reclining or easy chairs
    • A47C1/031Reclining or easy chairs having coupled concurrently adjustable supporting parts
    • A47C1/034Reclining or easy chairs having coupled concurrently adjustable supporting parts the parts including a leg-rest or foot-rest
    • A47C1/0342Reclining or easy chairs having coupled concurrently adjustable supporting parts the parts including a leg-rest or foot-rest in combination with movable backrest-seat unit or back-rest
    • A47C1/0345Reclining or easy chairs having coupled concurrently adjustable supporting parts the parts including a leg-rest or foot-rest in combination with movable backrest-seat unit or back-rest characterised by foot-rests actuated by lazy-tongs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C1/00Chairs adapted for special purposes
    • A47C1/02Reclining or easy chairs
    • A47C1/031Reclining or easy chairs having coupled concurrently adjustable supporting parts
    • A47C1/034Reclining or easy chairs having coupled concurrently adjustable supporting parts the parts including a leg-rest or foot-rest
    • A47C1/035Reclining or easy chairs having coupled concurrently adjustable supporting parts the parts including a leg-rest or foot-rest in combination with movably coupled seat and back-rest, i.e. the seat and back-rest being movably coupled in such a way that the extension mechanism of the foot-rest is actuated at least by the relative movements of seat and backrest
    • A47C1/0355Reclining or easy chairs having coupled concurrently adjustable supporting parts the parts including a leg-rest or foot-rest in combination with movably coupled seat and back-rest, i.e. the seat and back-rest being movably coupled in such a way that the extension mechanism of the foot-rest is actuated at least by the relative movements of seat and backrest actuated by linkages, e.g. lazy-tongs mechanisms
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C3/00Chairs characterised by structural features; Chairs or stools with rotatable or vertically-adjustable seats
    • A47C3/02Rocking chairs
    • A47C3/025Rocking chairs with seat, or seat and back-rest unit elastically or pivotally mounted in a rigid base frame
    • A47C3/027Rocking chairs with seat, or seat and back-rest unit elastically or pivotally mounted in a rigid base frame with curved rocking members between seat and base frame
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S297/00Chairs and seats
    • Y10S297/07Rocker/recliner

Description

July 21, 1964 P. s. FLETCHER 3,141,700

SEAT CONTROL MEANS FOR CHAIR OF THE T-CUSHION TYPE Filed Dec. 29, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. I.

ii iiii JB (/0926! 2a 4 26 INVENTOR. PETER -S. FLETCHER July 21, 1964 P. s. FLETCHER 3,141,700

SEAT CONTROL MEANS FOR CHAIR OF THE TCUSHION TYPE Filed Dec. 29, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 BY /24 M v July 21, 1964 P. s. FLETCHER 3,141,700

SEAT CONTROL MEANS FOR CHAIR OF THE T-CUSHION TYPE Filed Dec. 29, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Fl 6. 7. i k I 2/;

25 PETER 6. FLETCHER,

9 TTORAIEYS United States Patent Ofi ice 3,141,760 Patented July 21, 1964 3,141,700 SEAT CONTROL MEANS FOR CHAIR OF TI-m T-CUSHION TYPE Peter S. Fletcher, Delray Beach, Fla., assignor to Anton Lorenz, Ocean Ridge, Boynton Beach, Fla. Filed Dec. 29, 1960, Ser. No. 79,418 Claims. (Cl. 297--271) The present invention relates to improvements in reclining chairs and in particular to a reclining chair utilizing a seat of the T cushion type.

One of the more popular styling features in the design of upholstered chairs is the use of a T cushion seat, by which is meant a seat which in plan view has a generally T-shape. The front end of the seat has laterally-projecting portions at its sides, which portions overlap or extend across the front of the arms of the chair. This gives the visual effect of a seat which extends from one side edge of the chair to the other, when the chair is viewed from the front. The T-cushion style may be utilized in the seat itself or in a loose cushion resting on the seat.

To conform to such styling requirements, it is desirable to employ T-cushion type seats or loose cushions in chairs of the automatic reclining type, that is to say, in the usual reclining chair or in rocker chairs incorporating an automatic reclining movement. This has not hitherto been possible in reclining or rocker chairs incorporating a TV or slightly tilted resting position, or the reason that in such movement the seat is moved in a rearward direction relative to the chair frame of which the arms are an integral part. Since the T-cushion type seat or cushion includes the aforementioned laterally-projecting portions which closely overlap the front surfaces of the chair arms, these projecting portions could not be moved rearwardly with the seat relative to the fixed cnair arms and would block the rearward movement of the seat.

It is an object of the present invention to overcome the aforementioned difliculty by providing in a reclining or rocker chair means for mounting the seat in such a manner as to produce the desired movement to a TV or slightly tilted position, while at the sametime to permit the use of a T-cushion type seat or separate cushion.

More specifically, it is an object of the present invention to provide in a reclining or rocker chair having a seat or separate cushion of the T-cushion type, a control arrangement mounting the seat on the chair frame for rearward tilting movement to a TV or slightly-tilted resting position without any rearward shifting component in seat movement, whereby the projecting portions of the seat will remain clear of the chair arms and will not in terfere with such movement.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a chair of the character described in which the control atrangement also operates to lock the body-supporting unit to the chair frame in each of two stable positions, namely an upright sitting position, and a resting or slightly-tilted TV position. This is particularly adaptable to rocker chairs in which it is required that the locked body-supporting unit and chair frame be adapted to be rocked upon a base in both stable positions.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a chair of the character described which also includes a legrest and means mounting said leg-rest for movement between a retracted position and an extended leg-supporting position, and in which the seat control means also functions to actuate the control linkage whereby the leg-rest is extended in response to tilting movement of the seat relative to the chair frame.

In accordance with the invention, there is provided a chair having a body-supporting unit including a back-rest and a seat of the T-cushion type, a chair frame, and

the chair frame and a pair of pivotally interconnected links supporting the rear end portion of the seat in the upright sitting position. One link of the pair is pivotally mounted on the chair frame and the other link is pivotally connected to the rear portion of the seat. In the upright sitting position, the pair of links are arranged substantially in a dead-center, in-line position between the support frame and the seat to hold the seat immovable relative to the support frame. Means are provided to move the pair of links out of their in-line position and cause them to break at their pivotal interconnection, whereby to lower the rear portion of the seat and cause the seat to turn about its pivotal mount on the chair frame until it reaches its tilted position. In such seat movement there is no rearward shifting of the seat relative to the chair frame and the projecting seat portions do not contact the chair arms.

The chair also includes a leg-rest mounted for movement between a retracted position beneath the seat and an extended position forwardly of the seat. Actuating means are also provided to move the leg-rest to its extended position in response to tilting movement of the seat relative to the chair frame. Such actuating means may be provided by an extension of one of the links of said pair connected by a further linkage to said leg-rest.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent during the course of the following specification when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, with portions broken away and shown in section, of a swivel-rocker chair in corporating the invention herein, the chair being shown in its upright sitting position with the leg-rest retracted;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 1, but showing in full line the chair thereof in its tilted resting or TV position with the leg-rest extended, and in broken line the stable equilibrium position when occupied;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary elevational view of the lower rear exterior portion of the chair, showing the operating handle in its two extreme positions in full and broken line;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view, with portions broken away and shown in section, of a modified form of the in vention incorporated in a rocker chair, the chair being shown in upright sitting position with the leg-rest retracted;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the chair illustrated in FIG. 4, but showing the chair in its tilted resting position with the leg-rest extended;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary elevational view of the lower rear exterior portion of the chair shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, illustrating the operating handle thereof in its two extreme positions in full and broken line;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view, with portions broken away and shown in section, of a modified type of arrangement made in accordance with the invention and in corporated in a rocker chair having an independentlymovable seat and backrest with a loose T-cushion, the chair being shown in upright sitting position with the legrest retracted, and

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 7, but showing the chair thereof in its tilted resting position with the leg-rest extended.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the control arrangement of the present invention is shown, by way of example, incorporated in a swivel-rocker chair, designated generally by the reference numeral 10, although it is to be understood that the arrangement may be advantageously employed in any type of chair movable to a slightly-tilted or TV position and having a T-cushion type seating surface. For example, the invention may be applied to a reclining chair, an olfice swivel chair, or the like.

The chair is of the swivel-rocker type and includes a base 12, a chair frame 14 mounted thereon, and a bodysupporting unit 16 mounted on the frame 14.

The body-supporting unit 16 comprises a seat 18 and a back-rest 20 formed integrally with each other. The seat 18 is of the T-cushion type, that is to say, in plan view it presents a T-shape, having at its front end portions 18a which project laterally outwardly from the side edges of the seat body. While the seat 18 itself is shown as provided with this T-shape it is to be understood that the seat may be of the usual rectangular shape and covered by a loose cushion of T-shape, as illustrated, for example, in FIGS. 7 and 8.

The base 12 is illustrated in the form of a pedestal having five legs 24 which extend radially and downwardly from a swivel assembly 26. The swivel assembly 26 is of conventional construction and comprises a stationary plate 28 serving as a stationary raceway and secured to legs 24, and a movable plate 30 serving as a movable raceway and connected to the stationary plate 28 by a ball bearing assembly 32 of the usual type.

The chair frame 14 comprises a pair of side frames 38 and 40, the upper portions of which constitute the arms of the chair and have upwardly-inclined forward edges 39. The side frames 38, 40 are spaced from each other and are interconnected by cross-bars or braces such as the cross-bars 42 and 44. Seated on the cross-bars 42 and 44, and secured thereto, is a rocker member 46 having an arcuate rocker surface 48 on its under surface. The rocker surface 48 rests upon and engages a base member 50 secured to the upper swivel plate 30 of base 12, which base member 50 has a rocker supporting surface 52 on its upper face. It will be appreciated that the chair frame 14 and rocker member 46 constitute a rigid unit resting on base 12 and adapted to rock thereupon by means of the rocker surface 48 and rocker-supporting surface 52.

At either side, the rocker member 46 and base member 50 carry respective L-shaped brackets 54 and 56 between which are mounted a pair of tension springs 58 and 60. The ends of springs 58 and 60 are secured to the brackets 54 and 56, and the springs serve as means to connect the rocker member 46 with the base member 50, to provide a force against which the chair frame may be rocked, and to bring the chair frame to a level position of equilibrium, as shown in FIG. 1.

The body-supporting unit 16 is movably mounted on the chair frame 14 by means of a single pivot 62 which connects the lower central portion of the seat 18 to the side frames 38 and 40. The body-supporting unit 16 can therefore turn about pivot 62 relative to the chair frame 14 from the normal upright sitting position of FIG. 1 to the rearwardly-tilted sitting position of FIG. 2. In this simple pivoting movement, the front end of the seat is raised and its rear end is lowered, but the seat has no rearward translation relative to the chair frame 14. Such rearward translation is impossible because of the T- cushion construction of the seat 18, the front projecting portions 18a extending across the front edges of the side frames 38 and 40. The front edges 39 of the side frames 38 and 40 are, however, upwardly and rearwardly inclined slightly to provide clearance for the projecting seat portions 18a when the front of the seat 18 is raised during its pivoting movement.

The rear portion of the body-supporting unit 16 is supported by a pair of links 66 and 68, which normally maintain the seat 18 in the sitting position of FIG. 1. The link 66 is connected at its upper end by pivot 70 to the rear end portion of seat 18 and at its lower end by pivot 72 to the link 68. The lower end of link 63 is rigidly mounted on a stub shaft 74 which is journalled in the side frame 40. The end of shaft 74 extends through the side frame 40 and projects from the outer surface thereof. To this projecting end is secured a handle 76, shown in FIG. 3, for manual turning of shaft 74 and actuation of links 66 and 68 to lower the rear portion of the seat 18, in a manner to be presently described.

The chair also includes a leg-rest 78 and a leg-rest control linkage 80 mounting the leg-rest on the forward portion of the seat for movement from a retracted position beneath the seat (shown in FIG. 1) to an extended legsupporting position forwardly of the seat, as shown in FIG. 2. In this illustrative embodiment, the leg-rest control linkage 80 is illustrated as including three pairs of interconnected links providing a lazy tong or scissor type of leg-rest maunting and control linkage. It is to be understood, however, that any other suitable type of leg-rest mounting and control linkage may be substituted therefor, such other linkages being well-known and amply disclosed in prior patents owned by the assignee of this application.

Specifically, the leg-rest control linkage 80 includes a first pair of links 81 and 82 having their adjacent ends connected by pivot 83, a second pair of links 84 and 85 having their adjacent ends connected by pivot 86, and a third pair of links 87 and 88 having their adjacent ends connected by pivot 89. The first link 81 of the first pair has a pivotal mount 90 on the forward portion of the seat 18, while the first link 84 of the second pair has a pivotal mount 91 on the seat at a point spaced forwardly of the pivotal mount 90. The second link 82 of the first pair crosses over the first link 84 of the second pair and has a pivotal connection 92 therewith. The forward end of the second link 82 of the first pair has a pivotal connection 93 to the first link 87 of the third link pair. The second link 85 of the second link pair crosses over the first link 87 of the third link pair and is connected thereto at its crossing over point by pivot 95. The ends of links 85 and 88 are connected to spaced points on the leg-rest 78 by respective pivots 97 and 99.

Means are also provided for actuating the leg-rest control linkage 80 in response to tilting movement of the body-supporting unit 16 relative to the chair frame 14. Such actuating means includes an angular extension 68a of the link 68 and an actuating link 94. The extension 68a extends rearwardly and upwardly from the link 68 when the latter is in the upright position of FIG. 1, and the free end of extension 68a is connected by pivot 96 to the rear end of actuating link 94. The forward end of actuating link 94 is connected by pivot 98 to the link 81 at a point below the pivot 90.

In the upright sitting position of the chair shown in FIG. 1 with the leg-rest retracted, the body-supporting unit 16 is maintained in a fixed position relative to the chair frame 14 by the links 66 and 68 which are in axial alignment between the pivot 70 on seat 18 and the fixed pivot 74 on chair frame 14. The center of gravity of the body-supporting unit 16 establishes a stable position of the rocker member 46 on the base member 50 with the springs 58, 60 substantially unstressed. From this position, the rigidly-coupled body-supporting unit 16 and chair frame 14 may be rocked back and forth upon base 12 with the rocker surface 48 turning upon the rocker-supporting surface 52. The springs 58 and 60 are wound with some initial tension. When the unit 16 and frame 14 is rocked rearwardly, the rear pair of springs 61 are contracted to relieve some initial tension and the front pair of springs 58 are expanded to increase their tension. When the unit 16 and frame 14 are rocked forwardly, the front pair of springs 58 are contracted and the rear pair of springs 60 expanded.

When the occupant of the chair wishes to bring the chair to a tilted sitting position with the leg-rest extended, he grasps the handle or lever 76 and turns it forwardly or in a counter-clockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 3, from the position shown in full line to the position shown in broken line. The handle 76 turns shaft 74 correspondingly, and shaft 74 in turn moves link 68 from the upstanding position of FIG. 1 to the forwardly-extending position of FIG. 2. This movement of link 68 lowers the link 66 and thus permits the rear end portion of the seat 18 to lower, the seat 18 pivoting rearwardly about its pivotal mount 62 on the chair frame 14. Such rearward pivoting movement of body-supporting unit 16 relative to chair frame 14 continues until a rear surface 16a of the body-supporting unit 16 engages the rear end portion of rocker member 46 and is stopped thereby, as shown in FIG. 2.

The links 66 and 68 may be regarded as a toggle linkage which is in a dead-center, in-line position in FIG. 1 to provide rigid support for the rear end of the seat 18 so that the body-supporting unit 16 and chair frame 14 may rock as a rigidly-coupled unit upon the base 12. It is only when this toggle is broken at its knee pivot 72 by manual actuation of handle 76, that the rear end portion of seat 18 is released and the body-supporting unit 16 can tilt rearwardly relative to the chair frame 14 about its pivotal mount 62. It should be understood that the handle 76 need be manually actuated only to the extent necessary to move the links 66 and 68 out of their in-line, dead-center position of FIG. 1. Once the links 66, 68 assume an angular disposition relative to each other, the dropping movement of the rear of the seat becomes automatic. The weight of the seat and the occupant will cause the links 66, 68 to increase the angle therebetween until downward movement of the seat rear portion is stopped by engagement of the surface 16a with rocker member 46.

When the link 68 moves forwardly about pivot '74 to lower the rear end portion of the seat 18, as previously described, it also carries forwardly its integral angular extension 68a. The latter carries the leg-rest actuating link 94 in a forward direction. Actuating link 94 in turn applies a pushing force against leg-rest link 81 at its point of connection 98, causing links 81 and 84 to turn forwardly about their respective pivotal mounts 9t) and 91 on seat 18, and thereby actuating the leg-rest control linkage 80 to elevate the leg-rest 78 to its extended, leg-supporting position of FIG. 2. In this position, the leg-rest 78 is positioned forwardly of the seat 18 and substantially at the level thereof.

FIG. 2 depicts the stable TV position of the chair 10 with the body-supporting unit 16 slightly tilted and the legrest 78 extended in position to support the out-stretched legs of the occupant. With the chair in this position, the occupants body is in a restful attitude suitable for viewing television, reading, or the like. The position of the chair shown in full line in FIG. 2 is illustrated to show the relative positions of the body-supporting unit 16 and the chair frame 14 in comparison with their positions of FIG. 1. Actually, the chair parts will not stabilize in this position. When the chair is occupied, the center of weight of the occupants body will shift forwardly when the chair is brought to the position of FIG. 2, because the extended leg-rest 78 is supporting the weight of the occupants outstretched legs well forwardly of the seat. Thus, the rigidly-coupled body-supporting unit 16 and chair frame 14 have a tendency to tip forward, and the rocker member 46 will turn forwardly slightly on the base member 58 until a stabilized position is reached. The forward springs 58 will thus be contracted and the rear springs 60 expanded and further tensioned to achieve this stabilized position in conformity to the center of gravity of the chair frame 14, body-supporting unit 16 and occupants body as a combined entity. The brokenline representation in FIG. 2 represents an illustrative actual occupied position of the body-supporting unit 14 and chair frame 16 as stabilized in the manner just explained. It will be observed that while the body-supporting unit 16 has been appreciably tilted relative to the chair frame 14, it is only slightly tilted relative to the floor surface and the occupants body is still in a sitting position with only a slight rearward inclination.

In the stable position of FIG. 2, the chair may again be utilized as a rocker by action of the occupant in shifting his weight forwardly and rearwardly, and causing the rocker surface 48 of rocker member 46 to turn back and forth upon base member 50. When this rocker action is terminated, the springs 58, 60 will return the coupled chair frame 14 and body-supporting unit 16 to the stable position of FIG. 2.

To return from the stable resting position of FIG. 2 to the upright sitting position of FIG. 1, the occupant applies downward pressure with his legs upon the extended leg-rest 78. This causes the actuating link 94 to raise the link 68 until it has reached its upstanding position of FIG. 1, and the seat 18 is again in its level position with its rear end portion supported by the aligned links 66 and 68. To assist in this return movement against frictional resistance, the handle 76 may be. utilized.

The chair of the instant invention differs from conventional reclining chairs and rocker chairs with TV movements, in that its body-supporting unit has no rearward shifting movement relative to the chair frame. Instead, a single pivot 62 mounts the body-supporting unit 16 on the chair frame 14 in such a manner that the unit 16 turns in a simple pivoting movement on the chair frame. This permits the use of a T-cushion type seat in a chair of this type, the lateral extensions 18a of the seat moving along the inclined forward front edges 39 of the arm portions of side frame 38 and 46 without contacting these front edges. At the same time, the links 66 and 68 pro vide means for locking the body-supporting unit to the chair frame in the two stable positions and also to actuate the leg-rest in response to the tilting movement of the body-supporting unit.

As was previously indicated, the swivel-rocker chair shown herein is presented as an illustrative example of a type of chair in which the control arrangement of the invention may be incorporated. The arrangement may also be used advantageously in the ordinary reclining chair. In FIG. 1, legs 22 are shown in phantom as a means of supporting the chair frame 14 on the floor surface, in which case the chair shown herein would constitute a reclining chair instead of a rocker or swivel chair. The chair frame 10 would then be immovably supported on the floor surface, and the rocker member 46, base member 50, swivel assembly 26, and base legs 24 would be omitted from the chair structure.

Referring now to FIGS. 4-6, there is shown therein a chair 116 also of the swivel rocker type but incorporating a slightly modified mechanism made in accordance with the invention. The chair 118 includes a base 112, a chair frame 114 mounted thereon, and a body-supporting unit 116 mounted on the frame 114.

The body-supporting unit 116 comprises a seat 118 and a back-rest 120 formed rigidly with each other, the seat 1118 again being of the T-cushion type and having front end portions 118a which project laterally outwardly from the side edges of the seat body. Alternately, the seat may be covered by a loose cushion of T-shape.

The base 112 is again of pedestal form and is supported by legs 124 which extend radially and downwardly from a swivel assembly 126, comprising a stationary plate 128 secured to legs 124, and a movable plate 130 connected to the stationary plate 128 by a ball bearing assembly 132.

The chair frame 114 comprises a pair of spaced side frames 138 and 146, the upper portions of which constitute the arms of the chair and have forward edges 139 which fit the T-cushion portions 11811 of the seat 118 in the normal manner. The side frames 138, 140 are connected by cross-bars or braces 142 and 144. Seated on the cross-bars 142 and 144, and secured thereto, is a rocker member 146, the lower end of which is formed as an arcuate rocker surface 148. The rocker surface 148 rests upon and engages the rocker supporting surface 152 7 w of base member 150 secured to the upper swivel plate 130 of base 112.

At either side, the rocker member 146 and base member 150 carry respective L-shaped brackets 154 and 156 which are connected by a pair of tension springs 158 and 160 mounted therebetween. The springs S and 160 serve to bring the chair frame 114 to a level position of equilibrium, as shown in FIG. 4.

The body-supporting unit 116 is movably mounted on the chair frame 114 by means of a link 161 having a pivotal mount 163 on the support frame 114 and connected by pivot 165 to the seat 118. The link 161 provides a flexible pivotal mount for the seat which, in addition to providing the necessary pivotal connection of the seat with the support, also permits a slight degree of forward seat movement, as will be presently explained. The rear portion of the body-supporting unit 116 is supported by a pair of links 166 and 168, which normally maintain the seat 118 in the sitting position of FIG. 4. The link 166 is connected at its upper end by pivot 17% to the rear end portion of seat 118 and at its lower end by pivot 172 to the link 168. The lower end of link 168 is rigidly mounted on a stub shaft 174 which is journalled in the side frame 140. The end of shaft 174 extends through the side frame 140 and projects from the outer surface thereof. To this projecting end is secured a handle 176, shown in FIG. 6, for manual turning of shaft 174 and actuation of links 166 and 168 to lower the rear portion of the seat 118. A constraining link 167 is also utilized in this embodiment because of the flexible pivotal mount provided by the link 161. Said constraining link is mounted on the support frame by pivot 169 and is connected to the seat at pivot 170.

The chair also includes a leg-rest 178 and a leg-rest control linkage 186 which is identical to the control linkage 80 previously described. Control linkage 18b mounts the leg-rest on the forward portion of the seat for movement from its retracted position of FIG. 4 to its extended, leg-supporting position forwardly of the seat, shown in FIG. 5. It is again to be understood that the leg-rest control linkage 186 is shown merely by Way of illustration and that other types of leg-rest control linkages may be substituted therefor.

Specifically, the leg-rest control linkage 180 includes a first pair of links 181 and 182 connected by pivot 183, a second pair of links 184 and 185 connected by pivot 186, and a third pair of links 187 and 188 connected by pivot 189. The links 181 and 134 are mounted at spaced points on the seat 118 by respective pivots 190 and 191. The link 182 crosses over the link 184 and has a pivotal connection 192 therewith. The forward end of the link 182 has a pivotal connection 193 to the link 187. The link 185 crosses over the link 187 and is connected thereto at its crossing over point by pivot 195. The ends of links 185 and 188 are connected to spaced points on the legrest 178 by respective pivots 197 and 199.

Means are also provided for actuating the leg-rest control linkage 180 in response to tilting movement of the body-supporting unit 116 relative to the chair frame 114. Such actuating means includes a lever 171 mounted intermediate its ends on the support frame by pivot 173, a link 175 connected to one arm of lever 171 by pivot 177, and an actuating link 194 connected to the other arm of lever 171 by pivot 196. The link 175 is mounted on the seat 118 by pivot 179. The actuating link 194 extends forwardly from the lever 171 and at its forward end. is connected by pivot 198 to the link 181.

In the upright sitting position of the chair shown in FIG. 4 with the leg-rest retracted, the body-supporting unit 116 is maintained in a fixed position relative to the chair frame 114 by the links 166 and 168 which are in axial alignment between the pivot 170 on seat 118 and the fixed pivot 174 on chair frame 114. The center of gravity of the body-supporting unit 116 establishes a stable position of the rocker member 146 on the base 9 u member 151) with the springs 158, 16% substantially unstressed. From this position, the rigidly-coupled bodysupporting unit 116 and chair frame 114 may be rocked back and forth upon base 112, against the tension of springs 158, 160, with the rocker surface 148 turning upon the rocker-supporting surface 152.

When the occupant of the chair wishes to bring the chair to a tilted sitting position with the leg-rest extended, he turns the handle 176 forwardly or in a counter-clockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 6, from the position shown in broken line. The handle 176 turns shaft 174 correspondingly, and shaft 174 in turn moves link 168 from the upstanding position of FIG. 4 to the forwardlyextending position of FIG. 5. This movement of link 168 lowers the link 166 and thus permits the rear end portion of the seat 118 to descend until its lower rear surface 116a engages the rear end portion of the rocker member 146 and is stopped thereby. At the same time, the link 161 turns forwardly about its pivotal mount 163, as can be seen by a comparison of FIGS. 4 and 5, moving the seat slightly forwardly. To insure this forward movement of the seat 118, the link 167 turns downwardly about its fixed pivotal mount 169 and guides the rear portion of seat 118 in a forward direction. Since the rear portion of the seat is lowered by the toggle action of links 166 and 168 at a greater rate than the forward portion thereof, the body-supporting unit 116 is tilted rearwardly relative to the chair frame 114, even though it is shifted in a forward direction as previously described. In any event, the front laterally-extending portions 118a of the seat 118 do not engage the front edges 139 of the side frame arm portions, and the chair is again adapted for T-cushion seat construction.

As the rear portion of the seat 118 moves downwardly and forwardly to its tilted position of FIG. 5, it carries link 175 with it through the pivotal connection 179. Link 175 pulls downwardly upon the rear arm of lever 171, causing said lever 171 to turn about its pivotal mount 173 on the chair frame, so that its other arm moves in a forward direction, pushing actuating link 114 forwardly relative to the seat 118. Actuating link 194 in turn applies a pushing force against leg-rest 181 at its point of connection 11%, causing links 181 and 184 to turn forwardly about their respective pivotal mounts 1% and 191 on seat 118, and thereby actuating the leg-rest control linkage 186 to elevate the leg-rest 178 to its extended, leg-supporting position of FIG. 5. In this position, the leg-rest 178 is positioned forwardly of the seat 118 and substantially at the level thereof.

FIG. 5 illustrates the stable TV position of the chair with the body-supporting unit 116 slightly tilted and the leg-rest 178 extended in position to support the outstretched legs of the occupant. The position of the chair shown in full line in FIG. 5 is again intended to show the relative positions of the body-supporting unit 116 and the chair frame 114 in comparison with their positions of FIG. 4. The actual stabilized position of the occupied chair is shown in broken line, and, as previously described, takes into account the slight forward tipping action of the rocker assembly which compensates for the forward shift of the center of weight of the occupant and the chair when the leg-rest is extended.

In the stable position of FIG. 5, the chair may again be utilized as arocker by action of the occupant in shifting his weight forwardly and rearwardly, causing the rocker surface 148 of rocker member 146 to turn back and forth upon base member 150. When this rocker action is terminated, the springs 158, will return the coupled chair frame 114 and body-supporting unit 116 to the stable position of FIG. 5.

T 0 return from the stable resting position of FIG. 5 to the upright sitting position of FIG. 4, the occupant must, in this instant, manually turn the handle 176 to bring the links 166 and 168 to their substantially aligned position of FIG. 4. As the body-supporting unit 116 is 9 thus brought to its upright sitting position, the lever 171 is turned to bring the leg-rest 178 to its retracted position through acuating link 194 and control linkage 180.

FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate a modified type of rocker chair 210 in which the seat and back-rest are not rigidly connected, but are mounted for independent movement, and in which the tilting movement of the seat is automatically initiated by movement of the back-rest so that the handle is eliminated. In this embodiment, like reference numerals are again employed for similar parts, except that they form part of a 200 series.

The chair 2111 again includes a base 212, a chair frame 214 mounted thereon, and a body-supporting structure 216 mounted on the frame 214.

The body-supporting structure 216 comprises a seat 218 and a back-rest 228 which are separately formed. The seat 218 in this instance is shown as having a generally rectangular body which may be a spring framework or may be upholstered, and which supports and is covered by a loose cushion 219 of T-shape. The T-cushion 219 has front end portions 219a which project laterally outwardly from the side edges of the cushion 219.

The base 212 again includes a swivel assembly 226 mounted on legs 224. The swivel assembly 226 comprises a stationary raceway plate 228 connected to a movable raceway plate 238 by a ball bearing assembly 232.

The chair frame 2114 again comprises a pair of side frames 238 and 246, the upper portions of which constitute the arms of the chair and have forward edges 239 which extend substantially perpendicularly to the plane of sea-t 218. The side frames 238, 240 are spaced from each other and are interconnected by cross-bars or braces 242 and 244. Seated on the cross-bars 242 and 244, and secured thereto, is a rocker member 246 having an arcuate rocker surface 248 on its under surface. The rocker surface 248 rests upon and engages a base member 250 secured to the upper swivel plate 238 of base 212, which base member 256 has a rocker supporting surface 252 on its upper face. At either side, the rocker member 246 and base member 2541 carry respectiVe L-shaped brackets 254 and 256 between which are mounted a pair of tension springs 258 and 2613.

The body-supporting unit 216 is again movably mounted on the chair frame 214 by a link 261 which is mounted on the chair frame by pivot 263 and is connected to the seat 218 by pivot 265. The rear end of seat 218 is rigidly connected to a bar 259 which extends rearwardly therefrom, the rear end of the bar 259 being connected to bar 266 by pivot 276. The bar 266 is rigidly secured to the back-rest 220 and depends therefrom.

The back-rest 221) and the rear portion of the seat 218 are supported by the bar 266 and a link 268 which normally maintain the seat and back-rest in the sitting position of FIG. 7. The bar 266 is connected at its lower end by ipivot 272 to the link 268. The lower end of link 268 is mounted by pivot 274 on the chair frame 214. A further link 267 is pivotally mounted at 269 on the chair frame, and is connected by pivot 278 to the bars 259 and 266.

The chair also includes a leg-rest 278 and a leg-rest control linkage 288 mounting the leg-rest on the forward portion of the seat for movement from the retracted posiof FIG. 7 to the extended leg-supporting position shown in FIG. 8. In this embodiment, the leg-rest control linkage 281) is again illustrated as including three pairs of interconnected links, although it is to be understood that any other suitable type of leg-rest mounting and control linkage may be substituted therefor.

The leg-rest control linkage 280 includes a first pair of links 281 and 282 having their adjacent ends connected by the pivot 283, a second pair of links 284 and 285 having their adjacent ends connected by pivot 286, and a third pair of links 287 and 288 having their adjacent ends connected by pivot 289. The first link 281 of the first pair has a pivotal mount 298 on the forward portion of the seat 218, while the first link 284 of the second pair has a pivotal mount 291 on the seat at a point spaced forwardly of the pivotal mount 290. The second link 282 of the first pair crosses over the first link 284 of the second pair and has a pivotal connection 292 therewith. The forward end of the second link 282 of the first pair has a pivotal connection 293 to the first link 287 of the third link pair. The second link 285 of the second link pair crosses over the first link 287 of the third link pair and is connected thereto at its crossing over point by pivot 295. The ends of links 285 and 288 are connected to spaced points on the leg-rest 278 by respective pivots 297 and 299.

Actuating link 294 is again provided for actuating the leg-rest control linkage 288 in response to tilting movement of the body-supporting structure 216 relative to the chair frame 214. Said actuating link 294 is connected by pivot 296 to an angular extension 268a of link 268. The extension 268a extends rearwardly and upwardly from the link 268 when the latter is in the upright position of FIG. 7, and the free end of extension 268a is connected by pivot 296 to the rear end of actuating link 294. The forward end of actuating link 294 is connected by pivot 298 to the link 281 at a point below the pivot 290.

In the upright sitting position, of the chair 210 shown in FIG. 7 with the leg-rest retracted, the body-supporting structure 216 is maintained in a fixed position relative to the chair frame 214 by the link 261 and by links 266 and 268 which are in axial alignment between the pivot 278 on back-rest 228 and the fixed pivot 274 on chair frame 214. The center of gravity of the body-supporting structure 216 establishes a stable position of the rocker member 246 on the base member 256. From this position, the back-rest 229, seat 218 and chair frame 214 as a rigid unit may be rocked back and forth upon base 212 with the rocker surface 248 turning upon the rockersupporting surface 252 against tension of springs 258 and 260.

When the occupant of the chair wishes to bring the chair to a tilted sitting position with the leg-rest extended, he merely applies his weight rearwardly against the backrest 220, no handle being required in this instance. The back-rest 228 turns rearwardly about pivot 278, so that the lower end of the depending bar 266 is moved in a forward direction. As the lower end of bar 266 moves forwardly, it turns link 268 from the upstanding position of FIG. 7 to the forwardly-extending position of FIG. 8. This movement of link 268 lowers the bar 266 and thus permits the back-rest 220 and the rear end portion of the seat 218 to move downwardly and slightly forwardly, the link 261 turning forwardly to permit this forward movement of the seat. Such movement of body-supporting structure 216 relative to chair frame 214 continues until the bottom surface 228a of the back-rest 220 engages the cross bar 244 and is stopped thereby, as shown in FIG. 8.

The bar 266 and link 274 may be regarded as a toggle linkage which is in a substantial dead-center, in-line position in FIG. 7 to provide rigid support for the back-rest 220 and the rear end of the seat 218. This toggle is broken automatically at its knee pivot 272 when the backrest 220 is turned relative to the chair frame 214. The link 267 turns downwardly about its pivotal mount 269 to insure that bar 266 moves forwardly and downwardly in such direction as to cause link 268 to turn forwardly about its pivotal mount 274.

When the link 268 moves forwardly about pivot 274 to lower the back-rest 226 and the rear end portion of the seat 218, it also carries forwardly its integral angular extension 268a. The latter carries the leg-rest actuating link 294 in a forward direction. Actuating link 294 in turn applies a pushing force against leg-rest link 281 at its point of connection 298, causing links 281 and 284 to turn forwardly about their respective pivotal mounts 290 and 291 on seat 218, and thereby actuating the leg-rest control linkage 288 to elevate the leg-rest 278 to its extended, leg-supporting position of FIG. 8.

The position of the chair shown in full line in FIG. 8 is again illustrated to show the relative positions of the body-supporting structure 215- and the chair frame 214 in comparison with their positions of FIG. 7. When the chair is occupied, the center of weight of the occupants body will shift forwardly when the chair is brought to the position of FIG. 8, because the extended leg-rest 278 is supporting the weight of the occupants outstretched legs well forwardly of the seat. Thus, the rigidly-coupled body-supporting structure 216 and chair frame 214 will tip slightly forwardly with the rocker member 24s turning forwardly slightly on the base member 25% until a stabilized position is reached. The broken-line representation in FIG. 8 represents this occupied, stabilized posi tion.

In the stable position of FIG. 8, the chair 21%} may again be utilized as a rocker by action of the occupant in shifting his weight forwardly and rearwardly, and causing the rocker surface 243 of rocker member 246 to turn back and forth upon base member 2%. When this rocker action is terminated, the springs 258, 2-50 will return the coupled chair frame 214 and body-supporting unit 216 to the stable position of FIG. 8.

To return from the position of P16. 8 to the upright sitting position of FIG. 7, the occupant applies downward pressure with his legs upon the extended leg-rest 278. This causes the actuating link 294 to raise the link 263 until it has reached its upstanding position of FIG. 7, and the back-rest 22d and rear portion of the seat 218 are raised and supported by the aligned bar 266 and link 268.

it will again be observed that the seat 2118 has no rearward shifting movement relative to the chair frame. Instead, the movement of its front end portion is slightly forwardly, permitting the use of a T-cushion type construction, in this instance the separate T-shaped cushion 219. During the chair movement, the lateral extensions 21% of the cushion 219 move along the forward front edges 235 of the arm portions of side frames 238 and 240 without contact these front edges.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described herein, it is obvious that numerous additions, changes and omissions may be made in such embodiments without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. A chair comprising a chair frame having arm portions, 3. body-supporting structure comprising a seat unit and back-rest, said seat unit having a T-cushion construction including a pair of laterally-projecting front extension portions overyling the forward edges of the chair frame arm portions, pivot means mounting the forward portion of the seat unit on the chair frame for tilting movement without rearward displacement from an upright sitting position to a tilted sitting position with the front end of the seat rising relative to the chair frame and the rear of the seat dropping relative to the chair frame, and control means mounting the rear portion of the seat unit on the chair frame and restraining the bodysupporting structure from tilting movement about said pivot means in the upright sitting position, said control means including a pair of links connected end-to-end at a knee pivot, one of said links being pivotally mounted on the support frame and other of said links being pivotally connected to the rear portion of the body-supporting structure, the pair of links being substantially in axial alignment in the upright sitting position to support the rear portion of the body-supporting structure, and actuating means independent of said links and seat unit for moving said links out of axial alignment to initiate movement of the body-supporting structure to the tilted sitting position, the pair of links turning relative to each other at their knee pivot to decrease the distance between said pivotal mount and the pivotal connection with the body-supporting structure whereby to permit the rear t2 portion of the latter'to drop as the body-supporting structure turns about said pivot means without rearward displacement relative to the chair frame, whereby the seat unit front extension portions move along the forward edges of the arm portions without engaging the latter.

2. A chair according to claim 1 which also includes a legrest, means mounting the leg-rest on the seat for movement between a retracted and an extended, leg-supporting position, and actuating means for moving the legrest in response to movement of the body-supporting structure to its tilted sitting position, said actuating means including an angular extension of one link of said pair of links projecting beyond said knee pivot, and an actuating link connecting said angular extension to said leg-rest mounting means.

3. A chair comprising a chair frame having arm portions, a body-supporting structure including a seat and a back-rest, said seat having a T-cushion construction including a pair of laterally-projecting front extension portions overyling the forward edges of the chair frame arm portions, a single fixed pivot mounting the forward portion of the-body-supporting structure on the chair frame for tilting movement without rearward displacement from an upright sitting position to a tilted sitting position with the front end of the seat rising relative to the chair frame and the rear end of the seat dropping relative to the chair frame, and control means mounting the rear portion of the body-supporting structure on the chair frame and restraining the body-supporting structure from tilting movement about said fixed pivot in the upright sitting position, said control means including a pair of links connected end-to-end at a knee pivot, one of said links being pivotally mounted on the support frame and the other of said links being pivotally connected to the rear portion of the body-supporting structure, the pair of links being substantially in vertical axial alignment in the upright sitting position to support the rear portion of the body-supporting structure, and manually-operable means connected to said links for moving said links out of axial alignment and causing said links to break at said knee pivot to initiate movement of the body-supporting structure about said single fixed pivot to the tilted sitting position, the pair of links turning relative to each other at their knee pivot to decrease the distance between said pivotal mount and the pivotal connection with the bodysupporting structure whereby to permit the rear portion of the latter to drop as the body-supporting structure turns about said pivot means without rearward translation relative to the chair frame, whereby the seat unit front extension portions move along the forward edges of the arm portions without engaging the latter.

4. A chair according to claim 3 in which said manually-operable means comprises a handle exteriorly of said chair frame and operatively connected to the pivotal mount of said one of said pair of links on the chair frame.

5. A rocker chair comprising a base, a chair frame having a rocker member engaging said base to rock thereon and also having arm portions, a body-supporting structure including a seat unit and a back-rest, said seat unit having a T-cushion construction including a pair of laterally-projecting front extension portions overlying the forward edges of the chair frame arm portions, pivot means mounting the forward portion of the body-supporting structure on the chair frame for tilting movement without rearward displacement from an upright sitting position to a tilted sitting position with the front end of the seat rising relative to the chair frame and the rear of the seat dropping relative to the chair frame, and control means mounting the rear portion of the body-supporting structure on the chair frame and restraining the bodysupporting structure from tilting movement about said pivot means in the upright sitting position, said control means including a pair of links connected end-to-end at a knee pivot, one of said links being pivotally mounted on the support frame and the other of said links being pivotally connected to the rear portion of the bodysupporting structure, the pair of links being substantially in axial alignment in the upright sitting postion to support the rear portion of the body-supporting structure and provide a rigid mount for the body-supporting structure on the chair frame whereby the body-supporting structure and chair frame may be rocked as a unit upon said base, actuating means independent of said pair of links for moving said links out of axial alignment to initiate movement of the body-supporting structure to the tilted sitting position, the pair of links turning relative to each other at their knee pivot to decrease the distance between said piovtal mount and the pivotal connection with the body-supporting structure whereby to permit the rear portion of the latter to drop as the body-supporting structure turns about said pivot means without rearward translation relative to the chair frame, whereby the seat unit front extension portions move along the forward edges of the arm portions without engaging the latter, and means on the chair frame postioned to engage the rear portion of the body-supporting structure in the tilted sitting position to rigidly couple the body-supporting structure and chair frame in the latter position for rocking movement as a unit upon said base.

6. A chair according to claim in which the actuating means for moving the links out of axial alignment comprises a handle journalled in the chair frame and operatively connected to the pivotal mount of said one of said pair of links on the chair frame.

7. A chair according to claim 5 which also includes a leg-rest, means mounting the leg-rest on the seat for movement between a retracted and an extended, leg-supporting position, and leg-rest actuating means for moving the legrest in response to movement of the body-supporting structure to its tilted sitting position, said leg-rest actuating means including an angular extension of one link of said pair of links projecting beyond said knee pivot and an actuating link connecting said angular extension tosaid leg-rest mounting means.

8. A chair according to claim 5 which also includes a leg-rest, means mounting the leg-rest on the seat for movement between a retracted and an extended, legsupporting position, and leg-rest actuating means for moving the leg-rest in response to movement of the bodysupporting structure to its tilted sitting position, said legrest actuating means including a lever pivotally mounted intermediate its ends on the chair frame, a link connecting one arm of the lever to said seat, and an actuating link connecting the other arm of said lever to said leg-rest mounting means.

9. A rocker chair comprising a base, a chair frame having a rocker member engaging said base to rock thereon and also having arm portions, a body-supporting structure including a seat and a back-rest pivotally connected to each other, pivot means mounting an intermediate portion of the seaton the chair frame for tilt-ing movement without rearward displacement from a normal sitting position to a tilted sitting position with the rear end of the seat dropping relative to the chair frame, and control means mounting the back-rest on the chair frame and restraining downward movement of the back-rest and the rear portion of the seat in said sitting position, said control means including an arm and a link connected end-toend at a knee pivot, said link being pivotally mounted on the chair frame and said arm being rigidly connected to the back-rest and depending therefrom, the arm and link being substantially in axial alignment in the normal sitting position to support the back-rest and rear portion of the seat, and actuating means mounting the back-rest for movement relative to the seat with said back-rest moving said arm and link out of axial alignment to initiate movement of the seat to the tilted sitting position, the link turning relative to the arm at said knee pivot to decrease the distance between said pivotal mount of the link and the rigid connection of the arm with the back-rest whereby to permit the back-rest and the rear portion of the seat to drop as the seat turns about said pivot means without rearward translation relative to the chair frame, a legrest, means mounting the leg-rest on the seat for movement between a retracted and extended leg-supporting position, and leg-rest actuating means for moving the legrest in response to movement of the seat to its tilted sitting position, said leg-rest actuating means including an actuating member connecting the link of said arm and link to said leg-rest mounting means for movement of said leg-rest to its extended position simultaneously with the downward movement of the rear portion of the seat as said link turns relative to said arm at said knee pivot.

10. A rocker chair comprising a base, a chair frame having a rocker member engaging said base to rock thereon and also having arm portions, a body-supporting structure including a seat and a back-rest pivotally connected to each other, pivot means mounting an intermediate portion of the seat on the chair frame for tilting movement without rearward displacement from a normal sitting position to a tilted sitting position with the rear end of the seat dropping relative to the chair frame, and control means mounting the back-rest on the chair frame and restraining downward movement of the back-rest and the rear portion of the seat in said sitting position, said control means including an arm and a link connected end-toend at a knee pivot, said link being pivotally mounted on the chair frame and said arm being rigidly connected to the back-rest and depending therefrom, the arm and link being substantially in axial alignment in the normal sitting position to support the back-rest and rear portion of the seat, and actuating means mounting the back-rest for movement relative to the seat with said back-rest moving said arm and link out of axial alignment to initiate movement of the seat to the tilted sitting position, the link turning relative to the arm at said knee pivot to decrease the distance between said pivotal mount of the link and the rigid connection of the arm with the back-rest whereby to permit the back-rest and the rear portion of the seat to drop as the seat turns about said pivot means without rearward translation relative to the chair frame, said pivot means comprising a guide link pivotally mounted on the chair frame and pivotally connected to the seat, said guide link extending from its pivotal mount toward said seat in a direction to guide the seat in a forward direction relative to the chair frame.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 706,835 Learned Aug. 12, 1902 2,015,138 Drake Aug. 24, 1935 2,625,983 Slyter et al. Jan. 20, 1953 2,817,388 Knabusch et a1 Dec. 24, 1957 2,951,528 Maurer Sept. 6, 1960 2,965,157 Fletcher Dec. 20, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 106,799 Australia Feb. 28, 1939 206,571 Great Britain Nov. 5, 1923 691,437 Germany Apr. 30, 1940

Claims (1)

1. A CHAIR COMPRISING A CHAIR FRAME HAVING ARM PORTIONS, A BODY-SUPPORTING STRUCTURE COMPRISING A SEAT UNIT AND BACK-REST, SAID SEAT UNIT HAVING A T-CUSHION CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING A PAIR OF LATERALLY-PROJECTING FRONT EXTENSION PORTINS OVERYLING THE FORWARD EDGES OF THE CHAIR FRAME ARM PORTIONS, PIVOT MEANS MOUNTING THE FORWARD PORTION OF THE SEAT UNIT ON THE CHAIR FRAME FOR TILTING MOVEMENT WITHOUT REARWARD DISPLACEMENT FROM AND UPRIGHT SITTING POSITION TO A TILTED SITTING POSITION WITH THE FRONT END OF THE SEAT RISING RELATIVE TO THE CHAIR FRAME AND THE REAR OF THE SEAT DROPPING RELATIVE TO THE CHAIR FRAME, AND CONTROL MEANS MOUNTING THE REAR PORTION OF THE SEAT UNIT ON THE CHAIR FRAME AND RESTRAINING THE BODYSUPPORTING STRUCTURE FROM TILTING MOVEMENT ABOUT SAID PIVOT MEANS IN THE UPRIGHT SITTING POSITION, SAID CONTROL MEANS INCLUDING A PAIR OF LINKS CONNECTED END-TO-END AT A KNEE PIVOT, ONE OF SAID LINKS BEING PIVOTALLY MOUNTED ON THE SUPPORT FRAME AND OTHER OF SAID LINKS BEING PIVOTALLY CONNECTED TO THE REAR PORTION OF THE BODY-SUPPORTING STRUCTURE, THE PAIR OF LINKS BEING SUBSTANTIALLY IN AXIAL ALIGNMENT IN THE UPRIGHT SITTING POSITION TO SUPPORT THE REAR PORTION OF THE BODY-SUPPORTING STRUCTURE, AND ACTUATING MEANS INDEPENDENT OF SAID LINKS AND SEAT UNIT FOR MOVING SAID LINKS OUT OF AXIAL ALIGNMENT TO INITATE MOVEMENT OF THE BODY-SUPPORTING STRUCTURE TO THE TILTED SITTING POSITION, THE PAIR OF LINKS TURNING RELATIVE TO EACH OTHER AT THEIR KNEE PIVOT TO DECREASE THE DISTANCE BETWEEN SAID PIVOTAL MOUNT AND THE PIVOTAL CONNECTION WITH THE BODY-SUPPORTING STRUCTURE WHEREBY TO PERMIT THE REAR PORTION OF THE LATTER TO DROP AS THE BODY-SUPPORTING STRUCTURE TURNS ABOUT SAID PIVOT MEANS WITHOUT REARWARD DISPLACEMENT RELATIVE TO THE CHAIR FRAME, WHEREBY THE SEAT UNIT FRONT EXTENSION PORTIONS MOVE ALONG THE FORWARD EDGES OF THE ARM PORTIONS WITHOUT ENGAGING THE LATTER.
US79418A 1960-12-29 1960-12-29 Seat control means for chair of the tall-cushion type Expired - Lifetime US3141700A (en)

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US2625983A (en) * 1949-09-21 1953-01-20 Slyter Louis Raymond Combination rocking and swiveling chair
US2817388A (en) * 1955-03-01 1957-12-24 La Z Boy Chair Co Plateorm rocker
US2951528A (en) * 1955-06-30 1960-09-06 Herman W Maurer Tilt-back rocking chair
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US3243226A (en) * 1964-03-12 1966-03-29 Super Sagless Spring Corp Reclining lounger and hardware therefor
US3226155A (en) * 1964-07-01 1965-12-28 Grover C Whiteford Combination rocking and reclining chair
US3287059A (en) * 1964-11-17 1966-11-22 Futorian Mfg Corp Of New York Recliner rocker loungers and hardware therefor
US3244448A (en) * 1964-11-30 1966-04-05 Dual Mfg & Eng Reclining chair mechanism
US3302969A (en) * 1965-01-11 1967-02-07 Pontiac Design Corp Reclining platform rocking chair
US3339972A (en) * 1965-02-08 1967-09-05 Peter S Fletcher Reclining and rocking chair
US3322459A (en) * 1965-06-21 1967-05-30 Lear Siegler Inc Multiple position rocker-recliner
US3279847A (en) * 1965-12-21 1966-10-18 Dual Mfg & Eng Rocking-reclining chair mechanism
US3300244A (en) * 1966-01-06 1967-01-24 Claude A Hughes Reclining chair
US3371959A (en) * 1966-11-04 1968-03-05 Hickory Spring Mfg Co Inc Stop means for a recliner chair
US3464736A (en) * 1967-08-21 1969-09-02 Gen Steel Products Inc Reclining rocking chair fixture
US3522969A (en) * 1968-03-28 1970-08-04 Dual Mfg & Eng T-cushion reclining chair
US3493264A (en) * 1968-04-25 1970-02-03 Dual Mfg & Eng T-cushion rocker/reclining chair
US3537747A (en) * 1968-07-31 1970-11-03 Mohasco Ind Inc Rocking and reclining chair
US3904240A (en) * 1970-11-05 1975-09-09 Lane Company Inc Rocker recliner chair
US3815954A (en) * 1970-11-05 1974-06-11 Lane Co Inc Rocker recliner chair
US3819229A (en) * 1970-11-05 1974-06-25 Lane Co Inc Rocker recliner chair
US3790211A (en) * 1971-06-11 1974-02-05 R Caldwell Footrest mechanism
US4113305A (en) * 1977-06-06 1978-09-12 Leggett & Platt, Incorporated Recliner leg rest linkage assembly
DE3011279A1 (en) * 1979-03-28 1980-10-23 Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd New 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylthiopyriliumsalze and their production
DE3031595A1 (en) * 1979-08-21 1981-03-26 Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd Pentamethinethiopyrylium process for their preparation and their application in photoconductive masses
US5435622A (en) * 1994-05-05 1995-07-25 La-Z-Boy Chair Company Swivel recliner/rocker chair having preloaded base assembly
US5857744A (en) * 1997-10-15 1999-01-12 La-Z-Boy Incorporated Swivel base lockout assembly
US6059367A (en) * 1998-07-24 2000-05-09 Rogers; W. Clark Gliding seating unit with extendable footrest
US6918632B2 (en) * 2003-08-07 2005-07-19 Ashley Furniture Industries, Inc. Rocker mechanism for rocker recliner
US20090218862A1 (en) * 2008-02-29 2009-09-03 Guoliang Du Rocker base
US7628452B2 (en) 2008-02-29 2009-12-08 Shanghai Industries Group, Ltd. Rocker base
US9022473B2 (en) 2013-05-02 2015-05-05 L&P Property Management Company Rocker recliner mechanism with changeable features
USD799223S1 (en) 2016-07-08 2017-10-10 Zheijang Feili Technology Co., Ltd. Cam for a rocker/recliner base

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