US3109482A - Well-bore gas burner - Google Patents

Well-bore gas burner Download PDF

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US3109482A
US3109482A US92980A US9298061A US3109482A US 3109482 A US3109482 A US 3109482A US 92980 A US92980 A US 92980A US 9298061 A US9298061 A US 9298061A US 3109482 A US3109482 A US 3109482A
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housing
burner
well
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means
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US92980A
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Leo J O'brien
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Pure Oil Co
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Pure Oil Co
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B41/00Equipment or details not covered by groups E21B15/00 - E21B40/00
    • E21B41/0085Adaptations of electric power generating means for use in boreholes
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B36/00Heating, cooling, insulating arrangements for boreholes or wells, e.g. for use in permafrost zones
    • E21B36/02Heating, cooling, insulating arrangements for boreholes or wells, e.g. for use in permafrost zones using burners

Description

Nov. 5, 1963 V r J. O'BRIEN 3, 82

WELL-BORE GAS BURNER Filed Mrch 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FUEL 6A5 AIR -4- TURBINE 7 WHEEL IN VEN TOR.

LEO J. O'BRIEN BY FIGJ M a; 6

ENE)

United States atent 3,109,482 WELL-BORE GAS BURNER Leo J. GIirien, Crystal Lake, 111., assignor to The Pure Oil Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Ohio Filed Mar. 2, 1961, Ser. No. 92,980 2 Claims. (Cl. 153-115) This invention relates to means for igniting gas-fuelfired burners intended for use in inaccessible locations. In a more specific aspect, the invention relates to automatic means for igniting down-hole burners used in association with oil wells.

Down-hole oil-well burners are employed for a variety of purposes, such as the control of heavy paraflinic deposits in the formation zone surrounding the well-bore, and to apply intense heat to the formation prior to the institution of in-situ combustion. Conventional types of burners are also frequently employed at inconveniently accessible places for various purposes, such as disposing by combustion of noxious combustible vapors or fumes.

Various means have been devised for igniting such burners, and especially ingenious methods have been worked out for the ignition of down-hole oil-well burners. These burners are connected to one or more tubes through which fuel gas and air are delivered from the earths surface, through the well-bore, to the burner. Methods for igniting such burners include the use of pyrotechnic devices which are dropped through the Well-bore, as well as electric ignition techniques and devices controlled and operated by means of one or more electric cables which extends downward through the Well-bore from the surface of the earth. While such methods and means are often satisfactory for initially igniting the burner, they are often cumbersome, expensive, and inconvenient, especially when it becomes necessary to reignite the burner at intervals, because the flame is extinguished intentionally or inadvertently.

It is an object of this invention to provide means for the automatic ignition of gas-fuelfired burners. Another object of this invention is to provide automatic means for reigniting the burner in instances where the flame is accidentally extinguished. Still another object of this invention is to provide means for the automatic deactivation of the ignitor shortly after ignition has occured. Still another object of this invention is to provide an automatic ignitor for a burner located in an inaccessible position, which ignitor requires no connecting electric cable for actuation. Another object of this invention is to provide a downhole ignitor for automatically igniting a gaseous fuel stream, which ignitor operates automatically upon the institution of fuel flow, to ignite the fuel.

Briefly, the apparatus of this invention comprises an electrically operated spark or resistance-wire ignitor in association with a gaseous-fuel burner, and a turbinegenerator assembly disposed in association with the fuel inlet-line to the burner, so that the gaseous fuel flowing to the burner drives the turbine and generates the electric potential which operates the electric ignitor.

This invention is best described with reference to the drawings, of which,

FIGURE 1 is a sectional View of a well bore in which is disposed a down-hole burner incorporating the novel ignitor means of this invention;

FIGURES 2, 3, and 4 are schematic lay-outs of alternate ignitor means in accordance with this invention.

Referring to FIGURE 1, a gaseous fuel, such as methane, introduced through tubing 10, and air, introduced through tubing 12, are combined above the surface of the earth and flow through vertical well tubing 14, through burner inlet 15, and to the nozzle 16 of the ice burner. The mixture of gas and air is burned in the combustion zone 18 of well-bore 20, zone 18 being isolated and confined by means of we'll-bore packer 22. The hot combustion products flow through perforations 24 in well casing 26 and then into the surrounding formation.

In accordance with this invention, turbine wheel 27 is connected by means of shaft 28 to generator 29. The generator 29 is located Within housing 30 which forms a part of the burner assembly, and is located at the fuelgas inlet to the burner. Within the fuel-gas inlet 15 is disposed turbine wheel 27, such that the flow of fuelgas, or fuel-gas and air mixtures, to the burner causes rotation of the turbine wheel 27. The turbine utilizes the energy of the flowing mixture of fuel and air to drive generator 29 and generate electric energy, which energy is stored in condenser 31. Wire 32, which is insulated to withstand combustion temperature, is positioned in tube 34, which latter tube is connected to the generator housing. Surrounding tube 34 is positioned tubing 36, which is an extension of the housing 34} within which the generator and condenser are supported, by radial struts which are not shown in the drawing.

Jack-and-plug assembly 48 and bimetallic element 42 are located in series, and control the current flow in wire 32 so that when either of these elements provide an open circuit, no current can flow to electrodes 44 to produce the igniting spark. The circuit is complete only when the bimetallic element is cool, and when perforated housing 46 engages the bottom of the well and the pipe string above is dropped a few inches with respect to housing 46 to close the connection between jack 50, which is supported by housing 46, and plug 52, which is supported by tube 34.

The fuel and air mixture is ignited in combustion zone 18, the circuit to the electrode being broken automatically when the temperature rises sufficiently to actuate bimetallic strip 42. The production of a spark may be prevented, when so desired, by lifting the tubing string off the well bottom, thereby disengaging jack-and-plug assembly 48. It is evident that an igniting spark will otherwise occur each time the condenser becomes sufficiently charged to produce an arc discharge across the spark gap between electrodes 44.

Referring to FIGURES 2, 3, and 4, alternate electricgenerating and igniting means are shown. Referring to FIGURE 2 turbine wheel 60 drives generator 62 through shaft 64. The output of the generator, which may be a conventional low-voltage generator having a fractional watt output, is conducted through wire 66 to bimetallic element 68. When bimetallic element 68 is cold, connection is made to wire 70 which contacts the bimetallic element at 72, and is connected to the input of electric coil 74. High-tension wire 76 leads from coil 74 to spark gap 78. The output of generator 62 may be a high-frequency AC. voltage, and this voltage may be increased to a suitable potential to jump spark gap 7 8 by means of the windings of coil 74. Alternatively, the output of generator 62 may be a direct current, and coil 74 may be equipped with a continuously operating relay device to make and break the connection in the primary circuit of the coil. Such spark coils are well known and were commonly used in the ingition systems of older automobiles. lt is evident that upon the institution of fuel flow, rotation of turbine wheel 60 will cause an electric current to be produced. This current actuates the ignition coil to produce a spark at spark gap 78 to ignite a combustible fuel-and-air mixture. After burning has commenced, bimetallic element 68 becomes heated and bends to break contact and disconnect the ignition coil 74. In this manner, excessive deterioration of the elements forming the spark gap may wire 92, bimetallic element 94, contact 96, and return wire 98 to ignition resistance element 99. Generation of electricity by generator 90 results in the heating of resistance element 99, to product ignition of the fuel-gas mixture. Bimetallic element 94 is provided to prevent over-heating and deterioration of the resistance element. The bimetallic element 94 serves to break connection with generator 90 after the occurrence of ignition of the combustible mixture of fuel and air.

It will be evident that with respect to each embodiment described, the flow of fuel gas to the burner results in the generation of an electric potential which automatically operates ignition means to start the fire in the burner. It is evident that in each case, when the flow of fuel gas is terminated, as by closing a fuel-line control valve, operation of the generator terminates. However, upon reopening of the control valve to again provide fuel to the burner, ignition is automatically provided. In the case of the constant-ignition-providing embodiments, as shown in FIGURE 3, the ignition means operates continuously as long as fuel is flowing to the burner. Hence, if the flame becomes extinguished for any cause, reignition is automatically immediately provided. In the examples where a bimetallic element is used to interrupt operation of the ignition device after burning of the fuel has commenced, if the flame becomes extinguished for any cause other than termination of the fiow of fuel to the burner, reignition will automatically be provided upon the cooling of the bimetallic element to re-establish electrical connection between the generator and the ignition device.

' It will be evident that the ignition means of this invention may be employed with conventional gas burners, and is not limited to the use of down-hole oil-well burners. In cases where fuel only is provided to the burner, and mixed with available atmospheric air for combustion, the operation of the device will be the same as described in the specific embodiment, except that only the gaseous fuel will be available to drive the turbine wheel. This is not a serious limitation, since the amount of electricity needed to operate the ignitor is not great. Depending upon whether spark ignition or resistance-element ignition is employed, the power requirement for the generator may vary from a tenth of a watt to 100 watts. In most instances, however, a fractional wattage generator will provide ample power for ignition, and can most conveniently be employed without requiring serious modification of conventional burner structure. The apparatus of this invention may therefore be adapted for use with conventional gaseous fuel burners, such as those described in US. Patents 2,506,853 and 2,832,417. It should be understood that the ignition means comprising resistance wires, spark coils, etc., have been described by way of illustration only, and the invention should not be considered to be limited to these specific ignition means.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. An apparatus for burning a combustible gaseous fuel in a well-bore comprising (1) a downhole burner unit including (a) a burner housing having a gaseous fuel inlet opening at the upper end thereof and adapted to receive support from the interior of a well-bore,

(b) electrically actuated ignitor means within said burner housing, and

(c) a first electrical terminal supported adjacent the upper end of said housing and connected electrically to said ignitor means,

(2) a housing having open upper and lower ends, said upper end being adapted for connection to a gaseous fuel well tubing, said lower end being connected with said opening in said burner housing,

(3) electricity generating means supported within said last named housing,

(4) a turbine wheel connected to drive said generator means and positioned to be driven by the flow of gaseous fuel through said last named housing, and,

(5) a second electrical terminal connected to the output of said generating means, supported for movement with said last named housing, and positioned adjacent the lower end of said last named housing to contact said first terminal when said last named housing is in a lowered position with respect to said burner housing, but not to contact said first terminal when said last named housing is in a raised position with respect to said burner housing.

2. An apparatus in accordance with claim 1 in which said first and second terminals are disposed concentrically with respect to said openings at the upper end of said burner housing and at the lower end of said last mentioned housing, respectively.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,635,104 Woods July 5, 1927 2,346,704 Ray Apr. 18, 1944 2,398,106 McCollum Apr. 9, 1946 2,482,794 Peterson Sept. 27, 1949 2,542,666 Hall Feb. 20, 1951 2,997,105 Campion et a1 Aug. 22, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 480,620 Italy May 7, 1953

Claims (1)

1. AN APPARATUS FOR BURNING A COMBUSTIBLE GASEOUS FUEL IN A WELL-BORE COMPRISING (1) A DOWNHOLE BURNER UNIT INCLUDING (A) A BURNER HOUSING HAVING A GASEOUS FUEL INLET OPENING AT THE UPPER END THEREOF AND ADAPTED TO RECEIVE SUPPORT FROM THE INTERIOR OF A WELL-BORE, (B) ELECTRICALLY ACTUATED IGNITOR MEANS WITHIN SAID BURNER HOUSING, AND (C) A FIRST ELECTRICAL TERMINAL SUPPORTED ADJACENT THE UPPER END OF SAID HOUSING AND CONNECTED ELECTRICALLY TO SAID IGNITOR MEANS, (2) A HOUSING HAVING OPEN UPPER AND LOWER ENDS, SAID UPPER END BEING ADAPTED FOR CONNECTION TO A GASEOUS FUEL WELL TUBING, SAID LOWER END BEING CONNECTED WITH SAID OPENING IN SAID BURNER HOUSING, (3) ELECTRICITY GENERATING MEANS SUPPORTED WITHIN SAID LAST NAMED HOUSING, (4) A TURBINE WHEEL CONNECTED TO DRIVE SAID GENERATOR MEANS AND POSITIONED TO BE DRIVEN BY THE FLOW OF GASEOUS FUEL THROUGH SAID LAST NAMED HOUSING, AND, (5) A SECOND ELECTRICAL TERMINAL CONNECTED TO THE OUTPUT OF SAID GENERATING MEANS, SUPPORTED FOR MOVEMENT WITH SAID LAST NAMED HOUSING, AND POSITIONED ADJACENT THE LOWER END OF SAID LAST NAMED HOUSING TO CONTACT SAID FIRST TERMINAL WHEN SAID LAST NAMED HOUSING IS IN A LOWERED POSITION WITH RESPECT TO SAID BURNER HOUSING, BUT NOT TO CONTACT SAID FIRST TERMINAL WHEN SAID LAST NAMED HOUSING IS IN A RAISED POSITION WITH RESPECT TO SAID BURNER HOUSING.
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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3512584A (en) * 1966-08-12 1970-05-19 Deutsche Erdoel Ag Apparatus for obtaining bitumens from underground deposits
US3680635A (en) * 1969-12-30 1972-08-01 Sun Oil Co Delaware Method and apparatus for igniting well heaters
US4079784A (en) * 1976-03-22 1978-03-21 Texaco Inc. Method for in situ combustion for enhanced thermal recovery of hydrocarbons from a well and ignition system therefor
US4205725A (en) * 1976-03-22 1980-06-03 Texaco Inc. Method for forming an automatic burner for in situ combustion for enhanced thermal recovery of hydrocarbons from a well
US20080087426A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2008-04-17 Kaminsky Robert D Method of developing a subsurface freeze zone using formation fractures
US20080087420A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2008-04-17 Kaminsky Robert D Optimized well spacing for in situ shale oil development
US20080207970A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2008-08-28 Meurer William P Heating an organic-rich rock formation in situ to produce products with improved properties
US20080290719A1 (en) * 2007-05-25 2008-11-27 Kaminsky Robert D Process for producing Hydrocarbon fluids combining in situ heating, a power plant and a gas plant
WO2009009447A2 (en) * 2007-07-06 2009-01-15 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Downhole electricity generation
EP2098683A1 (en) 2008-03-04 2009-09-09 ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company Optimization of untreated oil shale geometry to control subsidence
US7631691B2 (en) 2003-06-24 2009-12-15 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Methods of treating a subterranean formation to convert organic matter into producible hydrocarbons
US7669657B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2010-03-02 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Enhanced shale oil production by in situ heating using hydraulically fractured producing wells
US8082995B2 (en) 2007-12-10 2011-12-27 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Optimization of untreated oil shale geometry to control subsidence
US8087460B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2012-01-03 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Granular electrical connections for in situ formation heating
US8122955B2 (en) 2007-05-15 2012-02-28 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Downhole burners for in situ conversion of organic-rich rock formations
US8146664B2 (en) 2007-05-25 2012-04-03 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Utilization of low BTU gas generated during in situ heating of organic-rich rock
US8151884B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2012-04-10 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Combined development of oil shale by in situ heating with a deeper hydrocarbon resource
US8151877B2 (en) 2007-05-15 2012-04-10 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Downhole burner wells for in situ conversion of organic-rich rock formations
US8230929B2 (en) 2008-05-23 2012-07-31 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Methods of producing hydrocarbons for substantially constant composition gas generation
US8540020B2 (en) 2009-05-05 2013-09-24 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Converting organic matter from a subterranean formation into producible hydrocarbons by controlling production operations based on availability of one or more production resources
US8616280B2 (en) 2010-08-30 2013-12-31 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Wellbore mechanical integrity for in situ pyrolysis
US8616279B2 (en) 2009-02-23 2013-12-31 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Water treatment following shale oil production by in situ heating
US8622133B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2014-01-07 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Resistive heater for in situ formation heating
US8622127B2 (en) 2010-08-30 2014-01-07 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Olefin reduction for in situ pyrolysis oil generation
US8641150B2 (en) 2006-04-21 2014-02-04 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company In situ co-development of oil shale with mineral recovery
US8770284B2 (en) 2012-05-04 2014-07-08 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Systems and methods of detecting an intersection between a wellbore and a subterranean structure that includes a marker material
US8863839B2 (en) 2009-12-17 2014-10-21 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Enhanced convection for in situ pyrolysis of organic-rich rock formations
US9080441B2 (en) 2011-11-04 2015-07-14 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Multiple electrical connections to optimize heating for in situ pyrolysis
US9394772B2 (en) 2013-11-07 2016-07-19 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Systems and methods for in situ resistive heating of organic matter in a subterranean formation
US9512699B2 (en) 2013-10-22 2016-12-06 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Systems and methods for regulating an in situ pyrolysis process
US9644466B2 (en) 2014-11-21 2017-05-09 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Method of recovering hydrocarbons within a subsurface formation using electric current

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1635104A (en) * 1925-07-07 1927-07-05 Woods Samuel Joseph Gas-igniting device
US2346704A (en) * 1944-04-18 Igniting system
US2398106A (en) * 1943-06-05 1946-04-09 Mccollum Thelma Heater
US2482794A (en) * 1944-09-12 1949-09-27 Repeter Products Inc Portable lighter and the like
US2542666A (en) * 1944-10-20 1951-02-20 William D Hall Safety control system for gaseous fuel burners
US2997105A (en) * 1956-10-08 1961-08-22 Pan American Petroleum Corp Burner apparatus

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2346704A (en) * 1944-04-18 Igniting system
US1635104A (en) * 1925-07-07 1927-07-05 Woods Samuel Joseph Gas-igniting device
US2398106A (en) * 1943-06-05 1946-04-09 Mccollum Thelma Heater
US2482794A (en) * 1944-09-12 1949-09-27 Repeter Products Inc Portable lighter and the like
US2542666A (en) * 1944-10-20 1951-02-20 William D Hall Safety control system for gaseous fuel burners
US2997105A (en) * 1956-10-08 1961-08-22 Pan American Petroleum Corp Burner apparatus

Cited By (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3512584A (en) * 1966-08-12 1970-05-19 Deutsche Erdoel Ag Apparatus for obtaining bitumens from underground deposits
US3680635A (en) * 1969-12-30 1972-08-01 Sun Oil Co Delaware Method and apparatus for igniting well heaters
US4079784A (en) * 1976-03-22 1978-03-21 Texaco Inc. Method for in situ combustion for enhanced thermal recovery of hydrocarbons from a well and ignition system therefor
US4136737A (en) * 1976-03-22 1979-01-30 Texaco Inc. Method for automatically initiating in situ combustion for enhanced thermal recovery of hydrocarbons from a well
US4137968A (en) * 1976-03-22 1979-02-06 Texaco Inc. Ignition system for an automatic burner for in situ combustion for enhanced thermal recovery of hydrocarbons from a well
US4205725A (en) * 1976-03-22 1980-06-03 Texaco Inc. Method for forming an automatic burner for in situ combustion for enhanced thermal recovery of hydrocarbons from a well
US7631691B2 (en) 2003-06-24 2009-12-15 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Methods of treating a subterranean formation to convert organic matter into producible hydrocarbons
US8596355B2 (en) 2003-06-24 2013-12-03 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Optimized well spacing for in situ shale oil development
US20100078169A1 (en) * 2003-06-24 2010-04-01 Symington William A Methods of Treating Suberranean Formation To Convert Organic Matter Into Producible Hydrocarbons
US8641150B2 (en) 2006-04-21 2014-02-04 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company In situ co-development of oil shale with mineral recovery
US7516787B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2009-04-14 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Method of developing a subsurface freeze zone using formation fractures
US7516785B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2009-04-14 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Method of developing subsurface freeze zone
US8151884B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2012-04-10 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Combined development of oil shale by in situ heating with a deeper hydrocarbon resource
US20090101348A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2009-04-23 Kaminsky Robert D Method of Developing Subsurface Freeze Zone
US20090107679A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2009-04-30 Kaminsky Robert D Subsurface Freeze Zone Using Formation Fractures
US20080207970A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2008-08-28 Meurer William P Heating an organic-rich rock formation in situ to produce products with improved properties
US20080087420A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2008-04-17 Kaminsky Robert D Optimized well spacing for in situ shale oil development
US20080087426A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2008-04-17 Kaminsky Robert D Method of developing a subsurface freeze zone using formation fractures
US7647971B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2010-01-19 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Method of developing subsurface freeze zone
US7647972B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2010-01-19 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Subsurface freeze zone using formation fractures
US7669657B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2010-03-02 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Enhanced shale oil production by in situ heating using hydraulically fractured producing wells
US8104537B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2012-01-31 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Method of developing subsurface freeze zone
US8622133B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2014-01-07 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Resistive heater for in situ formation heating
US9347302B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2016-05-24 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Resistive heater for in situ formation heating
US8087460B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2012-01-03 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Granular electrical connections for in situ formation heating
US8151877B2 (en) 2007-05-15 2012-04-10 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Downhole burner wells for in situ conversion of organic-rich rock formations
US8122955B2 (en) 2007-05-15 2012-02-28 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Downhole burners for in situ conversion of organic-rich rock formations
US20080290719A1 (en) * 2007-05-25 2008-11-27 Kaminsky Robert D Process for producing Hydrocarbon fluids combining in situ heating, a power plant and a gas plant
US8146664B2 (en) 2007-05-25 2012-04-03 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Utilization of low BTU gas generated during in situ heating of organic-rich rock
US8875789B2 (en) 2007-05-25 2014-11-04 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Process for producing hydrocarbon fluids combining in situ heating, a power plant and a gas plant
WO2009009447A2 (en) * 2007-07-06 2009-01-15 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Downhole electricity generation
WO2009009447A3 (en) * 2007-07-06 2009-06-18 Halliburton Energy Serv Inc Downhole electricity generation
US8082995B2 (en) 2007-12-10 2011-12-27 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Optimization of untreated oil shale geometry to control subsidence
EP2098683A1 (en) 2008-03-04 2009-09-09 ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company Optimization of untreated oil shale geometry to control subsidence
US8230929B2 (en) 2008-05-23 2012-07-31 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Methods of producing hydrocarbons for substantially constant composition gas generation
US8616279B2 (en) 2009-02-23 2013-12-31 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Water treatment following shale oil production by in situ heating
US8540020B2 (en) 2009-05-05 2013-09-24 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Converting organic matter from a subterranean formation into producible hydrocarbons by controlling production operations based on availability of one or more production resources
US8863839B2 (en) 2009-12-17 2014-10-21 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Enhanced convection for in situ pyrolysis of organic-rich rock formations
US8616280B2 (en) 2010-08-30 2013-12-31 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Wellbore mechanical integrity for in situ pyrolysis
US8622127B2 (en) 2010-08-30 2014-01-07 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Olefin reduction for in situ pyrolysis oil generation
US9080441B2 (en) 2011-11-04 2015-07-14 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Multiple electrical connections to optimize heating for in situ pyrolysis
US8770284B2 (en) 2012-05-04 2014-07-08 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Systems and methods of detecting an intersection between a wellbore and a subterranean structure that includes a marker material
US9512699B2 (en) 2013-10-22 2016-12-06 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Systems and methods for regulating an in situ pyrolysis process
US9394772B2 (en) 2013-11-07 2016-07-19 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Systems and methods for in situ resistive heating of organic matter in a subterranean formation
US9644466B2 (en) 2014-11-21 2017-05-09 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Method of recovering hydrocarbons within a subsurface formation using electric current
US9739122B2 (en) 2014-11-21 2017-08-22 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Mitigating the effects of subsurface shunts during bulk heating of a subsurface formation

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