US3092057A - Clinching machine for door overlap flanges - Google Patents

Clinching machine for door overlap flanges Download PDF

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US3092057A
US3092057A US613983A US61398356A US3092057A US 3092057 A US3092057 A US 3092057A US 613983 A US613983 A US 613983A US 61398356 A US61398356 A US 61398356A US 3092057 A US3092057 A US 3092057A
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clinching
movement
lever
tool
levers
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US613983A
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Warshilek Charles
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ThyssenKrupp Budd Co
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Budd Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21DWORKING OR PROCESSING OF SHEET METAL OR METAL TUBES, RODS OR PROFILES WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21D39/00Application of procedures in order to connect objects or parts, e.g. coating with sheet metal otherwise than by plating; Tube expanders
    • B21D39/02Application of procedures in order to connect objects or parts, e.g. coating with sheet metal otherwise than by plating; Tube expanders of sheet metal by folding, e.g. connecting edges of a sheet to form a cylinder
    • B21D39/021Application of procedures in order to connect objects or parts, e.g. coating with sheet metal otherwise than by plating; Tube expanders of sheet metal by folding, e.g. connecting edges of a sheet to form a cylinder for panels, e.g. vehicle doors
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/53709Overedge assembling means
    • Y10T29/53787Binding or covering
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/53709Overedge assembling means
    • Y10T29/53787Binding or covering
    • Y10T29/53791Edge binding
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/18Mechanical movements
    • Y10T74/18888Reciprocating to or from oscillating
    • Y10T74/1892Lever and slide
    • Y10T74/18952Lever and slide toggle transmissions

Description

c. WARSHILEK 3,092,057 CLINCHINGMACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES 1? Sheets-Sheet 1 m, wk w& 1% V. G W M m IQ C June 4, 1963 Filed 001;. 4, 1956 June 4, 1963 C WARSHILEK CLINCHING MACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES Filed Oct. 4, 1956 12 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR Chm es Wavshilelg AGENT June 4, 1963 c. WARSHILEK CLINCHING MACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES June 4, 1963 c. WARSHILEK I 3,092,057
CLINCHINGHMACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES Filed Oct. 4, 1956 12 Sheets-Sheet 5 u INVENTOR Charleswavshdek. M1
AGENT June 4, 1963 c. WARSHILEK CLINCHING MACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES Filed Oct. 4, 1956 12 Sheets-Sheet 8 mmo INVENTOR hm [es WClYShLIQkJ June 4, 1963 c. WARSHILEK CLINCHING MACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES Filed Oct. 4, 1956 12 Sheets-Sheet 9 INVENTOR ChavlesWarshddg. WW1.
AGENT June 4, 1963 Filed 001:. 4, 19 56 C. WARSHILEK CLINCHING MACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES l2 Sheets-Sheet l0 INVENTOR CharlesWavshilek.
AGENT June 4, 1963 c. WARSHILEK CLINCHING MACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES Filed 001;. 4, 1956 12 Sheets-Sheet 11 I H E Viv/A o INVENTOR Chaylaswavshdekl. W6
AGENT 7. 7 v E Y June 4, 1963 c, w s -u 3,092,057
CLINCHING MACHINE FOR DOOR OVERLAP FLANGES Filed Oct. 4, 1956 l2 Sheets-Sheet 12 9Q INVENT CharlesWarsh United Patented June 4, 1963 3,092,057 CLINCIHNG MACHINE FOR DGUR OVERLAP FLANGES Charles Warshrlek, Gary, Ind., assignor to The Budd Company, Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Oct. 4, 1956, Ser. No. 613,983 Claims. (Cl. 113-54) The invention relates to a machine for clinching together overlapping flanges of doors, particularly of automobile doors, comprising outer and inner sheet metal stampings. The term clinching specifically means the final squeezing or coining action on the flanges but in a broader sense it includes both the bending down and the coining of the flanges.
The aim of the invention is to provide a machine which accurately and speedily carries out the entire clinching operation and supplies firmly clinched flanges coupled with dimensional accuracy of the finished product.
The understanding of the features of the invention, its aims and advantages, and of the progress achieved by it will be facilitated by a brief introduction outlining the problems involved as Well as previously proposed or actually used solutions.
Automobile doors customarily comprise an outer and an inner sheet metal stamping or panel. The inner stamping has outwardly extending webs continued by laterally directed flanges which rest against the inner surface of the outer stamping. Inwardly directed marginal flanges or projections of the outer panel are to be folded over and firmly clinched against the inside of the flanges or the webs. It is important that the clinching results in a firm, vise-like grip of the flanges of the inner panel between the outer panel and its marginal flanges and that the shape and dimensions of the door are held within prescribed tolerances.
One of the known, Widely used procedures for carrying out the clinching operation involves two sets of dies mounted in two successive presses. In the first press one set of dies engages the inwardly directed flanges of the outer panel and turns them part way down toward the inside of the flanges of the inner panel. This is called fortyfive-ing because the angle of the flange becomes about 45 with respect to the general plane of the door. The dies in the second press bend the flanges of the outer panel all the way down into firm contact with the flanges of the inner panel and give the flange connection a final set or coining. An obvious disadvantage of this system is the need for two sets of expensive dies for each type of door, the need for two presses with a corresponding amount of floor space, and the time and labor required for moving the door out of one press and into the second press.
Several devices have previously been suggested and even used in which the entire operation is carried out in one machine, Patent No. 1,693,643 DArdenne, or press. One known machine has tools moveable at 45 toward the flanges so as to do the initial turning over and by movement in the same direction to do the final clinching. Another known device, Patent N0. 1,961,582 Eksergian, has forty-five-ing tools which are automatically Withdrawn upon the approach of a final clinching or coining tool. Still another device has a clinching tool telescopingly moveable within the fortyfive-ing tool, the latter engaging the outer door flanges first and then being stopped whereupon the clinching tool engages the flanges and completes the clinching operation.
These known one-machine solutions were found to be unsatisfactory for one reason or another in that the clinching is not sufficiently firm, that the door dimensions are not kept Within the prescribed tolerances, that the outer-panel flange may not be turned inwardly but squashed by biting into the fortyfive-ing tool, or in that the coining tool cannot extend to the outer margin and thereby leaves a bead on the inside along the edge of the door. It would lead too far afield to explain the reasons for the named shortcomings of the known devices. Suflioe it to say that all attempts to overcome them are believed to have failed.
The present invention provides another principle which avoids the shortcomings of the known one-machine systems in that it uses one and the same tool for the fortyfive-ing and the final coining and imparts in succession to this tool two different movements, first a fortyfive-ing movement transversely to the upstanding outerpanel flange and then a final coining movement about vertically to the plane of the inner-panel flange.
Further features of the invention consist in specific means for imparting the double movement to the tool and in means for loading and unloading the machine.
The broad aspects of the invention as well as its details and advantages will be more easily and fully understood from the following description of one embodiment which is shown in the attached drawing.
In the drawing:
FIG. 1 is a perspective of the new machine at a reduced scale;
FIG. 2 is a vertical section on a larger scale along lines 2-2 of FIGS. 3, 4 and 6;
FIG. 3 is a vertical section, on the scale of FIG. 2, taken mainly along lines 33 of FIGS. 2, 4 and 6 but in its left hand region in the plane of line 3 of FIG. 4;
FIG. 4 is a plan view, partly in section along line 44 of FIG. 2;
FIG. 5 is a plan view, partly in section along lines 5--5 of FIG. 2, 8 and 10, certain parts being omitted for more clearly showing the remaining parts;
FIGS. 6 and 7 are horizontal sections along the corresponding numbered lines of FIGS. 2 and 9;
FIGS. 8, 9, 10 and 11 are fragmentary vertical sections along the correspondingly numbered lines of FIGS. 4 and 6, the figures of the first pair and the figures of the second pair being substantially identical except for showing two different positions of the parts of the machine so that FIGS. 8 and 10 correspond to one position and FIGS. 9 and 11 to another position;
FIG. 12 is a fragmentary perspective, partly in section, approximately seen from and sectioned along line 12 in FIG. 4;
FIG. 13 is a fragmentary sectional view on a larger scale of the upper right hand portion of FIGS. 8 and 9,
illustrating by full lines and differently dotted lines several positions of the one type of clinching tool used in the machine and of the members for supporting and moving it;
FIGS. 14 to 16 are fragmentary sections on a still larger scale of the rectangular region surrounded by dash line 15 in FIGURE 13 and illustrating successive positions of the clinching tool and the flange to be clinched;
FIG. 17 is a fragmentary section on a larger scale along line 1717 of FIG. 9;
FIGS. 18 and 19 are fragmentary sections on a larger scale along the correspondingly numbered lines of FIGS. 4 and 6;
FIG. 20 is a fragmentary elevation on a larger scale, viewed in the direction of the arrows 20-20 of the FIG. 4;
FIG. 21 is a section along line 21-21 of FIG. 20;
FIG. 22 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 13 but corresponding to the upper left hand part of FIGS. 10 and 11, illustrating the operation of the other type of clinching tool used in the machine and of the means for moving it; and
FIGS. 23 to 25 are sections corresponding to the upper part of FIG. 22 and illustrating successive positions of the clinching tool and of the flange to be clinched which follow the starting position of the tool but precede the final position shown in FIG. 22.
The understanding of the illustrated embodiment of the novel machine will be facilitated by first briefly describing the work pieces and the general nature of the operations to be performed on them by the machine.
The description of the work pieces will be followed by descriptions of the stationary frame work of the machine, of the loading and unloading means, and of the clinching tools, the means for moving them and their operation.
The Work Pieces The door shown in the drawing comprises an outer sheet metal stamping 25 and an inner sheet metal stamping 26. Inner stamping 26 has outwardly directed webs 27, 28 forming the frame Work and jamb faces of the door. Webs 27, extending along three sides of the door, terminate in laterally directed flanges 29 which rest against the inner surface of outer stamping 25 and are surrounded by upstanding inwardly directed flanges or projections 36 of the latter. Web 28 ends in angle section flanges 31 and 32, outer flange 32 fitting against an inwardly directed flange 33 of outer panel or stamping 25, which is continued by a flange or projection 34 extending toward the center of the door. This is the shape and relative arrangement in which the two stampings 25, 26 are placed into the machine and which is shown e.g. in FIGS. 3, 8 and 10. The purpose of the machine is to turn outer-panel flanges or projections 30, 34 onto and into firm contact with innerpanel flanges 29, 32, as shown e.g. in FIGS. 2, 9 and 11.
The Machine Frame A rigid stationary frame work comprises a floormounted base structure 35, corner columns 36 supporting a horizontal bed frame 37 and interconnected by horizontal lower and upper braces 38, 39, upright guide tubes 49 spaced from and rigidly connected to columns 36 by brackets 41. Surmounting the columns 36 are converging frame members -42 which are secured to the braces 39 and connected with each other by top member 43.
Bed frame 36 has upright circumferential walls 44, 45. The three walls 44 have secured to their tops supports 46 accurately shaped to the contour of outer door panel 25 along its flanges 30. Wall 45 has secured to its topa member 47, to be described later on in detail, providing an abutment for flange 33 of outer stamping 26. Since the support members 46 and 47 take the clinching reactions they may be referred to as anvil members.
Loading and Unloading Devices Rods 48 are slidably guided Within the tubes 40 and have their ends interconnected by horizontal lower and upper members 49, 59. The lower members 49 carry upright rods 51 which extend through openings in bed frame 37 and carry a supporting structure 52 shaped to the contour of outer door panel 25 but of such smaller size as to clear the walls 44-, 45 of bed frame 37 and of member 47.
T he upper horizontal members 50 are transversely interconnected by workpiece hold-down structures 53 and a central transverse brace 54. Structures 53 are shaped to fit the contour of inner door panel 26. A double acting hydraulic cylinder 55 is suspended from top member 43 and has its piston rod 56 secured to cross brace 54.
FIGS. 1 and 3 show the machine in loading position with the piston rod 56 upwardly retracted and all the members connected with it, including supporting structure 52 and hold-down structures 53, in the uppermost position. The preliminary assembled outer and inner stampings 25 and 26 have been pushed from the left side in FIG. 3 onto support 52 over rollers 57.
Upon admission of pressure fluid to the top of cylinder 54 (source, valve, conduits, etc., not shown), piston rod 56 is moved downwardly together with support 52 and hold-down members 53. During this travel the door panel 25 is engaged and stopped by the supports 46 with out interrupting the further downward movement of supporting member 52 until hoiddown members 53 engage inner panel 26 thereby pressing panel 26 against outer panel 25 and the latter firmly against support 46.
After performing the clinching operation, to be described in the following, pressure fluid is admitted to the lower part of cylinder 55 in venting its upper part (valve, conduits, etc., again not shown), hold-down structure 53 is lifted off panel 26, outer door panel is engaged by supporting member 52 and brought back to the position shown in FIG. 3, whereupon a workman pushes the door to the right in FIG. 3 onto unloading arms 58 over rollers 59. The arms 58 are journaled to a stationary bracket 60 and counter balanced by weight 61 so that they are held in the receiving position shown in full lines in FIG. 3, but are caused by a door on them to swing downwardly, into the position shown in dash-and-dot lines in the same figure, for convenient removal of the finished door.
The clinching Mechanisms The illustrated machine comprises two types of clinching devices or mechanisms, both embodying the basic principle of the invention but differing from each other sufiiciently so as to take care of the differences between the arrangement of flanges 29, 30 provided along three sides and the arrangement of flanges 32, 34 provided along the fourth side of the illustrated door.
A common driving mechanism for both types of clinching devices comprises an upstanding hydraulic cylinder 62 mounted on base 35 and having its piston rod 63 connected with a horizontal plate or crosshead 64. Plate 64 is slidably guided on rods 65 inserted between base structure 35 and bed frame 37. Abutments 66 limit the upward movement of plate 64. The means, such as conduits, valves, etc., for admitting pressure fluid to top or bottom of cylinder 62 or for venting it, are again not shown and are so commonly known as to require no description.
The movement of the first type of clinching mechanismthat for flanges 39 upon flanges 29-is derived from plate 64 by means of links 67 which are journaled by pins 68 to ears or lugs 69 of plate 64.
A rigid frame or vertical slide 70 surrounding bed frame 37 has three upright walls 71 adjacent the walls 44 and a fourth wall '72 along wall 45 of the bed frame. This frame 70 is floatingly supported and vertically guided on bed frame 37 by springs 7 3 and bolts 74 and its upward movement is adjustably limited by screw bolts 75 (FIGS. 6 and 10).
Levers 76 are fulcrumed by pins 77 to ears 78 projecting from walls 71 of frame 70. The fourth wall 72 carries no levers and merely imparts rigidity to frame 70.
Pairs of links 79 have one of their ends journaled by pins 86 to each other and to the outer upper ends of the links 67 and their other ends respectively by pins 81 to the lower ends of the levers 76 and by pins 82 to cars 83 projecting downwardly from bed frame 37. Links 79 (FIGS. 3, 9 and 13) form a conventional toggle joint or toggle linkage. Upper links 79 are pivotally connected at their upper ends to ears 33 on frame 37 by pins 82 and lower links 79 are pivotally connected at their lower ends to floating levers 76 by pins 81. Upper and lower links 79 are pivotally connected at the knee of the toggle linkage by pin 8% which also connects to the operating links 67. Movement of links 67 causes links 79 to be straightened out exerting outward pressure at the ends of links 79 which in turn operates lever '76.
Clinching tools or bars 34 are secured to the upper inner sides of the levers 76. These bars have, as best visible in FIGS. 14 to 16, a beveled lower inner projectionbending edge 85 adjoined by a wide under clinching surface 86.
The axes of the pins 80 at the lower ends of the levers 76 are inwardly spaced from the axes of the pins 77 supporting the levers 76 in their mid region. This is important for achieving the movements, later to be explained, of the levers 76 and clinching bars 84 connected with them.
Upon admission of pressure fluid to the lower part of cylinder 62, plate 64 is pushed upward. This forces the links 67 to swing about their lower pins 68 and to move their outer ends outwardly thereby straightening the toggle link pairs 79. This in turn forces the lower ends of the levers 76 downwardly and outwardly while swinging their upper ends with the tool bars 84 inwardly and downwardly.
Different phases of this movement are illustrated on alarge scale in FIGS. 13 to 16.
Similar shadings 87 (FIG. 13) illustrate the initial movement of the links 79 and the movement of the lever 76 entrained thereby. During this swinging movement frame 70 with center pins 77 remains substantially stationary. Tool bar 84 engages with its beveled edge 85 upstanding outer-panel flange 30 and folds or bends it inwardly until about the position shown in FIG. is reached. Further inward movement is prevented by engagement of projection 88 on the upper inner side of lover 76 with the outside of frame wall 71.
Plate or crosshead 64 has, however, not yet reached its highest position when the swinging movement of lever 76 is halted. Further upward movement of the plate 64 causes links 79 to straighten out further, as indicated by shading 89 in FIG. 13, thereby exerting a downward pull through pin 81 on lever 76 which can only be accommodated by bodily downward movement of frame 70 with lever 76 and tool bar 84 in overcoming the bias of the springs 73. This final vertical movement, depicted by the shadings 90 corresponding to shading 89, forces or clinches flange 30 firmly downwardly on flange 29 and panel against anvil support 46 thereby giving the joint a final set or coining.
Further outward swing of links 79 is stopped by their engagement with projections 91 on levers 76. It will be understood that herein the singular is widely used for more simply describing the movement though, of course links 76, bars 84, flanges 30, etc., are provided along three sides of the machine and of a door thereon.
Positioning members 92 for a workpiece (FIGS. 20, 21) are slidably carried in sleeves 93 on the outside of frame walls 71 and pushed upwards by springs 94 until stopped by pins 95. These positioning members 92 define the location of the three door sides provided with the flanges 29, whereas the position of the fourth side is defined by engagement of flange 33 with the inner surface of member 47. The members 92 project through slots 96 in frame walls 71 and are pushed downwardly out of the way during a clinching action by the downward movements of bars 84.
The second type of clinching mechanism-that for flange 34 upon flange 32is derived from plate a crosshead 64 by means of link 97 journaled by pin 98 to lug 99 of plate 64.
Wall 45 of bed frame 37 is provided with outwardly projecting lugs 100 to which are journaled a link 101 (in two parts) by a pin 102. The lower end of link 101 is journaled by pin 103 to the outer end of the link 97. Rigidly secured to the outer portion of the link 97 is a horizontal bar 104 which by ears 105 and pins 106 carries the lower ends of levers 107, the mid portions of which are retained by U-shape brackets 108 outwardly projecting from frame wall 72. Springs 109 between links 107 and brackets 108 pull links 107 outwardly against adjustable stop screws 110 on brackets 108.
The link 101 pivoted on fixed pin 102 and the ears 105 pivoted to pin 103 and carrying pin 106 constitute a 6 toggle linkage and the link 97 and the middle pin 103 constitute the power toggle operating connection.
The shape, relative arrangement and operation of the clinching mechanism for flange 34 are shown in FIGS. 3, 10 to 12 and particularly in the large scale FIGS. 22 to 25.
The inwardly projecting upper ends of the levers 107 carry a clinching tool or bar 111 which has a downwardly projecting rib 112 along its inner edge. This rib has an inclined lower outer flange-bending edge surface 113 which is inwardly extended by a generously curved surface 114 and adjoined by a plane upright, outer clinching surface 115.
Cam member 116, projecting from the inner side of lever 107, has a lever return push-out cam surface 117 which faces and about parallels the inclined flange-bending surface 113 and which is adjoined at its top by a slightly inwardly inclined bend and clinch cam surface 118.
Member 47, secured (as previously mentioned) to top of wall 45 of bed frame 37, has an inner anvil surface 119, shaped and arranged as abutment for flange 33 of outer panel 25, and an inclined upper inner lever guide edge 120. A reaction cam member 121, one for each lever 107, is secured to member 47 and has a generously rounded outer lower edge 122 adjoined by an upwardly and slightly inwardly extending fiat reaction surface 123. Edges 120, 122 and surfaces 119, 123 are designed for co action with the respective edges and surfaces 113, 115, 117, 118 on tool 111 and lever 107.
Upward movement of plate 64 forces link 97 to swing about its inner pin 98 and its outer end, together with pins 106 and lower ends of links 101, to swing outwardly about pin 102 of link 101, which causes a circling or ancuate movement of pin 103 about pin 102 and of pins 106 conjointly about pin 103- and pin 102. The path followed by the center of each pin 106, as a result of the described compound movements, is shown in FIG. 22
by dot-and-dash line 124. This path has two portions the inclined tool edge 113 engages inclined edge 120 of member 47 thereby forcing the upper end of lever 107 to swing inwardly about pin 106. This inward swinging is limited by engagement of cam surface 117 with the rounded cam edge 122. As this movement progresses, the surfaces 114, 113- engage in succession the inwardly directed flange 34 of outer panel 25 and turn it downwardly over flange 32 of inner panel 26. See FIGS. 23 and 24. The stiffness of the flange 34 and the inclination of the surface 113 forces the tool 111 inward from the FIG. 23 position rto the FIG. 24 position.
After surfaces 113 and 120 have cleared each other, flange 34 is engaged by tool surface 115, as shown in FIG. 25, and cam surface 118 engages the cam surface 123 and, upon further downward movement of pin 106 along line 125, pulls the upper end of lever 107 outwardly, thereby beginning to draw surface by wedge action against flange 34 and, together with flanges 3-2 and 33, against surface 119 of member 47.
At substantially the same time that the tool clinching surface 115 comes solidly against the bent-down flange -or projection 34, as shown in FIG. 22, the toggle linkage pins 102, 103 and 106 are nearly in alignment and further movement of link 97 causes pin 106 to swing along the portion 1260f its path of movement. When the secondary and final movement of pin 106 along the inwardly directed portion 126 of its path pulls the lower end of lever 107 inwardly, upper end of lever 107 is swung about the instantaneous contact reaction point between cam surface 118' and rounded edge 122, thereby pulling surface 115 of the tool outwardly with great power and compressing the flanges 34, 32 and 33 firmly between itself and surface 119 of the member 47 to give this flange connection its final clinch setting or coining, as shown in FIG. 22.
The swinging movement of link 97 is limited by a stop- 12.7 engaging the link 101 at the end of its out-ward movement. Brackets 1&8, springs 169 and adjustable stops 110 serve for holding levers 107 against side movement for determining the starting position of tool 111 relative to co-acting member 47. The springs no are, however, not depended upon to return the upper ends of levers 107 and tool 111 from the final position shown in full lines in FIG. 22 to the starting position shown by dotted lines in the same figure; but the outward return movement is positively enforced by engagement of cam surfaces 117, 122 when retraction of plate 64 causes upward movement of lever 107 and tool 111.
As explained above, the levers 76 and 107 are all of the floating type in that in part they have a turning movement and in part have a translational movement. There is a translational movement of the links with their fulcrum points at a time when there is little or no turning movement about the pivot point. The tools 84 and 111 all have an inclined flange-bending surface (85 of 84 and 113 of 111); all have -a fl-at clinching surface (86 of 84 and 115 of 111); the levers all have a point of power application (pin $1 for lever 76 and pin 106 of lever 107); all levers have a fulcrum point between their tools and the point of power application (pin 77 for levers 76 and points along surface 118 for levers 107); and all fulcrum points have translatory movement during a flange bending-clinching action (the point 77 of lever 76 moving, as at 90, during the clinching action; and the surface 118 of lever 107 moving, as shown in FIGS. 22-25, during the bending action). The fulcrum reaction point of surface 118, which will be active during clinching, changes position during the bending action; but the fulcrum point for the clinching action, FIGS. 22 and 25, is a relatively fixed point along the surface 118. There is some rolling movement of surface 118 over the cam surface portion 122 as pin 1&6 moves along the portion 126 of its path but this movement is so small that there is practically no change in the effective fulcrum point. It is located near the tool end of the lever to provide a relatively long lever arm for power application; and since the tog le linkage pin centers (102, 103, 106) are practically in alignment when the clinching action occurs, there is a very great mechanical advantage and the clinching force is very powerful.
Miscellaneous Details and Observations For easier understanding, the construction and operation of the two types of clinching tools have been described separately but, of course, both types work simultaneously upon admission of pressure fluid to the lower part of cylinder 62 and resultant upward movement of plate 64.
Guide rods 128 with rounded or beveled ends are provided on tool bars 84 of two opposite sides (FIG. 2) and serve for facilitating the insertion and removal of the door 25, 26 into and out of the working position. As shown in FIG. 3, the door moves in over one of the four sides, that having the tool bars 111 and rollers 57; and is guided on its sides as it moves in and down by the guide bars 128 (shown in FIG. 2) of the two parallel sides; and the door moves out over the other or third side having the tool bars 84 and rollers 59, but not having guide bars 128.
The hereinbefore mentioned loading and unloading rollers 57, 59 are respectively supported by the upper ends of levers 6'7 and levers 107. Bracket 60 for unloading arms 58 is carried by wall 71, the slight floating of the latter being unobjectionable. Wall 72 of floatlog frame 70 has cut-outs through which bracket and cams 116, 121 extend.
The machine may advantageously be equipped for automatically going through an entire cycle of operations, from the start of the machine, after placement of two stampings 25, 26 on support 52 (FIG. 3), until re turn of the clinched door with its support 52 to the same raised position. Such full cycle of operations comprises: admission of pressure fluid to the upper end of top cylinder 54 resulting in lowering and firmly holding panels 25, 26 on supporting members 46; admission of pressure fluid to the lower end of main cylinder 62 resulting in the performance of the clinching operations; admission of pressure fluid to the upper end of main cylinder 62 resulting in the withdrawal of the clinching tools; and admission of pressure fluid to the lower end of top cylinder 55 resulting in lifting support 52 with the finished door to the top position. The means for effecting such automation need not to be shown and described because they are commonplace.
The embodiment, herein shown and described, conforms in its details to the characteristics of the illustrated door but the invention may be adapted to other types or shapes of doors or structures without departing from the invention. It may be remembered, for instance, that most doors have along all four sides the type of flange connection shown in the drawing for flanges 29, 30 along three sides only and that in such a case the same type of clinching tools would be used for all four sides while dispensing with the special type shown in the embodiment for flanges 34, 32.
Both types of clinching tools have in common the principles of a single tool for fortyfive-ing and final clinching; the principle of floating suspension of the clinching tool; the principle of a first relative tool movement with a bevelled flange-bending surface in a direction transversely to or across the flange in its upstanding position; and the principle of a second relative tool movement with a fiat flange-clinching surface in a direction perpendicular or normal to the surface of the bent-down flange. In the first type the floating suspension is achieved by supporting the tool carrying levers on the floating frame. in the second type it is achieved by the attachment of the tools to one end of a lever so that the tool carrying end may swing about the levers journal at the other end. In short, in both types the first movement otters at the beginning the least resistance and the second movement takes place when continuation of the first movement is blocked and the only escape is the second movement. The second movement in each case is a very powerful one obtained, at least in part, by moving the three centers of a toggle linkage into alignment to move the tool in a direction perpendicular or normal to the surface of the turned-down projection or flange and securely clinch it against the body of the workpiece.
Although the invention has herein been described and illustrated for the door of an automobile, it is, of course, also intended for similar structures, for instance trunk lids, and for other structures in which similar clinching operations are to be performed.
While the foregoing description refers to hydraulic cylinders for loading and unloading and for moving the clinching tools, evidently other power means can be used, particularly it will often be more advantageous to use another type of fluid cylinder namely pneumatic cylinders fed with compressed air.
The yielding support of the first type of tools and levers need not necessarily be achieved by metal springs but other means are available for permitting retraction of the support for the levers at the desired moment and for its later returning to the starting position. In this connection attention is directed to the importance of the relative lengths of the arms of the levers supporting the tools and of the relative lateral offsets of the toolsupporting and link-attached ends from the centers of rotation of the levers.
Important is also synchronization of the several tools driven by common means because otherwise a single tool reaching the end position first, would prevent the other tools from reaching the end position and loose crimp joints would result.
It will also be realized that it is the relative movements between co-acting dies, i.e., the hereinbefore described clinching tools and the door supports or anvils, which give the desired result. However, it is believed particularly advantageous to keep the supports and panels stationary while imparting the two successive, differently directed movements exclusively to the tools, as done in the shown and described embodiment.
In general, the invention is not restricted to the illustrated and described embodiment or its details but is susceptible of adaptations and modifications which will present themselves to those skilled in the art.
What is claimed is:
1. A machine for bending down and clinching upstanding projections extending in different directions from a body by a power device movable in a single direction, comprising in combination, support mean-s adapted to support the body beneath the projections, tool bars disposed adjacent said projections and said support means, a plurality of swingable pivoted levers each carrying one of said tool bars, a single power device for operating, all of said levers and tools, said power device including a reciprocable member movable in a direction parallel to some of said projections and transversely to others of said projections, vertically movable frame means for supporting said levers, and operating means between said reciprocable member and said levers for imparting a first movement to give all of said tools a first movement laterally across the associated projections obliquely down toward said body and the associated support means to bend down the projections, and thereafter imparting a second movement to give the tools a final movement, by an abrupt change of direction, directly down upon the bent projections and body against the support means to clinch the projections down upon the body.
2. A machine as set forth in claim 1 wherein said mounting and operating means includes toggle operating linkages pivotally connected to said reciprocable member, .to said support means, and to said levers.
3. A machine for bending down and clinching upstanding projections on the periphery of a workpiece, comp-rising in combination,
a base frame, anvil backing supports carried by the :base frame at the periphery of the frame for holding said workpiece in a generally horizontal position,
floating tool levers mounted alongside said frame for swinging movement toward and from the edges of the workpiece,
projection turning and clinching tools rigidly carried by said tool levers in a position to swing inward over the edges of the workpiece when the levers are swung inward to cooperate with said anvil backing supports to bend over said projections upon the body of the workpiece and subsequently to clinch the projections down upon .the workpiece,
power operating means having pivot connections connected to the lower ends of said floating tool levers for swinging their tool-carrying ends in and out and up and down relative to the workpiece,
fulcrum pivot points on said tool levers, and fulcrum reaction means carried by said frame cooperating with said fulcrum pivot points providing floating vertical movement of the pivot points of said tool levers during turning and clinching of the projection,
by said tools on said levers, said power operating means, fulcrum points, and fulcrum reaction means having conjoint movement to first move said tool laterally across a projection to bend it down and then, by an abrupt change in direction of the tool, to bring it down perpendicularly against the surface 0f the projection to clinch it.
4. A machine as set forth in claim 3, wherein said power means includes a toggle linkage having two end pivots and a center pivot, one end pivot being connected to said base frame part, and another end pivot being connected to a tool lever pivot, and the center pivot of said toggle linkage being connected to a power toggle operating link.
5. A machine as set forth in claim 3, wherein the fulorum pivot points on said levers include pivot pins connected to said fulcrum reaction means, said reaction means being spring mounted to said base frame to resist vertical movement until said tools have bent down the upstanding projections and engage the top surfaces of the bent-d-own projections, the fulcrum reaction means then moving down upon further action of the power means to move said fulcrum pivot pins of said floating tool levers down to clinch the bent-down projections without tendency toward lateral movement of said clinching tool during clinching.
6. A machine as set forth in claim 3, wherein said clinching tools each include an inclined surface which moves across a projection to bend it down and ad jacent thereto a flat clinching surface which is brought int-o position directly above the surface of a bent-down projection after the inclined surface has bent it down and-moved past it.
7. -A machine for bending down and clinching the pe ripheral edge flanges of a plurality of sides of a door having an outer panel with upstanding flanges to be bent over the edges of an inner panel, the door having at least one side with marginal flanges initially upstanding generally perpendicularly to the plane of the door, and the door having one side disposed at an angle to the plane of the door with marginal flanges initially upstanding generally perpendicularly to the angular side and generally parallel to the plane of the door, comprising in combination,
a base frame, anvil backing supports carried by the frame at the periphery of the frame for supporting the peripheral edges of the door and holding the door in a generally horizontal position, means for holding said door down on said backing supports during the flange turning and clinching operations, floating tool levers comprising levers of the first and second class types mounted alongside said frame for swinging movement toward and from the edges of the door,
flange turning and clinching tools rigidly carried by ends of said levers,
said tools including an inclined surface for moving laterally across a projection to bend it over upon the body of the door and a flat surface on said tool which overlies the surface of a flange after it has been bent over,
a vertically slidable frame carried by the base frame and having pivot pin fulcrums carrying pivot pins for said first-class-type tool levers, said first-classtype .tool levers adapted for turning the vertically upstanding flanges, means resiliently holding said slidable frame in an upper position relative tosaid base frame, stop means carried by said first-classtype tool levers for halting their inward swinging movement after the inclined tool surfaces have bent over a flange land the flat surfaces abut the bentover flanges,
a cam reaction bar carried by the base frame adapted to cooperate with a fulcrum point of the secondclass-type tool levers for turning the lateral flanges on the angular edge of the door, said cam reaction bar providing vertical sliding movement and turning movement of said second-class-type tool levers relative thereto,
1 1 means guiding said second-class-type tool levers and resilientlyurging the upper ends thereof outwardly, coacting means between said second-class-type levers and said base frame which move the tool ends of the levers inward against the upper side of a flange, the stiffness of the flange urging the tool end further inward, icoacting means between said second-class-type levers and saidbase frame which move the tool end of the levers outward as the levers move downward fur- 7 ither after engaging a flange,
a vertically reciprocable power orosshead disposed disposed between the lower ends of said tool levers, toggle linkages having an upper and lower pivot and a center pivot, said toggle linkages pivoted at the top pivot to said base frame and carrying the lower other of the ends of said tool levers on pivots at the lower ends of the toggle linkages,
toggle operating links pivoted at one end on said crosshead and pivoted at the other end to the center of said toggle linkages,
the operating link ofthe second-class-type tool lever having a downturned bell crank arm at its outer end forming a part of the .toggle linkage and having the second-class-type lever pivoted to its lower end, i a
the toggle linkages and toggle operating links for the first-class-type tool levers causing them first to swing inward and bend over the flanges until the levers engage their said stopmeans, and-thereafter, as the toggle linkages approach their pivot-aligned position, causing the slidable frame and levers to move down vertically without turning movement of the levers to clinch the flanges,
and the toggle linkages and toggle operating links for the second-class-type tool levers causing them first to swing inward and move downward to bend down the flanges, and thereafter causing the levers to swing about their fulcrum points with-out downward movement to clinch the flanges.
8. A machine for bending over and clinching down an 'upstanding'projection of an outer door panel upon a flange portion of an inner door panel comprising in said fixed frame, a lever pivotally mounted on said movable frame by a horizontal pin connection located intermediate the ends :of said lever, a tool bar afiixed to one end of said lever opposite said upstanding projection on said outer door panel adapted to bend over said upstanding projection when said lever is rotated on its pivot pin connection, said tool bar being further adapted to clinch said projection and said flange between said fixed frame and said tool when said lever is moved vertically downward, and operating means cooperating with the other end of said lever to sequentially pivot the lever on said pivot pin connection imparting a horizontal arcuate movement to said tool on said lever for bending over said upstanding projection on said outer panel onto the flange of said inner panel, and thereafter imparting a vertically downward movement to said lever and said vertically movable frame causing said tool on said lever to clinch the bent over projection on said outer door panel down upon the flange of the inner door panel.
9. A device for bending over and clinching down an upstanding projection of an outer door panel upon a flange portion of an inner door panel comprising in combination, a fixed frame adapted to support said panels, a movable frame rnounted on said fixed frame for movement along a vertical path adjacent to and spaced apart from said panels, a lever pivotally mounted on said movable frame for movement of said lever normal to said upstanding projection on said outer door panel, operating means for moving said lever and said frame in such a manner that one end of said lever travels along a path having a first portion directed inwardly toward said upstanding portion of said outer door panel and a second portion of said path having a motion directed :downwar-d relative to said flange of said inner door panel,
and a tool bar carried by the one end of said lever adapted to engage the upstanding portion of said outer door panel in response to movement of said lever along said first portion of said path and subsequently to clinch said bent upstanding portion and said flange portion of said panels together in response to movement of said lever along said second portion of said path.
10. A device as set forth in claim 9 wherein said operating means comprises, a three pivot toggle linkage connected at one end pivot to said fixed frame and connected at its other end pivot at said lever, said toggle being connected by its center pivot through a single linkage to a power operating cylinder.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Claims (1)

  1. 9. A DEVICE FOR BENDING OVER AND CLINCHING DOWN AN UPSTANDING PROJECTION OF AN OUTER DOOR PANEL UPON A FLANGE PORTION OF AN INNER DOOR PANEL COMPRISING IN COMBINATION, A FIXED FRAME ADAPTED TO SUPPORT SAID PANELS, A MOVABLE FRAME MOUNTED ON SAID FIXED FRAME FOR MOVEMENT ALONG A VERTICAL PATH ADJACENT TO AND SPACED APART FROM SAID PANELS, A LEVER PIVOTALLY MOUNTED ON SAID MOVABLE FRAME FOR MOVEMENT OF SAID LEVER NORMAL TO SAID UPSTANDING PROJECTION ON SAID OUTER DOOR PANEL, OPERATING MEANS FOR MOVING SAID LEVER AND SAID FRAME IN SUCH A MANNER THAT ONE END OF SAID LEVER TRAVELS ALONG A PATH HAVING A FIRST PORTION DIRECTED INWARDLY TOWARD SAID UPSTANDING PORTION OF SAID OUTER DOOR PANEL AND A SECOND PORTION OF SAID PATH HAVING A MOTION DIRECTED DOWNWARD RELATIVE TO SAID FLANGE OF SAID INNER DOOR PANEL, AND A TOOL BAR CARRIED BY THE ONE END OF SAID LEVER ADAPTED TO ENGAGE THE UPSTANDING PORTION OF SAID OUTER DOOR PANEL IN RESPONSE TO MOVEMENT OF SAID LEVER ALONG SAID FIRST PORTION OF SAID PATH AND SUBSEQUENTLY TO CLINCH SAID BENT UPSTANDING PORTION AND SAID FLANGE PORTION OF SAID PANELS TOGETHER IN RESPONSE TO MOVEMENT OF SAID LEVER ALONG SAID SECOND PORTION OF SAID PATH.
US613983A 1956-10-04 1956-10-04 Clinching machine for door overlap flanges Expired - Lifetime US3092057A (en)

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Cited By (16)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3241513A (en) * 1964-06-05 1966-03-22 Commercial Engineering Corp Marine tow-line with snap-on fairing
US4827595A (en) * 1985-12-05 1989-05-09 Utica Engineering Company Method for hemming overlapped sheet material
FR2645053A1 (en) * 1989-04-04 1990-10-05 Renault Open-table crimping rig
US5086638A (en) * 1991-04-09 1992-02-11 Link Special Machinery, Inc. Drive mechanism for a hemming apparatus
US5740691A (en) * 1994-02-14 1998-04-21 Western Atlas U.K. Limited Hemming machine
ES2145651A1 (en) * 1996-07-26 2000-07-01 Ingemat Sa Modular tabletop system for connecting metal pieces by flanging
US6314783B1 (en) * 2000-05-05 2001-11-13 William Patrick Electromechanical hemming apparatus and method
US6314784B1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2001-11-13 Matrici S. Coop Modular system for seaming metal sheets
US6378348B1 (en) * 1999-08-04 2002-04-30 Hirotec Corporation Hemming process and hemming apparatus
US6446478B1 (en) * 1999-07-29 2002-09-10 Progressive Tool & Industries Co. Two-stage hemming machine with movable dies
US6460392B2 (en) 2001-02-28 2002-10-08 Unova Ip Corp. Flange bending apparatus
US6467324B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2002-10-22 William Patrick Die hemming assembly and method
US20020157441A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2002-10-31 William Patrick Die hemming assembly and method
US6745608B2 (en) * 2001-12-10 2004-06-08 Shinkoh Co., Ltd. Hemming units and apparatus
US20040206149A1 (en) * 2000-03-17 2004-10-21 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd Hemming device and hemming method
US20060042340A1 (en) * 2004-08-30 2006-03-02 Utica Enterprises, Inc. System and method for hemming vehicle sheet metal

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US1602962A (en) * 1924-02-05 1926-10-12 Empire Tinware Co Pail-cover-attaching device
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US699843A (en) * 1901-04-13 1902-05-13 William S Cumming Machine for end-seaming sheet-metal bodies.
US1693643A (en) * 1921-08-27 1928-12-04 Budd Edward G Mfg Co Machine for making automobile doors
US1602962A (en) * 1924-02-05 1926-10-12 Empire Tinware Co Pail-cover-attaching device
US1605284A (en) * 1926-05-15 1926-11-02 Wheeling Steel Corp Pail-closing device
US1720133A (en) * 1927-09-02 1929-07-09 Roy Bernard L Le Bending and clinching machine
US1961582A (en) * 1929-01-31 1934-06-05 Edward G Bndd Mfg Company Crimping die device
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US2690727A (en) * 1951-02-03 1954-10-05 Western Electric Co Apparatus for bending container fastener lugs and for printing on containers

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3241513A (en) * 1964-06-05 1966-03-22 Commercial Engineering Corp Marine tow-line with snap-on fairing
US4827595A (en) * 1985-12-05 1989-05-09 Utica Engineering Company Method for hemming overlapped sheet material
FR2645053A1 (en) * 1989-04-04 1990-10-05 Renault Open-table crimping rig
US5086638A (en) * 1991-04-09 1992-02-11 Link Special Machinery, Inc. Drive mechanism for a hemming apparatus
US5740691A (en) * 1994-02-14 1998-04-21 Western Atlas U.K. Limited Hemming machine
ES2145651A1 (en) * 1996-07-26 2000-07-01 Ingemat Sa Modular tabletop system for connecting metal pieces by flanging
US6477881B2 (en) 1998-11-20 2002-11-12 Matrici S. Coop. Modular system for seaming metal sheets
US6314784B1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2001-11-13 Matrici S. Coop Modular system for seaming metal sheets
US6446478B1 (en) * 1999-07-29 2002-09-10 Progressive Tool & Industries Co. Two-stage hemming machine with movable dies
US6378348B1 (en) * 1999-08-04 2002-04-30 Hirotec Corporation Hemming process and hemming apparatus
US7082803B2 (en) * 2000-03-17 2006-08-01 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Hemming device and hemming method
US20040206149A1 (en) * 2000-03-17 2004-10-21 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd Hemming device and hemming method
US6314783B1 (en) * 2000-05-05 2001-11-13 William Patrick Electromechanical hemming apparatus and method
US20020157441A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2002-10-31 William Patrick Die hemming assembly and method
US6467324B2 (en) 2001-02-27 2002-10-22 William Patrick Die hemming assembly and method
US6460392B2 (en) 2001-02-28 2002-10-08 Unova Ip Corp. Flange bending apparatus
US6745608B2 (en) * 2001-12-10 2004-06-08 Shinkoh Co., Ltd. Hemming units and apparatus
US20060042340A1 (en) * 2004-08-30 2006-03-02 Utica Enterprises, Inc. System and method for hemming vehicle sheet metal

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