US3001525A - Parenteral equipment - Google Patents

Parenteral equipment Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3001525A
US3001525A US69455157A US3001525A US 3001525 A US3001525 A US 3001525A US 69455157 A US69455157 A US 69455157A US 3001525 A US3001525 A US 3001525A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
container
concentrate
liquid
solution
tube
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Gerald E Hendricks
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
American Sterilizer Co
Original Assignee
American Sterilizer Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/1411Drip chambers

Description

Sept. 26, 1961 G. E. HENDRICKS PARENTERAL EQUIPMENT Filed Nov. 5, 1957 INVENTOR. 54 5 5 M W WWW United States Patent sylvania Filed Nov. 5, 1957, Ser. No. 694,551 Claims. (Cl. 128-214) Many solutions may be shipped as concentrates and reconstituted at the point of use by mixing with distilled water or with another solution. The reconstituted solution is then administered through an administration set which typically includes a needle, tubing and drip chamber. Heretofore, the typical steps required for use of reconstituted solutions have been (1) connecting a sterile container for the concentrate to the solution container which has been previously filled with distilled water or other solution, (2) mixing the concentrate with the solution to reconstitute, (3) disconnecting the concentrate container and (4) connecting an administration set to the solution container.

This invention is intended to simplify the use of reconstituted solutions by shipping the concentrate in a container which can serve as a drip chamber so that the concentrate container need not be disconnected after reconstitution but can remain as a part of the administration set. In a preferred form, the concentrate chamber is of resilient transparent walled plastic so that alternate squeezing and release Will have a pumping action which speeds up the mixing necessary for reconstitution.

In the drawing FIG. 1 is a section through a solution container with the concentrate container connected thereto for reconstitution, FIG. 2 shows the administration set connected to the solution container ready for administration of the reconstituted solution, FIG. 3 is an elevation of the concentrate container, and FIG. 4 is a sectional elevation of another form of concentrate container.

The concentrate for forming the solution may be either a powder or a liquid and is shipped in a sealed container 1 which may, for example, be made of vinyl plastic or other transparent resilient tubing. At the lower end the walls of the tube are pinched together at 2 and fused to each other and to a plastic drain tube 3 having its outer end covered by a removable cap seal 4. At the upper end the walls of the tubular body are pinched together at 5 and are fused to each other and to a plastic tube 6, the inner end 7 of which depends Within the upper end of the body and provides a drip tube nozzle. The upper end of the tube 6 is fixed over a tubular projection 8 forming an extension of a cannula 9. Midway between the projection 8 and the cannula 9 is an integral flange 10 by which the cannula may be forced through the diaphragm seal 11 in a rubber stopper 12 for the flask 13 which contains the distilled water or other solution to be mixed with the concentrate in the container 1. The stopper carries an air vent tube 14 having its upper end extending above the liquid level of the flask whenthe flask is inverted. The lower end of the air vent tube is sealed by a diaphragm 15 which may be suitably punctured or removed when the contents of the flask are to be dispensed.

In FIG. 4 is shown another shipping container the lower end of which is of the same construction as the container shown in FIG. 3. l The upper end of the plastic tubing 1 is sealed directly to the rim of the flange 10. This may be done by heat sealing. After sealing the tubular projection 8 at the lower side of the flange 10 depends Within the upper end ofthe plastic body 1 and serves as a drip tube by means of which the rate of flow of fluid can be observed. The cannula 9 as in the FIG. :3

construction is closed by a cap 13a.

Both of the containers of FIGS. 3 and 4 are sterilized Patented Sept. 26, 1961 after filling, preferably by steam, and are sealed by the caps 4 and 13a to retain sterility. If sealed while the container is filled with vapor, the condensation of the vapor will produce a vacuum. Both the containers and contents are sealed in a sterile condition and will remain sterile during shipment and other handling preceding arrival at the point of use.

The first step for using the contents of either the FIG. 3 or the FIG. 4 container is to remove the cap 13a and to force the cannula 9 through the diaphragm 11 in the stopper closure 12 for the flask container. This establishes communication between the flask 13 and the container 1 and some liquid will flow from the flask to the container. The liquid flow 'may be accelerated by squeezing the walls of the container to expel air up through the cannula into the flask 13 and then releasing the container so that asthe container Walls expand due to their inherent resilience liquid will be drawn down into the container. By alternately squeezing and releasing the flexible walls of the container, liquid can be surged back and forth between the flask 13 and the container 1 to assist in mixing the solution with the concentrate to reconstitute the concentrate into solution. From one aspect, the container acts as an expansible chamber surge pump. The surging action is particularly useful when the concentrate is a powder. The reconstitution takes place with the flask 13 in the inverted position so that there will be a free flow of liquid into and out of the concentrate container 1. After reconstitution,the cap 4 may be removed and the upper end of the dispensing tubing 16 connected to the depending tube 3 at the lower end of the container. The dispensing tubing16 is usually made of one ofthe flexible plastics and may have fixed to its lower end a hypodermic needle 17. The container 1 now serves as a'drip chamber which can be used in the conventional manner. If the container 1 should be too full of liquid, the drip level. can be adjusted by moving the flask 13 to an upright position and squeezing the container 1 to force liquid back into the flask. On the other hand, if'the container should not have enough liquid in it, additional liquid can be drawn into the container by squeezing and releasing the side walls to suck liquid into the container from the flask.

By having the shipping container for the concentrate in a form such that it can be used as a drip chamber, the reconstitution of parenteral solutions can be effected with a minimum of handling and according a minimum of opportunity for contamination There further is a very substantial saving in expense. Heretofore when the concentrate containers were not usable as drip chambers, it was necessary that each concentrate container have a cannula such as illustrated at 9 and a cap for the cannula such as illustrated at 13a. The reconstitution started with the insertion of the concentrate container cannula through the diaphragm 11 in the rubber stopper 12. After reconstitution, it was then necessary to havethe same drip chamber such as illustrated in FIG. 3 or 4 with another cannula 9 and another cap 13a so that the cannula of the drip chamber could be inserted through the diaphragm 11 after the concentrate container and cannula had been removed. Instead of having the added cost of a separate concentrate container and cannula, applicant has completely eliminated this cost by combining the functions of a shipping and storage container and drip chamber into the conventional drip chamber. This means that applicant is able to supply a throw away dispensing kit consisting of needle 17, tubing 16 and drip chamber -1 filled with the desired concentrate for substantially the same price as those elements would cost labor and cost of sterilizing which is unchanged whether the drip chamber container 1 is empty or is filled with concentrate.

What is clairned as new is:

l.- A container having a tubular flexible walled body Gf resilient transparent material hermetically sealed at both its upper and its lower end, the structure for sealing the lower end of the body including a depending tube of size for connection to tubing for dispensing solutions and a removable cap seal over the lower end of the tube, the structure for sealing the upper end of the body including a drip tube nozzle depending within the upper and of the body and an upwardly extending conducting means leading to said nozzle and a removable cap seal "over the liquid conducting means, a concentrate within the body for reconstitution into a solution, the container and concentrate being sterilized .and sealed, the liquid conducting means being connectable to a liquid containing flask much larger than the shipping container, the body of the container when connected to the flask by the liquid conducting means serving as an expansible chamber pump for surging liquid back and forth between the container and flask to mix the concentrate with the liquid for reconstitution into a solution and the container thereafter serving as a drip chamber, and the tube being .connectable to tubing for dispensing the solutions flowseal over the lower end of the tube, the structure for sealing the upper end of the body including a cannula permanently bonded to the body and having an associated portion projecting interiorly inside the. body to provide a drip tube nozzle and a removable cap seal over the cannula, a concentrate within the body for reconstitution into a solution, the container and concentrate being sterilized and sealed to retain the inherent steriliza- .tion, the cannula being connectable to a liquid containing flask and the body of the container when so connected serving as an expansible chamber pump for surging liquid back and forth between the container and flask to mix the concentrate with the liquid for reconstitution into a solution and thereafter serving as a drip chamber, and the tube at the lower end of the body being connectable to tubing for dispensing solutions flowing through the drip chamber.

3. A container having a transparent chamber capable of expansion and contraction at will and hermetically sealed by seals breakable at both its upper and its lower end, the structure for sealing the lower end of the chamber including a depending tube of size for connection to tubing for dispensing solutions and a removable cap seal over the lower end of the tube, the structure for sealing the upper end of the chamber including an upwardly extending cannula, an associated tube depending into the body to provide a drip tube nozzle and a removable cap over the cannula, a concentrate within the chamber for reconstitution into a solution, the container and concentrate being sterilized and sealed to retain the inherent sterilization, the cannula being connectable to a liquid containing flask and when connected serving as an expansible chamber pump for surging liquid back and forth between the container and flask to mix the concentrate with the liquid for reconstitution into a solution and thereafter serving as a drip chamber, and the tube being connectable to tubing for dispensing solutions flowing through the drip chamber.

4. A shipping or storage container for a parenteral solution concentrate which upon connection to a liquid containing flask can discharge its contents to the flask fortmixing to :torm or reconstitute a parenteral solution and which thereafter need not be'disconnected but can remain as part of a solution administration set, said container having a flexible body of resilient transparent material hermetically sealed at both its upper and its lower end, the structure for sealing the lower end of the body including a depending small diameter tube permanently bonded to the body and of size for connection to tubing for dispensing solutions and aremovable cap seal over the lower end of the tube, the structure for sealing the upper end of the body including liquid conducting means permanently bonded to the body and having an outer end outside the body and an inner end projecting interiorly inside the body to provide a drip tube nozzle and a removable cap seal over the outer end of said liquid conducting means, a concentrate within the body for reconstitution into a solution, the container and .concentrate being sterilized and sealed to retain the inherent sterilization, the outer end of said liquid conducting means being connectable to a liquid containing flask and the body of the container when so connected serving as an expansible chamber pump for surging liquid back and forth between the container and flask to mix the concentrate with the liquid for reconstitution into a solution and thereafter serving as a drip chamber, and the tube at the lower end of the body being connectable to tubing for dispensing solutions flowing through the drip-chamber.

5. A shipping or storage container for a parenteral solution concentrate which upon connection to a liquid containing flask can discharge its contents to the flask for mixing to form or reconstitute a parenteral solution and which thereafter need not be disconnected but can remain as part of a solution administration set, said container having a flexible body of resilient transparent material hermetically sealed at both its upper and its lower end, the structure for sealing the lower end of the chamber including a depending tube of size for connection to tubing for dispensing solutions and a removable cap seal over the lower end of the tube, the structure for sealing the upper end of the chamber including an upwardly extending liquid conducting means, an associated tube depending into the body to provide a drip tube nozzle and a removable cap over the liquid conducting means,

a concentrate Within the chamber for reconstitution into 7 a solution, the container and concentrate being sterilized and sealed to retain the inherent sterilization, the liquid conducting means being connectable to a liquid containing flask and when connected serving as an expansible chamber pump for surging liquid back and forth between the container and flask to mix the concentrate with the liquid for reconstitution into a solution and thereafter serving as a drip chamber, and the tube being connectable to tubing for dispensing solutions flowing through the drip chamber.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,682,268 Ryan et al. June 29, 1954 2,704,544 Ryan Mar. 22, 1955 2,777,443 Thomas et al Jan. 15, 1957 2,786,467 Price Mar. 26, 1957 2,829,644 Anderson Apr. 8, 1958 2,855,131 Gewecke et al Oct. 7, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,108,782 France Sept. 14, 1955 1,127,010 France Aug. 6, 1956 89,076 Norway Apr. -15, 1957 89,889 Norway Aug. 26, 1957 772,636 Great Britain Apr. 17, 1957 OTHER REFERENCES .Walter et al.: A Closed Gravity Technique, Surgery, Gynecology and Obstetrics, volume 94, No.6, June 1952, .pp. 687-692 (PP. 687-689 relied on). (Available in Science Library.)

US3001525A 1957-11-05 1957-11-05 Parenteral equipment Expired - Lifetime US3001525A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3001525A US3001525A (en) 1957-11-05 1957-11-05 Parenteral equipment

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3001525A US3001525A (en) 1957-11-05 1957-11-05 Parenteral equipment

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3001525A true US3001525A (en) 1961-09-26

Family

ID=24789314

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3001525A Expired - Lifetime US3001525A (en) 1957-11-05 1957-11-05 Parenteral equipment

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3001525A (en)

Cited By (55)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3128917A (en) * 1964-04-14 krause
US3157103A (en) * 1961-08-09 1964-11-17 Eastman Kodak Co Viscous solution processing device adapted for continuous operation
US3326424A (en) * 1964-01-03 1967-06-20 Virginia Chemicals & Smelting Method and apparatus for metering liquid
US3394831A (en) * 1966-06-13 1968-07-30 American Hospital Supply Corp Apparatus for storing and handling parenteral liquids and method for opening same
US3822700A (en) * 1973-03-16 1974-07-09 M Pennington Intravenous solution dispenser
US3868965A (en) * 1973-07-03 1975-03-04 United States Surgical Corp Drop former for intravenous set
US3951145A (en) * 1973-10-25 1976-04-20 Bob Lee Smith Intravenous measuring chamber
US3965897A (en) * 1974-10-11 1976-06-29 Origo, Incorporated Measured volume drug administration device for use with intravenous feeding pump
US4392850A (en) * 1981-11-23 1983-07-12 Abbott Laboratories In-line transfer unit
US4392851A (en) * 1981-11-23 1983-07-12 Abbott Laboratories In-line transfer unit
WO1983003539A1 (en) * 1982-04-06 1983-10-27 Baxter Travenol Lab Container for mixing a liquid and a solid
US4432755A (en) * 1982-04-06 1984-02-21 Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc. Sterile coupling
US4439183A (en) * 1981-10-09 1984-03-27 Alza Corporation Parenteral agent dispensing equipment
US4465471A (en) * 1981-08-26 1984-08-14 Eli Lilly And Company Intravenous administration system for dry medicine
US4511351A (en) * 1984-05-14 1985-04-16 Alza Corporation Parenteral delivery system utilizing a hollow fiber cellular unit
US4511352A (en) * 1984-05-14 1985-04-16 Alza Corporation Parenteral delivery system with in-line container
US4521211A (en) * 1981-10-09 1985-06-04 Alza Corporation Parenteral agent dispensing equipment
US4525162A (en) * 1981-07-31 1985-06-25 Alza Corporation Parenteral controlled delivery
US4548598A (en) * 1981-10-09 1985-10-22 Alza Corporation Parenteral agent dispensing equipment
US4552556A (en) * 1981-11-27 1985-11-12 Alza Corporation Parenteral controlled therapy
US4568331A (en) * 1983-10-17 1986-02-04 Marcus Fischer Disposable medicine dispensing device
US4573967A (en) * 1983-12-06 1986-03-04 Eli Lilly And Company Vacuum vial infusion system
US4579553A (en) * 1981-11-27 1986-04-01 Alza Corporation Parenteral controlled therapy
US4583981A (en) * 1981-11-27 1986-04-22 Alza Corporation Parenteral controlled therapy, using a porous matrix with parenteral agent
US4586922A (en) * 1981-10-09 1986-05-06 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4596555A (en) * 1984-05-14 1986-06-24 Alza Corporation Parenteral delivery system utilizing a hollow fiber cellular unit
US4740199A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4740197A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent via polymer delivery
US4740198A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Method of administering intravenous drug using rate-controlled dosage form
US4740201A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4740103A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4740200A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4741734A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-05-03 Alza Corporation Releasing means for adding agent using releasing means to IV fluid
US4741735A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-05-03 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4758236A (en) * 1986-05-12 1988-07-19 Bent Heimreid Arrangement in an infusion kit
WO1988008722A1 (en) * 1987-05-12 1988-11-17 Heimreid, Ken An arrangement in an infusion kit
US4790820A (en) * 1981-07-13 1988-12-13 Alza Corporation Parenteral agent dispensing equipment with drug releasing member
US4857052A (en) * 1981-07-13 1989-08-15 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4871360A (en) * 1981-07-31 1989-10-03 Alza Corporation System for intravenous delivery of a beneficial drug at a regulated rates
US4895275A (en) * 1988-08-30 1990-01-23 Corpak, Inc. Dispensing spike for penetrable pre-filled shape retentive containers
US4902287A (en) * 1987-09-24 1990-02-20 Miles Inc. Sterilizable system for blood storage
US4908019A (en) * 1982-05-24 1990-03-13 Alza Corporation Apparatus comprising dual reservoirs for parenteral infusion of fluid containing beneficial agent
US4973307A (en) * 1981-07-13 1990-11-27 Alza Corporation Method for administering drugs to a patient
US4985017A (en) * 1981-07-13 1991-01-15 Alza Corporation Parenteral therapeutical system comprising drug cell
US4994031A (en) * 1981-07-13 1991-02-19 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US5002530A (en) * 1988-02-25 1991-03-26 Schiwa Gmbh Container for infusion solutions
US5069671A (en) * 1981-07-13 1991-12-03 Alza Corporation Intravenous medication
USRE34365E (en) * 1981-07-13 1993-08-31 Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US5423751A (en) * 1993-02-18 1995-06-13 Harrison; Samuel W. Contrast media dispensing apparatus
US5593385A (en) * 1993-02-18 1997-01-14 Harrison; Samuel W. Contrast media dispensing apparatus
US6520937B2 (en) 2000-12-18 2003-02-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Fluid injection device
US20040153047A1 (en) * 2002-11-18 2004-08-05 Ricardo Blank Connector device
US7066914B2 (en) 2000-07-12 2006-06-27 Bird Products Corporation Catheter having a tip with an elongated collar
US7976518B2 (en) 2005-01-13 2011-07-12 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
US9028441B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2015-05-12 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Apparatus and method used with guidance system for feeding and suctioning

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2682268A (en) * 1950-08-08 1954-06-29 Abbott Lab Venoclysis equipment
US2704544A (en) * 1954-07-02 1955-03-22 Venoclysis equipment
FR1108782A (en) * 1953-11-16 1956-01-17 Baxter Laboratories Inc blood pump operable by hand
FR1127010A (en) * 1954-03-29 1956-12-06 Method and apparatus for the storage and transfusion of blood
US2777443A (en) * 1955-03-29 1957-01-15 Baxter Laboratories Inc Air-way puncture device
US2786467A (en) * 1955-07-01 1957-03-26 Russell W Price Apparatus for dispensing intravenous solutions
US2829644A (en) * 1954-10-28 1958-04-08 Lynn H Anderson Venous catheter
US2855131A (en) * 1956-05-09 1958-10-07 Baxter Laboratories Inc Parenteral solution equipment

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2682268A (en) * 1950-08-08 1954-06-29 Abbott Lab Venoclysis equipment
FR1108782A (en) * 1953-11-16 1956-01-17 Baxter Laboratories Inc blood pump operable by hand
FR1127010A (en) * 1954-03-29 1956-12-06 Method and apparatus for the storage and transfusion of blood
GB772636A (en) * 1954-03-29 1957-04-17 Edward Joseph Poitras Improvements in or relating to medical fluids handling and administering apparatus and method
US2704544A (en) * 1954-07-02 1955-03-22 Venoclysis equipment
US2829644A (en) * 1954-10-28 1958-04-08 Lynn H Anderson Venous catheter
US2777443A (en) * 1955-03-29 1957-01-15 Baxter Laboratories Inc Air-way puncture device
US2786467A (en) * 1955-07-01 1957-03-26 Russell W Price Apparatus for dispensing intravenous solutions
US2855131A (en) * 1956-05-09 1958-10-07 Baxter Laboratories Inc Parenteral solution equipment

Cited By (64)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3128917A (en) * 1964-04-14 krause
US3157103A (en) * 1961-08-09 1964-11-17 Eastman Kodak Co Viscous solution processing device adapted for continuous operation
US3326424A (en) * 1964-01-03 1967-06-20 Virginia Chemicals & Smelting Method and apparatus for metering liquid
US3394831A (en) * 1966-06-13 1968-07-30 American Hospital Supply Corp Apparatus for storing and handling parenteral liquids and method for opening same
US3822700A (en) * 1973-03-16 1974-07-09 M Pennington Intravenous solution dispenser
US3868965A (en) * 1973-07-03 1975-03-04 United States Surgical Corp Drop former for intravenous set
US3951145A (en) * 1973-10-25 1976-04-20 Bob Lee Smith Intravenous measuring chamber
US3965897A (en) * 1974-10-11 1976-06-29 Origo, Incorporated Measured volume drug administration device for use with intravenous feeding pump
US4994031A (en) * 1981-07-13 1991-02-19 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4857052A (en) * 1981-07-13 1989-08-15 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4985017A (en) * 1981-07-13 1991-01-15 Alza Corporation Parenteral therapeutical system comprising drug cell
USRE34365E (en) * 1981-07-13 1993-08-31 Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4790820A (en) * 1981-07-13 1988-12-13 Alza Corporation Parenteral agent dispensing equipment with drug releasing member
US5069671A (en) * 1981-07-13 1991-12-03 Alza Corporation Intravenous medication
US4973307A (en) * 1981-07-13 1990-11-27 Alza Corporation Method for administering drugs to a patient
US4525162A (en) * 1981-07-31 1985-06-25 Alza Corporation Parenteral controlled delivery
US4871360A (en) * 1981-07-31 1989-10-03 Alza Corporation System for intravenous delivery of a beneficial drug at a regulated rates
US4465471A (en) * 1981-08-26 1984-08-14 Eli Lilly And Company Intravenous administration system for dry medicine
US4740201A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4521211A (en) * 1981-10-09 1985-06-04 Alza Corporation Parenteral agent dispensing equipment
US4548598A (en) * 1981-10-09 1985-10-22 Alza Corporation Parenteral agent dispensing equipment
US4439183A (en) * 1981-10-09 1984-03-27 Alza Corporation Parenteral agent dispensing equipment
US4741735A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-05-03 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4741734A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-05-03 Alza Corporation Releasing means for adding agent using releasing means to IV fluid
US4740197A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent via polymer delivery
US4740200A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4586922A (en) * 1981-10-09 1986-05-06 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4740103A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4740199A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Intravenous system for delivering a beneficial agent
US4740198A (en) * 1981-10-09 1988-04-26 Alza Corporation Method of administering intravenous drug using rate-controlled dosage form
US4392851A (en) * 1981-11-23 1983-07-12 Abbott Laboratories In-line transfer unit
US4392850A (en) * 1981-11-23 1983-07-12 Abbott Laboratories In-line transfer unit
US4552556A (en) * 1981-11-27 1985-11-12 Alza Corporation Parenteral controlled therapy
US4583981A (en) * 1981-11-27 1986-04-22 Alza Corporation Parenteral controlled therapy, using a porous matrix with parenteral agent
US4579553A (en) * 1981-11-27 1986-04-01 Alza Corporation Parenteral controlled therapy
WO1983003539A1 (en) * 1982-04-06 1983-10-27 Baxter Travenol Lab Container for mixing a liquid and a solid
US4432755A (en) * 1982-04-06 1984-02-21 Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc. Sterile coupling
US4458733A (en) * 1982-04-06 1984-07-10 Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc. Mixing apparatus
US4484920A (en) * 1982-04-06 1984-11-27 Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc. Container for mixing a liquid and a solid
US4908019A (en) * 1982-05-24 1990-03-13 Alza Corporation Apparatus comprising dual reservoirs for parenteral infusion of fluid containing beneficial agent
US4568331A (en) * 1983-10-17 1986-02-04 Marcus Fischer Disposable medicine dispensing device
US4573967A (en) * 1983-12-06 1986-03-04 Eli Lilly And Company Vacuum vial infusion system
US4511352A (en) * 1984-05-14 1985-04-16 Alza Corporation Parenteral delivery system with in-line container
US4511351A (en) * 1984-05-14 1985-04-16 Alza Corporation Parenteral delivery system utilizing a hollow fiber cellular unit
US4596555A (en) * 1984-05-14 1986-06-24 Alza Corporation Parenteral delivery system utilizing a hollow fiber cellular unit
US4758236A (en) * 1986-05-12 1988-07-19 Bent Heimreid Arrangement in an infusion kit
GB2211423A (en) * 1987-05-12 1989-07-05 Heimreid Ken An arrangement in an infusion kit
WO1988008722A1 (en) * 1987-05-12 1988-11-17 Heimreid, Ken An arrangement in an infusion kit
US4902287A (en) * 1987-09-24 1990-02-20 Miles Inc. Sterilizable system for blood storage
US5002530A (en) * 1988-02-25 1991-03-26 Schiwa Gmbh Container for infusion solutions
US4895275A (en) * 1988-08-30 1990-01-23 Corpak, Inc. Dispensing spike for penetrable pre-filled shape retentive containers
WO1990002093A1 (en) * 1988-08-30 1990-03-08 Corpak, Inc. Dispensing spike for penetrable pre-filled shape retentive containers
US5593385A (en) * 1993-02-18 1997-01-14 Harrison; Samuel W. Contrast media dispensing apparatus
US5423751A (en) * 1993-02-18 1995-06-13 Harrison; Samuel W. Contrast media dispensing apparatus
US7066914B2 (en) 2000-07-12 2006-06-27 Bird Products Corporation Catheter having a tip with an elongated collar
US6520937B2 (en) 2000-12-18 2003-02-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Fluid injection device
US20040153047A1 (en) * 2002-11-18 2004-08-05 Ricardo Blank Connector device
US8100879B2 (en) * 2002-11-18 2012-01-24 Nestec S.A. Connector device for enteral administration set
US9889277B2 (en) 2005-01-13 2018-02-13 Avent, Inc. Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
US9131956B2 (en) 2005-01-13 2015-09-15 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
US9579488B2 (en) 2005-01-13 2017-02-28 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
US7976518B2 (en) 2005-01-13 2011-07-12 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
US9028441B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2015-05-12 Corpak Medsystems, Inc. Apparatus and method used with guidance system for feeding and suctioning
US9918907B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2018-03-20 Avent, Inc. Method for electromagnetic guidance of feeding and suctioning tube assembly

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3647397A (en) Reagent solution preparation
US3306563A (en) Aseptic draining and support means for flexible bags
US3608550A (en) Transfer needle assembly
US3380451A (en) Two compartment syringe
US3340869A (en) Collapsible ampoules
US3467270A (en) Cap
US3369708A (en) Means for reconstituting a dry biological and for controlled dispensing thereof
US3319684A (en) Collapsible container
US3381687A (en) Suction apparatus
US2876113A (en) Packaging device for merchandising food concentrates
US1509916A (en) of springville
US6245041B1 (en) Fluid dispenser with fill adapter
US5032117A (en) Tandem syringe
US4014329A (en) Method and apparatus for autotransfusion of blood
US6551298B1 (en) Controlled medicament security enclosure system
US3757779A (en) Filter syringe
US4511355A (en) Infusion device intended for implantation in a living body
US4432755A (en) Sterile coupling
US5087250A (en) Autotransfusion unit with vacuum regulation and cardiotomy reservoir
US6398031B1 (en) Vial for packaging a liquid for medical use
US5137511A (en) Syringe
US5398851A (en) Liquid delivery device
US6039718A (en) Multiple use universal connector
US2936757A (en) Surgical drainage apparatus
US2704075A (en) Flexible plastic container