US2922309A - Vibratory driving mechanism for conveyors and the like - Google Patents

Vibratory driving mechanism for conveyors and the like Download PDF

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US2922309A
US2922309A US452099A US45209954A US2922309A US 2922309 A US2922309 A US 2922309A US 452099 A US452099 A US 452099A US 45209954 A US45209954 A US 45209954A US 2922309 A US2922309 A US 2922309A
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weights
carrier
vibratory
forces
shafts
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US452099A
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Robert E Adams
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GIFFORD WOOD CO
GIFFORD-WOOD Co
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GIFFORD WOOD CO
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G27/00Jigging conveyors
    • B65G27/10Applications of devices for generating or transmitting jigging movements
    • B65G27/16Applications of devices for generating or transmitting jigging movements of vibrators, i.e. devices for producing movements of high frequency and small amplitude
    • B65G27/18Mechanical devices
    • B65G27/20Mechanical devices rotating unbalanced masses
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B06GENERATING OR TRANSMITTING MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS IN GENERAL
    • B06BMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR GENERATING OR TRANSMITTING MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS OF INFRASONIC, SONIC, OR ULTRASONIC FREQUENCY, e.g. FOR PERFORMING MECHANICAL WORK IN GENERAL
    • B06B1/00Methods or apparatus for generating mechanical vibrations of infrasonic, sonic, or ultrasonic frequency
    • B06B1/10Methods or apparatus for generating mechanical vibrations of infrasonic, sonic, or ultrasonic frequency making use of mechanical energy
    • B06B1/16Methods or apparatus for generating mechanical vibrations of infrasonic, sonic, or ultrasonic frequency making use of mechanical energy operating with systems involving rotary unbalanced masses
    • B06B1/161Adjustable systems, i.e. where amplitude or direction of frequency of vibration can be varied
    • B06B1/166Where the phase-angle of masses mounted on counter-rotating shafts can be varied, e.g. variation of the vibration phase
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B07SEPARATING SOLIDS FROM SOLIDS; SORTING
    • B07BSEPARATING SOLIDS FROM SOLIDS BY SIEVING, SCREENING, SIFTING OR BY USING GAS CURRENTS; SEPARATING BY OTHER DRY METHODS APPLICABLE TO BULK MATERIAL, e.g. LOOSE ARTICLES FIT TO BE HANDLED LIKE BULK MATERIAL
    • B07B1/00Sieving, screening, sifting, or sorting solid materials using networks, gratings, grids, or the like
    • B07B1/42Drive mechanisms, regulating or controlling devices, or balancing devices, specially adapted for screens
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/18Mechanical movements
    • Y10T74/18056Rotary to or from reciprocating or oscillating
    • Y10T74/18344Unbalanced weights
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/18Mechanical movements
    • Y10T74/18528Rotary to intermittent unidirectional motion

Description

R. E. ADAMS Jan. 26, 1960 VIBRATORY DRIVING MECHANISM FOR CONVEYORS AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. 25. 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jan. 26, 1960 R. E. ADAMS VIBRATORY DRIVING MECHANISM FOR CONVEYORS AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. 25, 1954 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 1N V EN TOR. Ro :e1-Ef ADA M5. BY Mba! M? n R. E. ADAMS Jan. 26, 1960 VIBRATORY DRIVING MECHANISM FOR CONVEYORS AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. 25. 1954 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TOR. ROBERT E aA M5.
BY AMJ auf Mu; 0M Afro/vwfrs United States Patent ff' vrRAToRY DRIVING MECHANISM FOR coNvEYoRs AND THE LIKE Robert E. Adams, Hudson, N.Y., assignor to Gilford- Wood Co., Hudson, N.Y., a corporation of New York Application August 2s, 1954, serial No. 452,099
s claims. (ci. 14-61) `The invention relates to driving mechanism forconveyors of the vibratory type, and like machines in which a carrier for material is to be vibrated longitudinally, i.e. in general horizontally but frequently with up and down as well as horizontal components of movement. The invention primarily aims to provide such a driving mechanism wherein the vibratory impulses are secured by rotating eccentrically -disposed weights, and wherein the weights and their supporting shafts are so coordinated as to provide the driving forces and yet largely suppress the transmission of vibrations to the surrounding supporting structure. The invention is of particular advantage as employed in connection with elongated conveyors of the vibratory type, in conjunction with which the parts of the driving mechanism are coordinated to enable the mechanism to function as desired, without entailing an arrangement of parts so space consuming as to be objectionable from that viewpoint. Further objects and advantages of the invention will be in part obvious and in part specifically referred to in the description hereinafter contained which, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, discloses a preferred form of vibratory driving mechanism constructed to operate in accordance with the invention; the disclosure, however, should be understood as merely illustrative of the invention in its broader aspects.
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a side view of a vibratory conveyor equipped with vibratory driving mechanism constructedto opcrate in accordance with the invention.
Figs. 2 and 3 are Sections respectively on the broken lines 2-2 and 3-3 of Fig. 1 and Fig. 2, looking in the direction of ythe arrows.
Fig. 4 is a section on the broken line 4 4 of Fig. 2 looking in the direction of the arrow, but` showing a. somewhat modified form of driving mechanism.
Figs. to 8 are schematic diagrams illustrating the mode of operation of the mechanism shown in Figs.l 1 to 3.
The invention isdisclosed in Figs. l to 3 as applied to an elongated conveyor comprising a trough having a bottom wall 1 and side walls 2, it beingunderstood that loose material is to be conveyed progressively-along they trough from left to right as the trough appears in Fig. 1, the movements of the trough towardthe right, i.e. in the direction of feed, being accompanied by an upward component of motion, while movements of the trough toward the left are occampanied by a downward component of motion. f
The trough is to be understoodas having appropriate mounting structure which guides'its movements in the` path above mentioned. The disclosed form 4of mounting structure comprises arms 3, an appropriate number of which are provided at points spaced longitudinally along the length of the Itrough, and also at points spaced vtransversely thereof, in accordance with the size of the conveyor. As shown, each of the arms 3 is provided at its upperr end with a transversely extending flange 4 Patented Jan. 26, 1960 ICC which is juxtaposed with respect to the face 5 of a cross piece 6 of L-shaped cross-section, running transversely beneath the trough and aiixed thereto. Elastic cushions 7 of rubber-like material are interposed between the elements 4 and 5 above mentioned, and clamped therebetween bybolts 8, preferably in conjunction with interposed washers or plates havingcylindrically convex surfaces, as indicated at 9. Elements 5a to 9a at the lower ends of the arms 3 are respectively similar to the elements 5 and 9, the cross piece 6a being understood as extending between and affixed to main supporting frame members 10 which underlie the machine at its opposite sides. The above structure, including the arms 3 and associated parts, should bevunderstood as merely illustrative of an appropriate resilient mounting structure for guiding the trough 1 in its vibratory movements above referred to, and springs 11 (Fig. 1) may also be used in conjunction with the conveyor trough,`but will not be described in detail since appropriate forms thereof are known in the art.
In accordance with the invention, a vibratory driving mechanism is carried by the trough or carrier 1, which has at least three shafts spaced laterally, i.e. horizontally lel thereto, the weights being coordinated to produce the pulsating vibratory forces applied to the conveyor and t0 ease between driving impulses, the vibratory forces imposed on the surrounding supporting structure.
, As shown in Figs. 1 to 3, the drive shaft 12 of the driving mechanism is provided at one end with a driving pulley 13 which is rotated by a belt 14 driven by a pulley 15 (Fig. 1) carried by a shaft 16 having appropriate bearings in the supporting frames 10. of the machine, the shaft 16 also carrying apulley 17 which is in turn driven by a pulley 18 on an appropriate motor 19.
The arms 3 may be understood as directed at an angle of about 30 to the vertical, with a plane directed through the axes of shafts 12`and 16 disposed at about the same angle, so that when the trough moves from' left to right the articulation of the arms 3 to the trough will produce upward movement of the latter equal to about one half of its horizontal movement, and during reverse strokes downward movement equal to about one half of the horizontal movement. The belt 14 affords proportionate movements of the shaft 12 and associated elements as hereinafter described, during the vibratory movements of the trough, the driving power being continuously applied. t
In the form of the invention under discussion, cross shafts 20 and 21 are provided underneath the trough 1, being laterally, i.e. substantially horizontally, spaced from shaft 12 and parallel thereto. As shown, appropriate bearing members 22 (Fig. 2) are provided for the shafts 12, 20 and 21, these bearing members being affixed underneath the bottom wall 1 of thetrough. The shaft 12 is provided with a gear 23 shown as interposed between the bearing members 22, which meshes with similar gears 24 and 25 respectively on the shafts 20 and 21. Thus the shafts-20 and 21 rotate in the samey direction, which is opposite to the direction lof rotation of shaft 12, and all three shafts rotate at the same speed.
Each of the shafts 12, 20 and 21 carries weights as indicated respectively at 2.6, 27 and 28, which weights are eccentrically disposed with respect to the axes of their respective shafts. As shown in Fig. 2, two of such 'weights are preferably provided at the opposite end portions fof each Shaft, the trough being preferably nrovided with top flanges `29 (Fig. 2) at its opposite sides and with outer side walls 30 depending therefrom to constitute housings for the eccentrically disposed weights above described.
Preferably as also shown at Figs. 2 and A3, the eccentrically disposed weights of successive shafts are disposed in staggered relationship in respect to each other, transversely of the machine, so that adjacent weights may turn through paths of rotation which overlap each other.
Fig. 5 shows schematically la phase of operation of the above described driving mechanism in which the effective driving forces as applied to the trough are indicated by the vectors 26, 27 and `28 respectively, which correspond respectively to the Weights 26, 27 and 28 above described. In this phase the forces imposed by the weights are additive, so that the trough is then receiving its maximum impulse from left to right.
Fig. 6 shows a phase displaced 90 with respect to Fig. 5, in which the Victors 27 and 28 are additive with respect to each other, but the vector 26 is in direct opposition thereto and of twice the magnitude of either of them. Fig. 6 shows an intermediate phase Vin which it is desired that the forces applied by the different weights shall neutralize each other. In the form of the invention under discussion, assuming the weights 26, 27 and 28 to be othelwise alike in dimensions, the weight 26 may be made double the thickness of the weights 27 and 28, so that its force as shown in Fig. 6 is equal and opposite to the sum of the forces applied by the weights 27 and 28.
Fig. 7 shows a phase of operation displaced 90 with respect to Fig. 6, wherein as indicated by the vectors 26, 27 and 28, the forces applied by the weights are again additive, but act in the opposite direction as compared to Fig. 5. In the phase shown in Fig. 7, the maximum impulse from right to left is being applied to the trough.
The result as indicated in Fig. 8 is that the vibratory forces shift smoothly from maximum in the direction of feed as indicated in Fig. 5, down through zero as indicated in Fig. 6, to maximum in the reverse direction as indicated in Fig. 7, and then back through zero to the position shown in Fig. 5, the curve of the resultant vibratory impulses applied to the conveyor taking substantially the form of a sine wave. The resilient mounting structure for the conveyor, including the arms 3, elastic cushions 7 and 7a, and the springs 11 if the latter be used, reacts against the vibratory impulses applied by the weights, in such manner that the ultimate movements imparted to the conveyor are the resultant of the forces applied by the weights, and the reactive forces applied by the resilient mounting, Referring to Fig. l for example, and assuming that the weights have applied an activating force toward the right, which force has just reached a maximum, this activating force will have been opposed by compression of the portions of the cushions 7 which in Fig. l are to the left of the bolts 8, and also by compression of the portions of the elastic cushions 7a which in Fig. 1 are to the right of the bolts 8a. Thus the extent of movement of the trough will be the resultant of the activating forces produced by the weights, and the reactive forces imposed by the cushions 7 and 7a, the conveyor moving to the right until the reactive forces imposed by the resilient mounting balance the activating forces applied by the Weights, after which as the phase of the weights changes, the reactive energy stored in the resilient mounting is given back to the conveyor so to speak, and the balance between activating and reactive forces gradually builds u p during movement of the conveyor in the opposite direction.
As shown in Fig. 4 with respect to `a driving mechanism coordinated as above described, the driving force may be readily ,augmented .by .the addition of further shafts and weights if desired. In Fig. 4 the shafts 12a, 20a' and 21a, their respective weights 26a, 27a and 28a, and also the interconnecting gearing 23a, 24a and 25a, may be taken as respectively similar to the above described elements 12, 20 and 21; Z6, 27 and 28; and 23, 24 and 25. The pulley 14a of Fig. 3 is also comparable to the pulley 14 previously described. In the case of Fig. 4, however, a further shaft 31 has been added, carrying eccentrically disposed weights 32 as previously described, and provided with a gear 33 which meshes with the gear 25a. When an even number of shafts is employed as in Fig. 4, the weights may all be identical in dimensions. In the case of an odd number of shafts, the weights should be so proportioned that the sums of the forces applied by weights rotating respectively in opposite directions, are substantially equal.
A vibratory driving mechanism of the above nature, with working parts disposed substantially in a row parallel to the trough as above described, may be incorporated into the assembly without consuming an undue amount of additional space, and will impart substantially augmented vibratory forces as compared to cam and like mechanisms heretofore used for such purposes. The vibratory forces applied shift in direction so smoothly as to ease to a substantial extent the vibratory shocks transmitted to the adjoining supporting structure.
While the invention has been disclosed as carried out by the specific mechanism above described, it should be understood that changes may be made therein without departing from the invention in its broader aspects, within the scope of the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A conveyor of the character described having a carrier for material, means mounting said carrier to afford vibratory movement thereof, and vibratory driving mechanism carried by said carrier to feed material progressively along said carrier as the latter vibrates, said driving mechanism having at least three shafts spaced successively along said carrier, means for rotating one of said shafts, means interconnecting said spaced shafts to rotate certain of said shafts in one direction and the others of said shaft in the opposite direction, and means for confining the vibratory driving forces applied to said carrier substantially to the opposite directions of vibration thereof, comprising eccentrically disposed weights respectively carried by said shafts, the weight mass rotating in one direction substantially balancing the weight masses rotating in the opposite direction in respect to the mass moments of inertia respectively set up thereby, said last mentioned weights being constructed and angularly related to apply vsuccessive additive forces to said carrier substantially in the respective opposite directions of vibration of the carrier, said weights being also constructed and angularly related to cause the vibratory forces of the weights to substantially neutralize each other in respect to all components atright angles to said opposite directions of vibration, in all phases between said successive additive forces, said carrier mounting means including resilient members constructed and arranged to yieldingly oppose the vibratory movements of the carrier as produced by the aforesaid eccentrically disposed weights, said mounting means in combination with said weights causing the ultimate vibratory movements of the carrier, under given conditionsof load, to be the resultant of the activating forces imposed on the carrier by the weights and the reactive forces imposed on the carrier by said resilient members, said carrier mounting means including resilient members constructed and arranged to yieldingly oppose the vibratory movements of the carrier as produced by the aforesaid eccentrically disposed weights, whereby the ultimate vibratory movements of' the carrier are the resultant of the activating forces im? posed on the carrier by the weights, and the reactive forces imposed on thearrier by said resilient members.
2- A conveyor ef the character described having an elongated conveyor trough running in general horizontally, means mounting said trough to-afford longitudinal vibratory movements thereof, and vibratory driving mechanism carried by said trough to feed material progressively along said trough as the latter vibrates, said driving mechanism having at least three shafts running transversely of the trough and spaced successively along the trough, means for rotating one of said shafts, means interconnecting said spaced shafts to rotate certain of said shafts in one direction and the others of said shafts in the opposite direction, and means for confining the vibratory driving forces applied to said carrier substantially to the opposite directions of vibration thereof, comprising eccentrically disposed weights respectively carried by said shafts, the weight mass rotating in one direction substantially balancing the weight mass rotating in the opposite direction in respect to the mass moments of inertia respectively set up thereby, said weights being carried by said shafts at their opposite end portions, said trough having housings extending along the opposite sides thereof, in which housings said weights are respectively mounted to revolve, said weights being constructed and angularly related so as to apply successive additive vibratory forces to said carrier in opposite directions and substantially longitudinally thereof, and also to cause the vibratory forces of the weights to substan tially neutralize each other in respect to all components at right angles to said opposite directions of vibration, in all phases between said successive additive forces, said carrier mounting means including resilient members constructed and arranged to yieldingly oppose thevibratory movements of the carrier as produced by the aforesaid eccentrically disposed weights, said mounting means in combination with said weights causing the ultimate vibratory movements of the carrier, under given conditions of load, to be the resultant of the activating forces imposed on the carrier by the weights and the reactive forces imposed on the -carrier by said resilient members.
3. A conveyor of the characterdescribed having a carrier for material,`means mounting said carrier to aiford vibratory movement thereof, and vibratory driving mechanism operatively connected to said carrier to feed material progressively along said carrier as the latter vibrates, said driving mechanism having atleast three shafts spaced with respect to each other and having their axes directed substantially normal to the path of vibration of the carrier, means for rotating certain'of said shafts in one direction and others of said shafts in the oppositedirection, and
means for confining the vibratory driving forces applied to said carrier substantially to the opposite directions of vibration thereof, comprising Veccentrically disposed Weights respectively carried by said shafts, the weight mass rotating in one direction substantially balancing the weight masses rotating in the opposite direction in respect to the mass moments of inertia respectively set up thereby, said last mentioned weights being constructed and angularly related to apply successive additive forces to said carrier substantially in the respective opposite directions of vibration of the carrier, said weights being also constructed and angularly related to cause the vibratory forces of the weights to substantially neutralize each other in respect to all components at right angles to said opposite directions of vibration, in all phases between said successive additive forces, said carrier mounting means including resilient members constructed and arranged to yieldingly oppose the vibratory movements of the carrier as produced by the aforesaid eccentrically disposed weights, said mounting means in combination with said weights causing the ultimate vibratory movements of the carrier, under given conditions of load, to be the resultant of the activating forces imposed on the carrier by the weights and the reactive forces imposed on the carrier by said resilient members, said carrier mounting means including resilient members constructed and arranged to yieldinglyoppose the vibratory movements of the carrier as produced by the aforesaid eccentrically disposed weights, whereby the ultimate vibratory movements of the carrier are the resultant of the activating forces imposed on the carrier bythe weights, and the reactive forces imposed on the carrier by said resilient members.
References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,495,850 Jacquelin May 27, 1924 2,054,253 Horsch Sept. 15, 1936 2,144,382 Lincoln Jan. 17. 1939 2,258,217 Robins Oct. 7, 1941 2,312,477 Polltz Mar. 2, 1943 2,542,227 Bernhard Feb. 20, 1951 2,630,211 Carrier et al Mar. 30, 1953 2,756,973 Donstatni July 31, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 221,128 Great Britain Aug. 25, 1924 262,358 Switzerland Sept. 16, 1,949
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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3272024A (en) * 1964-08-31 1966-09-13 Eugene A Wahl Electro-mechanical gyrator
US3442381A (en) * 1966-04-25 1969-05-06 Louis W Johnson Vibratory screening apparatus
FR2357314A1 (en) * 1975-12-08 1978-02-03 El Jay Inc Vibratory sifting machine - has intermeshing rotary drives carrying adjustable eccentric weights
FR2457236A1 (en) * 1979-05-21 1980-12-19 Rexnord Inc Vibrating circular conveyor
US4632751A (en) * 1982-11-15 1986-12-30 Johnson Louis W Shaker screen
US4742721A (en) * 1981-03-26 1988-05-10 501 Cribla S.A. Vibrating device
US20120304819A1 (en) * 2010-01-14 2012-12-06 Osvaldo Falesiedi Inertial traction device
WO2018065782A1 (en) * 2016-10-07 2018-04-12 Axiom Process Limited Screening apparatus

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1495850A (en) * 1923-04-14 1924-05-27 Jacquelin Armand Damping device with a balanced action for oscillating apparatus
GB221128A (en) * 1923-05-24 1924-08-25 Wilfrid L Spence Improvements in or connected with mechanism for the conversion of rotary into reciprocating motion
US2054253A (en) * 1931-10-29 1936-09-15 Massey Concrete Products Corp Vibrator and method of treating concrete
US2144382A (en) * 1936-04-09 1939-01-17 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co Low head vibrating screen
US2258217A (en) * 1940-04-11 1941-10-07 Robins Conveying Belt Co Gyratory apparatus
US2312477A (en) * 1940-08-03 1943-03-02 Iowa Mfg Company Vibrating screen
CH262358A (en) * 1939-02-18 1949-06-30 Pinazza Giosue Eccentric centrifugal mass drive device for percussion devices, such as hammers, nailers, drills, hammers, hammers and the like.
US2542227A (en) * 1946-07-02 1951-02-20 Rudolf K Bernhard Testing apparatus
US2630211A (en) * 1950-01-04 1953-03-03 Carrier Conveyor Corp Shaker conveyer
US2756973A (en) * 1952-12-10 1956-07-31 Prep Ind Combustibles Dynamically balanced vibrating agitators

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1495850A (en) * 1923-04-14 1924-05-27 Jacquelin Armand Damping device with a balanced action for oscillating apparatus
GB221128A (en) * 1923-05-24 1924-08-25 Wilfrid L Spence Improvements in or connected with mechanism for the conversion of rotary into reciprocating motion
US2054253A (en) * 1931-10-29 1936-09-15 Massey Concrete Products Corp Vibrator and method of treating concrete
US2144382A (en) * 1936-04-09 1939-01-17 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co Low head vibrating screen
CH262358A (en) * 1939-02-18 1949-06-30 Pinazza Giosue Eccentric centrifugal mass drive device for percussion devices, such as hammers, nailers, drills, hammers, hammers and the like.
US2258217A (en) * 1940-04-11 1941-10-07 Robins Conveying Belt Co Gyratory apparatus
US2312477A (en) * 1940-08-03 1943-03-02 Iowa Mfg Company Vibrating screen
US2542227A (en) * 1946-07-02 1951-02-20 Rudolf K Bernhard Testing apparatus
US2630211A (en) * 1950-01-04 1953-03-03 Carrier Conveyor Corp Shaker conveyer
US2756973A (en) * 1952-12-10 1956-07-31 Prep Ind Combustibles Dynamically balanced vibrating agitators

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3272024A (en) * 1964-08-31 1966-09-13 Eugene A Wahl Electro-mechanical gyrator
US3442381A (en) * 1966-04-25 1969-05-06 Louis W Johnson Vibratory screening apparatus
FR2357314A1 (en) * 1975-12-08 1978-02-03 El Jay Inc Vibratory sifting machine - has intermeshing rotary drives carrying adjustable eccentric weights
FR2457236A1 (en) * 1979-05-21 1980-12-19 Rexnord Inc Vibrating circular conveyor
US4267919A (en) * 1979-05-21 1981-05-19 Rexnord Inc. Vibrating spiral conveyor drive
US4742721A (en) * 1981-03-26 1988-05-10 501 Cribla S.A. Vibrating device
US4632751A (en) * 1982-11-15 1986-12-30 Johnson Louis W Shaker screen
US20120304819A1 (en) * 2010-01-14 2012-12-06 Osvaldo Falesiedi Inertial traction device
WO2018065782A1 (en) * 2016-10-07 2018-04-12 Axiom Process Limited Screening apparatus

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