US2875316A - Combined heating and ventilating unit - Google Patents

Combined heating and ventilating unit Download PDF

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US2875316A
US2875316A US701598A US70159857A US2875316A US 2875316 A US2875316 A US 2875316A US 701598 A US701598 A US 701598A US 70159857 A US70159857 A US 70159857A US 2875316 A US2875316 A US 2875316A
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housing
air
fan
heating
room
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US701598A
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Harold H Ford
Robert A Papsdorf
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Emerson Pryne Co
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Emerson Pryne Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H3/00Air heaters having heat generating means
    • F24H3/02Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation
    • F24H3/04Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation the air being in direct contact with the heating medium, e.g. electric heating element
    • F24H3/0405Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation the air being in direct contact with the heating medium, e.g. electric heating element using electric energy supply, e.g. the heating medium being a resistive element; Heating by direct contact, i.e. with resistive elements, electrodes and fins being bonded together without additional element in-between
    • F24H3/0411Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation the air being in direct contact with the heating medium, e.g. electric heating element using electric energy supply, e.g. the heating medium being a resistive element; Heating by direct contact, i.e. with resistive elements, electrodes and fins being bonded together without additional element in-between for domestic or space-heating systems

Description

Feb. 24, 1959 H. l-i. FORD ETAL COMBINED HEATING AND VENTILATING UNIT Filed Dec. e, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 8009:, JM EumQs. 9 7? 1g 19 .Hiakaab 1905:0714, PAP
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b-- 9 H. H. FORD EFAL 2,875,316 C'OMBINEDHEATING AND VENTILATING UNIT Filed Dec. 9, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 k 19 I 4; g 22 v 55' ,4? 1 57 i 52 .Hkoza H men,
ed States Patent COMBINED HEATING AND VENTILATING UNIT Harold H. Ford and Robert A. Papsdorf, 'Claremont, Califl, assignors to Emerson-Pryne Company, Pomona, Califl, a corporation of Delaware Application December 9, 1957, Serial No. 701,598 3 Claims. (Cl. 219-39) The present invention relates generally to combination heating and ventilating units which are adapted to be installed in or at the ceiling of a room in order to provide for either forced circulation of warm air into the room below the unit or ventilation by exhausting air from the room, or a combination of both. Units of this kind are frequently and preferably designed for installation in the ceiling of a room. Accordingly, our inven tion is described as installed in this manner; but it should be realized that in its broader aspects, the invention may be embodied in units adapted for installation in a side wall of a room.
Heaters of this type are especially suited to bathrooms wherein quick, safe heat is desired and the total volume of the space to be heated is relatively small. Heretofore, it has been common practice to use a radiant type of heater which is installed in the side wall of the bath room. This type of heater is located usually in the lower portion of the wall because the heat is delivered by direct radiation and the heater is located where a person can stand in front of it and be warmed by heat radiated from the heater. However, this location has disadvantages. For example, in this location the heater restricts other uses of that area of the wall, especially as it must be kept clear of towels and the like. Since a heater of this type delivers its heat chiefly by direct radiation, it is slow to warm up the whole room; and it tends to concentrate the major portion of the heat in a zone directly in front of the heater.
This characteristic of a radiant electric heater can be overcome by adding a fan or blower which circulates air past the heating element and creates enough air 'movement within the room to bring about a high degree of equalization of temperature throughout the room :space in a relatively short time. A heater of this charac .ter employing forced circulation can be located in the ceiling of the room to considerable advantage. In the ceiling, the heater is always free of any obstruction to radiant heat or to air movement around the heater. It is more effective in bringing warm air as well as radiant heat to all parts of the bathroom because all parts of the bathroom are ordinarily more fully accessible from a heater located in the ceiling. Another advantage of the ceiling location is that the hot coils of the heater are removed from the possibility of contact with people or clothing, to obvious advantage in safety and comfort. It is also advantageous to provide a ventilating unit in the bathroom in order to remove water vapor or odors. This is especially desired because bathrooms are often poorly located to have adequate natural ventilation and "are ordinarily so fully enclosed as to require forced draft to accomplish satisfactory change of air.
Thus it becomes a general object of our invention to provide in a single unit a forced air heater and a ventilator. Combination of these functions into a single unit results in economy of space and materials and unitesboth functions in a single location which is particularly ad- 2,875,316 Patented Feb. 24, 19 59 vantageous for satisfactory performance of both heating and ventilating functions.
Another object of our invention is to provide a combined unit of the character described in which the ventilation-of the room may be carried on without heating, using the same blower for both the heating and ventilating functions.
It is also an object to provide a combined heating and ventilating unit in which the heating function is carried out effectively and etficiently, using both radiant heat and heated air obtained from air circulation around the heating elements to obtain a quick and comfortable heating of the room space.
A further object of our invention is to provide a combined heating and ventilating unit of this character which is capable of discharging air from the bathroom directly to the outside atmosphere and which prevents a reverse draft of cold air into the room when the fan is not in operation.
A still further object of our invention is to provide a combined heating and ventilating unit in which air is circulated through the unit before reaching the heating element in a manner to prevent any accumulation of heat within the unit, thus keeping internal temperatures below allowable safe values.
These and other objects of the invention have been accomplished by providing a housing that is adapted for installation partly or entirely in the ceiling of a room and has an opening at its lower side which communicates with the room space. An electric heating element of a suitable type is located within the housing and above said opening, the element being an open resistance coil, a lamp, or the like. The housing is also provided with air inlet and outlet means communicating with the interior of the housing to receive and discharge air from the housing at a position above the heating element. Fan means is located within the housing that is capable of moving air through the housing and around the heating element in either of two directions. Air is circulated in one direction to exhaust through the opening at the lower side and into the room air that is warmed within the housing; and air is circulated in the reverse direction to withdraw air from the room into the housing for ventilation.
In order to accomplish ventilation of the room, the unit is in communication with an air duct leading to the outside atmosphere. Air that is withdrawn from the room upwardly into the housing is then discharged into the duct which delivers this air to the outside atmosphere. Replacement of the air taken from the room by incoming air from another room or through a window results in a draft that sweeps out odors, water vapor, or other unwanted gases.
How the above objects and advantages of the invention, as well as others not specifically referred to, are attained will be better understood by reference to the following description and to the annexed drawing, in which:
Fig. l is a vertical median section through a combined heating and ventilating unit constructed according to our invention;
Fig. 2 is a horizontal section on line 2-2 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a vertical median section through a combined heating and ventilating unit illustrating a second embodiment of our invention;
Fig. 4 is a horizontal section on line 4-4 of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a vertical median section through a combined heating and ventilating unit illustrating a third form of our invention;
Fig. 6 is a vertical median section through a combined ment of our invention;
game e I r f i Fig. 7' is a horizontal section on line 7-7 of Fig. 6; and
Fig. 8 is a schematic wiring layout suitable for the units in Figs. 1, 3 or 5. 7
Referring now to Figs. 1 and 2, there is illustrated therein a presently preferred embodiment of our invention. In this form of the invention, the combined heating and ventilating unit comprises an inner housing 10 and an outer housing 12, these two housings preferably being circular in transverse cross-section and arranged concentrically with respect to each other. Since the combined unit is shown as installed in a ceiling with the lower end of outer housing 12 flush with the surface of ceiling 14, the central axis of the housing is vertically arranged. Accordingly, portions of the housing structure may be referred to for descriptive purposes as upper or lower and parts may be described as above or below others, or the like, but it will be realized that such relative designations are not necessarily limitative upon the broader aspects of the invention.
Inner housing 16 is a tubular member which is open at both ends. The upper end opens to the interior of outer housing 12. The outer housing is also open at both ends but has shutter means at the upper end to regulate air flow out of the housing at that end. It will be realized that the lower end of the housing may have any suitable ornamental or protective cover so that the net area through which air can enter and leave the housings is somewhat less than the cross-sectional area of the housing. For example, the lower end of the unit is ordinarily covered by a grill or wire screen, 13, but it still may be regarded as having an opening in its lower end providing air inlet and outlet means communicating with the room for passage of air into and out of the housing.
Within the inner housing there is located an electrical heating element which may be of any suitable type, but is here shown as an open, resistance-type coil supported on ceramic brackets 16. The heating element is above and preferably adjacent the open lower end of housing 10. Also within the inner housing and above the heating element is fan 18 which is driven by motor 19. The fan motor may be of any suitable design that is reversible and adapted to rotate fan 18 in either direction, as selected, about its central axis. Motor 19 and the fan are supported inside the housing by means of spider .20, or any other suitable supporting means.
Since electrical connections to heating element 15 and motor 19 are well known in the art, such connections are not shown in detail in the drawing. The conductors leading to the heating element and fan are indicated only generally at 22 and 23, respectively, in Fig. 1. As typical of a preferred way of connecting the fan and heating element, a suitable wiring diagram is shown in Fig. 8. Electric power is supplied to the heating element and fan from any suitable source through conductors 24. One of the conductors 24 is connected to motor 19, driving .fan
.18, through single pole switch 25 which is connected in series with the motor. This same conductor 24 is also connected to one side of each of the two sets of contacts in a double pole-switch 26. One set of contacts of switch 26 is connected in series with fan motor .:be operated whereasby closing-switch 26 both the heater 'coil .and the fan are placed in operation.
For reasons to be explained more fully, the motor is energized for a different direction of rotation by closing each switch 25 or 26. Thus the ventilating function alone may be performed without warming the heating element 'while 4 the fan is always turned on to rotate in a proper direction when the heating coil is in operation.
Outer housing 12, like inner housing 10, is open at its lower end to be in continuous communication with the room beneath the unit. The inner housing is supported from the outer housing by means of angularly spaced supporting members 3% which allow free communication between the annular space 31 between the two housings and the head space 32 above the fan and within the inner housing. With this construction, air from the room can enter annular space 31 and move upwardly therein to head space 32 and thence downwardly within housing It as a result of the draft induced by rotation of fan 18, as indicated by solid arrows 33. This direction of fan rotation may be termed the forward direction for purposes of description. This rotation of the fan draws the air downwardly in the inner housing past the fan and past heating element 15 by which the air is heated and then is discharged through the open end of housing 10 into the room beneath.
In this form of the invention the annular air passage 31 between the inner housing and the outer housing may be considered to be part of the air inlet means admitting air to the inner housing at or near the upper end thereof. The actual air inlet to the inner housing is spaced from the lower end to place the two air inlets at opposite sides of fan 18. Passage 31 also serves as a heat barrier to reduce the heat from element 15 that reaches the adjoining building structure. The air currents sweeping through the passage carry away heat passing through housing 10 and prevent an accumulation of heat within the outer housing.
In order to facilitate circulation of air as indicated by the solid arrows 33, outer housing 12 is provided at a position spaced above housing 10 with shutter means which may take any of various forms but which is here shown as comprising a pair of flat, semi-circular shutters 34 pivotally mounted ona diametrically extending rod 35. These shutters 34 are biased by gravity towards the closed position shown in full lines in Fig. l; and when in this position they close the open upper end of housing 12. The shutters deflect air rising in annular passage 31 first horizontally and then downwardly into inner housing 10.
The shutters 34 may be swung around rod 35 to some raised position as indicated at 34a by broken lines in Fig. 1. They are of very light weight construction so that they can be lifted from the closed position by an upwardly directed stream of air from fan 18. When fan -18 is rotated in the reverse direction for ventilation purposes, the fan draws air into the open lower end of housing 10 and moves the air upwardly through the housing, and out of the upper end of housing 10. The upwardly mving stream of air strikes against the under-side of shutters '34 with force suflicient to lift the shutters and allow air to pass upwardly out of the outer housing as indicated by the broken arrows 36. As may be seen in Fig. 1, outer housing 12 is open above shutters 34 and is connected with duct 38 so that the air passing shutters 34 is discharged to the duct which in turn delivers the air to any suitable place, as for example to the atmosphere outside of the house. Some air may flow downwardly through passage 31 into the room below.
There is illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4, a variational embodiment of my invention which differs from the previously described form primarily in the shutter means provided. In these figures shutter means prevents any rflow of air back into the room when the .fan is being driven in the reverse direction for ventilating purposes. Various other .changes have been madein this form of the invention from the previously described form in order to illustrate typical changes that are possible in the design and construction of the unit within the scope of my invention.
Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, it will be seen that outer housing 40 and inner housing 41 are both rectangular in outline when viewed in plan, and like the housings previously described, are open at the underside to the room beneath. Walls of the inner housing are parallel to and spaced from the corresponding walls of the outer housing, defining between them air passage 42. Housing 41 is connected to top wall 43 of the outer housing and to the side walls, by brackets 4111. Fan 18, motor 19, and heating element 15 are located within the inner housing. The fan and motor are supported as before by spider 20 or any other suitable support.
Housing 40 has a top wall 43. Adjacent wall 43 there is an opening 41a in each of two side walls at opposite sides of the inner housing 41. Through these openings 41a space 42 communicates with the interior of housing 41 at a position above fan 18. Mounted on the Walls of housing 41 to close each opening 41a is a pivotally mounted shutter 45. Each shuter is hinged at its upper edge and is adapted to swing under the influence of gravity downwardly to a generally vertical position in which it is in contact with the inner face of a wall of housing 41 near its upper edge. Shutters 45 are of light-weight construction and can be easily swung away from the closed position to permit the flow of air from passage 42 into the space above fan 18 and thence downwardly past the fan and heating element 15 when the fan is being driven in a forwardly direction. For heating purposes air is circulated as indicated by the solid arrows and is discharged through the open end of the housing into the room space beneath the unit after being heated by passage around element 15.
Opening 44 in top wall 43 is surrounded by an upstanding flange 47 which is a sliding fit within the end of duct 48. Within flange 47 there is pivotally mounted on the upper end of housing 40 a pair of shutters 50. Each shutter is a flat plate and is hinged at one edge. They are normally closed by the influence of gravity, resting in the horizontal position indicated in solid lines in Fig. 3. In this position, they close opening 44 to air moving downwardly from duct 48 into housing 40. However, when fan 18 is driven in the reverse direction so that it draws air upwardly past the fan, the force of the upwardly moving air stream is able to raise shutters 50, as indicated by the bro-ken line position 50a, sufficiently to permit the discharge of air from housing 40 into duct 48. Laterally directed force of this upwardly moving air stream holds shutters 45 firmly in the closed position. Shutters 45 when closed confine the air above fan 18 and prevent it from flowing into passages 42; and accordingly a stream of upwardly moving air exerts a greater force against shutters 50 than if shutters 45 were omitted.
There is illustrated in Fig. 5 another embodiment of our invention which in many respects is similar to that shown in Figs. 3 and 4, but differs in the type of heating element used and in the shutter arrangement at the upper end of the housing. In Fig. 5, opening 54 is provided in top wall 43 of the housing, the opening being surrounded by collar 47. This opening is rectangular in outline and communicates with duct 48 into which air can be exhausted by fan 18. Two shutters 55 are mounted on individual pivots 56 at opening 54, the two shutters being adapted to completely close opening 54 when the shutters occupy the solid line position shown in Fig. 5. The portions of shutters between the central axis of the unit and pivot 56 of each shutter, are flat and resemble the conventional shutter. However, the outside portion of each shutter, that is the portion disposed at the other side of the pivot 56, is of angular configuration viewed in vertical section and extends horizontally far enough from the pivot to close the gap between the pivot and the upstanding flange 47.
When fan 18 is rotated in the reverse direction to move air upwardly through the housing, the air impinges on the under side of the flat section of shutters 55 to rotate the shutters to the positions 55a shown in broken lines in Fig. 5. The rotational movement of each shutter 55 about its pivot 56 causes the extreme outer end of the shutter to move downwardly towards the upper edge of an end wall of housing 41 to close the opening 41a. These shutters are biased by gravity to close the opening 54 in the top of housing 40, thus placing the passage 42 through openings 41a in free communication with the space above fan 18. However, when the fan is used for ventilating purposes, the upward draft causes the shutters to move to a position opening outlet 54 and closing the openings 41a between walls of housing 41 and top wall 43, thus shutting off communication between air passage 42 and the space above fan 18.
An alternate type of heating element is also incorporated in this embodiment, consisting of a plurality of infra-red lamps 52 which direct their rays outwardly and downwardly from the housing into the room beneath. These lamps may be supported in any desired way, but are here shown as mounted in an extension 53 to housing 41 which is suspended from and below housing 41. Extension 53 of the housing preferably has a grille 57 or the like arranged so that air entering or leaving the inner housing passes around the heat lamps 52. While they radiate most of their heat into the room there is enough heat immediately around the lamps to warm the air circulating past them, as previously described.
Optionally, the unit may include a light 58 used for illuminating purposes. Air circulation around reflector 59 above lamp 58 picks up heat transmitted from the lamp through the reflector.
Figs. 6 and 7 illustrate a simplified form of our invention which embodies other variational features of construction that may be used within the scope of our invention. The form herein illustrated may be characterized as simplified since certain parts perform dual functions and other parts are omitted since the unit is designed to draw in outside air during the heating cycle rather than to recirculate air from the room.
In this form of the invention the combined heating and ventilating unit comprises a single housing 60 which may be of any desired shape in cross-section but is here shown as being circular as this is a typical and convenient shape. Housing 60 is open at both ends. The lower end is in communication with the room below and is preferably arranged flush with the surface of ceiling 14, as in the forms previously described. The upper end of the housing is in communication with duct 61 which, in a typical installation, communicates with the atmosphere outside the building.
Within housing 60 is located heating element 15. Within housing 60 and above heating element 15 are located two separate fans 63 and 64 each driven in one direction only by its own motor 65 and 66, respectively.
Fan 64 when driven by motor 66 causes a stream of air moving downwardly within housing 60 to move past heating element 15 and to be discharged through the lower end of the housing into the room beneath. Fan 63 when driven by motor 65 causes upward draft of air within the housing, drawing air into the housing at the lower end and discharging it from the upper end into duct 61. Each motor 65 and 66 is designed to operate in one direction only, reversal of the fan means to change direction of air movement being accomplished by energizing separate fan rotors. The electrical connections are such that the motors can be energized separately, and preferably only one at a time. It will be obvious without added illustration that the shafts of motors 65 and 66 can be connected so that only a single fan is required.
Near its upper end, housing 60 is provided with shutter means designed to permit flow of air through the housing when the fans are rotating but to prevent air movement in either direction through the housing when the fans are not in operation.
At the upper end of housing 60 is a pair of semi-cireularshutters 63-each 'pivotally mounted on a rod 69. Each shutter 68 is biased by gravity to the closed positionindicated by the solid lines of Fig. 6; and can be raised to some such position as is indicated at 68a by the broken line by swinging around its pivot 69 in response to force applied by an upwardly moving stream of air impelled by fan 63. In this open position, shutters 68 permit the delivery of air from the housing to duct 61 which in turn conducts the air to the atmosphere.
In order to permit reverse or downward fiow of air from duct 61 into housing 60, one or both of shutter blades 68 are provided with an opening 74 through which air flow is regulated by an auxiliary shutter 70. Each shutter 70 is mounted on a pivot '71 and is biased by spring 72 to the closed position in which the shutter 70 closes opening 74 in shutter 68. When fan 64 is in operation for the purpose of moving air downwardly within housing 60 past heating element 15, the reduced pressure within housing 60 causes the shutters 70 to swing downwardly, as shown in Fig. 6 to open each of the openings 74 to a greater or lesser extent and allow air to be drawn into the housing from duct 61. When fan 64 ceases to rotate, springs 72 return shutters 70 to the horizontal position closing opening 74.
From the foregoing, it will be understood that various changes may be made in the design and arrangement of parts of the combined heating and ventilating unit comprising our invention, without departing from the spirit and scope of our invention. Accordingly, it is to be understood that the above description is considered to be illustrative of, .rather than limitative upon, the appended claims.
We claim:
1. A ventilating and heating unit adapted .for installation on the ceiling of a room, comprising: an outer housing having an opening at its lower side in communication with the room; an inner housing open at the top and at the bottom to communicate with the room at the bottom; air outlet means in the top Wall of the outer housing at a location to discharge air passing upwardly through the inner housing; a heating element Within'the inner housing; a fan means within the inner housing for moving air through the inner housing and past the heating element in a selected direction to move air downwardly through the inner housing into the room or upwardly from the room through the inner housing; air passage means at the top of the inner housing communicating with the surrounding space; and shutter means at said passage means to control air flow therethrough; said shutter means admitting air to the inner'housing when air movement therein is downward and closing said passage means when air movement in the inner housing is upward.
2. A ventilating and heating unit as in claim lthat also includes a second shutter means at the air outlet means in the top wall of the outer housing, said second shutter means being biased to a closed position and opened in response to'upward movement of air within the inner housing to discharge the upwardly moving air stream through said air outlet means.
3. A ventilating andheating unit as in claim 2 in which the first mentioned and second shutter means are interconnected -whereby movement of one moves the other.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS
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Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3001056A (en) * 1958-10-01 1961-09-19 Nutone Inc Ceiling heater and ventilator
US3076887A (en) * 1959-12-30 1963-02-05 Interstate Sanitation Company Dryer
US3309502A (en) * 1964-10-30 1967-03-14 Ceilheat Inc Damper control and assembly for heating and ventilating apparatus
US3320406A (en) * 1963-09-16 1967-05-16 Fasco Industries Combination heating and ventilating unit
US3692977A (en) * 1970-12-23 1972-09-19 Panacon Corp Compact combination infra-red heating and ventilating unit
US3786233A (en) * 1972-08-18 1974-01-15 Fasco Industries Infrared heater and ventilator unit
US3834453A (en) * 1972-11-07 1974-09-10 Tiem Inc Ab Air conditioning unit
US3909589A (en) * 1974-01-11 1975-09-30 Ventrola Mfg Co Modular heating, lighting and ventilating unit
US4103146A (en) * 1975-09-02 1978-07-25 Rampe Research Methods and apparatus for ductlessly circulating and selectively supplementally heating large volumes of air in industrial facilities
US4681024A (en) * 1986-07-29 1987-07-21 Fasco Industries, Inc. Combination heater-light-ventilator unit
US4972570A (en) * 1989-04-11 1990-11-27 Tateishi Art K Method of manufacturing an oscillating fan
US5909534A (en) * 1998-02-12 1999-06-01 Ko; Li-Sheng Ventilator with far infrared generators
US6003242A (en) * 1998-01-09 1999-12-21 Carley; Joseph C. Portable heater
US6974381B1 (en) 2004-08-26 2005-12-13 Keith Lloyd Walker Drop ceiling air flow producer
US20060177324A1 (en) * 2005-02-04 2006-08-10 O'TOOLE John Blower system for generating controlled columnar air flow
US20070122126A1 (en) * 2005-11-10 2007-05-31 Hollingsworth Rita G Heat assister
US20080237218A1 (en) * 2005-09-06 2008-10-02 Ratko Isidorovic Electric Room Heater
US20090092488A1 (en) * 2007-03-14 2009-04-09 Weaver William C Dropped ceiling fan housing
US20100021294A1 (en) * 2008-07-28 2010-01-28 Yeh Tien-Bao Fan structure for mounting in a light steel structure of a ceiling
US20120052786A1 (en) * 2009-05-01 2012-03-01 Mark Clawsey Ventilator system for recirculation of air and regulating indoor air temperature
US20140248041A1 (en) * 2011-06-30 2014-09-04 Panasonic Ecology Systems Guangdong Co., Ltd. Ventilating fan for heating
US9290890B2 (en) 2005-02-17 2016-03-22 417 And 7/8, Llc Heating unit for direct current applications
US9392646B2 (en) * 2005-02-17 2016-07-12 417 And 7/8, Llc Pallet warmer heating unit
US9538581B2 (en) 2005-02-17 2017-01-03 417 and 7/8 LLC Heating unit for warming fluid conduits
US9945080B2 (en) 2005-02-17 2018-04-17 Greenheat Ip Holdings, Llc Grounded modular heated cover
US20180192482A1 (en) * 2017-01-03 2018-07-05 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Cooking appliance
US10920379B2 (en) 2005-02-17 2021-02-16 Greenheat Ip Holdings Llc Grounded modular heated cover

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US2304042A (en) * 1941-09-22 1942-12-01 Roy M Upton House cooler and heater
US2614202A (en) * 1950-05-25 1952-10-14 Jordan Paul Otto Air conditioning apparatus
US2689906A (en) * 1951-02-10 1954-09-21 Nu Tone Inc Ceiling heater and ventilator

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2304042A (en) * 1941-09-22 1942-12-01 Roy M Upton House cooler and heater
US2614202A (en) * 1950-05-25 1952-10-14 Jordan Paul Otto Air conditioning apparatus
US2689906A (en) * 1951-02-10 1954-09-21 Nu Tone Inc Ceiling heater and ventilator

Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3001056A (en) * 1958-10-01 1961-09-19 Nutone Inc Ceiling heater and ventilator
US3076887A (en) * 1959-12-30 1963-02-05 Interstate Sanitation Company Dryer
US3320406A (en) * 1963-09-16 1967-05-16 Fasco Industries Combination heating and ventilating unit
US3309502A (en) * 1964-10-30 1967-03-14 Ceilheat Inc Damper control and assembly for heating and ventilating apparatus
US3692977A (en) * 1970-12-23 1972-09-19 Panacon Corp Compact combination infra-red heating and ventilating unit
US3786233A (en) * 1972-08-18 1974-01-15 Fasco Industries Infrared heater and ventilator unit
US3834453A (en) * 1972-11-07 1974-09-10 Tiem Inc Ab Air conditioning unit
US3909589A (en) * 1974-01-11 1975-09-30 Ventrola Mfg Co Modular heating, lighting and ventilating unit
US4103146A (en) * 1975-09-02 1978-07-25 Rampe Research Methods and apparatus for ductlessly circulating and selectively supplementally heating large volumes of air in industrial facilities
US4681024A (en) * 1986-07-29 1987-07-21 Fasco Industries, Inc. Combination heater-light-ventilator unit
US4972570A (en) * 1989-04-11 1990-11-27 Tateishi Art K Method of manufacturing an oscillating fan
US6003242A (en) * 1998-01-09 1999-12-21 Carley; Joseph C. Portable heater
US5909534A (en) * 1998-02-12 1999-06-01 Ko; Li-Sheng Ventilator with far infrared generators
US6974381B1 (en) 2004-08-26 2005-12-13 Keith Lloyd Walker Drop ceiling air flow producer
US20060177324A1 (en) * 2005-02-04 2006-08-10 O'TOOLE John Blower system for generating controlled columnar air flow
US7467931B2 (en) 2005-02-04 2008-12-23 O'TOOLE John Blower system for generating controlled columnar air flow
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