US2846081A - Boom loader for overhead crane - Google Patents

Boom loader for overhead crane Download PDF

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US2846081A
US2846081A US486551A US48655155A US2846081A US 2846081 A US2846081 A US 2846081A US 486551 A US486551 A US 486551A US 48655155 A US48655155 A US 48655155A US 2846081 A US2846081 A US 2846081A
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boom
carrier
load
block
crane
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US486551A
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Ralph T Moore
Vivian J Moore
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VIVIAN J MOORE
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VIVIAN J MOORE
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C11/00Trolleys or crabs, e.g. operating above runways
    • B66C11/08Trolleys or crabs, e.g. operating above runways with turntables
    • B66C11/10Trolleys or crabs, e.g. operating above runways with turntables equipped with jibs

Description

Aug. 5, 1958 R. T. MOORE BOOM LOADER FOR OVERHEAD CRANE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. v. 1955 Aug. 5, 1958 R. T. MOORE BOOM LOADER FOR OVERHEAD CRANE 4 Sheets-Sheet Z.
Filed Feb. 7, 1955 R. T. MOORE BOOM LOADER FOR OVERHEAD CRANE Aug. s, 195s 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 7, 1955 IN VEN TOR.
Aug. 5, i958 R. T. MOORE BOOM LOADER FOR OVERHEAD CRANE 4 sheets-sheet 4 Filed Feb. 7, 1955 ,Nm/ D. E D D my @mm1 /INVENTOR W/ Wma,
United tates EGSM LADER FR VERHEAD CRANE Application February 7, 1955, Serial No. 455,551
4 Claims. (Cl. 212-17) This invention relates to material-handling equipment -n1ore particularly, to overhead cranes of the type that travel along tracks for servicing a work or storage area.
One of the limitations of an overhead crane is the restriction of its effective load-handling to the area over which a truck or carriage is movable, it being necessary to locate the truck or carriage vertically above the load, in order that the hook or sling of the hoist or other lifting mechanism carried by the truck or carriage can be lowered vertically to the load and act on the latter without horizontal force components. The present invention is concerned with extending the effective work area coverage of an overhead traveling crane and with providing such a crane with a different type of load handling facility, it being the principle object of the invention to provide a low headroom crane capable of applying a vertical lifting force to a load located outside or beyond the vertical projection of the crane carriage.
Another object is to provide a crane which is capable of shifting the relative position of the load and the carriage or carrier of the crane, so that, in use, a number of loads can be serviced Without moving the carrier or, if desired, the crane can be oriented in various positions relative to a single load, so as to facilitate the handling of such load.
ln its broader aspects, the invention contemplates a crane having a boom mounted on a carrier or truck as by being suspended below such carrier. The boom is pivotally attached to the crane carrier, the pivotal connection constraining the boo-m to relative swing movements in a vertical plane. An actuator is connected between a point on the carrier and a point on the beam,
each spaced from the point of pivotal connection, so as to impart lever action to the boom. In the contemplated arrangement, one end of the boom is pivoted on the carrier and the other, or load-carrying, end of the boom extends beyond the vertical projection of the carrier. In such arrangement, the actuator conveniently takes the form of a hoist connected between a point on the carrier spaced from the pivotal connection of the boom and a point on the boom intermediate the pivot and loadcarrying ends, constituting the boom a third `degree lever. As a specialized version of the invention, a latch mechanism comprising an element on the carrier and an element on the boom is provided for the purpose of fastening the boom in predetermined relation to the carrier, the boom preferably being in raised position when so latched, so as to relieve the hoist actuator of load with attendant safety and operating advantages. As a still further refinement of this aspect of the invention, a detachable connection is provided between the hoist and the boom so that with the boom latched in raised position, the hoist is available for vconventional direct-lift load-handling operations.
As a further variation of the crane-boom arrangement referred to, and as another objective of the invention, the boom is mounted on the crane carrier for relative rotative or swiveling movement about a vertical axis, this being a preferred way of accomplishing the orientation of the carrier and the load-lifting end of the boom in different relative positions. In providing for rotative movement of the boom relative to the carrier, the wheels and rails of the crane structure are relieved of horizontal force components resulting from moments caused by the eccentric loading of the crane resulting from the application of a load to the horizontally projecting boom. In the preferred arrangement, horizontal force components are carried by a specialized component of the carrier herein called a stiifener or strut member that is disposed in the vertical swing plane of the boom and is coupled to the boom to turn with the latter, this being one of the more specialized objectives of the invention.
In the operation of an overhead traveling crane equipped with a lever-type boom of the character referred to, one of the limiting factors governing the weight of the load that can be handled satisfactorily is the tendency of the crane, truck or carrier to be tilted on the tracks by reason of the application of a vertical load to the outer end of the boom. The structural arrangement of the present invention lends itself to convenient location of counter-balancing weights or loads on the carrier,
strut or boom for the purpose of increasing the capacity of the boom with respect to loads applied to the boom outer end. In certain applications of the invention, it is feasible to mount heavy components, such as drive motors, on the inner, or base, Aend of the boom or on the strut or other part of the carrier adjacent the pivot, utilizing such components as counter-weights in augmenting the effective load-carrying capacity of the boom. A hoist for raising and lowering the boom may, for example, constitute one such counter-balancing weight. Another counter-balancing Weight may be the electric drive for a mechanical grab or the like, the grab structure being on the outer or load-carrying end of the boom and the drive therefore being at or beyond the pivot end of the boom to constitute a counter-weight.
Other objects and advantages pertain to certain novel features of construction and combinations and arrangements of parts which provide a compact, relatively inexpensive crane-boom combination, simple in construction and design, inexpensive to manufacture, erect and service in the field, as will become apparent from the following detailed description of the invention made in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming a part of the specification.
In the drawings:
Fig. l is a fragmentary, partly diagrammatic, side elevational view, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, of a suspended overhead crane incorporating a boom-carrier combination and embodying the principles of the present invention, this view showing in phantom the application of the device to the placement of cargo inside the covered body of a truck or van;
Fig. 2 is a plan view, partly diagrammatic, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, of the crane structure of Fig. l;
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional detail through the boom pivot member, this view being taken substantially in the plane indicated at 3-3 of Fig. l and enlarged with respect to that figure;
Fig. 4 is a fragmentary elevational detail, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, showing the boom trolley, this view being taken substantially in the plane indicated at 4 4 of Fig. 2 and enlarged with respect to that figure;
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary elevational detail, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, showing the trolley wheel suspension by which the carrier is mounted on the traveling bridge;
Fig. 6 is a fragmentary side elevational view, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed,
showing a modification of the invention, incorporating 360 rotative movement of the boom on and relative to the carrier, this view being otherwise similar to Fig. 1.
Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional detail through the boom to show the separable connection between the hoist and the boom, this view being taken substantially in the plane indicated at 7 7 of Fig. 6 and enlarged with respect to that figure;
Fig. 8 is a fragmentary elevational View, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, showing the latch structure for interconnecting the boom and the carrier strut;
Fig. 9 is a fragmentary plan view, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, of the boomcrane combination of Fig. 6;
Fig. l0 is a fragmentary elevational detail, partly in section and with parts removed, showing one of the strut suspending trolleys of the embodiment of Figs. 6 and 9,
this view being taken substantially in the plane indicated at 10-10 of Fig. 6 and enlarged with respect to that figure; and
Fig. ll is a fragmentary elevational detail, partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, showing the vertical pivot guiding the rotation of the boom structure in the embodiment of Figs. 6 and 9, this view being taken substantially in the plane 11--11 of Fig. 9 and enlarged with respect to that gure.
Traveling cranes, particularly cranes of the low headroom type, are designed for suspension from one or more horizontal rails or tracks that are suitably secured to the structure of the building in which the crane is installed or on suitable stanchions or uprights erected for the purpose. The crane rails may consist of short, straight runs or they `may comprise a vertical network, interconnecti ing and interlocking in such a way as to permit a crane bearing a load to travel from one point to any of a number of destinations within a plant, shop or yard serviced by the crane system. In many instances, however, it is not feasible to construct overhead rails that `will enable a crane to move into every part of the establishment in which it is installed and, of course, it is virtually impossible to extend the rails of an overhead crane system into the interior of -a box car, truck or van to be loaded.
The boom-crane combination of the present invention is provided to extend the load lifting ability of the overhead crane beyond the vertical projection of the crane bridge and carrier so as to cover areas which are beyond or outside the reach of the crane rails. While the invention is applicable to overhead cranes of the type that travel ".i
on single tracks, it is most practical and useful in connection with traveling overhead cranes of the double bridge type that are mounted on spaced parallel tracks, the boom being suspended from a carrier that travels back and forth on the bridge transversely to the direction of travel of the bridge structure along the rails, such a structural arrangement representing the best known mode of practicing the invention.
Referring now to the drawings,y one of the rolled steel I-section runway rails for supporting the double bridge crane is indicated at 1, it being understood that a similar rail 1s provided at the other end of bridge A, both rails belng suitably secured to the building or other supportlng structure so that the rails are parallel to one another, all in accordance with conventional practice in erecting overhead crane rails. At the opposite ends of the bridge A and arranged to travel along the rails are trucks. Only one truck is `shown in the drawings, the other being the same, comprising a pair of spaced parallel steel channel frame members 2 that are located one on each side of the vertical plane of the rail with which it is associated. These frame members extend between and connect the ends of the main bridge capsor channel memb ers 7, to which they are rigidly secured as by bolting, riveting or welding. The bridge structure thus comprises a rectangular frame which is suspended from the runway rails by trolley wheels 3. These trolley wheels may comprise single pairs, as shown at the left in Figs. l and 2, or double pairs, as shown at the right in these figures. The trolley wheel pairs are each carried by stub shafts fast in a yoke 4. In the case of the single pair of trolley wheels (at the left in Figs. l and 2) the yoke receives a rigid element projecting from the bridge frame and thus carries the load directly. In the case of the double pair of trolleys (at the right in Figs. l and 2) the yokes 4 are connected as by a load bar 5 which receives a transverse element 46 (Fig. 2) secured between the overhanging ends of the truck frame members 2. ln the arrangement shown the double pairs of trolleys are employed at the right-hand side of the bridge frame to carry the relatively greater load imposed on such side of the 'bridge by reason of the eccentric loading resulting from the boom Structure, as will appear. Thus the overhanging or projecting arrangement of the tinck members 2 with respect to one of the main bridge members 7 obtains certain advantages such as increased stability and load carrying capacity. It is apparent that it is feasible to use single trolley pairs at each side of the truck or, if desired, the dou-ble pairs of trolleys may be used at both sides, as will appear. Movement of the crane bridge to and fro along the runway rails 1 is accomplished conventionally as by rubber-tired drive wheels one of which is indicated at 30 actuated by a drive shaft 31 and a suitable motor (not shown). The drive wheels frictionally engage the underside of the bottom fianges of the runway rail-s 1 and the drive motor is energized through conventional controls.
Suspended beneath the traveling double bridge for movement along the latter transversely to the direction of movement of the bridge along the rail or rails 1 is a carrier C that also is of rectangular frame construction and has trolley wheels 6 in pairs that ride along the bottom anges of I-beam rails 8 secured to the underside of the main bridge cap members 7. In the arrangement illustrated the bridge members 7 may comprise rolled steel channels disposed and spaced in parallel relation with their channels opening downwardly. The carrier rails 8 are then disposed with their upper flanges against the web portions of the channel members 7 and secured by the usual welding, riveting or bolting.
The carrier frame comprises pairs of spaced parallel truck members 10, one pair associated with each of the carrier rails 8, and spaced parallel transverse members 1l which extend across and are rigidly connected to the ends of all of the truck members. The wheels 6 are carried on stub shafts as are the bridge wheels 3, the stub shafts of the carrier wheels being held in yokes 9 that receive the stems of load carrying elements 37 (Fig. 5) disposed Abetween the carrier frame members 10 and 11 and held in place as by ybolts 38 which extend through the members and elements. The load carrying elements 37 are each T-shaped in plan form, the head of the T being clamped between or held fast to the frame members of the carrier, and the stem of the T extending into the -saddle of the yoke and resting on a locating and centering element 39 supported as by a suitable anti-friction bearing.
While the cross-sectional shapes of the various bridge frame and carrier frame members may vary, these parts are made of conventional rolled steel sections suitably selected as to size and shape to carry the loads for which the particular crane system is designed, all in accordance with customary crane design practice.
Mounted on the carrier C, preferably in suspended relation below the bridge structure and also below the carrier, is a boom B which is arranged so that its forward or load carrying end (at the right in Figs. l and 2) extends laterally beyond the vertical projection of the carrier and thereby increases the area over which the load carryying ability of the crane is effective. The suspension of the boom incorporates a rotative swivel arrangement which permits side to side swaying of the boom in addition to its up and down or lcad lifting movement. The up and downswinging of the boom and also the swiveling or rotating of the boom relative to the carrier are accommodated in pivots associated with block 17 disposed at the inner or base end of the boom. This block, comprising a steel forging or machining capable of withstanding strong shearing, twisting and bending forces, includes an integral vertical or upstanding pin portion 40 which is received through a central opening in lower ange 41 of a supporting or I-beam 14 secured to short supplemental frame members 36 that are connected in spaced parallel relation to one another between one of the pairs of carrier truck members (Fig. 2). The web of the pivot beam 14 is suitably reinforced as by gusset plates 42 and is formed with a cutout 43 adjacent the lower ange 41, this cutout accommodating the pivot pin 40 and a nut 15 screwed onto the threaded upper end of the pivot pin. A thrust assembly 16 is interposed `between the nut and the flange of the beam. A transverse pin through the nut and the pivot pin 40 prevents turning of the nut on the pin.
The pivot block 17 constitutes a support or anchorage on the carrier C for the left-hand end (as viewed in Fig. 1) of both a strut assembly S and the boom B. The strut assembly comprises a pair of rolled steel channels 19 disposed in parallel relation to one another with their open channels facing. At their ends the anges of the strut channels are removed, leaving web portions which at 'the pivot end of the strut are indicated at 49 and are received on opposite sides of the pivot block 17. Against the outside surfaces of the struts are received hinge plates 18, these hinge plates being located one on each side of the pivot block. A pin 27 is received through aligned holes in the hinge plates, strut web ends 49 and the pivot 'block 17 so as hingedly to fasten the strut S and the hinge plates to the pivot block. Suitable retainers 34 are received on the projecting ends of the pin 27, held as by transverse pins. Washers 50 are desirably interposed between the retainers 34 and the surfaces of the hinge plates 18 so that the hinge plates can turn freely on the pins in the up and down swinging movement of the boom.
At its forward or right-hand end (Fig, l), the strut assembly S is suspended from load bar (Fig. 4) of a trolley comprising two pairs of wheels 24 and yokes 23 that supportingly receive oppositely directed horizontal end portions 51 of the load bar 20. Forward web portions 52 of the strut channel member 19 are disposed one ou each side of and in embracing relation to a depending bifurcated end 53 of the T-shaped load bar 20. A transverse pin 2S is received through aligned holes in the strut channel webs 52, the bifurcated load bar body 53 and a sheave 21 that is located in the space between the depending leg portions of the latter. Suitable pin-held retainers 33 on the projecting ends of the main pin 28 hold the latter in place, and a suitable ball or other antifriction assembly 54 is used in the mounting of the sheave 21 on the center of the pin 2S so that the sheave turns freely during the paying out and drawing in movements of the boom hoist cable 25, as will appear.
The boom trolley wheel pairs 24 ride along the lower ilanges 56 of an arcuately curved track member 35 secured tothe underside of the rolled steel L-sectioned members 10 comprising one of the trucks of the carrier. The track 35 may comprise a rolled steel I-beam providing top flanges 57 which are bolted or otherwise secured to and against the underside of the truck members 10, and track flanges 56 that carry the trolley wheels 24. The curvature of the track 35 corresponds to that of an arc of a circle having its center on the axis of the pin 40 of the pivot block 17 so that the trolley wheels 24 ride smoothly along the track flanges 56 during rotative or side to side horizontally swinging movement of the strut assembly S and the boom B as an integrated unit and as between the broken and full line positions of Fig. 2. At the ends of the track stop blocks 58 are secured as by bolts 59 against the undersides of the flanges 56 to engage the boom trolley and limit the turning movement of the boom and strut assembly about its vertical axis.
The boom B is of box construction, being fabricated from rolled steel members and plates. I-n the arrangement shown, top and bottom channels 60 and 61 are disposed in confronting relation to one another and are secured together by a series of side plates 62 riveted to the anges of the channel members. The base or lefthand end of the boom (as viewed in Fig. l) is received between the depending portions of the hinge plates 18 to which the members of the boom are secured as by riveting and welding. At its forward or right-hand end (as viewed in the same gure) the boom is tted with a conventional hook 32 Ifor carrying a load 64 as by means of a sling 65. Desirably the boom is tapered, having its maximum section at a lifting point spaced from the base end of the boom a distance corresponding to the length of the strut member S, so that in the raised position of the boom, shown by the full lines of Fig. 1, a sheave 22 carried by a pin 66 held at the lift point of the boom is directly below and in the plane of the sheave 21 carried by the load bar 20. A cable 25 running from electric hoist 26 fast on the strut channels 19 adjacent the pivot block 17 at the base end of the strut assembly is trained over the sheave 21, thence downwardly and under the boom sheave 22 and thence upwardly to the strut S, the end of the hoist cable being fast to the strut adjacent the sheave 21. In addition to having its maximum section at or adjacent the lift pointV of the sheave pin 66, the boom is `formed with a bend at such section so that in raised position the forward portion of the boom between the lift point and t-he hook 32 extends upwardly at an acute angle to the horizontal, the hook being thus movable to a point above the level of the base of the boom and above the strut S. Although a hook 32 of elementary type is shown, it is apparent that the end of the boom may be equipped with any of various load handling devices such as a grab, forks, or turning and stacking implements. In the event such load handling devices require power operation, it is feasible to rig them with riving components extending through the hollow interior of the boom, a suitable drive motor or actuator being located on a rearward extension 68 of the boom in lieu of counterbalance or weight 13.
in the proportioning of the dilerent parts of the boom, regard must be had to the weight and character of load that is to be handled. Since the load 64 applies a downward force on the outer end of the boom, the reaction of the load pin 66 on the hoist cable 25 is likewise downwardly and the pin 27 at the base end of the boom reacts upwardly against the pivot block 17. Thus the boom constitutes a third degree lever and the load carrying capacity of the boom is limited by the strength of the boom in resisting bending moments, by the tensile strength of the hoist cable 25, and by the strength of the carrier C and bridge A components on the right of the crane structure (as viewed in Figs. l and 2). The upward reaction against the pivot block 17 resulting from a load on the boom hook 32 tends to raise the carrier trolley wheels 6 at the left side of the carrier (as viewed in Figs. l and 2) off the track 8. Under extremely heavy loads it is apparent that an upward reaction might result-against the left side of the bridge (as viewed in Figs. l and 2), tending also to raise the bridge trolley wheels 3 off the runway rails l.
As a stabilizer for the boom, to counterbalance the weight of the projecting outer portion of the boom and any load carried by the hook 32, the weight 13 is mounted at the base end of the boom, this weight comprising a concrete or metal block or, as previously mentioned, a
drive motor for a mechanical grab or other device utilized in lieu ofthe hook 32. To further counterbalance the boom and any load carried thereby, a weight 12 is mounted on the left side of the carrier (as viewed in Fig. 1). This weight also may comprise a biock of metal or concrete or a sutable drive and controls for shifting the carrier C back and forth across the bridge rails 8. ln addition to or in lieu of the weights 12 and 13, or one of them, the carrier suspension may incorporate rollers (not shown) mounted as on the load carrying elements 37 to engage against and ride along the underside or sides of the bottom flanges of the left-hand track 8, such rollers serving to prevent raising of the trolley wheels 6 otf the track flanges. Other rollers (not shown) can be incorporated in the trolley structure of the bridge A to prevent raising of the rollers 3 off the track lianges of the runway rails 1.
The length of the forward portion of the boom B between the liftpin 66 and the load hook 32 is determined by the permissible reactions on the load pins of the strut-boom assembly, upward on the pin 27 and downward on the pin 28. The longer the forward portion of a boom, the greater the reactions against these pins for a given load. In the arrangement shown the distance between the load pin 66 and the hook 32 is approximately twice the distance between such pin and the pivot pin 27 so that, in accordance with well known principles, the load that can be accommodated on the hook is one-third the lifting capacity of the hoist 26. Thus a hoist capable of exerting a 3,000-pound lifting force on the pin 66 is capable of lifting a load 64 of approximately 1,000 pounds suspended from the hook 32, less the dead load of the beam. A `geometrical arrangement proportioned and arranged as shown is suitable for use in many material handling situations, particularly in the placement of crated items and the like into the covered body of a van or trailer 70, indicated in phantom in Fig. l.
In the operation of the boom-crane as in loading the van 7i) the boom 29 swings up and down as between the broken and full lines shown in Fig. 1, this movement being in a vertical plane normal to the axis of the horizontal pivot pin 27 and being common to both the boom and the strut assembly 19. When the boom is lowered to the broken line position shown the sheave 22 is displaced horizontally and the forces in the fixed and movable runs of the hoist cable 25 include horizontal components that react against the pin 28 in the load bar 2t) of the boom trolley. The presence of the strut member S, however, and its connection to and between the main pivot pin 27 and the forward trolley pin 28 relieve the boom trolley and the carrier structure of the horizontal force components resulting from the boom load. Since the strut member S and the boom B are received at their base ends on a common horizontal pin 27 and at the forward end of the strut assembly the boom is suspended from the pin 28 by the hoist cable, the strut and boom are constrained to horizontal movement in unison. Thus at all times they are disposed in a common vertical plane. Such side to side movement of the boom and strut with the boom trolley wheels 24 traveling along the arcuate track 35 is effected manually or through cable and pulleys actuated by suitable electric drive means (not shown). Such a drive may be carried by either the strut assembly or the carrier frame members 11 and conventionally controlled.
Lateral stability is imparted to the boom B through the rigidly attached hinge plates 18 that embrace the pivot block 17, the latter in turn being rotatable on its vertical axis and held against turning on a horizontal axis by the iiatwise engagement of the top of the block against the underside of the bottom flange 41 of the support beam 14. The pivot or hinge block 17 is drawn and held snugly against the bottom iiange of the beam by the nut 15 acting against the thrust bearing assembly 8 16. Thus the pivot or hinge block 17 and associated components, while permitting up and down swinging of the boom in a vertical plane and side to side rotative turning as a unit of the strut-boom combination about a vertical axis through the pin 40, prevents lateral twisting of both the strut and the boom.
In Figs. 6-11 is illustrated a modification of the invention in which parts corresponding to those described in connection with the preceding figures are indicated by the same refcrence numerals and similar or corresponding parts are indicated by the same numerals primed. in this modication a boom 29 is capable of continuous or 360 rotative movement about its vertical axis,instead of the limited arcuate side to side swinging movement of the corresponding boom 29 previously described. The truck frame members 2 of the crane bridge A overhang or extend beyond both of the bridge cap members in cantilever fashion and at their ends are supported on trolley assemblies corresponding to the double trolley Wheel pairs described in connection with the suspension of the forward or right-hand side of the bridge crane of Figs. 1 and 2. The carrier structure C', comprising a rectangular frame having the truck members 1t) and cross members i1, as previously described, is suspended by the trolley wheels 6 from the bridge rails 8.
ln the full swiveling modification of Figs. 6-11 the boom-strut unit is suspended wholly by fore and aft trolleys that ride on the lower flanges of a circular track 72. This track is formed of a rolled steel I-beam bent into circular form and its ends joined as by welding to form a complete annulus having the desired diameter, here shown as being greater than the distance between the rails 8 of the bridge A. The circular track 72 is secured to the underside of the carrier as by bolting its upper anges to and against the undersides of the carrier members 1) and 11. Certain of the carrier truck members, indicated at 10', are extended beyond the cross frame members l1 so as to provide additional support for the circular track to which they are connected through spacers (not shown).
The strut S of the embodiment of Figs. 6-11 is of modified construction and comprises a pair of rolled steel channels 73 and 74 disposed in spaced parallel relation, with the openings in the channels facing outwardly. The forward or right-hand end of the strut is suspened by a pair of double wheel trolleys and related parts as described in connection with the embodiment of Figs. 1 and 2. Instead of being pinned to the extreme end of the strut as in the arrangement of Figs. 1 and 2, the bifurcated end 53 of the load bar 20 is received and held by the pin 28 between the strut channels 73 and 74 at a point spaced from the forward end of the strut to provide an overhang cantilever end on the latter, which carries a latching mechanism for locking the boom in raised position, as will later appear.
The rear or left-hand end of the strut S is suspended from the track 72 by a trolley assembly shown in Fig. 10. The trolley wheels 76, in pairs, turn on aligned stub shafts fast in the upper ends of the arms of yokes 77. A load bar 78 formed with a depressed or underslung central portion and raised ends is carried between the yokes, the raised ends of the load bar being received within the yokes and located and held in place on suitable bearing elements. The load bar is formed with one or more lateral flanges 79 along the bottom edge or edges of its underslung central portion, these flanges being bolted as at 80 to the upper flanges of the channels 73 and 74 comprising the strut S.
A pivot or hinge block 17 corresponding to the block 17 previously described is disposed between the spaced hinge plates 18 of the boom and carries the hinge pin 27 which constitutes one of the points of connection between the boom and the carrier and on which the boom is suspended and swings in a vertical plane. The block 17' is connected rigidly to the rear or base end of the strut S.
either directly or, as shown, by means of an interposed bracket 85 fabricated from a short piece of rolled steel I-beam section and plates. Bolts and screws 81 and 82 or other suitable fasteners secure the number 85 to and against the bottom of the strut S and to and against the top of the pivot block 17 respectively. By reason of the rigid connection thus established between the pivot block 17 and the strut S' the boom B is constrained to swinging movement in the plane of the strut S.
Rollers 86 are recessed in wells 87 formed in the load bar 78 and turn on pins or spindles 89 held at their ends in the load bar. These rollers are disposed to engage against underside 90 of the bottom flange of the circular track 72 to transmit to the track any upward force applied by the base of the boom through the pivot pin 27 resulting say, from heavy or excessive loading of the hook or grab 32. Similar rollers may be provided in the load carrying elements 37 or elsewhere on the carrier to transmit any upward forces from the carrier C to the bottoms of the tracks 8 of the crane bridge A.
As an optional feature of construction and as one of the advantages and objectives of the invention, means is provided for guiding or centering the rotation of the strutboom combination on the carrier C' to relieve the trolleys associated with the wheels 24 and 75 of horizontal loads. A central frame member 91 is supported on and secured to the cross frame members 11 of the carrier, this frame member being midway between and parallel to the truck members The ends of the central frame member, which member may comprise a rolled steel I-beam, project cantilever fashion beyond the cross frame members 11 and are fastened to diametrically opposite points of the circular track 72 through interposed spacers. Thus the central frame member provides support for the circular track in addition to that obtained through the truck frame and cross frame members of the carrier. At its center or mid-point, which is also the center of the carrier, the frame member 91 has secured against its underside as by bolts 92 a bracket 93 on the bottom of which is mounted a tough wear resistant metal pivot block 94. A central recess 95 in this block receives for free turning movement an upstanding pin 96 carried on a plate 97 welded or otherwise secured to channel shaped spacers 98 that are fast to the top ilanges of the strut channels 73 and 74. A plate 99 is interposed and secured between the strut members and the spacers 98, and another reinforcement plate 100 is welded to the bottom of the ystrut members. Rotation of the strut-boom unit relative to the carrier is centered on the axis of the pin 96. Horizontal forces between the boom and the carrier are thus transf mitted through the pin 96, thereby relieving the circular track 72 and the trolley wheels associated therewith from such loads.
On the cantilevered forward end of the strut S is carried a latch element 102 that is arranged to eifect interlocking connection with a mating latch element 103 secured to the boom B for the purpose of holding and supporting the forward or load carrying end of the boom in raised position, as shown in Fig. 6. The latch element 102 is a tough steel forging or casting having a rectangular base secured to the anges of the strut members 73 and 74 as by bolts 104. Depending or projecting downwardly from the base of the latch element is an integral bifurcated structure comprising arms 106 and 107 defining between them a latch socket or recess 108. The latch element 103 also comprises a tough metal forging or casting having a rectangular base secured as by bolts 109 to the top of the boom B. An integral leg or prong 110 projects upwardly from the base of the element 103, the parts of the two latch elements being so oriented that when the boom is raised the prong 110 moves into the latch recess 108 of the latch element on the strut in position to be held by a retractable pin 111 guided in a bore 112 formed in a lateral boss extension 114 of the arm 107. A helical coil spring 115 is received about a reduced diameter stem portion 116 of the pin 111 and within the recess 112. The spring reacts against the shoulder of the pin and the circular wall at the inner end of the bore 112, biasing the pin to the left (as viewed in Fig.` 8) for movement across the latch recess 108 and into an aligned socket 117 in the latch arm 106 so that in its projected position shown the pin 111 is supported at both ends by the arms 106 and 107.
When the boom B is in the raised position shown in Figs. 6 and 8 and the pin 111 is projected across the latch recess 108 it is received through an opening 118 in the prong to effect an interlock between the elements or components of the latch mechanism and thereby hold the boom in raised position. The central portion of the pin 111 may be formed with a depressed saddle 119 providing axially spaced shoulders engageable .against opposite sides of the prong 110 to prevent endwise shifting of the pin when loaded by the weight of the boom.
The end of the reduced diameter stern 116 projects through an axial guide hole in the end of the boss extension 114 and carries a transverse pin 120 the ends of which are received in parallel slots 121 in the spaced portions of a bifurcated arm 122 of a bell crank lever. This lever is carried on a pin 123 supported between the strut channel members 73 and 74. A pull cord 125 is connected to the other ann 124 of the bell crank lever for actuating the latch mechanism to retract the pin 111 into the bore 112 and thereby release the prong 110 so that the boom is free to move up and down -as actuated by the hoist. When it is desired to release the latch from the locked position shown, the hoist 26 is first energized sufliciently to relieve the pin 111 of load so that it may be readily withdrawn by actuation of the bell crank lever through the cord 125.
Latching the boom to the strut in the manner described relieves the hoist cable 25 of load and permits the electric drive motor of the hoist 26 to be de-energized. Thus the latch arrangement constitutes a safety measure which prevents -inadvertent lowering of the boom.
Figs. 6-11 illustrate a further variation and combination of parts that has advantages in situations requiring occasional lifting of loads heavier than can be accommodated conveniently on the hook or grab 32. This arrangement uses, in lieu of the lixed sheave 22 described in connection with Figs. l and 2, a separable block 126 that carries a sheave 127 about which the hoist cable 25 is reeved. The block 126 i-s formed with or carries across its sides and ends a load receiving element or elements 128 which may collectively take the form of an annulus that closely embraces the casing of the block, being either integral therewith or rigidly secured thereto as 'by welding. In the normal operation of the crane-boom loader cornbination the block 126 is disposed within the box structure of the boom at the lift point which is also the intersection of the base portion and the forwardly extending load carrying portion that are angularly disposed relative to each other. A pair of bearing members 130 and 131 are arranged inside the boom, being suitably secured to the insides of the top and bottom boom channel members 60 and 61 and the side plates 62. The members 130 and 131 may comprise steel castings or forgings and define between them a guideway 132 that accommodates the block 126. Supplemental plates 138 secured against the sides of the boom at the lift point reinforce the angle joint between the base and forward boom portions. The upper portion of the guideway, indicated at 133, is of reduced section in the provision of one or more shoulders 134 engageable with the load elements 128 on the block 126 so as to locate the block in the guideway in boom lifting position and prevent movement of the block upwardly through the guideway portion 133 of reduced section. An opening 135 is formed in the top boom channel member 60 -in alignment with the guideway portion 133 to accommodate theupper end ofthe block and the vertical runs dicated by the broken lines of Fig. 6. When the block is thus released from the boom it can be used in the usual manner for directly lifting and moving loads, a suitable hook or grab 146 being fast on the block for such purpose.
The present invention thus provides a crane hoist-boom loader combination in which a lever type boom is sus-iv pended wholly below the carrier of an overhead crane in the provision of a unique low overhead load handling apparatus that can be readily maneuvered for shifting, lifting and placing loads in narrow, low overhead locations that would otherwise be inaccessible with conventional cranes and loaders. Numerous combinations and arrangements of the structures described are feasible at the option of the builder of the crane. Provision is made for either limited horizontal swinging of the boom as in the arrangement of Figs. l and 2 or for complete 360 swiveling if such is desired, as in the arrangement of Figs. 6 and 9.
In accordance with the patent statutes the principles of the present invention may be utilized in various ways, numerous modifications andV alterations being contemplated, substitution of parts and changes in construction being resorted to as desired, it being understood that the embodiments shown in the drawings and described above are given merely for purposes of explanation and illustration without intending to limit the scope of the claims to the spechic details disclosed.
What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
l. A low overhead traveling crane comprising a carriage adapted to travel along a rail and a cantilever boom disposed below and suspended from the carriage, the boom suspension comprising a ull circle track below the carriage, trolley trucks mounted on the track in diametric positions, ymeans connecting the trolley trucks for movement about the track in unison, a horizontal pivot pin connecting one point of the boom to one of the trucks for swinging movement solely about a horizontal axis, and a hoist connecting another point of the boom to another of the trucks.
2. In an overhead crane of the type comprising rail means supported in a generally horizontal plane above an area to be serviced by the crane anda carriage mounted on the rail means for movement in said plane, the cornbination of a carrier, means securing the carrier to the carriage for relative rotative movement about a vertical axis, an elongated rigid cantilever boom, means suspending the boom from the carrier, the boom suspension means including pivot means connected between the carrier and one end of the boom and hoist means connected between points of the carrier and the boom spaced horizontally from the pivot means and from the other end of the boom and constituting the latter a third degree lever, latch means comprising separable interlockingelements, one on the carrier, the other on the boom, each spaced from the pivotal axis of the boom and engageable with one another to hold the boom against swinging; and thereby locked in fixed relation to the carrier, the hoist including a block, separable connection means between the block and the 'boom at said point of the latter intermediate its ends, the
eparable connection means between the block and the boom comprising elements having complemental shoulders engageable with one another to connect the block operatively to the boom for raising the latter and Clt permitting the block to drop by gravity away from the Y boom when the latter is latched to the carrier for use of the block in direct litt hoisting operations independently of the booml` the complemental shoulders of the connecting elements effecting automatic reconnection of the block to the boom upon raising of the block to a predetermined position relative to the boom for immediate use of the block in actuating the boom in hoisting operations.
3. An overhead crane comprising in combination a pair of runway rails adapted to be supported in spaced parallel relation above an area to be serviced by the crane, a main bridge structure adapted to be mounted on and to travel horizontally along said pair of runway rails, a carriage structure adapted to be mounted on the main bridge structure for horizontal movement therealong in a direction generally transverse to the horizontal travel direction of the main bridge structure on the runway rails, a carrier comprising a rigid horizontal strut, means suspending the carrier from the carriage structure, the carrier suspension means including means providing rotative movement of the carrier relative to the carriage structure about a vertical axis, an elongated rigid cantilever boom, means suspending the boom from the carrier, the boom suspension means including pivot lmeans connected between the carrier and one end of the boom and hoist means connected between points of the carrier and the boom spaced horizontally from the pivot means and from the other end of the boom and constituting the latter a third degree lever, the pivot means constraining the boom to swinging movement solely in a vertical plane relative to the horizontal strut of the carrier, latch means comprising separable interlocking elements, one on the carrier, the other on the boom, each spaced `from the pivotal axis of the boom and engageable with one another to hold the boom against swinging and thereby locked yin xed relation to the carrier, the hoist including a block, separable connection means between the block and the boom at said point of the latter intermediate its ends, the separable connection means between the block and the boom comprising elements having complemental shoulders engageable with one another to connect the block operatively to the boom for raising the latter and permitting the block to drop by gravity away from the boom when the latter is latched to the carrier for use of the block in direct lift hoisting operations independently of the boom, the complemental shoulders of the connecting elements effecting automatic reconnection of the block to the boom upon raising of the block to a predetermined position relative to the boom for immediate use of the block in actuating the boom in hoisting operations.
4. In an overhead crane of the type comprising rail means adapted to be supported in a generally horizontal plane above an area to be serviced by the crane and a carriage frame mounted on the rail means for movement in said plane, the combination of a carrier, means suspending the carrier from the carriage, an elongated cantilever boom having an inner pivot end and an outer load lcarrying end, a pin joint connecting the inner end of the boom to the carrier and constraining the movement of the boom relative to the carrier to swinging in a vertical plane, a hoist connected between points of the carrier and the boom spaced horizontally from the pin joint to raise and lower the boom relative to the carrier, the boom point to which the hoist is connected being intermediate and spaced from both ends of the boom, latch means comprising separable interlocking elements, one on the carrier, the other on the boom, each spaced from the pivotal axis of the boom and engageable with one another to hold the boom against swinging and thereby locked in fixed relation to the carrier, the hoist including a block and flexible cable means running from the carrier to the block, separable connection means between the block and the boom comprising elements having complemental shoulders engageable with one another to connect the-block operatively to the boom for raising the llatter and permitting the block to drop away from the boom by gravity when the latter is latched to the carrier for use of the block in direct lift hoisting operations independently of the boom, the complemental shoulders of the connecting elements effecting automatic reconnection of the block to the boom upon raising of the block References Cited in the le of this patent to a predetermined position relative to the boom for m- UNITED STATES PATENTS mediate use of the block in actuating the boom -in boom 666 123 Wellman et al Jan 15 1901 hoisting operations, one of the connection elements being 734187 Matthews July 21 1903 an outer element carried by the boom and having a ver- 5 854837 Paige May 28, 1907 tical through opening receiving the cable means, and the 1,334,892 Dickinson Man 23, 1920 other of the connection elements being on the block, the 1,794,714 Kiphnger Mar. 3, 1931 one element constituting a guide for the cable means in 1,799,209 Bennington Apr. 7, 1931 direct lift hoisting operations and in raising the block to lo 1,818,374 Bennington Aug. 11, 1931 said boom hoisting position. 2,553,378 Miller May 15, 1951
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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2996197A (en) * 1957-12-30 1961-08-15 Nelson Mfg Co Inc L R Irrigation pipe moving apparatus
US3438160A (en) * 1966-02-09 1969-04-15 Kwikform Ltd Lifting device for a supporting framework
DE2829336A1 (en) * 1977-07-19 1979-02-01 B & W Motor As ELEVATING CRANE, IN PARTICULAR FOR USE IN THE MACHINE ROOM OF A SHIP
US4159796A (en) * 1976-08-09 1979-07-03 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Method for making a boom
US4249853A (en) * 1979-04-16 1981-02-10 Lyvers Daniel L Apparatus for loading and unloading a vehicle
US4449634A (en) * 1980-07-04 1984-05-22 Enterprises Buzzichelli Hoisting assembly with a boom and a counterweight having adjustable respective positions
US4491227A (en) * 1980-07-04 1985-01-01 Entreprises Buzzichelli Hoisting assemblies with a boom and a counterweight support having adjustable respective positions
US5186343A (en) * 1989-03-21 1993-02-16 Iti/Clm Impianti Tecnici Industriali Spa Bridge crane with articulated rotary boom
US5582467A (en) * 1995-04-10 1996-12-10 Centre De Recherche Industrielle Du Quebec Displaceable working apparatus with extensible boom
WO2007018487A3 (en) * 2005-07-21 2008-01-10 Mhe Technologies Inc Overhead crane
US20080245756A1 (en) * 2006-03-23 2008-10-09 Clipper Windpower Technology, Inc. Wind Turbine Nacelle With Integral Service Crane for Accessing Turbine Components
US20080251485A1 (en) * 2004-09-03 2008-10-16 Waisanen Steven K Container Crane

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US734187A (en) * 1902-11-10 1903-07-21 Joseph Matthews Crane.
US854837A (en) * 1905-02-24 1907-05-28 Pfaudler Co Inc Crane.
US1334892A (en) * 1920-03-23 Method and mead s fob setting bbick mechanically in spaced begulab
US1794714A (en) * 1925-11-06 1931-03-03 Nat Aniline & Chem Co Inc Material handling
US1799209A (en) * 1927-01-24 1931-04-07 Cleveland Crane Eng Overhead traveling carrier
US1818374A (en) * 1927-01-15 1931-08-11 Cleveland Crane Eng Overhead traveling carrier
US2553378A (en) * 1947-07-09 1951-05-15 Du Pont Material handling device

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US1334892A (en) * 1920-03-23 Method and mead s fob setting bbick mechanically in spaced begulab
US666123A (en) * 1900-01-17 1901-01-15 Wellman Seaver Engineering Company Furnace-charging apparatus.
US734187A (en) * 1902-11-10 1903-07-21 Joseph Matthews Crane.
US854837A (en) * 1905-02-24 1907-05-28 Pfaudler Co Inc Crane.
US1794714A (en) * 1925-11-06 1931-03-03 Nat Aniline & Chem Co Inc Material handling
US1818374A (en) * 1927-01-15 1931-08-11 Cleveland Crane Eng Overhead traveling carrier
US1799209A (en) * 1927-01-24 1931-04-07 Cleveland Crane Eng Overhead traveling carrier
US2553378A (en) * 1947-07-09 1951-05-15 Du Pont Material handling device

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2996197A (en) * 1957-12-30 1961-08-15 Nelson Mfg Co Inc L R Irrigation pipe moving apparatus
US3438160A (en) * 1966-02-09 1969-04-15 Kwikform Ltd Lifting device for a supporting framework
US4159796A (en) * 1976-08-09 1979-07-03 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Method for making a boom
DE2829336A1 (en) * 1977-07-19 1979-02-01 B & W Motor As ELEVATING CRANE, IN PARTICULAR FOR USE IN THE MACHINE ROOM OF A SHIP
FR2398016A1 (en) * 1977-07-19 1979-02-16 B & W Motor LIFTING INSTALLATION, INTENDED IN PARTICULAR TO BE INSTALLED IN THE MACHINERY COMPARTMENT OF A SHIP
US4249853A (en) * 1979-04-16 1981-02-10 Lyvers Daniel L Apparatus for loading and unloading a vehicle
US4449634A (en) * 1980-07-04 1984-05-22 Enterprises Buzzichelli Hoisting assembly with a boom and a counterweight having adjustable respective positions
US4491227A (en) * 1980-07-04 1985-01-01 Entreprises Buzzichelli Hoisting assemblies with a boom and a counterweight support having adjustable respective positions
US5186343A (en) * 1989-03-21 1993-02-16 Iti/Clm Impianti Tecnici Industriali Spa Bridge crane with articulated rotary boom
US5582467A (en) * 1995-04-10 1996-12-10 Centre De Recherche Industrielle Du Quebec Displaceable working apparatus with extensible boom
US7686175B2 (en) * 2004-09-03 2010-03-30 Mhe Technologies, Inc. Container crane
US20080251485A1 (en) * 2004-09-03 2008-10-16 Waisanen Steven K Container Crane
EP1910210A2 (en) * 2005-07-21 2008-04-16 Mhe Technologies, Inc. Overhead crane
US7874439B2 (en) * 2005-07-21 2011-01-25 Mhe Technologies, Inc. Overhead crane
US20090159548A1 (en) * 2005-07-21 2009-06-25 Waisanen Steven K Overhead crane
EP1910210A4 (en) * 2005-07-21 2009-08-19 Mhe Technologies Inc Overhead crane
WO2007018487A3 (en) * 2005-07-21 2008-01-10 Mhe Technologies Inc Overhead crane
US7789252B2 (en) * 2006-03-23 2010-09-07 Clipper Windpower, Inc. Wind turbine nacelle with integral service crane for accessing turbine components
US20080245756A1 (en) * 2006-03-23 2008-10-09 Clipper Windpower Technology, Inc. Wind Turbine Nacelle With Integral Service Crane for Accessing Turbine Components

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