US2744398A - Warp knitting machine - Google Patents

Warp knitting machine Download PDF

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US2744398A
US2744398A US284699A US28469952A US2744398A US 2744398 A US2744398 A US 2744398A US 284699 A US284699 A US 284699A US 28469952 A US28469952 A US 28469952A US 2744398 A US2744398 A US 2744398A
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needle
needles
needle bar
machine
shaft
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US284699A
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Scheibe Walter
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Scheibe Walter
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B27/00Details of, or auxiliary devices incorporated in, warp knitting machines, restricted to machines of this kind
    • D04B27/06Needle bars; Sinker bars
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B27/00Details of, or auxiliary devices incorporated in, warp knitting machines, restricted to machines of this kind
    • D04B27/06Needle bars; Sinker bars
    • D04B27/08Driving devices therefor

Description

May 8, 1956 w. SCHEIBE 2,744,398
WARP KNITTING MACHINE Filed April 28, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG.1 31 25 30 26 27 INVENTOR:
'h a/Ier SCHE/BE ATTORNEY May 8, 1956 w. SCHEIBE WARP KNITTING MACHINE Filed April 28, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORZ l/d/Ier Sche/be BY W- 77714.;6
ATTORNEY May 8, 1956 W SCHEIBE WARP KNITTING MACHINE Filed April 28, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG7 g |NVENTOR= Mfi/fer Sche/be BY 44/4 mag/e ATTORNEY y 8, 1956 w. SCHEIBE 2,744,398
WARP KNITTING MACHINE Filed April 28, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR:
Wat/(er Sche/Zae BY @h/M m ATTORNEY United States Patent 2,744,398 WARP KNITTING MACHINE Walter Scheibe, Oberursel (Taunus), Germany Application April 28, 1952, Serial No. 284,699 Claims priority, application Germany April 28, 1951 11 Claims. (Cl. 66'86) This invention relates to a machine for the manufacture of warp knitted goods, especially for single needle bar stitched products, and its main object is the attainment of certain improvements in a machine of this type with a view, inter alia, of materially increasing its work ing speed and also the variety of the work to be produced on the machine.
Up to the present, warp knitting machines of the kind herein referred to necessitated the provision of a needle catcher, or latch retaining device, which consisted of a wire stretched tightly across the full length of the needle bar, where it served as a stop forthe latches of the needles in order to prevent the needles closing during their precipitated upward movement during work. However, this wire also prevented the attainment of higher working speeds of the machine and it is, therefore, another one of the main objects of the invention, to abolish the said latch retaining wire in machines of the said class and to thereby provide a machine which will be capable of considerably higher working speeds as have heretofore been possible.
Another object of the invention is the provision of a warp knitting machine of the said kind which not only enables the production of practically all single needle bar goods which up to the present could be produced on slow running machines only, for instance loosely knitted textiles such as curtains, veils, nettings, and the like, as also tightly knitted fabrics such as tulle and others, for the production of which machines of this type could not be used, as these machines were applicable to loose fabrics only.
A further object of the invention rests in the provision of means whereby the least possible distance between the stitches just finished and the needles may be obtained.
A still further object is the provision of means which will allow the needle bar to remain a prolonged period in its lowermost position and there to carry out a subsiduary, preferably arcuate movement, by which in the working cycle of the machine a special tightening-up of the threads may be efiected and, coincidentally therewith, the formation of surplus thread material avoided, so that a particularly tight knitted fabric will be produced.
Yet another object of the invention consists in the provision of means which will prevent the needle bar returning to its lowest position after the completion of its subsiduary movement.
Other objects, for example, are the provision of a more simplified construction of the needle bed or guide; the application of a particularly fine gauge of needle arrangement with any desired type of latch needles; an improved lateral guidance of the needles, and the provision of exchangeable holders for the said guides which may be stationary, movable, or resilient.
These and other objects and improvements are rendered possible by providing a warp knitting machine in accordance with the invention with various new and improved devices, such for example as a stitch comb which is provided with a latch retainer, or retainers, or which itself is adapted to function as such. v I
The accompanying drawings illustrate several embodiments of the various features of the invention by way of example. In these drawings:
Fig. 1 represents the improved warp knitting machine in perspective.
Fig. 2 is a cross section, on an enlarged scale, through a machine in accordance with Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 illustrates some of the major working parts of the machine in cross section.
Fig. 3a is a perspective view of the rocking means shown in Fig. 3.
Fig. 4 is a front elevation of a part of the needle bar and its rocking shaft.
Fig. 5 is a cross section through one of the latch needle bars.
Fig. 6 is a similar section through a movable form of needle guide or trick plate.
Fig. 7 is a similar cross section through a resilient form'of the needle guide or trick plate.
Fig. 8 is a part section through the needle bar and needle guide as illustrated in Fig. 3.
Fig. 9 illustrates an enlarged sectional view showing the co-operation of needle bar and trick plate adapted for substantially rectilinear vertical movement of the said needle bar.
Fig. 10 is a front elevation of one form of needle bed or trick plate.
Fig. 11 illustrates a cross section similar to Fig. 6 of another form of needle guide.
Fig. 12 is a cross section through a resilient form of needle guide in accordance with the invention.
The warp knitting machine as represented in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings comprises a supporting frame 1 resting on feet 2 and provided with standards or end plates 3 and 4. The guide bar shaft 5 is journaled in the end bearings 6 and intermediate bearings, which latter are supported on the tubular member 8. Arranged outside the end plate 3 is the pattern wheel 9, which is driven by a worm gear in the gear box 11 as by a chain 10 from the adjustable sprocket or distance wheel 12. Adjustment of the pattern wheel through the chain 10 can be effected by means of a shift rod or the like 13; The pattern wheel is journaled in bearings 14 which are provided in brackets 15 on theend plate 3. Transmission of the pattern wheel movement to the yarn guide bars 16 and 16a is controlled by the two-armed rocking levers 17 and 17a which are moved by the pattern wheel and which are connected to and move the guide bars by means of tappets 18 and springs 19. With their upper ends 20 the rocking levers are in contact with the pattern wheel 9 by the followers 21 under the action of springs 23 at the lower ends 22 of the levers. The yarn guide bars 16 and 16a are supported in bearings 24 and hold the lead clamps for the guide bar needles, serving as yarn carriers.
The yarn is introduced into the machine over the spools on the yarn beams 25 and 26 which are supported in the end plates 3 and 4, of which the end plate 3 is provided with the thread brakes 27, 28, which are adjustable as by means of the springs 29 and controlled by the tension bars 30. These tension bars are supported with their ends in the end plates 3 and 4, and centrally in the bearing block 31 on the tubular member 8. From the yarn beams thethreads are passed over the tension bars to the yarn guides where the knitting operation takes place and from where the finished fabric glides over theneedle bed, or trick plate 32, the sanding roll 33, and the roller 34 to the winding-up roll 35. All the rolls just referred to are journaled in the end plates 3 and 4. The sanding roll 33 is driven by a stageless gear 36 to which the winding-up roll 35 is connected by means, preferably, of a slip clutch of any known or convenient kind and which, for that reason, has not been shown in the drawing.
The machine may be driven by an electric motor 42 (Fig. 2) for the control of which a regulator 37 is provided. Starting and stopping is effected by means of a hand bar 38. The machine may also be turned through by hand, for which purpose a hand wheel 40 operating over a gear 39 is provided. The reference 41 indicates a safety switch for the electric driving installation just described.
Fig. 2 is a cross section through a machine as illustrated in Fig. 1 showing all the more important parts which are effective in the operation of the machine.
As will be seen in this figure the electric driving motor 42 and the regulating resistance 37 are conveniently arranged in the lower frame portion 1 of the machine. The motor drives the main or cam shaft 46 over pulleys 44, by means of a belt 43. Keyed to the said cam shaft are cams 47 for the control of the various operations of the machine. Arranged at the front of the machine within easy reach of the operator and above the safety switch 41 is the hand wheel 40 by means of which the machine may be turned through by hand, and the brackets 43 for the slidable support of the throwing-in bar 38.
Approximately in the centre of the machine intermediate the end plates 3 and 4 is an angle bar 49 mounting the needle bed, or trick plate as it is sometimes called, 32, behind which the needle bar 50 is positioned on rocking arms 51 which are keyed or otherwise fixed to the rock shaft 52 (see also Figs. 3 and 3a). The said rock shaft is operated to rock the said arms 51 in substantially vertical direction by means of cam levers 53 with their two followers 54, each cam lever with its followers being in contact with a respective one of the earns 47. A stitch comb 55 is positioned in the working region of the latch needles 50b which latter are fixed, as by being cast into leaden holders, to the needle bar 50. The stitch comb 55 comprises pegs 56 which are positioned to face the latch side of the needles. It is also fastened to a rocking arm 57 (Fig. 2) which, in turn, is keyed to the comb shaft 58 adapted to be controlled by the cam lever 59 over two follower rollers from the cam 47.
Also fastened to the needle bar rock shaft 52 are the rocking arms 60 for the control of the guide bar shaft 5, which are likewise actuated by open cam and corresponding cam levers similar to the cam levers 53 and 59. The rocking arms 60 are connected to the actuating levers 62 by means of links 61. Arranged on the guide bar shafts 5 are the blocks 63 for the guide bar brackets 24 and 24a to which the guide bars 16 and 16a with their thread guiding eyes are fastened. The said guide bar shaft, as already described, is journaled in the end plates of the machine and on the tubular member 8, and the thread is guided from the yarn beams 25 and 26 over the tension bars 30, the shafts of which are journaled in the end plates 3 and 4 and in the central bearing 31, to the yarn guide bars and thence in the shape of the finished fabric over the sanding roller 33 and the intermediate roller 34 to the winding-up or cloth roll 35.
Referring particularly to Figs. 3, 3a and 4 of the drawing it will be seen that the needle bar 50, to which the lead clamps 50a for the latch needles 50b are fastened, is supported by rocking arms 51 which are keyed to the rocking shaft 52. Brackets 46a rotatably support cam shaft 46 which is journaled in bearing boxes 46b. The cam shaft carries a plurality of identical earns 47, each cooperating with respective cam followers 54 of cam levers 53, one cam lever 53 and one rocking arm 51 being provided between each two shaft support means, as shown in Fig. 3a. A machine of medium length may have the shafts 46 and 52 supported at their respective ends and in the center, two cam levers 53 and two or three rocking arms 51 may be provided for operation of the needle bar. Cam lever heads 53a are fixedly connected to rocking shaft 52 which is journaled in top portions 46c of brackets 46a. Movement is imparted to the needle bar by the cam lever 53 over the two cam followers 54 from the earns 47. The needle bar 50 rocks about the shaft 52 and the latch needles 50b are thereby guided in the arcuate needle bed, or trick plate, 32, so that the needle bar and, therewith, the latch needles reciprocate in a substantially vertical direction as indicated by the two-pointed arrow 64. The enlargement in Fig. 3 also shows the stitch comb more plainly and it will be seen that in this embodiment the forepart of the stitch comb 55 is provided with a preferably leaden plate 55:! to which the pegs 56 of the comb are fastened. The stitch comb reciprocates in a substantially horizontal path which is indicated by the twopointed arrow 65. It is positioned on the latch side of the needles 50b and has pin-shaped stops 66 arranged between the pegs 56 in the path of the latches 50c of the needles. Arranged above the needles are the thread guides 67.
The aforementioned stops 66 serve as abutments for the latches 500 to prevent the closing of the needles by the latches jerking up during the reciprocation of the needles.
As will be seen from Fig. 4, in which only the lead clamps 50a for the latch needles 50b are shown on the needle bar 59, the latter is supported at distanced places on the needle bar rocking shaft 52 by means of the rocking arms 51, whereby a considerable increase in the speed of the machine can be obtained. The needle bed 32 which, as has already been mentioned, is positioned on the angle bar 49, is arc-shaped in order thereby to constitute an intimate guiding means for the needles in their likewise arcuate path of movement. In the case of a curved arrangement of the needles 50b as shown in Fig. 5 the needle bed plate 32 may be stationary. If, however, the needles are straight as very often is the case, the needle bed plate 32a will preferably be arranged to be movable by being pivoted to a bracket 48a as illustrated in Fig. 6. Control of the movement of the plate 32a is effected by a link 68 and an antifriction roller 70 from an eccentric 69 of the cam shaft 46.
Fig. 7 shows a needle bed plate 32b which is resiliently constructed in its upper portion so as to be able to adapt itself to the movements of the needle bar. In the examples so far referred to the needle bar moves in an arcuate path with the axis of the needle bar rock shaft as centre.
The cam 47 on the cam shaft 46 is provided, as shown in Fig. 3, with a rise 71 which causes the needle bar to remain a prolonged period in its lowermost position and to produce, while in that position, a subsidary arcuate movement. This movement serves the object of effecting an increased tension on the fabric and preventing the accumulation of surplus thread material. In this way, and particularly by the increased tension on the fabric, the latter receives a-density of texture which heretofore it has not been possible to obtain. Just prior to the needle bar attaining its lowermost position the fabric slips back slightly, but the needle bar immediately rises a short distance, allowing the fabric to follow. Hereupon it recedes again, and it is during this part of the movement that the tensioning of the fabric takes place. It will be understood by the foregoing description of movements, that the needle bar thus performs a short, irregular vibration while in its lowest position. By suitably shaping the rise 71 of the cam 47 the needle bar can be prevented from returning into its lowermost position during the just described tensioning of the fabric.
Further, the guide means for the needles, namely the needle bed 32, is of a formation which enables the employment in the machine of a considerably finer gauge as heretofore has been possible. It is not necessary, in this case, to arrange the said guiding means vertically as shown, for they may just as well be positioned at an inclination or even horizontally. The needle bed proper, by which is to be understood the upper portion of the trick plate 32 in Figs. 8 to l2, is laminated with the needles 50b moving between the laminations. It may be mentioned that the invention'is not intended to be limited to the'forrn of needles illustrated in the drawings; in fact, any type needles may be employed which may be considered convenient for the work to be carried out on the machine. The illustration of Fig. 8 corresponds in principle to that shown in Fig. 3, because also in this case the needle bar 50 moves in an arcuate path and the needles 50b are guided between the laminations 72, which are fastened to a holder or cast in lead as shown at 73.
In the modification as shown in Fig. 9 the blades or laminations 72 are arranged on an intermediate member or also cast in a leaden carrier 73, whereby the strips or blocks of lead are fixed to the needle bed plate 32 similar to the construction which has just been described. In this case, however, the needle bar 50 with its needles 50b, which move between the laminations 72, performs its up and down movement in a straight vertical direction. For increased rigidity the laminations 72 may be appropriately supported for instance by the provision of distance pieces, or by a strengthening rod 74 as shown in Fig. 10, which is passed through the openings 75 of the laminations 72. Fig. 10 also shows the holding ledge for the laminations 72 to be subdivided into individual sections 73 fastened to the bed plate by means of screws 76 or in any other convenient way.
The rod 74 just referred to may be round, oval, or of any other cross section. It not only serves as a strengthening member and for the mutual support of the lamina tions, but it also takes part in guiding the fabric away from the knitting instrumentalities. It may be connected to the individual laminations, but it has been found that the friction between the laminations and the surface of the rod 74 is sufiicient to maintain the required distance between the adjacent laminations even under the strain exerted by the needles.
In Fig. 11 the shape of the bed plate 32 resembles that shown in Fig. 6 with the diiference, that at its upper por tion it is provided with a ledge 73, which is fixed thereto by means of the screws 76 and which terminates into the laminations 72.
Fig. 12 illustrates a further modification of the needle bed plate which is similar to the embodiment shown in Fig. 7 in that it is also resilient by being constructed in the form of a leaf spring. The upper end of the leaf spring carries a separate holder 77 to which the laminations 72 are fixed as by being cast into a strip of lead 73.
What I claim is:
1. A warp knitting machine having a needle bar, a plurality of latch needles provided therein, means for moving said needle bar in substantially vertical direction, and means for operatively supporting said needle bar in the machine, a comb-shaped needle bed for guiding the latch needles in their reciprocating movement, a stitch comb, pegs on said stitch comb adapted to extend between the said latch needles to keep down the stitches, means for reciprocating the said stitch comb on the latch side of the needles, and abutments on the said stitch comb for engaging the latches and thus preventing their closing at a predetermined point of their upward movement.
2. A warp knitting machine as claimed in claim 1, in which the abutments on the stitch comb are positioned between the pegs of the said stitch comb.
3. A warp-knitting machine having a needle bar and a plurality of latch needles provided therein, comprising means for rocking said needle bar in substantially vertical direction, said rocking means including a shaft, rocking arms fixedly connecting the needle bar and the shaft, controlling cam levers in rigid connection with said shaft, a cam shaft, and cams on said cam shaft for moving said cam levers; a comb-shaped needle guide, a stitch comb for holding down the stitches as they are produced, means for reciprocating said stitch comb, and abutments in connection with the said stitch comb for stopping latches which enter into the region of the said stitch comb.
4. A warp knitting machine as claimed in claim 3, comwhich the upper part of the said comb-shaped needle guide" is in the shape of a plate spring;
7. A warp knitting machine having a needle bar and a plurality of latch needles provided therein, comprising means for rocking said needle bar in substantially vertical direction, said rocking means including a shaft, rocking arms fixedly connecting the needle bar and said shaft, controlling cam levers in rigid connection with said shaft, a cam shaft, and cams on said cam shaft for moving said cam levers; needle guide, a comb portion on said needle guide of arcuate cross section with the centre of the arc coinciding with the axis of the shaft supporting said rocking arms, a comb member for holding down the stitches as they are produced, means for reciprocating said comb member, and abutments in connection with the said comb member for stopping the upward movement of latches which enter into the region of the said comb member.
8. In a warp knitting machine, a rockingly supported needle bar, curved latch needles fastened to the said needle bar, means for rocking said needle bar together with said latch needles in a substantially vertical direction, said rocking means comprising a plurality of rocking arms, control levers for moving said rocking arms, a rock shaft rigidlymounting said rocking arms and control levers,
and a needle guide having comb-like arranged laminations at the upper part of said needle guide between which 1aminations uniform distances are provided for the guiding of the needles in their reciprocatory movement.
9. In a warp knitting machine, a rockingly supported needle bar, curved latch needles fastened to the said needle bar, means for rocking said neeedle bar together with said latch needles in a substantially vertical direction, said rocking means comprising a plurality of rocking arms, control levers for moving said rocking arms, a rock shaft rigidly mounting said rocking arms and control levers, a needle guide of substantially plate-shaped formation, a holder fastened to the upper edge of said guide, and distanced laminations secured to the said holder for the guidance of the latch needles during their reciprocatory movement.
10. In a warp knitting machine as claimed in claim 9, in which the said holder is subdivided into a plurality of individual parts.
11. A warp knitting machine as claimed in claim 1, wherein spaced laminations form the comb portion of the needle bed, said laminations being provided with perforations, and means is provided in connection with the said laminations for maintaining the mutual distances therebetween, said last-mentioned means being provided with a rod passing through the perforations in the longitudinal direction of the needle bed.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,165,294 Springthorpe Dec. 21, 1915 1,436,529 Preston Nov: 21, 1929 2,155,145 Morton et al. Apr. 18, 1939 2,333,697 Boaler et al. Nov. 9, 1943 2,504,316 Fontaine Apr. 18, 1950 2,533,061 Sorton Dec. 5, 1950 2,650,486 Hartung Sept. 1, 1953 2,682,163 Staff et al. June 29, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 4,757 Great Britain of 1879 373,744 Germany Apr. 16, 1923 554,968 Germany July 14, 1932
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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2959948A (en) * 1955-02-04 1960-11-15 Hobourn F N F Ltd Flat warp knitting machines
US3008314A (en) * 1957-08-10 1961-11-14 Karl Mayer Erste Hessische Wir Raschel knitting machine
US3063273A (en) * 1958-10-16 1962-11-13 Karl Mayer Erste Hessische Wir Raschel warp knitting machine
US3140592A (en) * 1960-11-02 1964-07-14 Fielderest Mills Inc Apparatus for knitting variant height pile fabrics
US3236067A (en) * 1963-08-24 1966-02-22 Knit All Res Ag Warp knitting machine
US3279219A (en) * 1963-01-31 1966-10-18 Kohl Karl Warp knitting machine
US3491558A (en) * 1967-02-22 1970-01-27 Karl Kohl Needle mechanism for a raschel warp knitting and method of operating the same
US3523431A (en) * 1965-08-18 1970-08-11 Knit All Research Ag Raschel machine
US4169363A (en) * 1977-02-18 1979-10-02 Karl Mayer Textilmaschinen Fabrik Gmbh Latch opening means for warp knitting machine with latch needles

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1165294A (en) * 1912-11-06 1915-12-21 Isaac Springthorpe Lace-knitting machine.
US1436529A (en) * 1920-02-25 1922-11-21 Preston Edward Everard Knitting-machine-needle-knocking-over means
DE373744C (en) * 1923-04-16 Bruno Knobloch Deduction bar for Raschel and similar machines
DE554968C (en) * 1931-05-21 1932-07-14 Adolf Max Mueller Device for attaching chain threads for warp knitting and similar machines
US2155145A (en) * 1936-02-21 1939-04-18 Fnf Ltd Knitting machinery
US2333697A (en) * 1940-02-03 1943-11-09 Celanese Corp Knitting machine
US2504316A (en) * 1944-12-29 1950-04-18 Fontaine Jack Knitting machinery
US2533061A (en) * 1948-04-13 1950-12-05 Whitin Machine Works Warp knitting machine
US2650486A (en) * 1950-04-26 1953-09-01 Sr Hans Hartung Warp knitting machine
US2682163A (en) * 1949-11-17 1954-06-29 Aaron S Staff Trick plate

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE373744C (en) * 1923-04-16 Bruno Knobloch Deduction bar for Raschel and similar machines
US1165294A (en) * 1912-11-06 1915-12-21 Isaac Springthorpe Lace-knitting machine.
US1436529A (en) * 1920-02-25 1922-11-21 Preston Edward Everard Knitting-machine-needle-knocking-over means
DE554968C (en) * 1931-05-21 1932-07-14 Adolf Max Mueller Device for attaching chain threads for warp knitting and similar machines
US2155145A (en) * 1936-02-21 1939-04-18 Fnf Ltd Knitting machinery
US2333697A (en) * 1940-02-03 1943-11-09 Celanese Corp Knitting machine
US2504316A (en) * 1944-12-29 1950-04-18 Fontaine Jack Knitting machinery
US2533061A (en) * 1948-04-13 1950-12-05 Whitin Machine Works Warp knitting machine
US2682163A (en) * 1949-11-17 1954-06-29 Aaron S Staff Trick plate
US2650486A (en) * 1950-04-26 1953-09-01 Sr Hans Hartung Warp knitting machine

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2959948A (en) * 1955-02-04 1960-11-15 Hobourn F N F Ltd Flat warp knitting machines
US3008314A (en) * 1957-08-10 1961-11-14 Karl Mayer Erste Hessische Wir Raschel knitting machine
US3063273A (en) * 1958-10-16 1962-11-13 Karl Mayer Erste Hessische Wir Raschel warp knitting machine
DE1236117B (en) * 1958-10-16 1967-03-09 Mayer Fa Karl Single-barrel Raschel machine with swiveling needle bar
US3140592A (en) * 1960-11-02 1964-07-14 Fielderest Mills Inc Apparatus for knitting variant height pile fabrics
US3279219A (en) * 1963-01-31 1966-10-18 Kohl Karl Warp knitting machine
US3236067A (en) * 1963-08-24 1966-02-22 Knit All Res Ag Warp knitting machine
US3523431A (en) * 1965-08-18 1970-08-11 Knit All Research Ag Raschel machine
US3491558A (en) * 1967-02-22 1970-01-27 Karl Kohl Needle mechanism for a raschel warp knitting and method of operating the same
US4169363A (en) * 1977-02-18 1979-10-02 Karl Mayer Textilmaschinen Fabrik Gmbh Latch opening means for warp knitting machine with latch needles

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