US2724554A - Accounting machine interlocks - Google Patents

Accounting machine interlocks Download PDF

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US2724554A
US2724554A US28118852A US2724554A US 2724554 A US2724554 A US 2724554A US 28118852 A US28118852 A US 28118852A US 2724554 A US2724554 A US 2724554A
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machine
key
hours
card
keys
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Angus G Helgeson
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NCR Corp
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NCR Corp
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06CDIGITAL COMPUTERS IN WHICH ALL THE COMPUTATION IS EFFECTED MECHANICALLY
    • G06C27/00Computing machines characterised by the structural interrelation of their functional units, e.g. invoicing machines

Description

N0V- 22, 1955 A. G. HELGESON 2,724,554
ACCOUNTING MACHINE INTERLOCKS Original Filed Nov. 2l, 1950 8 Sheets-Sheet l da: mi' am x4 8 lNvi-:NToR
ANGus G. HELGEsoN Mz/M %S{TTORNEYS NOV. 22, 1955 A G, HELGESON 2,724,554
ACCOUNTING MACHINE INTERLOCKS Original Filed Nov. 21, 1950 8 Sheets-sheet :5
g Iii FIG 4 l1f 0 `j INVENTOR ANGUS G. HELGESON HIS ATTORNEYS Nov. 22, 1955 A. G. HELGESON 2,724,554
ACCOUNTING MACHINE INTERLOCKS Original Filed Nov. 2l, 1950 S Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG. 5
INVENTOR ANGUS G. HELGESON www HIS ATTORNEYS NUV' 22, 1955 A. G. HELGr-:soN
ACCOUNTING MACHINE INTERLOCKS Original Filed Nov. 21, 1950 INVENTOR ANGUS G. HELGESON BY 5a, g M HIS ATTORNEY NOV' 22, l955 A. G. HELGEsoN 2,724,554
ACCOUNTING MACHINE INTERLOCKS Original Filed Nov. 2l, 1950 8 Sheecs-SheefI 6 INVENTOR ANGUS G. HELGESON *SYM @WWW
HIS ATTORNEYS Nov. 22, 1955 A. G. HELGEsoN ACCOUNTING MACHINE INTERLOCKS original Filed Nov. 21, 195o 8 Sheets-Sheet '7 ww www mx E Ez INVENTOR ANGUS G. HELGESON mmm www
mmm n N OPOS- www mDOI OS HIS ATTORNEYS Nov. 22, 1955 A. G. HELGEsoN 2,724,554
` ACCOUNTING MACHINE INTERLOCKS Original Filed Nov. 21, 1950 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR ANGUS G. HELGESON BYM @u w@ HIS ATTORNEYS United States Patent O ACCOUNTING MACHINE INTERLoCKs Angus G. Helgeson, Birmingham, Mich., assignor to The National Cash Register Company, Dayton, Ohio, a corporation of Maryland Original application November 21, 1950, Serial No. 196,906, now Patent No. 2,682,993, dated `luly 6, 1954. and this application April 8, 1952, Serial No.
5 Claims. (Cl. 23S- 130) This invention relates to accounting machines and similar business machines and is directed particularly to means for speeding up the recording of payroll data and the consequent printing of the payroll checks, and for controlling various mechanisms in the machine in this connection.
The present application constitutes a division of the United States application for Letters Patent of Angus G. Helgeson, Serial No. 196,906, tiled November 21, 1950, now Patent No. 2,682,993.
This invention is especially adapted to be used in machines of the payroll type shown and described in the United States Patent No. 2,467,704, issued April 19, 1949, to Pascal Spurlino, Rudolph J. Moser, Alfred G. Kibler, Marvin D. Frost, and Walter I. Kreider, and for illustrative purposes is embodied in a machine of the type shown in said patent.
This invention is also embodied in machines of the general type shown in the following United States Letters Patent, and reference may be had to them and` to the above-mentioned patent for a complete showing and description of standard mechanism not fully disclosed herein: United States Patents Nos. 1,619,796; 1,747,397; 1,761,542; and 1,916,535, issued March 1, 1927; February 18, 1930; June 3, 1930; and July 4, 1933, respectively, to Bernis M. Shipley; No. 2,175,346, issued October l0, 1939, to Maximilian M. Goldberg; No. 2,141,332, issued December 27, 1938, to Charles H. Arnold; No. 1,693,279, issued November 27, 1928, to Walter l. Kreider; No. 2,305,000, issued December 15, 1942, to Mayo A. Goodbar; No. 2,361,662, issued October 31, 1944, to Pascal Spurlino and Konrad Rauch; No. 2,345,839, issued April 4, 1944, to Pascal Spurlino, Mayo A. Goodbar, and Marvin D. Frost; and No. 2,351,541, issued June 13, 1944, to Everett H. Placke.
The specific machine shown in the above-mentioned Patent No. 2,467,704 embodying the present invention, and as now constructed, is Well adapted for use by any organization Where a large number of payroll checks are to be issued periodically, and particularly Where such organizations wish to keep accurate records of totals of amounts paid to their employees and also a record of various deductions which nowadays are common practice. As is well known, such deductions include Social Security payments, group insurance payments, tax withholdings, union dues, and many other types of deductions, which various organizations permit their employees to make against gross earnings for a definite period.
Accurate records of each of the various types of individual deductions are accumulated in the machine, with the result that the company may at any time definitely ascertain, by means of printed records, the various totals of such deductions and also the totals of the net earnings of the employees, the gross earnings of the employees, and other records relative to the employees.
Other records, such as the total number of regular hours worked and the total number of overtime hours lCC worked, are also accumulated in the machine, so that the company may at any time definitely ascertain, by means of printed records, the number of regular hours paid for and also the number of overtime hours paid for.
The machine is also adapted to print a payroll check, upon the main portion of which are shown the con; secutive number, the date, and the net amount of the check printed in two places; and on the stub portion of the check, which is to be torn off and retained by the employee before he cashes the check, are shown the number of regular hours he Worked, the gross earnings for those regular hours, the number of overtime hours, the gross earnings for the overtime hours, a total of the gross regular hour and overtime hour earnings, and a list of all deductions, showing the amount of each, a symbol for each deduction, and the net pay period. The net pay printed on the stub portion of the check is identical with the net amount which is printed on two places on the main portion of the check.
The machine in which the present invention is embodied is also adapted to print upon a payroll summary sheet, which, for example, may be used for the departmental summary of the employees in any one or more departments. It the departments are too large, the payroll summary may be allotted to various jobs of the departments.
An individual employees earnings record card may also be printed by the machine in which this present invention is embodied. Upon this earnings card, which is divided into columns, there may be printed the number of regular hours the employee works and the number of overtime hours he works; also, the gross amount of earnings for regular hours and the gross amount of earnings for overtime hours may be recorded. The deductions against each employee are also printed and recorded on this particular earnings record card for the individual employee. In the last column on the card, there is a space for a Balance Forward, which is picked up from a former earnings record set up on the keyboard and printed in this column, when a new card is begun for the employee when his old card is lilled,
On the top of the machine there is a time card box, which carries the time cards for each individual employee. On these time cards there is various data relating particularly to the number of regular hours and the number of overtime hours which the employees work. On these cards there are also various types of deductions, which have been mentioned previously and which are recorded thereon by the clerk.
These time cards are adapted to be ejected from the stack upon operation of the Net Pay key.
Mounted on top of the machine and alongside the time card box is also what will be referred to hereinafter as a pattern card box. This pattern card, there being one for each individual employee, has printed on it certain constant figures, which relate to the printing of the payroll check for this particular employee. This employees time clock card and his pattern card are side by side, one in the time card box and one in the pattern card box, and other employees time cards and pattern cards are stacked successively, so that a corresponding pattern card for the same employee will be ejected each time a time clock card is ejected. This pattern card shows, on the left, the number of hours worked. The next column shows the base pay for that number of hours, which base pay has been figured according to the rate which the employee gets per hour. Near the bottom of the card are shown the employees name, his check number, and his hourly rate, which in the example and illustration given here is $1.295 per hour. The employees name is on the time clock card. In the third column from the left, there are figures which show the overtime pay. The
next column shows the O. A. B. deductions at the rate of 1%. The next column shows the withholding tax to be deducted.
The next four columns show various net pays for this particular individual, according to the number of hours which he has worked and according to the deductions which he has had against his pay for that week. The left-hand Net Pay column shows the net pay with no other deductions outside of the O. A. B. and the withholding tax. The second Net Pay column shows the amount of net pay for the employee when union ducs have been deducted, in addition to the income tax and O. A. B. The third Net Pay column, which is the second from the right, shows the net pay to which the employee is entitled after his insurance premium has been taken out, along with his withholding tax and O. A. B., and the right-hand Net Pay column shows what his net pay will be when his hospitalization is taken out, along with the withholding tax and O. A. B.
As above mentioned, this pattern card is ejected upon the depression of the Net Pay key, which causes the employees net pay to be printed on the check which has been inserted into the machine.
This pattern card is divided into groups of hours, and the front of the pattern card box is so arranged that only the proper line which is to be used by the operator in computing the employees pay is to be read. This is to be accomplished by lighting a lamp, the selection of which is controlled by the number of hours an employee has worked, and which is under the control of the keys on the machine in the hourly banks.
It is thought that it would be well at this point to describe briey the sequence of a normal operation of the machine.
First, a group of clock cards for a particular department is inserted into the clock card box, which is located, as above mentioned, on the top of the machine. Then a corresponding number of pattern cards for these same employees is inserted into the pattern card box, which is normally located on top of the machine, just to the left of the clock card box. This pattern card box is provided with the same type of feeler mechanism with which the clock card box is provided, which will assure the operator that a pattern card goes out of the pattern card box every time the clock card mechanism is operated to eject the clock card. If a card does not go down, a light is lighted on the face of the pattern card box, and the current from the machine is shut off. Thus, when the current is shut off, the operator can tell, from whichever light goes on, which box failed to eject the card. Therefore, by proving, through the light system, that a card goes down in each box each operation, it insures that a proper sequence of cards will be maintained between the two stacks of cards, so that the clock card and the pattern card for the same employee will always be the front card in each of the respective boxes. As above mentioned, the name of the employee and his clock number are on the clock card and are visible to the operator; the name of the employee is on the pattern card, and also the rate per hour shows on this pattern card.
Having placed the two sets of cards in the two boxesthat is, the clock card box and the pattern card boxthe operator first will pick up all of the old balances appearing on the earnings card for this particular employee, which earnings card is taken from the regular payroll tile. She will first pick up the balance of the withholding tax and, at the same time she is making these pickups, will insert the check into the check chute ready to be printed upon at the proper time. The last pickup should be the earnings-to-date pickup, and at this time she should record the total hours on the left side of the keyboard. Just before the operation of the machine, she will insert the earnings card in the machine, on the printing table, and therefore the total hours will be printed on the earnings card and on the check in this operation.
At the same time, the regular differential mechanism in the machine for the three banks of hour keys will control three light switches and move them into position which will set up the right type of an electrical circuit to cause the proper line to be selected on the pattern box, moving the face or the box to the right position and illuminate the proper lamp in order that the correct line is selected. The total hours are accumulated on this operation together with a total o the earnings to date, in their respective totalizers.
The total number of hours accumulated in the machine 'for each payroll division is ter cheu ed against a prclisted accumulation of hor rom the clock cards in order to prove that the right hour keys were selected and, therefore, proving that the correct line was selected on tue pattern boi-L. Vrrhus, as a result of the movement of the light switches under control of the hours keys, which was brought about by setting of the proper hours on those hours keys, the pattern box mechanism selects and nates the proper line on the face of tbc card acig to the hours recorded. Reading from that illuminated line on the pattern the operator will then record the total amount of ase pay and the totai overtime hours and earnings (t there are any), the total amount of the O. A. B. tax, t withholding tax, and whajever xed deduction is being deducted for that week, provided this employee has such deduction to be made. The het amount, depending upon the fixed deduction applicable to this employee, appears in one of the Net Pay columns and should be visible at all times. The operator then records whichever net pay is visibie, either the one for the fixed deduction factor being deducted that week, or one without any fixed deduction, depending upon whether or not that type of deduction is applicable to that particular employee whose check is being written.
rThe l'l key, .vhich is used to record the amount of the net pay in this case, causes such amount to be deducted from the crc-ssooter and causes that amo= at to bc printed on the main portion and on the stub potion of thc check, as well as on the journal sheet, thus completing the check` and ejecting the same, as well actuating both the clock card box and the pattern card box, causing the clock card and the pattern card to be ejected so as to bring to view the clock card and the pattern card for thc next employee whose che-ck is to be written.
The routine of the sequence ot' operations on the payroll machines or' the type shown in the above-mentioned Patent No. 2,467,704 calls for the use of the .v'ithholding ri`ax Pickup key lrst on every check, and it, therefore, requires the operator to press the key regardless o whether or not there is any withholding tax to pick up. This withholding tax key then serves the purpose of signaling the operator as to whether' or not the previous check written was written correctly.
if the operator is able to pick up the amount of withholding tax with that pickup key, tri-en she knows that the previous check was completed correctly. It' the withholding tax key is locked on this operation, that means tha there was still some amount remaining in the crossfooter, thus giving evidence of the fact that the previous check was not correctly written.
Should such a thing occur, the operator would then remove the last check from the check compartment: underneath the machine, place it in the check chute upside down, and hit or depress the Net Pay key, which would cause the machine to clear the amount of the ditlcrence out of the crossfooter and print that amount, which is the net amount of the error, on the back of this check. The operator would then lay aside this check for correction at a later time, and the machine, together with the crossfooter, would be automatically adjusted back to zero; thus the withholding tax key would be unlocked. lf any condition should leave the crossfooterv at zero and 4locked up as a resultof being on thesubtract side, provisionis made to release this lock on the next pickup operation of the Withholding tax key.
There is shown in connection with this application a patterncard which provides five fixed patterns for 39.9, 39.8, 39.7, 39.6, and 39.5 hours. This chart provides six patterns for every even hour from up to 48 hours. In addition to that, it provides a special pattern chart at the bottom, showing earnings patterns for each .1 hour from 0 hours up to 2 hours.
In addition to providing the earnings for these various hours, it also provides a chart of proof factors forthe same units of hours. It is this additional section of the pattern card, together with ythe proper setup on the machine, which makes theadditional spread of 500 patterns possible.
The machine is constructed with an operating key, special key No. 1, which will cause any amount recorded on the keyboard to accumulate in the total, and which non-prints all amounts and non-spaces all of the records.
Another special key, named special key No. 2, is a non-operating key, which, when depressed together withany operating key, allows that operating key to function as it normally does, but also causes the amount previously accumulated in total key No. 1 to transfer automatically into the accumulator controlled by the operat ing key and print on all of the records, as determined by the operating key.
Such mechanism for controlling the selection and operation of the totals and the transfer of totals is fully illustrated and described in the above-mentioned patents.
Whenever an operator sets up the hours on the left side of the keyboard and the earnings on the right side of the keyboard, and no line is selected or illuminated on the pattern box, she then knows that she does not havethat pattern as an active pattern on the card.
Now let us assume, for example, that the number of hours recorded was 34.6 hours. No line will be illuminated, and therefore the operator will press a special key No. 3, which will not retain but will select and illuminate Athe line for the 34-hour pattern, and it will also light a special lamp for the lower chart. Thus, there will be two lamps illuminated on the pattern card box at the same time, the lower` lamp illuminating the special chart at the bottom, and the upper lamp illuminating the line for the 34 hours worked.
The operator will set up $44.03 in the special key No. 1, which amount will be accumulated into that total. She will then read from her special chart at the bottom of the pattern card, which amount appears in the position for .6 hour, which is the difference between 34 hours and 34.6 hours. This amount is .78 cents, whichshe will record on the keyboard; then she will press the special key No. 1. The operator then pressesspecial key No. 2 first, and, immediately after, she will press the proper earnings key, which in this case will be the key marked Straight Time. That would be $44.81, which is the amount accumulated in the Special Total No'. 2, to print as a regular earnings entry on all records, and accumulate in the Earnings Total, and add the earnings to the crossfooter. The operator then records the O. A. B., tax, but she will see from the position of the 78 cents on the chart that she is supposed to add one cent to the O. A. B, tax and 10 cents to the withholding tax.
Therefore, when she records the O. A. B. tax, instead of recording 44 cents, she will record 45 cents, and the withholding tax, instead of recording $2.80, which appears on the line for the 34-hour premium, she will record $2.90, which is the $2.80 plus the extra 10 cents. The operator will then read the proper Net Pay' ligure appearing on the pattern card for 34 hours. In this case, it would be $40.79. She will record that amount on the keyboard yand press the `special ykey No. 1, whichy will accumulate such amount.
She will then read from they special chart at thebottom of the pattern card the amount of the balancing factor forethefadjustment. In this case, that amount is 67 cents. Having recorded this amount also through the special key No. 1, she will press the special key No. 2, followed by the K Net Pay key. This K Net Pay key functions as it normally does, causing the amount to be printed on the check for the total amount in the accumulator of special key No. 1. That amount will: be transferred into the totalizer associated with the K key, subtracted from the crossfooter, and printed on allrecords, and the amount so printed will be $41.46.
Upon the operation of the Net Pay key, the check Will be ejected and stacked, and the operator then proceeds to write the next payroll check.
During the writing of the above check for 34.6 hours, $44.03 and 78 cents, making a total of $44.81, were added to the crossfooter. The O. A. B. of 45 cents, the withholding tax of $2.90, and the net pay of $40.79 for 34 hours, and the net pay of 67 cents for .6 hour, making a total of $44.81, will be subtracted from the gross pay of $44.81, leaving the crossfooter at Zero, which proves that all computations have been made correctly, and therefore the operator may proceed in the writing of the next check.
If an error had been made during the printing of the above check, the machine would have been locked by mechanism well known in the art, under control of the crossfooter when the latter is not at zero. One form of such mechanism is shown in the Rudolph I. Moser Patent No. 2,417,563.
The machine is also provided with an electrical contact switch, which feels the position of the diiierential mechanism associated with the thousand-dollar bank of keys. When the thousand-dollar bank is in the zero position, or in the No. 1 or No. 2 position of the bank, the differential will cause the switch to remain open, thus preventing any contact from taking place. However, when the diierential for that bank is in the position to record $3,000.00 or more, the differential causes the switch to close, thus sending an electrical signal toV a red lamp located on top of the machine, and, when this lamp is illuminated on the clearing of the earnings-to-date total, the operator of the machine will know that the particular employee has just completed earnings of $3,000.00 or more. Thus she will split the amount of the O. A. B. Tax on that particular check. When the operator comes to record the amount of the split O. A. B. tax in a case of this kind, she will look at the dials, which show the total, and read the amount in excess of $3,000.00. For example, let us say that we are Writing a check in which the earnings of the employee for this particular week were $100.00, and that the previous earningsto-date picked up were $2,970.00. Therefore, when the new balance of the earnings-to-date is extended, a red lamp is illuminated, and the operator will see by the total indicator dials $3,070.00, indicating that $70.00 of the earnings were not taxable for O. A. B. purposes.
The operator, therefore, records 70 cents in special key No. 1 totalizer, which will non-print all of the records and accumulate a total of that 70 cents, and then she will record 30 cents, which was to be collected as a tax, through the regular O. A. B. key, in this particular case key No. 22, marked F. She will then continue on with the remainder of her checks. Thus let us assume, for example, that there is no Withholding tax on this particular check, and normally, if the O. A. B. tax were to be deducted, the net check, as indicated on the pattern card, calls for $99.00 net pay. When it is time to record the net pay, the operator will record the $99.00, in this case not through the K key but through the special key No. 1. She will then press the special key No. 2, following with depression of the K key. That will cause the accumulation of the special key No. 1 to be printed on :the check and all of the records and subtracted from "7 the crossfooter, and complete the check for $99.70, which is the correct amount of the net pay.
In this case, the machine has again proved the accuracy of the computation. Through the use of the line lock proof, the machine here proves that each one of the amounts of earnings, deductions, etc., was correctly entered, and also proves that the operator made the correct split in the O. A. B. tax, because she read the rst amount from the total reading dial in the machine, and the second amount, which was a mental calculation of the difference, must be correct, in order to make the machine balance. Therefore, the machine provides 100% accuracy, even though there are mental calculations involved in an operation of this type.
Whenever the red signal is lit, warning of a split O. A, B. tax of this type, the same electrical impulse is used to actuate a type wheel in the journal sheet section of the machine, which prints a clearly-visible symbol, which will stand out so that it can be seen at a glance. The purpose of this symbol is to assist the balancing clerk in her audit. When she secures the journal sheet from the payroll of the machine operator, together with the pattern card and other records, she will glance down the sheet, providing that it is the right time of year to expect employees to go over the $3,000.00 earning point, and she will be able to audit the sheet in order to determine if any special signals appear on the journal sheet.
Wherever she nds such a special printed signal appearing on the journal sheet, she will look for the pattern card for that particular employee and see to it that said card is turned around or turned over, so that the back of the card faces the front, because the back of the pattern card has the same calculations which appear on the front. with the exclusion of the O. A. B. calculations.
The electrical hook-up in this particular case on the $3,000.00 mechanism is made in such a manner that it takes into consideration the earnings-to-date pickup key on the machine as well as the clearing key for the earnings-to-date. In other words, if the $3,000.00 in the machine comes about as a result of adding suicient earnings to the earnings-to-date pickup to make $3,000.00, then a lamp is illuminated, indicating this condition to the operator. However, if the pickup of the earnings-to-date is $3,000.00 or more, then this mechanism also causes the machine to lock the O. A. B. key so that it will be impossible to record any O. A. B. tax on the check.
This electrical hook-up also actuates a relay when the $3,000.00 amount is secured on the pickup key, and no red light will be lit on the machine in such a condition.
The mechanism of the pattern card box also provides for holding the electrical selection, which has been made on the pickup of the carnings-to-date, throughout the eutire writing of the check, eliminating any possibility of interference which might occur from any source. For example, the hours keys will be used again on the recording of the overtime hours, in which case a movement will be given to the wipe switches, setting up a new selection.
However, an electrical hookup is provided in order that there will be no interference with the previous selection at the time the total hours are recorded. A relay is used in the circuit to disconnect the previously-selected hookup at the time the clock card boxes are actuated. In other words, when either one of the Net Pat keys is used, and the electrical impulse is given to the pattern card box and to the clock card box, these same impulses are used to actuate a relay which cuts off all the power which was locking the electrical selection, so that the line selection will be completely wiped out on the net pay operation, and the face of the pattern card box is hooked up with the mechanism which pushes the pattern card down, so that, when the pattern card box is actuated, the mechanism in this box will restore the face of the pattern card box to its home position from whatever position it has been previously selected.
In connection with payroll operations, there are certain conditions where unusual deductions or earnings adjustments are made, for which there has been no previous pattern set up. For example, many employees might be atfected by a Community Chest deduction on a payroll, which would make it impossible to complete the pattern and to use any one of the net pay figures. In order to accomplish this type of setup etiiciently, provision is made on the machine to construct one of the totalizing keys in the total row to function as an indicating balance key. In other words, when that key is pressed, it will sub-total the crosstooter without printing on any of the records or spacing any of the records, and only indicating the amount of the net pay in the visible total dials in the front of the machine.
Then, when the operator of the machine completes the writing of the check from the pattern card up to the point of inserting the amount of the special deduction or addition, and just prior to recording that amount on the machine, the operator will press the indicating balance key and then will check the amount which appears in the visible total dials with the amount of the correct net pay visible on the pattern card. Thus, she will prove visibly that the payroll has been written correctly up to that point. She will record the amount of the special deduction adjustment in one of the special deduction or addition keys on the machine and complete the check by pressing the Net Pay key, which clears the crossfooter and prints the amount of the net pay on all of the records-namely, thc check, the stub of the check, and the check register-and eject and stack the check as on the normal payroll machine operation of the type of machine shown and described in the abovementioned Patent No. 2,467,704.
For the purpose of illustrating one form of the present invention, the machine shown herein is constructed to perform the functions above stated, when used in connection with a machine similar to that shown in the abovementioned Spurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704, which machine is constructed primarily for the purpose of payroll work.
It is, therefore, one object of this invention to provide an accounting machine for distributing items into a plurality of classification totals, and also to provide the necessary crossfooters or add-subtract totalizers for obtaining the proper totals and balances of the various necessary items, in order to produce a payroll check and the necessary records in connection therewith.
Another object of the present invention is to provide patterncards having prccalculated amounts used in connection with the production of payroll checks, which pattern cards show the total hours, gross pay, various de ductions, and net pay amounts, according to the various deductions which have been taken from the gross pay.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a pattern card box for holding the cards so that they can be properly read by the operator while she is preparing the check to be printed by the machine.
A further object of the present invention is to provide means in the machine to signal the operator when the employees gross pay has reached the amount of $3,000.00, so that no further O. A. B. tax deductions will be taken from his pay after such amount has been reached.
` A still further object of the invention is to provide an electrical device associated with the differential mechanism of the hours keys, which electrical device will light up a signal light for the operator whenever the employees gross pay amount has reached $3,000.00 or more.
A further object of the present invention is to provide means associated with the thousand-dollar bank of keys and its differential mechanism which will control the machine to signal the operator that the employees gross pay has reached the sum of $3,000.00 or more.
A further object of the present invention is to lock the machine against operation of the O. A. B. key whenever the employees gross amount has reached $3,000.00 or has exceeded that sum.
With these and incidental objects-in vien/the invention includes certain novel features of construction and com? binations of parts, a preferred form or embodiment of which is hereinafter described with reference tothe drawingswhich accompany and form apart of this specification.
In the drawings:
Fig. l is a diagrammatic view of the keyboard of they machine used in connection wtih the present invention, which keyboard is to control a machine of the type illustrated and described in the above-mentionedSpurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704.
Fig. 2 shows an employees pattern card with precalculated amounts of net pay for amounts of from 2 to 48 hours. This pattern card is broken down into tenths of hours with relation to the 39-hour periods.
Fig. 3 is a View showing the switch mechanism in connection with the differential mechanism contro1led=by the thousand-dollar bank to cause a lamp to light whenever the. employees gross pay has reached $3,000.00 or more.
Fig. 4 is a detail sectional View through one of the hour banks of the machine, showing the wipeswitches in connection with this bank for selecting the proper line of the pattern card, according to the positioning of the wipe switch under control of the hour keys.
Fig. 5 is a front elevation of the pattern card'box.
Fig. 6 is a left side elevation of the pattern cardbox, showing the magnets for causing the shifting of the box face or front to select the proper group line according to the number of hour keys depressed;
Fig. 7 is a right side elevation of the pattern card box, showing the means for restoring the box face or front to normal position at the end of the writing of the pay check.
Fig. 8 is a wiring diagram showing the controls for the pattern card box for lighting the proper lamp of a certain group of lines, and shows the solenoidsor electric magnets for selectingfor adjusting the pattern card box base, dependent upon the group of keys which `is depressedin the hour banks.
Fig. 9 shows the mechanism forlocking the F. O. A. B. key when the earnings-to-date pickup is $3,000.00 or more.
General description Described in general terms, the machine embodying the present inventionl is of the general type disclosed in the above-mentioned Shipley and Goldberg'patents and particularly the patent to Spurlino et al., No. 2,467,704. These patents all disclose a plurality of totalizers into which may be distributed Various amounts, according to the business system forwhich the machinelis being built. The Spurlino et al. patent last mentionedv is used particularly for payroll work, and the totalizers are adapted to receive the many and various items constituting individual transactions that are handled in the process of making out payroll checks.
The abovementioned Shipley and Goldbergpatents also disclose what are known in the art as addv and subtract totalizers or crossfooters, by which name they have come to be known, from which balances-may be printed at any` tlme.
To control the printing of the various printing media, the machine has four rows of control keys4 and 15 banks of amount keys, as shown diagrammatically in Fig.` 1. The amount keyboard is what is knownk inthe art asa split keyboard. The rst six rows of amount keys on the left side control amounts to be addedvinto the left-'hand' side of the split totalizers, and the nine banks to the right of this indicated split control amounts to be added into the right-hand side of the split totalizer.
The machine as shown in the last-mentioned Spurlino et al. patent is adapted to print on an earnings record card to the right of the machine, on a check near the center of the machine, and on a payroll summary, whichl is l matic form in Fig. 1.
adapted "tobe'e fed andfprinted upon aty the left of` the machine.
TheA four rows of controlkeys. at the/right side of the keyboard control the selection of the-columns and the selection of the various line spaces in thecolumns to receive the printed data according to the several operations of the machiner necessary to complete a payroll check writing and issuing` transaction.
The number of operations, of course, varies with the number of types of earnings tobe credited to each employee andalso Varies with they number of deductions chargeable against the gross earnings of each employee. As has been previously stated, the time clock card box and the pattern card box are located on top of the machine, and stacks of pattern cards and. stacks of time clock cards are put in the respective boxes in proper sequence, according to employees. yIn other words, the iii-st card of each stack will be for thel same employee, the second card for the next employee, and so on through the stack, and, upon depression of the Net Pay key, which is the nal operation of writing an employees payroll check, these cards 'are simultaneously ejected from the respective boxes to present to view the second card in each box. The line of the pattern card to be selected is under control of the keys headed Hours in Fig. l, the keys depressed in the hours bankdetermining which of the lines of thev pattern card are to be selected, causingk a shifting of the front or face of the pattern card box to select the proper linein the group after the group has been selected. Y
Detailed description The keyboard of the machinel is shown in diagramamount keys 60 to the left of a permanent split, indicated by a dotted line, and to the right of this split there are nine. rows or. banks of amount keys 61. This gives a registering and accumulating capacity of six banks to the left of, the split and nine banks to the right of the split for the totalizers inl the machine, which are split according to the permanent split between the keys 60 and 61, in a manner well known in the art.
To the right of the amount keys 60 and 61 are four rows of control keys designated Row 1, Row 2, Row 3, and Row 4. Keys 62 of row 1 are operating keys; that is, they release the machine for actuation when depressed. Key 63 is anon-operating key and is used in conjunction with the X Earnings-to-date key of row 2. The top three keys 64 of row 1 are non-operating keys and are used to select the totalizers corresponding to the keys of rows 2, 3, and 4 during clearing operations.
The keys of row 2 are designated-65, the keys of row 3 are designated 66, and the keys of row 4 are designated 67.
The X', Y, and Z keys 65 of row 2y are used to pick up the totals of the Earningsfto-Date, Bond-Balance-to- Date, and Tax-to-Date, respectively, prior to the writing of an individual payroll check. The remaining keys in this bank are used during analysis operations. The functions of the three bottom keys of row 2 have been previously mentioned generally and will be more fully given later on.
The K Net Pay key 66 of row 3 is used to make the iinal printing of the net pay on the employees check. The remaining keys, L to U, in this row 3 are used to set up the various deductions which may be applicable to any employee. v
The keys 67 of row 4, marked A to I, are used in connection with the writing of the payroll, according yto the designation of the keysfoppositel the letters.
The keys of rows 2, 3, and 4 select various totalizers in the machine in the manner-which hasbeen. fully illustrated and described in the previously-mentioned Spurlino et al. Patent No. 21,467,704'.
There are six rows or banks ofk Differential mechanism for hours and amount banks The differential mechanism for each of the key banks 60 and each of the key banks 61 are identical, and in Fig. 4 there is shown a cross section of the machine alongside one of the banks of keys 60. This differential mechanism, as above mentioned, being identical with the differential mechanism for the amount keys, it is thought that a description of this dilerential mechanism will suflice for all banks of amount keys and hours keys.
Moreover, the key bank frames for the keys 60 and 61 are identical, as is the zero stop mechanism for these differential banks of keys, and therefore the description of the bank of keys 60 and its supporting framework, shown in Fig. 4, will sutlice for all.
The keys 60, which are used in this case to record the number of hours worked, are mounted in the usual key frame 71, supported by rods 72 and 73, which in turn are supported by machine side frames 74 (only one of which is shown). The keys all cooperate with a detent 75, having a flattened pin 76, which retains the key in its depressed position, as fully illustrated and described in the above-mentioned Shipley patents.
This detent 75 is pivoted to an arm 77, which, through a pin 78, on an arm 79, and a shaft 80, rocks a zero stop pawl 81 for this particular denomination counterclockwise out of the path of a reset spider 82, free on a hub of an amount differential actuator 83, rotatably supported by a hub 84, extending between two similar amount diierential support plates 85 (only one shown) in turn supported by rods 86, extending between and supported by the machine side frames 74. There is a pair of support plates 85 for each amount differential, and a tie rod 87 extends through the holes in the center of the hubs 84 to secure all of the amount differentials in a compact unit. The reset spider 82 has, in its forward end, a slot which engages a stud 91 in a bell crank 92, pivoted on an extension of a differential actuator 83. This bell crank 92 is connected by a link 93 to a latch arm 94, which is pivoted on the differential actuator 83. The upper end of the arm 94 has a foot 95, which cooperates with a shoulder 96 on a driver 97, which receives a regular excursion clockwise and then counterclockwise to its normal position each operation of the machine. A spring 98 holds the foot 95 of the latch arm 94 in engagement with the driver 97. The driver 97 is pivoted on the hub 84 of the diiferential actuator 83 and is connected by a link 99 to a lever 100, pivoted on a stud 101, supported by the plate 85. The lever 100 carries rollers 102 and 103, which cooperate, respectively, with the peripheries of companion plate cams 104 and 105, secured to a main drive shaft 106. This main drive shaft 106 receives its motion by the usual mechanism, which is fully illustrated and described in the abovementioned Shipley patents, but which is not shown herein.
Depression of any one of the keys 60 moves its lower end into the path of a forward extension 111 of the bell crank 92, and operation of the machine causes the cams 104 and 105, as previously described, to make one complete revolution in adding and/ or subtracting operations, to rock the lever 100 and the driver 97 clockwise, whereupon the latch foot 95 carries the differential actuator 83 and the spider 82 clockwise in unison therewith until the extension 111 of the bell crank 92 engages the end of the depressed key 60. When this occurs, the bell crank 92 is rocked counter-clockwise, whereupon the link 93 rocks the latch arm 94 counter-clockwise, disengages the foot 95 from the shoulder 96 of the driver 97, and causes a nose 112 on the extension of the link 93 to engage with the proper one of a series of alining notches 113. These notches 113 correspond to the differential positions of the differential actuator 83 and are cut in a plate 114, supported by extensions of the plate 85 and the front tie rod 86. This positions the differential actuator 83 according to the Value of the depressed key 60, without interfering with the oscillating movement of the driver l2 97 and connected parts. After the latch arm 94 is disengaged from the shoulder 96 and the driver 97, an arcuate surface 115 on the periphery of the driver 97, in cooperation with the sole of the foot 95, locks the latch in the corresponding notch 113 to retain the diferential mechanism in set position.
When lever 100 reaches or nears the terminus of its clockwise initial movement, a roller 120, carried thereby, engages the under surface 121 of a beam 122, pivotally mounted on the diierential actuator 83, and forces an arcuate upper surface of the beam to contact with an undercut portion of the hub 84 to position said beam 122 in proportion to the value of the depressed key 60. The rear end of the beam 122 embraces a stud 123 of a link 124 pivotally connected at its upper end to an alining segment 125, secured to one of the nested sleeves 126 mounted on the shaft 127, supported by the side frames 74. This aliner segment has alining notches 128 to cooperate with an aliner 129 mounted on a shaft 130. This aliner alines all amount differential actuators 83.
At its lower end, the link 124 is also pivotally connected to a printer-positioning segment (not shown herein) to set up and control the printing mechanism to print amounts according to the keys depressed, which has been fully illustrated and described in the above-mentioned Shipley patents.
The mechanism described above transmits the differential positioning of the beam 122 to the segments 125, so that at each operation of the machine the segment 125 is set and left set in the position according to the key 60 which has been depressed.
The positioning of this segment 125 controls the positioning of wipe switches, which will be described hereinafter and which are connected to the hours bank.
The machine is provided with the usual cabinet or casing 135, a portion of which is shown in Figs. 4, 6, and 7. This casing is provided with the usual openings, closed by hinged covers and provided with locks to prevent any unauthorized persons from tampering with any of the mechanisms of the machine.
Dz'erentally controlled switches for line selection on the pattern card Associated with each of the hours banks of keys 60 is a differentially-controlled switching mechanism for the purpose of selecting the proper line of the pattern card under control of the number of hours which the employee has worked. Only one of these switching mechanisms is shown in mechanical detail, this being in Fig. 4. The remaining switches are shown diagrammatically on the wiring diagram in Fig. 8. The one in Fig. 4 is associated with the units hours bank and will now be described.
Mounted on the cabinet 135, above the units hours key 60, is a casing 140, carrying a plate 141 of insulating material, upon which are supported pairs of electrical terminals 142, mounted one on each side of the plate 141. 'I'hese pairs of electrical terminals are arranged in positions corresponding to the 0 to 9 positions of the differential mechanism. 'Ihe terminals 142 are held in place by a pair of insulating plates 143, one of which yis secured on each side of the plate 141. Cooperating with the pairs of terminals 142 is a pair of wipers 144 (only one of which is shown), which are connected together and carried by but insulated from an arm 145, secured to the differentially positionable alining segment 125 associated with this units of hours bank of keys 60.
It will be recalled that this alining segment 125 is differentially positioned by the beam link 124 under control of the differential mechanism, which in turn is controlled by the keys 60 in this particular bank. Consequently, when the segment 125 is diierentially positioned, the arm is likewise positioned to move the pair of wiping contacts 144 to the position corresponding to the differential setting of the member 125, under control of the beam link 124, the beam 122, and the differential mechanism, the ultimate position of which is determined by the key 60 which has been depressed.
$3,000.00 switch mechanism As has been previously mentioned, the machine is provided with an electrical switch, which feels the position of the diiierential mechanism associated with the $1,000.00 bank of keys 61, so that, when the differential mechanism for this $1,000.00 bank of keys is in a position to record $3,000.00 or more, this particular differential causes the electric switch to close, thus sending an electrical signal to a red lamp located on top of the machine. When this lamp is lighted on the clearing or extension of the earnings-to-date total, the operator of the machine will know that the particular employee has just completed earnings of $3,000.00 or more. In this case, the operator will split the amount of the O. A. B. tax on that particular check, depending upon the amount of the mans earnings, whether it be exactly $3,000.00 or above $3,000.00.
The above condition arises when, for example, the pickup was $2,970.00 and the man earned for that particular week $100.00, which would make his total earnings $3,070.00. Then the amount of O. A. B. to be deducted would be split according to the amount which was necessary to reach the $3,000.00 mark; or, in other words, the1 O. A. B. would be taken on the amount of $30.00 on y.
This particular switch also operates on the pickup of the earnings-to-date, whenever the amount of the earnings-to-date is $3,000.00 or more. In such a case, the O. A. B. key 67 is locked, so that it is impossible to record any O. A. B. tax in connection with such a check.
This switch mechanism is shown in Fig. 3 and will now be described. Alongside the alining segment 125, which is associated with the $1,000.00 bank of keys, is a permanently-mounted bracket 150. Mounted on the bracket 1:70, by means of a switch block 151, is a switch 152, composed of blades 153 and 154. The blade 154 is resting on an insulating block 155, carried by the stationary bracket 150. Pivoted to the stationary bracket at 156 is an arm 157, made of insulating material, which arm carries an insulating block 158, having a curved bottom surface. This block 158 cooperates with a stud 159, carried by the alining segment 125 of this $1,000.00 amount bank. The block 158 is normally held in contact with the stud 159 by a spring 160, mounted on the switch 1clock 151.
In Fig. 3, the alining segment 125 and all of the parts are shown in the Zero position. When this alining segment 12S is in its zero position, or has been set to its l position or to the 2 position, the stud 159, of course, is moved downwardly, and the spring 160 causes the block 158 to follow the stud, thus rocking the arm 157 clockwise a corresponding distance, which, however, is not sufficient to cause the closing of the switch 1.52. However, when the segment 125 reaches the 3 position, the stud 153 then permits the block 158, under the influence of the spring 160, to be moved farther downwardly, thus rocking the arm 157 a distance sutlicient to cause it to bear on the switch blade 153 and cause this blade to contact the blade 154 and thus close the switch 152. When this occurs, a circuit is set up, which will be described later, to light up, as previously described, a red lamp 161, shown in Fig. 4, to indicate to the operator of the machine that the person whose payroll check is being written has in his earnings-to-date for the year reached the amount of $3,000.00 or more.
Dyerential mechanism for control bank l114 in connection with the control keys in the present application, and reference may be had to this patent for illustration and description of such mechanisms.
Totalzers The machine shown in this application has the three usual lines of totalizers, numbered 1, 2, and 3 in Fig. 4. As before stated, the totalizers on each of these lines are split between the keys 60 and 61 (Fig. l); that is, there is no transfer mechanism between the totalizer wheels associated with the rst left-hand bank of keys 61 and the rst right-hand bank of keys 60 in connection with their respective differential mechanisms.
The No. l line (Fig. 4) has on the right-hand side of the split a balance totalizer or crossfooter, and also one straight adding totalizer. On the left of the split, the totalizer line may have two adding totalizers on it, such as that described in the above-mentioned Spurlino Patent No. 2,467,704.
The No. 3 or front totalizer line, which is controlled by the key 66 of row 3, has nine totalizers on each side of the split, one for each of the keys K to U, and one in the zero position, herein called the GT3 totalizer.
The rear or No. 2 totalizer line has nine adding totalizers on each side of the split, one for each of the keys A to I, and also one in the zero position, called the GT4 totalizer.
The No. 1 or upper totalizer line has crossfooters and also regular adding totalizers thereon, as above mentioned. Such construction is illustrated in United States patent issued on May 8, 1945, to Pascal Spurlino, William M. Carroll, Arthur R. Colley, and Alfred G. Kibler, No. 2,375,594. 1f any further information is needed or desired with reference to such totalizer lines, having crossfooters and straight adding totalizers thereon, reference may be had to that patent.
The crossfooter on the upper or No. l line (Fig. 4), which is the crossfooter at the right of the split, is indicated by the reference number 16S. The totalizers on the No. 2 or back line are numbered 166. This number applies to the totalizers on both sides of the split. The totalizers on the front or No. 3 line are numbered 167, and this number likewise applies to the totalizers on both sides of the split.
Totalizers of this type are old and well known in the art, are known as interspersed totalizers, and are fully illustrated and described in the above-mentioned Shipley patent. Therefore, no further description of the construction of these totalizers is felt necessary herein.
As usual in machines of this type, the actuators 83 are divided into three tooth sections, numbered 168, 169, and 170. The section 16S actuates the crossfooter and also the regular totalizers on the No. l or upper totalizer line, the section 169 actuates the totalizers 166 on the No. 2 or rear line, and the tooth section 170 actuates the totalizers 167 on the front or No. 3 line.
In adding operations, the wheels of the selected totalizer or totalizers, as the case may be, are engaged with their respective sets of actuating tooth sections 16E, 16S?, and 170 of the actuators 53, after the actuators have completed their setting movements in a clockwise direction, under control of the keys 60 and 61, as is usual.
In subtract operations, corresponding subtract wheels of the crossfooter 1.65 are engaged with the tooth sections 168 of the actuator 83, exactly the same as in adding operations, and the return movement of the actuator reversely rotates the adding wheels of the crossfooter, through the reverse gearing, which is Well known in the art and shown in several of the above-mentioned Shipley patents and also in the Spurlino, Carroll, Colley, and Kibley Patent No. 2,375,594. f
Counterclockwise return movement of the actuators 83, as explained above, rotates the corresponding wheels of the selected and engaged totalizer or totalizers in proportion to the value of the depressed keys 60 and 61, to
1-5 enter into said totalizers the amounts corresponding to the keys which have been depressed.
If no amount key 61 is depressed, the zero stop pawl 81 remains in the path of the spider 82 upon the initial movement of the actuator 83 and engages said spider and disengages the latch 95 from the driver 97 to arrest the actuator 83 in the zero position. After the actuator 83 is positioned at zero, the roller 120 positions the beam 122, the link 124, and the segments 125 in proportion thereto, as is well known in the art.
At the end of every type of operation, the actuator 83 is always returned to home position, as shown in Fig. 4. However, the links 124 and the printing mechanisms controlled thereby, and also the segments 125, remain in set positions at the end of each machine operation and are moved directly from these positions to their new positions in the succeeding operations of the machine, through the beam mechanism, which is old and well known in the art and is often referred to as the minimum movement device. The usual transfer mechanism is provided for entering one unit in the next higher order of the totalizers, when the lower order totalizcr wheel passes through zero in either positive or negative direction.
The mechanism for engaging the totalizers with the actuators and disengaging them from the actuators during adding, subtracting, reading, totalizing, or transfer total operations is not shown in this application, but, for a description of such mechanism and its operation, reference may be had to the above-mentioned Spurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704, in which said mechanisms are illustrated and described, so that the totalizers in the present application are adapted to perform all of the functions necessary, with the accumulating and recording of all types of additions, subtractions, reading, totalizing, and transfer total operations that are necessary in connection with the production of a payroll, the issuing of employees payroll checks, and the keeping of other records in connection with this type of work.
Pattern cards in Fig. 2, there is illustrated a facsimile of a pattern card 171, used in connection with the present invention, and having thereon columns of precalculated figures, showing amounts of net pays, according to the number of hours which the employee worked. On each card, there will be the employees name, clock number, and rate per hour. ln the left-hand column, headed Hours, it is seen that the hours run from 2 to 48, and below this there is a group of hours listed as 39.5, 39.6, 39.7, 39.8, and 39.9, which represent tenths of hours, from .5 to .9, in connection with the 39 hours worked. The second column, ieaded Base Pay, is in fact the gross pay earned by the employee, according to the number of hours worked. The third column, headed Overtime Pay, shows overtime amounts in connection with 42, 44, 46, and 48 hours.
The next column, headed 0. A. B. is the amount which the operator deducts, depending upon the number of hours and the base pay. The next column, headed Withholding Tax, is the amount of income tax withheld, according to the number of hours work. The next four columns, under the main heading Net Pays, are net pays when certain deductions are made. The first column under Net Pays, headed No Other Deductions. represents the net pay which the employee will get when there are no other deductions outside of the O. A. B. and the withholding tax. The column headed Union Dues shows the net pay when the union dues are withheld. in addition to the O. A. B. and the withholding tax. The next column, headed Insurance, shows the net pay when the insurance is deducted from the ernployees net pay. in addition to the O. A. B. and the withholding tax, and the last, or right-hand column, headed Hospital, shows the employees net pay when the hospitalization insurance is deducted, in addition to the O. A. B. and the withholding tax,
Below these columns of figures there are six lines of gures. The first line shows earnings based on fractional hours in tenths, the next line shows the balance factor to be taken into consideration in connection with those fractional earnings, and the next line shows earnings for one full hour and also for that full hour plus fractional tenths of an hour from 1.1 to 1.9 inclusive. The next line, or next-to-last line, shows the balance factor for the earnings of 1.0 to 1.9 hours, and the last line indicates the hours and fractions applicable to each row of figures.
From the above chart it can be seen that, if an employee worked 34 hours, this line, by means to be described hereinafter, will be selected, which shows that the mans base pay is $44.03, and that he will have 44 cents deducted for O. A. B. and $2.80 deducted for withholding tax, and, that if he has no further deductions, his net pay will be $40.79. However, should the man belong to the union, and should it be the week during which union dues are being deducted, then his net pay will be $39.29. If in another week insurance is deducted, the mans net pay will be $38.69, and finally, if in another week hospitalization is deducted, then his net pay will be $34.54.
Should an employee work, for example, 34.6 hours, the operator will set up $44.03, which amount will be accumulated in the total in connection with that key depressed, which will be the No. 1 special key. She will then read from the special chart at the bottom of the pattern card, which amount appears in the position for .6 hour, which is the difference between 34 hours and 34.6 hours. This amount, it will be noticed, is the fractional earnings and shows 78 cents, which will be recorded on the keyboard and added to the $44.03, using special key No. l. This makes a total of $44.81, which is printed by pressing special key No. 2, followed by the B key 67. Now, in deducting the O. A. B., instead of deducting 44 cents, she will deduct 45 cents, and in deducting the withholding tax, instead of deducting $2.80, she will deduct $2.90. She will then read the proper net pay figure appearing on the pattern card for 34 hours, which is $40.79. She will record that on the keyboard and operate the machine with special key No. 1, and then read from the special chart at the bottom of the attern card in the balancing factor and find that this gure is 67 cents. She will then record this amount through special key No. 1. She will then press the special key No. 2, followed by the depression of the Net Pay key 66, which causes the amount normally to be printed on the check for the total amount of the accumulator associated with the special key No. 1. That amount will be transferred into the totalizer associated with the Net Pay key 66, subtracted from the crossfooter, and printed on the records, and the amount so printed will be $41.46, which is the total of $40.79 plus the balancing factor of 67 cents.
Pattern card x In Figs. 5, 6, and 7 is illustrated the pattern card box used in connection with the present invention, to house stacks of employees pattern cards when the payroll for those employees is being written. In Fig. 7 are shown a few of the pattern cards 171, stacked in the box. These cards are, upon operation of the Net Pay key 66, adapted to be ejected one at a time from the box, as the employees payroll check is completed. The ejection of the card is accomplished by mechanism which is fully illustrated and described in the above-mentioned Spurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704, which mechanism in that patent ejects the time clock card in connection with that particular patent.
The pattern card box used is very similar to the clock card box shown in the patent just mentioned. The clock card box shown in said patent has a fixed face or front, with an opening through which the clock card is visible, whereas in the pattern card box the front or face of the 17 box is adjustable from a normal position, shown in- Figs. 5, 6, and 7, to any one of four positions below such position. Moreover, this face or front of the pattern card box carries lamps which are adapted to be lighted up to show the line which has been selected for the op.
erator to read, in order to write the employees payroll check. The face of the box is provided with slots, so that only certain lines are visible at a time. The line to be used is the line which is lighted up by the lamp for the group of lines, of which the selected line is one.
The pattern card box will now be described, having been given reference number 180 in Figs. 5, 6, and 7. The box 180 is mounted on a T-shaped bar 181, secured to the back of the machine cabinet 135; The box has a base'portion 182, upon which the pattern cards 171 are stacked and held in contact with one another by a weighted slide 183. The base 182 slopes, so that the natural tendency of the cards, when pushed by the weighted slide 183, is for the first or front card to engage the back side of a slide 184 carrying a card picker or card ejector 175. This slide 184 lies just to the rear of an adjustable front or face 185 of the pattern card box. As the cards are ejected one at a time, after the employees payroll check has been written, the cards engage a slide 178, so that they will slide downwardly and be stacked in proper order in the bottom of the pattern card box 180. The box has an opening covered by a cover 179, so that the cards may be removed from the pattern card box 180 after all of the checks of the particular batch of cards have been written.
As shown in Fig. 5, the box face 185 is provided with five slots, numbered 186, 187, 188, 189, and 190, and a larger opening, the upper edge 191 of which acts as a line guide. Above each of the slots 186 to 190 and the opening 191 is a housing 192, for an electric lamp 193.
When the face 185 of the pattern card box is in its normal position, as shown in Figs. 5,- 6, and 7, the lines of figures on the pattern card 171 (Fig. 2) corresponding to the employees name, which is in a zero hour position, l hours, 20 hours, 30 hours, and 40 hours, are visible through the slots 186, 187, 188, 189, and. 190, respectively, and the lines corresponding to the 39.9 hours are visible just beneath the edge 191.
If the employee worked 40 hours, then the lamp 193 of the housing 192, just above the slot 190, will be lighted, so the operator knows that this is the line to read because the person whose check is being written worked 40 hours. Upon depression of the LtO-hour key and during the operation of the machine, conditions were set up, to be described hereinafter, to complete a circuit so that the above-mentioned lamp in the housing above theslot 190 will be lighted.
Secured to the back of the face 185, near its top, are two brackets 195 and 196, and secured to the back of the face 185, near its bottom, are two brackets 197 and 198. Each of the brackets 195 to 198 has a slot 19.9, through which extends a stud 200, carried by a pattern card box 180. These brackets 195 to 198 and the studs 200 serve as sliding guides for the face 185 during its adjustment from the position shown in Figs. 6 and 7, downwardly into any of its other four adjusted positions.
When the face 185 is adjusted into its lowermost position, they tops of the slots 199 strike the studs 200 and act as stops for the final movement downward. Secured to each side of the pattern card box 180- are upstanding brackets 201 and 202, which support a shaft 203. Se- Cured to the shaft 203 is an arm 204, having a slot 205, which surrounds a rod 206, supported by the brackets 195 and 196.
, Also secured to the shaft .203 (Fig. 6) is a lever207,
having a'slot 208, which surrounds the rod-206,l Thelever. 207 carries'a stud 209 (Fig. 7);., which extends through a slot 210 in the upper' end of a link 2115, to connect this link 211 with the rear end of the lever 207.
Secured to the shaft 203 is an arm 212, having a pin 18 213,'1 which cooperates with four hook levers 214, 4215, 216, and 217, all of which are pivoted on a stud 218 'mounted in a plate 219, secured to the side of the pattern card box 180.
AReferring to Fig. 6, it can be seen that the hook lever 218 has a flange 220 with a bent-up ear 221, to which is pivoted a link 222, which is also pivoted to a core 223 of a solenoid 224.I The tiange 220 normally rests against a stud 225, carried by the plate 219.
The hook lever 215 has a bent-over flange 226, which.
lies beneath the hook lever 214. This flange 226 has an upturned ear 22,7, to which is pivoted a link 228, which is also pivoted to a core 229 of a solenoid 230. This flange 226 normally rests against a stud 231, carried by the plate 219.
The hook lever 216 has a right-angled flange 232, which lies beneath both of the levers 214 and 215. This flange 232 has an upturned ear 233, to which is pivoted a link 234, also pivoted to a core 235 of a solenoid 236; This flange 232 normally rests against a stud 237, carried by the plate 219.
The hook lever 217 has a right-angle iiange 238, which lies just beneath all three of the levers 214, 215, and 216. This flange 238 has an upturned ear 239, to which is pivoted a link 240, also pivoted to a core 241 of a solenoid 242. This flange 238 normally rests against a stud 243, carried by the plate 219.
The operation of the above-described mechanism is as follows: Normally, the hook levers 214, 215, 216, and 217 are in the positions shown in Fig. 6, wherein the arm 212, the shaft 203, and the lever 207 and the arm 204 retain the pattern card box face 185 in the position shown, so that the lines on the pattern card 171 opposite the 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 hours are visible through the slots 186 to 190, respectively, in the face 185. By means to be described later in connection with the description of the wiring diagram, the solenoids 224, 230, 236, and
242 are adapted to be energized under control of the keys in the hours banks.
Upon energization of the solenoid 224, its core 223 is moved upwardly, thus rocking the hook lever 214 counter-clockwise and releasing the stud 213 of the arm 212. When this occurs, the pattern card box face 185 moves downwardly, thus, through the arm 204 and the lever 207, rocking the shaft 203 and the arm 212 clockwise until the stud 213 contacts the hook lever 215 and is stopped by such lever. Such movement of the pattern card box face 185 positions the slots 186 to 190, respectively, opposite the lines of the pattern card 171, which correspond to the 2, l2, 22, 32, and 42 hours, respectively, so that the figures in connection with these numbers of hours may be read through their respective slots. However, as has been previously pointed out, the
particular line to be read is illuminated by means of its associated lamp 193, which is selected, as above mentioned, under control of the hours keys.
The means for restoring the pattern card box face 185 upwardly to its normal position will now be described. Secured to a shaft 251 (Fig. 7), carried by the pattern card box 180, is a plate 252. This shaft 251 and plate 252`receive one full counter-clockwise rotation by means which is fully described and illustrated in the abovementioned Spurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704, whenever the Net Pay key 66 is operated. Pivoted at 253 to the plate 252 is a crank 254, which is pivoted at 255 to the previously-described link 211. The upper end of this crank 254 is connected, by means illustrated and described in the last-mentioned Spurlino et al. patent, to the previously-mentioned pattern card picker E75. Upon the counter-clockwise movement of the plate 252, the crank 254 receives a downward movement, from the position-shown in Fig. 7 and back to that position. Upon downward movement of the crank 254, the picker ejects the front pattern card 171 of the stack downwardly, sufficiently to cause it to be gripped by the feed rolls 176, whereupon it is fed downwardly over the plate 178 and into the bottom portion of the pattern card box 180. As the crank 254 is moved downwardly, it draws the link 211 downwardly until the top edge of this slot 210 contacts the stud 209 in the lever 207, whereupon continued downward movement of the crank 254 rocks the lever 207, the shaft 283, and the arm 204 clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 7, and counter-clockwise as viewed in Fig. 6, whereupon the arm 204 and the lever 207, due to the fact that they are connected to the brackets 195 and 196, respectively, of the face 185 of the pattern card box, raise the pattern card face 185 upwardly to its normal position. This, of course, occurs after the solenoid 224 has been deenergized, and thus the stud 213 of the arm 212 will be moved from its position in engagement with the lever 215 back to the position shown in Fig. 6, into engagement with the hook lever 214, thus retaining the face 185 of the pattern card box in its upper or normal position.
When the solenoid 230 is energized, its core 229 is raised, thus rocking the hook lever 215 counter-clockwise, whereupon its flange 226 also rocks the lever 214 counterclockwise, and the face 185 slides downwardly and rocks the arm 212 clockwise until the stud 213 contacts the hook lever 216, whereupon the face 185 is stopped in such position. In this position, the slots 186 to 190, respectively, of Fig. are positioned over the lines on the pattern card 171 corresponding to the 4, 14, 24, 34, and 44-hour designations on this card, so that the operator may read the particular one of these lines which is lighted up by its associated lamp 193.
After this selection of lines, and during the last of the machine operations necessary to the issuance of the payroll check, which last operation, as above mentioned, is initiated by depression of the Net Pay key 66, the pattern card is ejected by the picker 175, and the face of the box 185 is restored by the crank 254 (Fig. 7), as previously described.
When the solenoid 236 is energized, its core 235 raises the link 234 and rocks the hook lever 216 counterclockwise, and, during the rocking, the flange 232 of this lever also rocks the levers 215 and 214 counterclockwise, whereupon the downward movement of the face 185 is limited when the stud 213 contacts and is held by the hook lever 217. ln this position of the face 185, the lines opposite the hours 6, 16, 26, 36, and 46 are visible through the slots 186 to 190, respectively.
lf the solenoid 242 is energized during another operation of the machine, its core 241 raises the link 240 and rocks the hook lever 217 counterclockwise. At this time,
the ilange 238 of the lever 217 rocks the levers 214, 215, and 216 counterclockwise, whereupon the base 185 is lowered until the top edges of the slots 199 contact their associated studs 298, and, at the same time, the stud 213 is moved beyond all of the hook levers 214 to 217 inclusive, thus positioning the slots 186 to 189, respectively, opposite the lines on the pattern card 171, corresponding to the 8, 18, 28, 38, and 48 hours.
Now, when the associated lamp 193 of the selected line group is lighted, the operator knows that that is the line which she is to use because of the particular hour keys which have been operated to select that particular line.
Clock card box As pointed out in the early part of this specification, there is used in connection with the pattern card box 188 a clock card box in which are stacked employees clock cards or time cards, which show the number of hours the employee has worked, and these cards are stacked in conformity with the stacks of pattern cards 171; that is, the front card ot the stack of the clock cards and the front card on the stack of pattern cards relate to the same employee.
A clock card box 245 is diagrammatically shown in the wiring diagram of Fig. 8 and is like the one illus- 20 trated and fully described in the above-mentioned Spurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704, which patent describes the payroll system and the production of employees' payroll checks. Therefore, if any reference is desired in connection with the clock card box 245, attention is directed to this last-mentioned Spurlino et al. patent.
Wiring diagram circuits In connection with this electrical circuit diagram, the source of power for several of the circuits is indicated by a battery symbol, which battery has one side grounded. As has been previously stated, the selection of the line to be used on the employees pattern card 171 (Fig. 2) is accomplished by the solenoids 224, 230, 236, and 238 under control of the keys 61 in the units of hours bank.
The operation of the above-mentioned solenoids has been previously described; that is, it has been previously stated how the encrgization of certain ones of these sole. noids controls the positioning of the arm 212 (Fig. 6) so as to determine the positioning of the face of the pattern card box 180.
It is not thought necessary to describe all of the circuits in connection with the selection of these solenoids, and energization thereof, to in turn control the selection or adjustment of the contacts in the electrical differentials associated with the tens hours, the units hours, and the tenths hours banks. The circuits which they establish during their diterential movements, under control of the keys of these banks, are illustrated diagrammatically in the wiring diagram of Fig. 8.
In connection with the tens hours bank, there are tive pairs of electrical terminals 271, in the 0, l, 2, 3, and 4 positions. The right-hand ones of these pairs of terminals are connected to the bar 272. Also in connection with this bank is a pair of contacts 273 in the 3 position, the left-hand one of which is connetced to a bar 274. Cooperating with these pairs of terminals 271 and 273 is a pair of wipers 275, which are connected together in the diagram by a heavy line so as to represent the fact that they travel in unison. Associated with the units of hours bank are ten pairs of terminals 276 in the 0 to 9 positions, the right-hand terminal of each pair being connected electrically to a bar 277. Also associated with this units of hours bank are tive pairs of terminals 278 in the 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 positions. The left-hand ones of each of these pairs of terminals are connected electrically to a bar 279. Also associated with this units of hours bank is a special pair of terminals 280, the left one of which is connected to a bar 281. Associated with these terminals 276, 278, and 280 is a pair of wipers 282, which are non-electrically connected together, as represented by the heavy black line, so that they will move in unison.
Associated with the tenths of hours bank are four pairs of terminals 285, the left-hand ones of which are connected electrically to a bar 286. These pairs of terminals 285 are in the 5, 6, 7, and 8 positions. Also associated with these terminals is a series of single terminals 287, connected to a bar 288. These terminals 287 are in the 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 positions. In the zero position, directly beneath the bar 288, are a bar 290 and a terminal 291. Associated with these terminals and bars in the tenths of hours bank is a pair of wipers 292 electrically connected by a bar 293.
Assuming, now, that an employees time clock card shows that he worked 34 hours, and that the same employees pattern card 171 is on the front of the stack c-f cards in the pattern card box 180, the depression of the 3 key 61 in the tens hours bank and the depression of the 4 key 61 in the units hours bank completes circuits as follows, to select the 34-hour line and to light up the lamp 193 associated with the group of lines 30 to 38 hours.
When the units differential under the control of the 4-hour key travels to the 4 position, a circuit is completed from the battery 300 through the bar 290 over the lefthand wiper 292, bar 291, and line 301 to the bar 279,
then through the right-hand wiper 282, by means of the pair of contacts 278 to line 302, around the bar 277 through the pair of contacts 276 and the 4 position by means of a left-hand wiper 282, and then through line 303 to the solenoid 230 to the ground, thus energizing this solenoid. The energization of this solenoid 230, as has been previously described, rocks levers 214 and 215 counter-clockwise, thus releasing the stud 213 and the arm 212, whereupon the face 185 of the pattern card box drops down two steps, so that the slot 189 of the 30-hour group is positioned opposite the S4-hour line on the pattern card 171. At the same time, a circuit is cornpleted from the line 302, over lines 304 and 305 to the bar 272, and then through the terminals 271 in the 3 position, then through the left-hand wiper 275, thus over line 306 to a relay 307 to the ground, thus energizing this relay 307, which pulls up its armature 308 and completes the circuit, described later, to the lamp 193 associated with the 30-hour group of lines on the pattern card 171.
Associated with and adapted to be controlled by an ejected clock card and an ejected pattern card, respectively, are switches 311 and 312. The specic control of these switches will be described later.
These two switches 311 and 312 are wired in parallel. The circuit through switch 311 is from a battery 313 through the switch 311, line 314 to point 315. The circuit through switch 312 is from a battery 316, switch 312, and line 317 to point 315. From point 315, a circuit is established through a normally closed, manually operable switch 318 to point 319.
When the relay 307 is energized in the manner above described and pulls up its armature 308, a circuit is then completed from point 319 over line 320, line 321, armature 308, line 322, to the lamp 193, to the ground. This particular lamp 193 is associated with the 30-hour group of lines on the pattern card 171, thus lighting up the selected 34-hour line.
As has been previously pointed out, the hours are set up on the keyboard at the same time the employees earnings-to-date are set up on the keyboard. If the employees earningstodate, when it is picked up, is not $3,000.00 or more, the operator proceeds in the usual manner, as previously described, to make the proper deductions for O. A. B. and the rest of the deductions, and finally sets up the net pay.
However, should the employees earnings-todate amount to $3,000.00 or more, then, when this amount is picked up, the $1,000.00 differential will go to the 3 position and cause the previously-described switch 152 to be closed. When the earnings-to-date is picked up, the X Earnings-to-Date key 65 is depressed, and, when this key is depressed, it closes a switch 330. If the employees earnings-to-date was $3,000.00 or more, a circuit is completed from battery 331 through switch 152, through a normally closed switch 332, over line 333, and through the closed switch 330 to point 334. From this point, the circuit continues on and energizes a relay 335. The energization of the relay 335 attracts two armatures 336 and 337. The drawing-in of the armature 337 completes the holding circuit for the relay 335, which is as follows: From point 334 through armature 337, line 338 to point 319 in the power line.
At the same time, a circuit is completed from point 334 over line 339, through a solenoid 340 to the ground. The operation of this solenoid by the above circuit, when the amount of the earnings-to-date is $3,000.00 or more on the pick-up operation, actuates a link 257 (Fig. 9), bell crank 258 and link 259 to rock an arm 260, a shaft 261 and a lever 262 counter-clockwise, which raises a link 263 and rocks an arm 264 clockwise around its pivot 265 to position the end 266 of said arm beneath a pin 267 in the F. O. A. B. key 67 which causes the F. O. A. B.
key 67 to be locked, so that the operator cannot deduct any O A. B. from the gross pay, which is to be recorded for this particular employee, because of the fact that his earnings-to-date have already reached $3,000.00. Upon deenergization of solenoid 340, gravity rocks the arm 264 counter-clockwise until the forward end 268 of the lever 262 strikes a collar 269 on the rod 86, thus restor ing all of the parts in the above linkage to their normal positions.
When the armature switch 336 is pulled up by the relay 335, the circuit to the lamp 161 is opened, thus preventing this lamp from being lighted at any time during any subsequent operations necessary to complete a payroll check.
The operator will therefore proceed to make all other necessary deductions for this particular employee, and iinally set up the net pay and depress the Net Pay key 66.
Depression of this key 66, which is the final operation in the issuing of an employees payroll check, causes, as has been previously described, the yemployees clock card and the employees pattern card to be ejected, so that the next employees cards will be at the front of the respective stacks, ready for the operator to write the check associated with this next employee.
Upon depression of the Net Pay key 66, a circuit is completed to cause a clock card motor 341 to operate, and also to cause a pattern card motor 342 to operate.
Depression of the Net Pay key 66 completes the following circuit: From battery 343 through switch 344 to point 345, over line 346, to a relay 347, and thence to the ground. This causes energization of this relay 347, thus operating a latch 348 to release a lever 349, whereupon a spring 350 moves an arm 351 to the left and closes a switch 352, thus completing the circuit from the line 346, through the switch 352 and the line 353, to the clock card motor 341, as fully described in the Spurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704.
Simultaneously with the completion of this last-described circuit, a circuit is completed from point 345 over line 355 to a relay 356 to the ground. This energizes the relay 356, whereupon its armature releases a latch 357 from a lever 358, whereupon a spring 359 causes an arm 360 to close a switch 361, thus completing a circuit from the line 355 through the switch 361, and a line 362 to the pattern card motor 342. Thus both motors 341 and 342 operate to drive mechanism, previously mentioned, to eject the front clock card and the front pattern card from their respective boxes.
At 363 is shown the usual register motor, having in circuit a normally open switch 364, which is closed by depression of any one of the operating keys on the machine, fully illustrated and described in the patents previously mentioned, particularly the Spurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704. When this switch 364 is closed, the register circuit is completed from a battery 365 through an armature switch 366, line 367, switch 364, to the register motor 363, to operate the machine.
When the Net Pay key 66 is depressed, the following circuit is also completed: From the point 345, through a line 368 and armature switch 369, to a relay 370, and thence to the ground. This circuit energizes the relay 370, which pulls up both the armature switches 366 and 369, thus establishing one circuit from the battery 365 through the armature switch 366, line 371, and lamp 372 to the ground, thus lighting this lamp, which is the card clearing signal lamp. A holding circuit for the relay 370 is created from the power point 319, through line 373, through the relay 370, and thence to the ground.
As has been previously stated, the operation of the Net Pay key 66 is the iinal operation of the machine, and operates the motors 341 and 342 for the clock card and the pattern card, to eject these cards from their respective boxes in the manner illustrated and described in the above-mentioned Spurlino et al. Patent No. 2,467,704. When these cards are ejected, they break the circuits by causing the switches 311 and 312, respectively,
to open, thus breaking the circuit through the line 373 to the relay 370, whereupon the armature switches 366 and 369 are released, thus breaking the circuit to the lamp 372 and causing the lamp to go out, and at the same time reestablishing the circuit from battery 365, switch 366, and line 367 to the motor 363, so that, upon the next operation of the machine, when an operating key is depressed to close the switch 364, this circuit to the motor 363 may be completed. At the same time, release of the armature switch 319 reestablishes the circuit back to the Net Pay key 65, when this key is depressed.
From the above description it can be seen that it is necessary that both cards-that is, the clock card and the pattern cardbe ejected simultaneously, in order to reestablish the motor circuit and the Net Pay key circuit for any subsequent operation. Should one of the cards fail to be ejected, then the switch 311, if it is the clock card, or the switch 312, if it is the pattern card, would not be opened; consequently the holding circuit 373 for the relay 370 would not be broken, and the lamp 372 would remain lighted, thus indicating to the operator that one of the cards, either the clock card or the pattern card, had not been ejected from its respective box at the end of the operation of the Net Pay key.
When the holding circuit 373 for the relay 370 is not broken, due to the failure of either card to be ejected, the circuit to the motor 363 is held open, thus preventing any subsequent operations of the machine until the operator manually opens the switch 318 momentarily, which will release the holding circuit for the relay 370 and all other relays.
Also, when both switches 311 and 312 are opened simultaneously, the holding circuits for all relays are opened. Thus all of the relays are deenergized.
If during an operation of the machine, when the employees gross pay is added into the machine, which gross pay added to the earnings-to-date which was picked up reaches $3,000.00 or more, upon the extension of the balance during this operation, which is created by the depression of the Balance Extension key 63, this key operates the switch 332 to break the circuit to line 333 and close a circuit from the battery 331, switch 152, through the operated switch 332, line 375, armature switch 336, line 376, to the lamp 161 and thence to the ground, thus lighting up this lamp 161, which, as previously described, is a red light, which indicates to the operator that during the operation of the machine, when the employees gross pay was entered and added to the balance or earnings-to-date, which had been previously picked up, made $3,000.00 more, the operator would be apprised of this fact, due to the fact that the lamp 161 had been lighted to show as a red light.
It then becomes necessary for her to read the amount from the total indicating Wheels, as has been earlier described, so that she can make the proper calculations to r deduct a lesser amount of O. A. B. than would be required from the employees full pay for that particular week.
While the form of mechanism herein shown and described is admirably adapted to fulll the objects primarily stated, it is to be understood that it is not intended to confine the invention to the one particular form or embodiment which is herein disclosed.
What is claimed is:
l. In a machine capable of single and multiple operations involved in a complete transaction, including the pick-up entry of the earnings-to-date and the entry of various deductions, including the O. A. B. deduction; a plurality of banks of amount keys; a plurality of control keys, including an earnings-todate key and an O. A. B.
key, said keys being operable in different machine operations to control the recording of the pick-up of the earnings-to-date and the Q. A. B. deductions; totalizers actuated by said dierential mechanisms to record the amounts entered under control of said banks of amount keys; and
(1: electrical means, including a switch and a solenoid operable under control of the differential mechanism of one of said banks of amount keys when said one diierential mechanism reaches and/ or exceeds a certain fixed position during an operation of the machine in which the recording of the pick-up of the earnings-to-date exceeded a certain amount, to prevent operation of the O. A. B. control key in an immediate subsequent operation of the machine.
2. Vin a machine capable of single and multiple operations involved in a complete transaction, including the pick-up entry of the earnings-to-date and the entry of various deductions, including the O. A. B. deduction; a plurality of banks of amount keys; a differential mechanism associated with and controlled by each bank of amount keys; a plurality of control keys including an earnings-to-date key and an O. A. B. key, said keys being operable in different machine operations to control the recording ot the pick-up of the earnings to date and the O. A. deductions; totalizers actuated by said differential mechanisms to record the amounts entered under control of said banks of amount keys; an electrical switch normally open; means to close said switch; electrical means operated when said switch is closed to prevent operation of said O. A. B. key in an operation immediately subsequent to the operation in which the registered earnings-to-date amount reached or exceeded a predetermined xed amount; and a member actuated by the differential mechanism of one of the banks of amount keys to retain the said switch closing means in an ineffective position to prevent it from closing said switch during an operation of the machine wherein the pick-up of the earnings-to-date registered is less than said predetermined fixed amount.
3. in a machine capable of single and multiple cycle operations, involved in a complete transaction, and adapted for payroll recording in connection with an employees earnings-to-date, gross pay, OAB, and other deductions and net pays, a plurality of control keys, certain of which control the machine to make one-cycle operations, and certain others of which control the machine to make multiple-cycle operations; a plurality of banks of amount keys adapted to control the entry of earnings-to-date amounts, gross pay amounts, OAB, and other deductions, and also net pay amounts in different one-cycle operations; totalizers to record such amounts entered; a differential means controlled by each bank of amount keys in one-cycle operations and by said totalizers in multiple-cycle operations; and electrical means operable under control of the differential means of a =1ertain bank of keys during an operation of the machine in which the registration of the pickup of the earningsto-date exceeded a certain amount, to prevent operation of the OAB control key in an immediate subsequent operation.
4. Tn a machine capable of single and multiple cycle operations, involved in a complete transaction, a plurality of control keys, certain of which control the machine to make one-cycle operations and certain others control the machine to make multiple-cycle operations, certain of the single-cycle control keys causing operation of the machine upon depression thereof; a machine-operating motor; a potential electrical circuit for said motor adapted to be completed upon operation of a control key; a card holder having a plurality of data cards therein; a second card holder having a plurality of data cards therein; means to cause simultaneous ejection of the front card from each card holder; means controlled by another control key to cause operation of said card ejection means; two electrical circuits parallel; a relay adapted to be operated upon operation of said another control key, the operation of said relay opening said potential circuit to the machine motor; a holding circuit for said relay; and two normally-closed switches, one in each of said parallel circuits, said switches adapted to be opened, one by the card as it is
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Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1745283A (en) * 1930-01-28 von pein
US1866023A (en) * 1932-07-05 friden
US1874097A (en) * 1932-08-30 goldberg
US1886627A (en) * 1932-11-08 Hobace deummotsm
US1910738A (en) * 1927-06-18 1933-05-23 Harold T Avery Locking and clearing mechanism for calculating machines
US1977069A (en) * 1934-10-16 Cash register
US2343268A (en) * 1941-08-26 1944-03-07 Ibm Sorting machine
US2416598A (en) * 1941-12-09 1947-02-25 Ncr Co Sorting device
US2550133A (en) * 1951-04-24 Bookkeeping machine

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1745283A (en) * 1930-01-28 von pein
US1866023A (en) * 1932-07-05 friden
US1874097A (en) * 1932-08-30 goldberg
US1886627A (en) * 1932-11-08 Hobace deummotsm
US1977069A (en) * 1934-10-16 Cash register
US2550133A (en) * 1951-04-24 Bookkeeping machine
US1910738A (en) * 1927-06-18 1933-05-23 Harold T Avery Locking and clearing mechanism for calculating machines
US2343268A (en) * 1941-08-26 1944-03-07 Ibm Sorting machine
US2416598A (en) * 1941-12-09 1947-02-25 Ncr Co Sorting device

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