US2644436A - Valve actuating mechanism - Google Patents

Valve actuating mechanism Download PDF

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Publication number
US2644436A
US2644436A US19144350A US2644436A US 2644436 A US2644436 A US 2644436A US 19144350 A US19144350 A US 19144350A US 2644436 A US2644436 A US 2644436A
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Prior art keywords
piston
stroke
valve
exhaust
intake
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Expired - Lifetime
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Martin J Berlyn
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AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVE Co
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AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVE CO
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L1/00Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear
    • F01L1/02Valve drive
    • F01L1/04Valve drive by means of cams, camshafts, cam discs, eccentrics or the like
    • F01L1/047Camshafts
    • F01L1/053Camshafts overhead type
    • F01L1/0532Camshafts overhead type the cams being directly in contact with the driven valve
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B2275/00Other engines, components or details, not provided for in other groups of this subclass
    • F02B2275/18DOHC [Double overhead camshaft]

Description

July 7, 1953 M. J. BERLYN VALVE AcTuATING uEcHANrsu Filed Oct. 21. 1950 INVEUTUR /Mr/P r//v u. 552 Y/v. M @SM2 ITTOR Patented July 7, 1953 UN ITED PATENT OFFI I Y f...lancianolY l yALvl; Acro-@Tmc 1ym-CIJIANVI-SM Martin-JipBer-lynf lS'uield,` Conn., as signor to American v Locomotive Company, New York,

Y., :a corporation of New York Applicationoctober 21, 1950, Serial No. 191,443

Ily to valve actuating mechanisms of the class wherein cams von thecam shaft actuate linkages to reciprocate the vpoppet valves controllingfthe intake and exhaust 'passages of thel power `vcyl.-

inders. f f

In naturally aspirated compression-ignitionengines of the four-stroke cycle,y Vdirect injection, open' combustion chamber type, it 'is common practice to provide that the pistn" en i-ts cornpression stroke will closely approach the base-of the cylinder head i-n order-to-effect afs`quifsh or radially inward movement of the combustionsupporting air in the cylinder. Such squisli promotes toroidal turbulence of the air charge during fuelA injection, Vand such Y turbulence is conductive torgood mixing ofthevfuel and air toacl celerate ame propagation. -In -order-to produce such squish action, it is'conventional kto design the crown ofthe piston with an annular rim which Awill just clear the cylinder head -at the end of the compression stroke o fy the piston. 'Inwardly of the rim is a deep central'cavity ordep'ression, which constitutes the combustion space. Tobe most effective thermodynamically, the cavity however, where scavengingfis lprovided-vit is frequired that the opening'of the Aintake-valve vand the closing of the Aexhaust vvalve have .a consider.- able overlap. In the prior .art,such overlap'has been designed to take placepduringthat partrof the piston travel in which the pistonlisapproach.- ing and leaving .top dead .center /on-.its exhaust stroke. In order to prevent the 4rising piston from colliding with the valves during overlap, some designers have resorted -to relief recesses in the rim of the piston. Such recesses, however, have unsatisfactory characteristics. They diminish the eiective area of the rim which co.- acts with the cylinder Vheadto produce squishf they cause surface discontinuities prejudicial to the development and maintenance oftangential swirl, they increase the pistonarea exposed to the heat of combustion, and, most important, they increase the total clearance volume sothat the compression ratio is too small :for fthe require.-

ments of adequatercold starting :and .acceptable as thermal efficiencies. This is particularly true fin the eases of engines'having iourvalves toacylinder. Attempts have ,been .made to overcome the unfavorable compression ratio by providing ya shallower cavity, or even'by eliminating the cavity. But such alternatives have .been found wanting since the change in shape of the cavity constitutes .a departure from the desired .ratio of volume to surface.

To allow the Vuse of apiston having a central cavity in'its crown and a surrounding rim `without recesses in a supercharged, compression-ignition engineV ofthe type-described is the principal object 'of thisinvention. More specifically, it is the object of the invention to provide,.as part of the valve operating mechanism oan engine Aof the class described, cams so profiled that scavenging Awill be completed and 'both intake Jand exhaust valves substantially 'closed in time to clear the piston at the end of `its exhaust stroke thereby eliminating the necessity -of providing relief recesses in the piston crown. Stated Otherwise, `an object of the linvention is -to re-orient the scavenging overlap angle on the timing diagram of an engine of the class described sozthat 4it is substantially ahead of top dead center.

Other and further objects of the invention will appear from the following description, the ac!- companying drawings andthe appended claims.

In the drawings, Figs. l1 to 6 inclusive are diagrammatic representations of successive vpositions of the piston, the intake and exhaust valves, and vthe actuating cams. In Fig. `l, the po-werfstroke is just beginning; inFig. v2 the power Istroke-is nearly complete just before the beginning ofthe exhaust stroke and the exhaust -valve is shown as just beginning `to open; in Fig. 3 Ythe exhaust stroke is just beginning, the `intake valve being slightly open andthe exhaust valve fully open for the start of the scavenging operation; in Fig. y4 the exhaust stroke is nearing completion with both valves open; in Fig. 5 theexhaust stroke is shown slightly after completion, the valves `having lretracted to clear the piston at top dead center; and in Fig. 6 the intake stroke lhas begun. Fig. '7 isa profileview of the intake cam, and Fig.v8 `is a timing diagram of the valve operations beginnng with the power stroke and following the sequenceV of operations shown in Figs. `1--to 6in,- elusive.

y Referring now to the `drawings in which `the elements are diag-rammatically represented, episton l0 reciprocates -in VIcylinder I'I andis actuated by a connecting rod l2 operatively connected to crankshaft t3. Cylinder-head Mfiszsecured to the cylinder to provide a combustion chamber I5. The crown of piston I is formed with a central cavity IS and a rim Il, the length of the piston stroke being so designed lthat on the compression stroke, rim Il closely approaches the flat base I8 of the cylinder head to effect a squish or radially inward movement of the combustion supporting air. It should be noted that rim I1 is continuous and uninterrupted by recesses, so that it will coact with the flatbase I8 to achieve eiiicient squish action.

Central cavity I6 provides a major portion of the combustion chamber at ignition, and the squished air is received therein. Itis substantially cylindrical and is dimensioned tol provide a high ratio of volume to surface for most effective thermodynamic functioning. Thatvis to say, the depth-diameter ratio of the cavity approaches unity. Cylinder head I4 is formed with intake and exhaust passages I9 and 2B in which are arranged intake and" exhaust valves, generally indicated at 2l Vand 22.respectively. Return springs 23 con- -trol the valves inconventionalmanner.

The function of cams 24 and 25 is to dictate the opening and closing of the valves in desired timed relation. Cams 24 and 25 are shown as conta'cting'followers 26 and 21 on the valve stems 28 and 29, although in actual construction such cams may be on the cam shaft and operatively connected to the valves by conventional push rods and rocker arms; Other types of operating connections between the cams and the valves are well known, but such connections form no part ofthe invention as such. Sufiiceit to say that 'the proiiles of the cams are shaped to transmit desired motion to the valves by any of the conventional intermediate linkages or similar transmission mechanism, and that the cams are diagrammatically shown in the drawings without the intermediate transmission means. trative diagrams, the cams will be considered as rotating at one half the rate of rotation of the crank shaft, or at one rotation to each two rotations of the crank shaft in each four-stroke cycle. Such is the usual relation in engines of this class.

The periphery of cam 24 (see Fig. 7) is formed with a leading lobe 30 and a trailing lobe 3I with a flat or slightly convex connecting portion 32 therebetween. The minimum radial distance of connecting portion 32 from the cam center 35 is slightly greater than the radius of the base circle 33, as illustrated in Fig. 7. Cam 25 is formed with only one lobe 34 thereon, the remaining portion 35 of the periphery forming the base circle of the cam.

In operation, and in order to effect desired valve timing in accordance with the invention, the cams function as follows: At the start of 'the power stroke (see Fig. 1), cams 24 and 25 are operatively positioned so that their base circles 33 and 35 are registered with followers 26 and 21 respectively. 'Ihat is to say, both valves are closed and Athe cams in this portion of the cycle will impart no opening movement to them. Throughout substantially all of the power stroke, both cams, rotating at one half the angular velocity of the crank shaft, will impart no motion to the valves since base circles 33 and 35 are arranged to continue registering with the followers during such interval. Shortly before bottom dead center of the crank rotation at the end of the power stroke, lobe 34 of cam 25 will initiate the opening movement of the exhaust Valve 22. Such valve will reach its fully open position when the piston is substantially half way through its exhaust stroke In the illusl and will return to fully closed position at, or shortly after, the completion of the exhaust stroke of the piston. Throughout the entire power stroke and for a few degrees of crank angle of the exhaust stroke, portion 33 of cam 24 will remain registered with follower 26 and the intake valve will accordingly remain in closed position. After the'crank has'travelled such few degrees in the rst quadrant beyond bottom dead center of the power stroke, the leading lobe 30 of cam 24 will open the intake valve in order to allow for scavenging (see Fig. 4). This is the beginning of the overlap, since the exhaust valve is already open.

` Lobe 30'and lportion 32 are so dimensioned that ythe intake valve will move upwardly toward closed position in time to avoid collision with the risling piston-'But the upward movement of the valve is limited so that closing contact with the seat is avoided at this point in the cycle and a second downward movement of the valve is effected again'by lobe 3l on the intake stroke. This arrangement is provided in order to eliminate unnecessarily repetitive seating although Fig. 8 illustrates this with the legend Intake Valve Closes. To produce such motion, portion 32, as previously described, is at all points of its surface disposed radially at a greater distance from the cam center 3B vthan the circumference of the base circle 33.` During the intake stroke of the piston, trailing lobe 3| will openv the intake valve and maintain it in open position, and during this period the basecircle of cam 25 remains in register with-follower 21 so that the exhaust valve remains closed. During the compression stroke of the piston, the base circles of both cams will register with their corresponding followers so that the valves will remain closed.

An inspection of the timing diagram (Fig. 8) illustrates the period of scavenging as determined by the mechanism of the invention. The overlap angle is disposed almost completely ahead of top dead center on the exhaust stroke of the piston and begins in the rst quadrant following bottom dead center. In other words, the intake valve opens in the first quadrant following bottom dead center of the piston near the'beginning of the exhaust stroke to permit scavenging through the exhaust valve which has already begun to open in the quadrantimmediately preceding bottom deadcenter. The overlap continues throughout the quadrant immediately preceding top dead center ofY the exhaust stroke, after which the exhaust valve closes.

While there have been hereinbefore described approved embodiments of the invention, it will be understood Athat many and various changes and modications in form, arrangement of parts and details of construction thereof may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention, and that all such changes and modifications as fall within the scope of the appended claims are contemplated as a part of this invention.

What I claim is:

1. In a supercharged compression-ignition engine of the four-stroke cycle class, in combination, a cylinder; a cylinder head having a iiat base; a piston reciprocable in the cylinder; an annular uninterrupted rim on the piston crown adapted to coact with the flat base of the cylinder head to impart radially inward movement of combustions'upporting air on the compression stroke of the piston; an intake passage; an exhaust passage; a spring-returnl poppet intake valve; an exhaust valve; and means, including a cam, transmitting motion from the crank shaft to the intake valve to open the latter during the first half of the exhaust stroke of the piston to allow scavenging, said means thereafter during such stroke permitting the intake valve to move toward seating position in response to the urging of its spring in time to avoid collision with such piston.

- 2. In a supercharged compression-ignition engine of the four-stroke cycle class, in combination, a cylinder; a cylinder head having a flat base; a piston reciprocable in the cylinder; an annular, uninterrupted rim on the piston crown adapted to coact with the flat base of the cylinder head to impart radially inward movement of comn bustion-supporting air on the compression stroke of the piston; an intake passage; an exhaust passage; a spring-return poppet intake valve; an exhaust valve; and means transmitting motion from the crank shaft to the intake valve, includn ing a cam having a lobe to impart opening movement to the intake valve during the first half of the exhaust stroke of the piston thereby to allow scavenging and to permit return of the valve toward seating position in response to the urging of its spring in time to avoid collision with such piston.

Y 3. In a supercharged compression-ignition en gine of the four-stroke cycle class, in combination, a crank shaft, a power cylinder, a cylinder head having a flat base, a piston reciprocable in the cylinder, an annular uninterrupted rim on the cylinder crown, a cavity in the piston crown radially inward of the rim, meansconnecting the piston to the crank shaft, thepiston being adapted on itscompression stroke to effect a radial inward movement of the combustion-supporting air into the cavity by the close approach of its rim to the base of the cylinder head; a spring-return intake valve; an exhaust valve; means to open the exhaust valve; and a cam actuated by the crank shaft having a lobe shaped to open the intake valve forvscavenging purposes when the crank is in the quadrant immediately following bottom dead center at the beginning of the exhaust stroke, said cam permitting said intake valve thereafter to move towardvclosed position in response to spring urging at the completion of scavenging to avoid collision with the rising piston on its exhaust stroke.

4.-In a supercharged compression-ignition en= gine of the four-stroke cycle class, in combination, a cylinder, a cylinder head having a flat base, a piston, an annular, uninterrupted rim on the crown of the piston, a cavity in the piston crown radially inward of the rim, the piston being adapted on its compression stroke to force com-V bustion-supporting air radially inward into the cavity by the coaction of its rim with the cylinder head, an intake passage, an exhaust passage, a spring-return poppet intake valve, a spring-return poppet exhaust valve, means to transmit opening movement from the crank shaft to the inlet and exhaust valves, said means including a cam having a lobe shaped to open the exhaust valve before the beginning of the exhaust stroke of the piston but to permit its seating in response to spring urging slightly after the completion of such stroke, said means also including a second cam having a leading lobe shaped to open the inlet Valve during the rst half of the exhaust stroke of the piston to allow scavenging but to permit the return movement of the valve during the second half of the exhaust stroke in response to the urging of its spring in time to avoid collision with the piston.

5. A combination, according to claim 4, in which the second cam lis provided with atrailing lobe adapted to open the inlet valve to permit the inflow of charging air into the cylinder upon the completion of scavenging.

6. In a supercharged compression-ignition four-stroke cycle engine of the class wherein the piston crown has an annular uninterrupted rim `With a cavity radially inward thereof adapted to function as a portion of the combustion chamber, such rim coacting with the cylinder head to effect radially inward movement of the combustionsupporting air to achieve turbulence on the compression stroke, in combination, a spring return intake valve of the poppet type' and means transmitting motion from the crank shaft to such valve, including a cam having a lobe shaped to open the valve during the first half of the exhaust stroke of the piston to allow scavenging but to permit the return movement of the valve during the second half of the exhaust stroke in response to the urging of the spring in time to avoid collision with the piston.

MARTIN J. BERLYN.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 708,236 Leonard Sept. 2, 1902 1,146,864 Gibson .July 20, 1915 1,781,039 Treiber Nov. 11, 1930 2,122,484 Murray July 5. 193-8 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 21,782 Great Britain Oct. 15, 1908 542,429 Great Britain Jan. 8, 1942 587,276 Great Britain June 14, 1945

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Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2714374A (en) * 1951-06-26 1955-08-02 Hennig Albert Four stroke cycle valve timing
US2717583A (en) * 1951-11-09 1955-09-13 Maybach Control system for internal combustion engines
US2793631A (en) * 1951-04-28 1957-05-28 Daimler Benz Ag Valve timing of four cycle internal combustion engines with a great overlapping of the exhaust-and intakeperiods
US2834330A (en) * 1957-06-19 1958-05-13 Austin Motor Co Ltd Internal combustion engines
US2877752A (en) * 1957-09-03 1959-03-17 Harold G Schaller Double lobe cam shaft
US3298332A (en) * 1963-07-23 1967-01-17 Maschf Augsburg Nuernberg Ag Internal combustion engine supercharging
US3334618A (en) * 1964-05-26 1967-08-08 Funiciello Orazio Four stroke high r.p.m. internal combustion engine for racing purposes
US4084568A (en) * 1975-01-07 1978-04-18 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Decompression-type internal-combustion engine and method of improving the characteristics of such engine
US4561253A (en) * 1981-09-10 1985-12-31 Societe D'etudes De Machines Thermiques Semt Method of operating supercharged diesel engine with modified valve lift and bypassed intake air
US4620510A (en) * 1983-10-24 1986-11-04 Feuling James J Apparatus and method for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines and fluid pumping devices
US4765137A (en) * 1986-03-07 1988-08-23 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for engine
US4785626A (en) * 1986-10-27 1988-11-22 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for motorcycle and the like
US4795420A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-01-03 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for engine
US4817374A (en) * 1986-09-13 1989-04-04 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust control device of engine
US4831823A (en) * 1987-02-24 1989-05-23 Yamada Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for motorcycle and the like
US4840029A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-06-20 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for engine
US4860538A (en) * 1988-02-23 1989-08-29 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for motorcycle and the like
US4896504A (en) * 1986-12-03 1990-01-30 Yamaha Matsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control device for engines
US4909033A (en) * 1985-11-26 1990-03-20 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha High performance exhaust system for internal combustion engine
US4912930A (en) * 1985-11-26 1990-04-03 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha High performance exhaust system for internal combustion engine
US4999999A (en) * 1987-09-14 1991-03-19 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control device for motorcycles
US20040123849A1 (en) * 1996-07-17 2004-07-01 Bryant Clyde C. Cold air super-charged internal combustion engine, working cycle & method
WO2005019619A1 (en) * 2003-08-18 2005-03-03 Bryant, Clyde, C. Improved internal combustion engine and working cycle
US20050098149A1 (en) * 2002-05-14 2005-05-12 Coleman Gerald N. Air and fuel supply system for combustion engine
US20050098162A1 (en) * 1996-07-17 2005-05-12 Bryant Clyde C. Internal combustion engine and working cycle
US7191743B2 (en) 2002-05-14 2007-03-20 Caterpillar Inc Air and fuel supply system for a combustion engine
US7201121B2 (en) 2002-02-04 2007-04-10 Caterpillar Inc Combustion engine including fluidically-driven engine valve actuator
US7204213B2 (en) 2002-05-14 2007-04-17 Caterpillar Inc Air and fuel supply system for combustion engine
US7222614B2 (en) 1996-07-17 2007-05-29 Bryant Clyde C Internal combustion engine and working cycle
US7252054B2 (en) 2002-05-14 2007-08-07 Caterpillar Inc Combustion engine including cam phase-shifting
US8215292B2 (en) 1996-07-17 2012-07-10 Bryant Clyde C Internal combustion engine and working cycle
US20130037002A1 (en) * 2011-08-11 2013-02-14 Zoltan A. Kemeny In-cylinder emission cleaning by cams with auxiliary-lobes

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US708236A (en) * 1901-07-19 1902-09-02 William A Leonard Gas-engine.
GB190821782A (en) * 1908-10-15 1909-07-29 Frederic William Burstall Improvements in Gas Engines.
US1146864A (en) * 1909-11-24 1915-07-20 Arthur Hugo Cecil Gibson Internal-combustion engine.
US1781039A (en) * 1927-05-28 1930-11-11 Treiber Diesel Engine Corp Internal-combustion engine
US2122484A (en) * 1935-03-25 1938-07-05 Frederick F Murray Cooled valve
GB542429A (en) * 1940-02-17 1942-01-08 Milo Ab Improvements in or relating to internal combustion engines
GB587276A (en) * 1944-05-16 1947-04-21 William Spoor Improvements in or relating to liquid-fuel injection internal-combustion engines

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US708236A (en) * 1901-07-19 1902-09-02 William A Leonard Gas-engine.
GB190821782A (en) * 1908-10-15 1909-07-29 Frederic William Burstall Improvements in Gas Engines.
US1146864A (en) * 1909-11-24 1915-07-20 Arthur Hugo Cecil Gibson Internal-combustion engine.
US1781039A (en) * 1927-05-28 1930-11-11 Treiber Diesel Engine Corp Internal-combustion engine
US2122484A (en) * 1935-03-25 1938-07-05 Frederick F Murray Cooled valve
GB542429A (en) * 1940-02-17 1942-01-08 Milo Ab Improvements in or relating to internal combustion engines
GB587276A (en) * 1944-05-16 1947-04-21 William Spoor Improvements in or relating to liquid-fuel injection internal-combustion engines

Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2793631A (en) * 1951-04-28 1957-05-28 Daimler Benz Ag Valve timing of four cycle internal combustion engines with a great overlapping of the exhaust-and intakeperiods
US2714374A (en) * 1951-06-26 1955-08-02 Hennig Albert Four stroke cycle valve timing
US2717583A (en) * 1951-11-09 1955-09-13 Maybach Control system for internal combustion engines
US2834330A (en) * 1957-06-19 1958-05-13 Austin Motor Co Ltd Internal combustion engines
US2877752A (en) * 1957-09-03 1959-03-17 Harold G Schaller Double lobe cam shaft
US3298332A (en) * 1963-07-23 1967-01-17 Maschf Augsburg Nuernberg Ag Internal combustion engine supercharging
US3334618A (en) * 1964-05-26 1967-08-08 Funiciello Orazio Four stroke high r.p.m. internal combustion engine for racing purposes
US4084568A (en) * 1975-01-07 1978-04-18 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Decompression-type internal-combustion engine and method of improving the characteristics of such engine
US4561253A (en) * 1981-09-10 1985-12-31 Societe D'etudes De Machines Thermiques Semt Method of operating supercharged diesel engine with modified valve lift and bypassed intake air
US4620510A (en) * 1983-10-24 1986-11-04 Feuling James J Apparatus and method for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines and fluid pumping devices
US4909033A (en) * 1985-11-26 1990-03-20 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha High performance exhaust system for internal combustion engine
US4912930A (en) * 1985-11-26 1990-04-03 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha High performance exhaust system for internal combustion engine
US4869063A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-09-26 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for engine
US4795420A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-01-03 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for engine
US4840029A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-06-20 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for engine
US4765137A (en) * 1986-03-07 1988-08-23 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for engine
US4817374A (en) * 1986-09-13 1989-04-04 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust control device of engine
US4785626A (en) * 1986-10-27 1988-11-22 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for motorcycle and the like
US4896504A (en) * 1986-12-03 1990-01-30 Yamaha Matsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control device for engines
US4831823A (en) * 1987-02-24 1989-05-23 Yamada Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for motorcycle and the like
US4999999A (en) * 1987-09-14 1991-03-19 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control device for motorcycles
US4860538A (en) * 1988-02-23 1989-08-29 Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha Exhaust gas control means for motorcycle and the like
US20050098162A1 (en) * 1996-07-17 2005-05-12 Bryant Clyde C. Internal combustion engine and working cycle
US20040123849A1 (en) * 1996-07-17 2004-07-01 Bryant Clyde C. Cold air super-charged internal combustion engine, working cycle & method
US8215292B2 (en) 1996-07-17 2012-07-10 Bryant Clyde C Internal combustion engine and working cycle
US7281527B1 (en) 1996-07-17 2007-10-16 Bryant Clyde C Internal combustion engine and working cycle
US6951211B2 (en) 1996-07-17 2005-10-04 Bryant Clyde C Cold air super-charged internal combustion engine, working cycle and method
US7222614B2 (en) 1996-07-17 2007-05-29 Bryant Clyde C Internal combustion engine and working cycle
US7201121B2 (en) 2002-02-04 2007-04-10 Caterpillar Inc Combustion engine including fluidically-driven engine valve actuator
US7178492B2 (en) 2002-05-14 2007-02-20 Caterpillar Inc Air and fuel supply system for combustion engine
US7204213B2 (en) 2002-05-14 2007-04-17 Caterpillar Inc Air and fuel supply system for combustion engine
US7191743B2 (en) 2002-05-14 2007-03-20 Caterpillar Inc Air and fuel supply system for a combustion engine
US7252054B2 (en) 2002-05-14 2007-08-07 Caterpillar Inc Combustion engine including cam phase-shifting
US20050098149A1 (en) * 2002-05-14 2005-05-12 Coleman Gerald N. Air and fuel supply system for combustion engine
WO2005019619A1 (en) * 2003-08-18 2005-03-03 Bryant, Clyde, C. Improved internal combustion engine and working cycle
US20130037002A1 (en) * 2011-08-11 2013-02-14 Zoltan A. Kemeny In-cylinder emission cleaning by cams with auxiliary-lobes

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