US2636460A - Method of application of hairsimulating fiber - Google Patents

Method of application of hairsimulating fiber Download PDF

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US2636460A
US2636460A US24464751A US2636460A US 2636460 A US2636460 A US 2636460A US 24464751 A US24464751 A US 24464751A US 2636460 A US2636460 A US 2636460A
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base
needle
loops
strand
strands
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Seiderman Maurice
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Seiderman Maurice
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41GARTIFICIAL FLOWERS; WIGS; MASKS; FEATHERS
    • A41G3/00Wigs
    • A41G3/0066Planting hair on bases for wigs
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1052Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with cutting, punching, tearing or severing

Description

April 28, 1953 M. SEIDERMAN 2,636,460

METHOD OF APPLICATION OF HAIR-SIMULATING FIBER Filed Aug. 31 1951 2 SHEETSSHEET l ATTORNEYS April 28, 1953 M. SEIDERMAN 2,636,460

' METHOD OF APPLICATION OF HAIR-SIMULATING FIBER Filed Aug. 31 1951 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 INVENTOR.

Patented Apr. 28, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE METHOD OF APPLICATION OF HAIR- SIMULATING FIBER Maurice Seiderman, Burbank, Calif. Application August 31, 1951, Serial No. 244,647

Another ob ect of this invention is to provide a' process of the character described which is-sim- -ple and adapted to be carried out by even unskilled persons.

More particularly, it is an object of this invention to provide a process for the application of continuous strands of fibrous material to a resilient or rubber-like base. which process includes the step of reciprocating a hollow needle into and out of sa d base. the needle having threaded therethrough the strands of fibrous ma- 1 terials whereby a plurality of loops of fibrous material areapplied to the base, which loops may then be cut, and the resulting strands curled or waved to simulate natural hair.

Other obiects and advantages of this invention it is believed may be readily apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embod ment thereof, when read in connection with the drawings.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a front elevation of a dolls head having applied thereto hair-simulating material in accordance with a preferred embodiment of thi invention.

' Figure 2 is a sect onal e evation taken substantially on the line 22of Figure l.

Figure 3 is a view illustrating, in side elevation and in vertical section, a pre erred type of needle to be used in carrying out the process.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary side elevation, part- IV in section, illustrating the needle in position to penetrate through the rubber-like base.

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4, but illustrating the position of the needle as it penetrates the base.

Figure 6 is a fragmentary side elevation, partly in section, illustrating the position of the continuous strands of fibre after they have been applied to the base, and before they have been cut to provide the finished product.

: Figure 7 is a diagrammatic view illustrating a modified process "embodying the invention.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary side elevation, part- ;ly in section, illustrating the fibrous strands ,an-.

11 Claims. (01. 1 12-1) other t mes of hypodermic needles have been chored in place by means of the method shown in Figure 7.

Figure 9 is a diagrammatic another modification.

Figure 10'is a diagrammatic view illustrating yet another modification of the invention.

Figure 11 is a fragmentary side elevation, partly in section, illustrating the fibrous strands anchored in place by means of the method illustrated in Figure 10.

Referring now to the drawings, the preferred embodiment of this invention is illustrated in view illustrating connection with the production of a dolls head generally indicated In. The dolls head is preferably formed of a resilient, rubber-like material, and preferably is molded, in a manner familiar to those skilled in the art, of a plasticized resin composition. It is preferred to use a relatively soft, plasticized vinyl chloride polymer, although anv material having resilient or rubber-like properties may be'used.

Secured to the base or scalp portion H of the head In is a plurality of hair-simulating strands of fibres l2. These fibres are a plied to the head in accordance with the process illustrated in Figures 4 through 6. In carrying out this process a hollow needle I3 is provided. and it has been found that needles such as hypodermic needles are ex ellently suited to be used in carrying out this rocess. It is preferred to use a hypodermic needle having a so-cal ed Huber point, which as shown. comprises a ho low needle having a curved and shar ened end I5. I It has been found that there is less ten ency for a needle of this type to cut out portions of the base material, but

success ully ued and. in fact, any relatively narrow hollow needle having a sharp point and an openin ad acent the po nt may be used.

The needle 13 is threaded with a number of stran s of continuous fibre [6. A preferred type of material is a denier extruded fibre sold under the trade name Saran, a vinylidine chloride plastic material. Here again other materials may be used, such as, for example, Vinyon, nylon, or any other suitable continuous fibre material. Synthetic fibres of this type are preferred, since they closely resemble human hair when applied by the process herein described. As shown, it is preferred to thread four strands of the continuous fibre through the hollow needle 13, the free ends 20 of the strands extending through the lower opening 2| of the needle and the other ends of the strands extending to a supply spool or spools (not shown).

The needle is thus loaded is then caused to be moved in a path to reciprocate into and out of the scalp portion ll, from the position shown in Figure 4 through the respective positions illus trated in Figures 5 and 6. The needle during its downward stroke is caused to completely penetrate the base scalp portion so that the strands are caused to form the lower loops 23 shown in Figure 6. As the needle is withdrawn, the loops remain in place, due to the'fact that-the free legs z lthereof are gripped'by therubberdike material of the scalp portion, and there being little frictional resistance between the supply legs of the loops and the needles'ince' the supply legs are completely encased within the needle.

There is therefore no tendency for'tl'ieloo'ptobe pulled out as the needle withdrawnor re=- tracted. The needle is caused alternately to penetrate and be withdrawn over the entire area of the scalp portion, the points of penetration being spaced sufficiently close together to -afford complete coverage. Upper loops 36 are thereby formedand these loops are out sit-their outer ends, and the resulting single-"strandsarecurled or wavedto pi-oduce the fln'ished hair coveringillustr'ated'in Figures 1 and 2'. I

The inherent resiliency ofythe base material 'tendsto maintain th'e'strandso'f hair in place,

but" 111- career to avoidpulli'ngout ofthe hair on rough handling the fibres arefirliilyanchored in place; A" preferred method for anchoring the soles shares the use of an adhesive material. no adhesiv'mat'erial may be uses-'wnidhis not compatible'with' the material of di eases-recap portion, 1; el, one which does not have-a solvent action for the base" material, or" vice versa'. I prefer to "e' ordinary carpenters glue; but other adhesives'such as calcined magnesium oXyc'l iloride in a solution or magnesium chloride (is-22 Bi), plaster of Paris; etc; may 'be'used. The'liquid adhesive is merely poured into the inverted head and allowed to set as afllm indicatedat33, whereby the strands arefirnilyanchored in place.

While the reciprocation" of the needle may be accomplished by ha d, it" is preferred to mount a gang'o'f at least four needlesupoh a machine (not shown) is arranged to vertically reciprocate the gang of needles. such machine is neither shown nor described in detail since any mechanical device maybe" used and since it does not per se form a part oftliis'invefition. r further'facilitate' the operation the head i il'is'placed upon a mandrel 39 which is mounted directly snow the-needle is m-jbeids the eerie" of needles, as the case may be, the assessments provided was a central recess a! in which the needle or needles are received at the lower portion of the downward stroke. When the needles are mounted for mechanical reciprocation as described above the operator simply moves the head about on the mandrel to obtain complete coverage of the scal portion.

In Figure 7 is illustrated a modified method for securing the hair to the scalp portion H. Here a jet of gas is forced through a nozzle ii], the gas being at a temperature sufiiciently high to cause the loops 23 to become fused. It has been found that with fibres of thermoplastic material such as Saran, hot air at a temperature of about 660 F. is satisfactory in fusing; the loops without affecting the scalp portion H; It has been found that the jet of hot air need only be directed atany onegroup of loops for only a few seconds to fuse the loops into the form of nodules indicated at 42 in Figure 8; These lumps or nodules 42 are of sufiicient size so that they prevent withdrawal of the air strands from the scalp portion. During the process of fusing, the loops tend to curl and shrink so that the nodules 42 thus formed are brought into contact with the underside of the scalp portion i! as shown in Figure 8.

Another modified method for anchoring the hair strands in place on the scalp portion is shown iii-Figure 9. Hre a relativelythin film $5 of thermoplastic material of the same type as that used for the hair strands is placed inside of the scalp portion H and against the loops 23. A'heate'd'ma'ndrel or die 46 is then inserted into the scalp portion and contacts the film 45 under pressure'to fuse the same integrally with the loops 23.

In-Figure it) is illustrated a further modificatlon of the invention. In carrying out this form of the invention, the hair strands are spaced relative to-thelength of the=loops23-so that-when the loops are deformed to the -position shown. in

Figure ll, adjacent loops are: iii-contactwith each other.- Inorder to anchor the'stlands in place=a heated die ifi isdrawnacross the underside of the scalpportion it with sufficient pressure to'force the loops 23 against the scalp portion-and. to-fuse-adjacentloopstogether as shown in Figure 11.

While the proccsswhich embodies this invention has been described with reference to the application of hair-simulatingfibzes to'- adoil s head, it will be readily apparent thatt-he process isnot inherently so limited, and may be used in applying hair to toy animals and the like, and in the manufacture of other products adapted to simulate hair, such as wigs and the like. Furthcrmore,while-the base H isdescribBd' as being of a rubber-like material, itisapparent that'a fabric base impregnated with a rubber-like material may oe'used.

Having fully described my invention, it is to be understoodtha-t I do not wish to be limited to the details herein set forth but my invention is of the full scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a process of the character described, the steps which comprise vertically reciprocatingthe pointed end of a hollow needle into, through and out of a rubber-like base, said needle having an openingin the pointed end thereof, said needle having a strand of continuous fibre threaded therethroug'h, the free end of said strand extending outwardly through the opening, said rubberlike base being sufiiciently resilient to grip the strand and maintain it in place whereby said strand is repeatedly embedded in said base and formed into a plurality of loops on both sides of said base as said needle is reciprocated; cutting the outer ends of the loops on one side of the base; and fusing said uncut loops on the other side of said base to form nodules of greater diameter than said strands.

2. In a process of the character described, the steps which comprise vertically reciprocating the pointed end of a hollow needle into, through and out of a rubber-like base, said needle having an opening in the pointed end thereof, said needle having a strand of continuous fibre threaded therethrough, the free end of said strand eartending outwardly through the opening, said rubber like' base being sufficiently resilient tog'rip the strand and maintain it in place whereby said strand is repeatedly embedded in said base and formed into a plurality of'loops on both sides said loops are fused to form nodules of greater diameter than said strands.

3. In a process of the character described, the

steps which comprise vertically reciprocating the pointed end of a hollow needle into, through and out of a rubber-like base, said needle having an opening in the pointed end thereof, said needle having a strand of continuous fibre threaded therethrough, the free end of said strand extending outwardly through the opening, said .ru'bber-like base being. sufiiciently resilient to grip the strand and maintainit in place whereby said strand is repeatedly embedded in said base and formed into a plurality of loops on both sides ofsaid base as saidneedle is reciprocated; cutting the outer ends of the loops on one side of the base; applyin a relatively thin 'film of thermo plastic material to said uncut loops on the other side of said base; and fusing said film to said loops by means of heat and pressure.

4. In a process of the character described, the steps which comprise vertically reciprocating the pointed end of a hollow needle into, through and out of a rubber-like base, said needle having an opening in the pointed end thereof, said needle having a strand of continuous fibre threaded therethrough, the free end of said strand extending outwardly through the opening, said rubber-like base being sufficiently resilient to rip the strand and maintain it in place whereby said strand is repeatedly embedded in said base and formed into a plurality of loops on both sides of said base as said needle is reciprocated; cutting the outer ends of the loops on one side of the base; and applying heat and pressure to said uncut loops n the other side of said base whereby adjacent loops are fused together.

5. In a process for applying hair to a hollow doll head, the steps which comprise reciprocating the pointed end of a hollow needle into, through and out of the scalp portion of said doll, said scalp portion comprising a rubber-like base, said needle having an opening in the pointed end thereof and a strand of continuous fibre threaded therethrough with the free end of the strand extending outwardly through the opening, said rubberlike base being sufiiciently resilient to grip the strand and maintain it in place, whereby said strand is repeatedly embedded in said base and formed into a plurality of loops on both the interior and exterior sides of said scalp portion as said needle is reciprocated; cutting the loops extending from the exterior side of said scalp Portion to form individual strands, and changing the configuration of said individual strands on the exterior side of said scalp portion.

6. In a process for applying hair to a hollow doll head, the steps which comprise vertically reciprocating the pointed end of a hollow needle into, through and out of the scalp portion of said doll, said scalp portion comprising a rubberlike base, said needle having an opening in the pointed end thereof and a strand of continuous fibre threaded therethrough with the free end of the strand extending outwardly through the opening, said rubber-like base being sufliciently resilient to grip the strand and maintain it in place, whereby said strand is repeatedly embedded in said base and formed into a plurality of loops on both the interior and exterior sides of said scalp portion as said needle is reciprocated; cutting the loops extending from the exterior side of said scalp portion to form individual strands; anchoring the loops on the interior side of said scalp portion, and changing the configuration of said individual strands on the exterior side of said scalp portion.

7. Ina process for applying hair to a hollow doll head, the steps which comprise vertically reciprocating the pointed end of a hollow needle into, through and out of the scalp portion of said doll, said scalp portion comprising a rubberlikebase, said needle having an opening in the pointed end thereof and a strand of continuous thermoplastic fibre threaded therethroughwith the free end of the strand extending outwardly -through the opening, said rubber-like base, being ,sufiicientlyresilient to gripthe stranduand maintain'it in place, whereby said strand is repeatedly embedded in;said base and formed into apluralityof loops on both the interior and exterior sides of said scalp portion as said needleis reciprocated; cutting the loops extending from the exterior side of said scalp portion to form in dividual strands; fusing said uncut loops on the interior side of said scalp portion to form nodules of greater diameter than said strands; and changing the configuration of said individual strands on the exterior side of said scalp portion.

8. In a process of the character described, the steps which comprise threading a strand of continuous fibre through a hollow needle having an opening in the pointed end thereof, forming a supply leg of said strand encased in said needle and a free leg of said strand exteriorly of said needle and extending from said opening, inserting said needle through a rubber-like base from one side thereof to form a loop on the other side of said base, withdrawing said needle completely therefrom a substantial distance, said rubber-like base being sufficiently resilient to grip said free leg and prevent withdrawal thereof as the needle is withdrawn and to prevent withdrawal of the portion of the strand previously comprising the supply leg and left in the base as a result of the withdrawal of said needle, whereby said loop as a whole remains in place, forming a loop on said one side of said base by again inserting said needle through said base, repeating the steps of insertion and withdrawal to form a plurality of loops on both sides of said base, cutting the loops extending from one side of the base to form individual strands and waving said individual strands to change the configuration thereof.

9. In a process of the character described, the steps which comprise threading a strand of continuous fibre through a hollow needle having an opening in the pointed end thereof, forming a supply leg of said strand encased in said needle and a free leg of said strand exteriorly of said needle and extending from said opening, inserting said needle through a rubber-like base from one side thereof to form a loop on the other side of said base, withdrawing said needle completely therefrom a substantial distance, said rubber-like base being sufiiciently resilient to grip said free leg and prevent withdrawal thereof as the needle is withdrawn and to prevent withdrawal of the portion of the strand previously comprising the supply leg and left in the base as a result of the withdrawal of said needle, whereby said loop as a whole remains in place, forming a loop on said one side of said base by again inserting said needle through said base, repeating the steps of insertion and withdrawal to form a plurality of loops on both sides of said base, cutting the loops o i'e "ii of @616 base; to ram ifidividul wanes, anchoflng do we ease the 100155 ghe ache: side of sai base, and waving Said 11'1dlVld- 10. In 9; prbcess {6'1" applying hair to a bellow doll head, the steps which eompiis'e reip'rocating the liointed 'r'id 6f 9, hollow meme ifitd, through "euid out if fihe scalp pdrtin of aid (1011, said {'sclb pOitiOn comprisitig a} flibbr-like' base, aid fiedle having 'ari opnifig in the painted end "blixof mid a; sola'fid O f cjntiimous fibie threaded extending fr'dir'i the eiteiii Side 5f said Sblb "pumon to form ifldivi'du'el strands;

iia'tq, ziiremgh aria ut 6f the'salp pbrtion'of slat-1d d611, said caip portion comprising a rubberlik'e base, said needle having openin'g in the tibinted efid thfeof and a strand of continuous fibre thi'etdeii therthlolig'h With the free end bf the strand extending outwardly through the epefiing said rubbef like base being suffieiently fesi-lient grip the strand 85nd maintain it in place; whereby said strand is repeatedly em- Refernce came in the me of this patem; f

I STATES PQHEN- I S V Name Date 2125 3 812 Kellogg Jan. 28, 1936 2,226,631 Miller Dem; 3-1, 1 94 0

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Cited By (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2686305A (en) * 1953-08-26 1954-08-10 Lawrence E Hall Attachment for converting chain stitch type sewing machines into machines for rooting hair into the resultant product
US2725835A (en) * 1953-04-27 1955-12-06 Robert I Mather Composite carpet and method of making same
US2728314A (en) * 1952-05-28 1955-12-27 Ideal Toy Corp Apparatus for inserting hair into a doll's head
US2809909A (en) * 1952-06-21 1957-10-15 Chatanay Jean Simulated pile fabric structure
US2814301A (en) * 1953-07-01 1957-11-26 Joseph H Schmitz Artificial hair pieces and methods of making the same
US2820326A (en) * 1954-07-23 1958-01-21 American Character Doll Compan Wigged doll head
US2903708A (en) * 1955-05-02 1959-09-15 Du Pont Pile fabric
US2936513A (en) * 1956-06-08 1960-05-17 Jr Charles R Ibach Tufted fabric
US2938452A (en) * 1958-03-31 1960-05-31 Wheeling Steel Corp Apparatus for bundling lath or the like
US2968104A (en) * 1959-05-27 1961-01-17 Ito Yonezo Head model with hairs
US2973799A (en) * 1957-12-18 1961-03-07 Goodrich Co B F Vented rubberized fabric article and method of making same
US2984196A (en) * 1957-12-18 1961-05-16 Goodrich Co B F Apparatus for applying vent yarns to rubberized fabric
US3003155A (en) * 1956-07-06 1961-10-10 Felix C Mielzynski Hair darts for implanting in live or artificial media
US3010180A (en) * 1959-04-08 1961-11-28 Hoffman Maufred Turner Method for manufacturing non-woven pile fabrics
US3013567A (en) * 1953-03-10 1961-12-19 Rooted Hair Inc Method of stitching strands of simulated hair to a workpiece and of brushing aside loose ends of hair
US3032923A (en) * 1958-08-11 1962-05-08 Sternberg Jule R Von Wig construction
US3059598A (en) * 1955-03-14 1962-10-23 American Viscose Corp Tufted fabric
US3142611A (en) * 1960-12-12 1964-07-28 Jennings Engineering Company Non-woven pile fabrics and methods of their manufacture
US3158518A (en) * 1961-03-17 1964-11-24 Kessler Milton Method for making a pre-formable metal base pile material
US3201300A (en) * 1961-06-05 1965-08-17 Manfred T Hoffman Porous non-woven laminated fabrics
US3200944A (en) * 1961-05-26 1965-08-17 Illinois Tool Works Container package
US3216082A (en) * 1962-12-11 1965-11-09 Dunlop Rubber Co Method of making shaped felt
US3216387A (en) * 1963-07-22 1965-11-09 Callaway Mills Co Tufted article and method of making the same
US3257768A (en) * 1962-04-17 1966-06-28 Grace W R & Co Corner lock package
US3266969A (en) * 1962-09-10 1966-08-16 Du Pont Tufting process and products having tufted structures
US3273280A (en) * 1964-02-27 1966-09-20 Deluxe Reading Corp Doll joint construction for cooperation with hair rooting machine
US3313060A (en) * 1965-07-30 1967-04-11 Jr Edward L Mobley Toy with attachable ears
US3356047A (en) * 1965-08-02 1967-12-05 Callaway Mills Co Tufting needle and method of making same
US3411235A (en) * 1966-05-27 1968-11-19 Mattel Inc Eyelash-simulating rooted fibre
US3533892A (en) * 1966-03-28 1970-10-13 Josef Kantorowicz Unwoven textile surface structure and method for its production
US3660185A (en) * 1968-10-25 1972-05-02 David C Bonham Method of producing a hairpiece
US3831202A (en) * 1972-10-06 1974-08-27 W Hulsen Hair implant and process
US3839124A (en) * 1970-04-29 1974-10-01 Phillips Petroleum Co Article and method of manufacture
US3856602A (en) * 1971-01-12 1974-12-24 Breveteam Sa Method of producing non-woven textile fiber products having a relief-like structure
US3980090A (en) * 1974-09-25 1976-09-14 Bonham David C Hair seizure and implantation method
US4227335A (en) * 1979-01-05 1980-10-14 Marvin Glass & Associates Graphic art toy
US4263913A (en) * 1978-08-10 1981-04-28 Oscar Malmin Hair replacement method
US4346713A (en) * 1978-02-09 1982-08-31 Oscar Malmin Hair replacement method
US4382444A (en) * 1978-08-21 1983-05-10 Oscar Malmin Hair replacement method
US4491134A (en) * 1978-08-10 1985-01-01 Oscar Malmin Hair replacement apparatus
US4583540A (en) * 1978-08-21 1986-04-22 Hills Family Preservation Trust Hair replacement apparatus
US5025976A (en) * 1988-04-25 1991-06-25 Miller Jack V Manufacturing method for a sculpture having simulated hair
US5083967A (en) * 1987-05-23 1992-01-28 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Fiber for doll's hair
US5643308A (en) * 1995-02-28 1997-07-01 Markman; Barry Stephen Method and apparatus for forming multiple cavities for placement of hair grafts
US5868758A (en) * 1995-02-28 1999-02-09 Markman; Barry S. Method apparatus and kit for performing hair grafts
US5957139A (en) * 1994-11-24 1999-09-28 Interlego Ag Method of producing a wig for a toy figure

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US2028872A (en) * 1934-01-31 1936-01-28 Mohawk Carpet Mills Inc Pile fabric
US2226631A (en) * 1937-03-17 1940-12-31 Miller Jonas Corp Pile fabrics

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2028872A (en) * 1934-01-31 1936-01-28 Mohawk Carpet Mills Inc Pile fabric
US2226631A (en) * 1937-03-17 1940-12-31 Miller Jonas Corp Pile fabrics

Cited By (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2728314A (en) * 1952-05-28 1955-12-27 Ideal Toy Corp Apparatus for inserting hair into a doll's head
US2809909A (en) * 1952-06-21 1957-10-15 Chatanay Jean Simulated pile fabric structure
US3013567A (en) * 1953-03-10 1961-12-19 Rooted Hair Inc Method of stitching strands of simulated hair to a workpiece and of brushing aside loose ends of hair
US2725835A (en) * 1953-04-27 1955-12-06 Robert I Mather Composite carpet and method of making same
US2814301A (en) * 1953-07-01 1957-11-26 Joseph H Schmitz Artificial hair pieces and methods of making the same
US2686305A (en) * 1953-08-26 1954-08-10 Lawrence E Hall Attachment for converting chain stitch type sewing machines into machines for rooting hair into the resultant product
US2820326A (en) * 1954-07-23 1958-01-21 American Character Doll Compan Wigged doll head
US3059598A (en) * 1955-03-14 1962-10-23 American Viscose Corp Tufted fabric
US2903708A (en) * 1955-05-02 1959-09-15 Du Pont Pile fabric
US2936513A (en) * 1956-06-08 1960-05-17 Jr Charles R Ibach Tufted fabric
US3003155A (en) * 1956-07-06 1961-10-10 Felix C Mielzynski Hair darts for implanting in live or artificial media
US2984196A (en) * 1957-12-18 1961-05-16 Goodrich Co B F Apparatus for applying vent yarns to rubberized fabric
US2973799A (en) * 1957-12-18 1961-03-07 Goodrich Co B F Vented rubberized fabric article and method of making same
US2938452A (en) * 1958-03-31 1960-05-31 Wheeling Steel Corp Apparatus for bundling lath or the like
US3032923A (en) * 1958-08-11 1962-05-08 Sternberg Jule R Von Wig construction
US3010180A (en) * 1959-04-08 1961-11-28 Hoffman Maufred Turner Method for manufacturing non-woven pile fabrics
US2968104A (en) * 1959-05-27 1961-01-17 Ito Yonezo Head model with hairs
US3142611A (en) * 1960-12-12 1964-07-28 Jennings Engineering Company Non-woven pile fabrics and methods of their manufacture
US3158518A (en) * 1961-03-17 1964-11-24 Kessler Milton Method for making a pre-formable metal base pile material
US3200944A (en) * 1961-05-26 1965-08-17 Illinois Tool Works Container package
US3201300A (en) * 1961-06-05 1965-08-17 Manfred T Hoffman Porous non-woven laminated fabrics
US3257768A (en) * 1962-04-17 1966-06-28 Grace W R & Co Corner lock package
US3266969A (en) * 1962-09-10 1966-08-16 Du Pont Tufting process and products having tufted structures
US3216082A (en) * 1962-12-11 1965-11-09 Dunlop Rubber Co Method of making shaped felt
US3216387A (en) * 1963-07-22 1965-11-09 Callaway Mills Co Tufted article and method of making the same
US3273280A (en) * 1964-02-27 1966-09-20 Deluxe Reading Corp Doll joint construction for cooperation with hair rooting machine
US3313060A (en) * 1965-07-30 1967-04-11 Jr Edward L Mobley Toy with attachable ears
US3356047A (en) * 1965-08-02 1967-12-05 Callaway Mills Co Tufting needle and method of making same
US3533892A (en) * 1966-03-28 1970-10-13 Josef Kantorowicz Unwoven textile surface structure and method for its production
US3411235A (en) * 1966-05-27 1968-11-19 Mattel Inc Eyelash-simulating rooted fibre
US3660185A (en) * 1968-10-25 1972-05-02 David C Bonham Method of producing a hairpiece
US3839124A (en) * 1970-04-29 1974-10-01 Phillips Petroleum Co Article and method of manufacture
US3856602A (en) * 1971-01-12 1974-12-24 Breveteam Sa Method of producing non-woven textile fiber products having a relief-like structure
US3831202A (en) * 1972-10-06 1974-08-27 W Hulsen Hair implant and process
US3980090A (en) * 1974-09-25 1976-09-14 Bonham David C Hair seizure and implantation method
US4346713A (en) * 1978-02-09 1982-08-31 Oscar Malmin Hair replacement method
US4263913A (en) * 1978-08-10 1981-04-28 Oscar Malmin Hair replacement method
US4491134A (en) * 1978-08-10 1985-01-01 Oscar Malmin Hair replacement apparatus
US4382444A (en) * 1978-08-21 1983-05-10 Oscar Malmin Hair replacement method
US4583540A (en) * 1978-08-21 1986-04-22 Hills Family Preservation Trust Hair replacement apparatus
US4227335A (en) * 1979-01-05 1980-10-14 Marvin Glass & Associates Graphic art toy
US5083967A (en) * 1987-05-23 1992-01-28 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Fiber for doll's hair
US5025976A (en) * 1988-04-25 1991-06-25 Miller Jack V Manufacturing method for a sculpture having simulated hair
US5957139A (en) * 1994-11-24 1999-09-28 Interlego Ag Method of producing a wig for a toy figure
US5643308A (en) * 1995-02-28 1997-07-01 Markman; Barry Stephen Method and apparatus for forming multiple cavities for placement of hair grafts
US5868758A (en) * 1995-02-28 1999-02-09 Markman; Barry S. Method apparatus and kit for performing hair grafts

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