US2611425A - Self-gasifying heating equipment - Google Patents

Self-gasifying heating equipment Download PDF

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US2611425A
US2611425A US731297A US73129747A US2611425A US 2611425 A US2611425 A US 2611425A US 731297 A US731297 A US 731297A US 73129747 A US73129747 A US 73129747A US 2611425 A US2611425 A US 2611425A
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burner
gasifier
gas
fuel
gas chamber
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Martiri Roberto
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D11/00Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space
    • F23D11/36Details, e.g. burner cooling means, noise reduction means
    • F23D11/44Preheating devices; Vaporising devices
    • F23D11/441Vaporising devices incorporated with burners
    • F23D11/446Vaporising devices incorporated with burners heated by an auxiliary flame

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  • This invention relates to a burner system for hydrocarbon fuel, preferably oil, comprising a gasifier which includes a metal gauze, metal wire or similar material and a gas chamber to which the fuel is being supplied at a comparatively low pressure by gravity, at least one main burner provided with a valve and a separate auxiliary burner of considerably smaller capacity for the sole purpose of heating said gasifier and said gas chamber, which are separated from said main burner.
  • a gasifier which includes a metal gauze, metal wire or similar material and a gas chamber to which the fuel is being supplied at a comparatively low pressure by gravity
  • at least one main burner provided with a valve and a separate auxiliary burner of considerably smaller capacity for the sole purpose of heating said gasifier and said gas chamber, which are separated from said main burner.
  • gasifi'er is understood to refer to an enclosure in which liquid fuel is gasified' by heat.
  • the filling with metal gauze, metal wire or similar material performs a triple function, it
  • the filter action has the effect of leaving impurities or other small particles in the filling so as to avoid blocking of fine passages or apertures which have still to be traversed in the system,
  • the mechanical resistance tends to prevent the liquid fuel from being repelled into the reservoir under the pressure of the gases produced in the gasifier, whereby the regular course of the gasifying action and a possibly constant gas pressure would be affected.
  • the filter resistance has a damping effect on variations occuring in the gas pressure within the filter and in addition imparts storage properties to the gasifier.
  • the function of transmitting the heat and of evenly distributing the liquid about a large surface area results in a high efficiency of the gasifying process and in addition in a high capacity for gasifying.
  • gas chamber member is understood to refer to an enclosure which serves to store gas issuing from the gasifier and which has a sufiicient capacity to release sudden load fluctu ations and any irregular production of gas that may'still occur so that the gas supplied to the burners is of practically constant pressure.
  • the liquid fuel is supplied to the system at a low pressure.
  • the system is essentially distinguished from other systems, in which the liquid fuel is supplied generally under the influence of a comparatively high pressure, by means of gas pressure, compressed air, pumps and similar expedicnts.
  • One of the disadvantages inherent in such systems is that the probability of leakage oc curring is considerably greater, the leaks result ing in unclean operation and being in addition liable to disturb the operation (for example by excessively low gas pressure).
  • the fuel reservoir, and also all the pipes which are traversed by the fuel either in the liquid or in the gaseous state; must be of very reliable construction entailing the necessity of involved connections, packings of valve spindles, pressure gauges or the like.
  • the means for obtaining the high gas pressure which, moreover, can be kept constant with difiiculty only, the system is complicated and rendered expensive.
  • a system of this kind is particularly suitable for use in installations for domestic and cooking purposes which are not apt to be watched expertly, so that comparatively high requirements have to be fulfilled as regards safe Working, safety in view of the possibility of explosion or fire, simplicity in construction and operation and low initial expense.
  • the invention has for its object to further refine a system of the said kind so as to add to the advantages mentioned above some few important advantages which are most prominent in a domestic use of the apparatus.
  • each of the burners is provided with a separate low pressure fuel supply system constituted by a mixing chamber, an air inlet-duct and a nozzle connected directly to the gas chamher.
  • mixing chamber is understood to refer to an enclosure which is provided with one or more air inlet apertures through which air is sucked in under the elective action of the gas supplied, said air uniting with the gas in the mixing chamber to form a so-called blue-burning mixture.
  • the auxiliary burner operates irrespective of whether or not the main burners are in operation and provides a sufiicient supply of gas to be capable not only of immediately igniting, if need be, all of the main burners present at the same time, but also of maintaining them in full operation for any length of time without entailing the use of a further source of heat (for example in combination with one or more of the operating main burners).
  • a further source of heat for example in combination with one or more of the operating main burners.
  • the auxiliary burner having to operate at all times, so as to permit of using instantaneously one, more or all of the main burners, an economical consumption of the fuel by the auxiliary burner is necessary.
  • the consumption of oil (parafiin oil) of one main burner is about 0.17 litre/hour and of the auxiliary burner about 0.03 litre/hour so that the latter consumes about 16% as much fuel as one of the main burners provided in this apparatus.
  • the gasifier member is not heated to redness, as is often the case in devices in which the gasifier is heated by a main burner.
  • Such an extreme heating is a source of danger because the liquid fuel is transferred to the gaseous state comparatively suddenly so that either a very heavy construction is required or particular safety means must be provided. In the system according to the invention such precautions are unnecessary.
  • the system according to the invention is designed particularly for use as cooking apparatus, kitchen range or similar generally portable domestic devices of comparatively small power and comparatively small size.
  • the fuel being supplied at a comparatively low pressure the system is limited to the use of low pressure burners which are provided with a number of fine apertures, so that systems for industrial purposes having so-called open burners, where the fuel is injected at a comparatively high pressure by sprayers and is ignited at the open end of the burner with the formation of a blow pipe flame or pilot flame, do not fall within the ambit of the invention.
  • each nozzle of the main burners is connected directly to the gas chamber and each nozzle is combined separately with an adjustable supply valve, an air inlet duct and a mixing chamber, this permits of each of the main burners being separately controlled and thus altered to accord with instantaneous requirements (a large, medium-size, or small flame, economical burner) and avoids relative influence on the size of each flame.
  • the direct connection of the nozzles to the gas chamber permits of giving this common space a comparatively small size.
  • the system according to the invention may be preheated and put into use in the usual manner, for example, by heating by means of spirit, alcohol, or the like in a separate small container.
  • the nozzle of the auxiliary burner is provided with a separate valve, so that it is possible for the auxiliary burner to be adjusted, in some cases in view of differing or varying ambient temperatures, to a consumption as economical as possible.
  • any further control may be omitted irrespective of whether or not the main burners are in use.
  • the preferred construction of the gasifier and of the auxiliary burner is in the form of long tubes, which is also advantageous as regards the above-mentioned properties.
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the burner system according to the invention
  • Figures 2 and 3 are a plan and a front view respectively, and
  • Figures 4 and 5 show a cross-section and a longitudinal section respectively.
  • Figure 6 is a sectional view in elevation showing the means for preheating the air supply for the main burner.
  • the liquid fuel is constituted by paraffin oil, which is especially suitable for domestic use.
  • This liquid is supplied to the system at a low practically constant pressure by means of a supply tube I from a reservoir 2 arranged at a level of about cms. above the gasifier.
  • the supply tube is connected to a gasifier tube 3 which is filled with a rolled sheet of metal gauze 4.
  • a gasifier tube 3 which is filled with a rolled sheet of metal gauze 4.
  • a gas chamber 5 At the end of the gasifier 3, which is constructed as a long tube, there is a gas chamber 5 to which is connected a nozzle 6 for the auxiliary burner.
  • the nozzle 6 is provided with a needle valve 1, the front part 8 of which serves to enter the aperture 9 of the nozzle and to keep it free from any deposition of impurities.
  • the valve spindle I is entirely surrounded by the metal gauze 4, which for this purpose is arranged so as to be coiled about the valve spindle.
  • the valve is operated by means of a
  • a little beyond the nozzle-6 is arranged a mixing chamber [2 into which air is injected by the gap i3 as a result of the ejective operation of the gas flowing from the nozzle.
  • the mixing chamber is bent 180 and passes in the form of a longtime Hi provided with small apertures i5 onward below the gasifier and the gas chamber, thus constituting the auxiliary burner.
  • smallflames having a height and section of some few millimeters are formed at the apertures. l5, so that a small consumption is safeguarded.
  • a side connection I6 passes from the gas chamber 5 to a second gas chamber H which, also in the form of a long parallel tube, is arranged alongside of the gasifier and is also heated by the auxiliary burner Hi.
  • the nozzles [8 for the main burners 4B are connected direct to this second gas chamber. These nozzles have small apertures l9 and are connected to the second gas chamber ll by small pipes 20.
  • each nozzle is provided with a needle valve 2 I, a valve spindle 22 and its operating knob 23 and with an air inlet aperture 24 and a mixing chamber 25.
  • the mixing chambers 25 each communicate with a burner head 26 which is provided with apertures covered by metal gauze 21, where the main burners can be ignited.
  • Thesecond nozzle from the right is combined with a mixing chamber which leads to a burner for the furnace and for the sake of simplicity is not shown in detail.
  • the nozzles of the main burners and if desired also the aux-- ilia-ry burner, or that part of the housing with which these nozzles are associated such a thermal capacity and to heat them so that the gas nowing from the gas chamber into the nozzle is subjected to an ultimate subsequent heating whereby all the particles that may still be liquid are gasified completely.
  • the high thermal capacity may be ensured by robust construction with high mass and the heating may be ensured by a suitable arrangement above theauxiliary burner, as is efiected in Figure 4 at l8 and 20. An absolutely dry gas can be produced in this manner.
  • the air which is supplied to the mixing chambers by sucking-in comes from an enclosure 28 (Fig. 4) which, under the influence of the auxiliary burner is, may be heated to a suflicient extent to safeguard an air temperature which is as appropriate as possible for mixing:
  • This enclosure communicates with the open air by a tube 29.
  • the tube 29 is also heated by the radiation of the main burners and may in view thereof extend close to the main burners.
  • the space from which the mixing air for the auxiliary heating burner is obtained is indicated by reference numeral 23 in Figure 4 and is constructed so as to be heated mainly by the auxiliary burner itself. As shown in Figure 4 the space 23' completely encloses the gasifier 3 and gas chambers 5 and H. This ensures that the air in this space is maintained at a uniform temperature, because the auxiliary burner, in contradistinction to the main burners, operates at all times.
  • space 28' is connected to space 28 through an opening 34 as shown in Figure 4, or is connected directly 6. to the atmosphere through an openings; as shown in Figure 6.
  • This vpre-heating chamber is designated 30 in Figure 5 and is also heated by the auxiliary burner.
  • the liquid which is contained in this chamber is generally'speaking still entirely in the liquid condition, and-is not gasified until in the metal gauze-filled gasifier.
  • the nozzle 6, of the auxiliary burner 14 and the associated components may also be connected to this gas chamber and this readily permits of removing the filter 4 for cleaning purposes.
  • a second gas chamber H which is primarily intended for the connection of the nozzles of the main burners with their much larger capacity has the efiect of improving the quality condition of the gas and avoids the penetration of parts that may still be liquid so that a more satisfactory combustion is safeguarded.
  • the small connecting pipe it between the first and the second gas chambers is arranged at a certain levelabove the bottom of the first gas chamber 5 so as to ensure a threshold effect.
  • is in addition provided with a supply chute 32 for filling with spirit,
  • a burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member in the form of a straight tubular member, a filling of a porous mass of metal within said member, said gasifier member constituting at one end a fuel preheating chamber and at the opposite endfirst gas chamber, fuel conducting means to supply the liquid fuel by gravity to said preheating chamber,
  • eachof said main burners being provided with a separate low pressure vaporized fuel supply system comprising a mixing chamber, an air inlet duct and a nozzle connected directly to said second gas chamber, said auxiliary heating burner being provided with a separate low pressure vaporized fuel supply system comprising a mixing chamber, an air inlet duct and a nozzle connected directly to said first gas chamber.
  • a burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member having an inlet and an outlet, a filler comprised of a mass of porous material arranged in said gasifier member between said inlet and said outlet, fuel supply means connected to said inlet to supply liquid fuel at low pressure thereto, a gas chamber connected to said outlet, a main burner having an inlet opening, a low pressure vaporized fuel supply system for said burner, said supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means connecting said mixing chamber to a source of air, and a nozzle connected to said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said main burner; a separate auxiliary burner arranged'under both said gasifier member and said gas chamber to heat said members to pre-heat the fuel, and a low pressure fuel supply system for said auxiliary burner having an inlet opening, said latter supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means for introducing air into said latter mixing chamber, and a nozzle connected to said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said auxiliary burner.
  • a burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member having an inlet and an outlet, a filler comprised of a mass of porous material arranged in said gasifier member between said inlet and said outlet, fuel supply means connected to said inlet to supply liquid fuel at low pressure thereto, a gas chamber connected to said outlet, a plurality of main burners each having an inlet opening, a low pressure vaporized fuel supply system for each of said burners, each supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means connecting said mixing chamber to a source of air, and a nozzle connected to said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of a main burner; a separate auxiliary burner arranged under both said gasifier member and said gas chamber to heat said members to preheat the fuel, and a low pressure fuel supply system for said auxiliary burner having an inlet opening, said latter supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means for introducing air into said latter mixing chamber, and a nozzle connected to said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said auxiliary burner.
  • a burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member having an inlet and an outlet, 3, filler comprised of a mass of porous material arranged in said gasifier member between said inlet and said outlet, fuel supply means connected to said inlet to supply liquid fuel at low pressure thereto, a gas chamber connected to said outlet, said gas chamber having a first section located near the gasifier member and a second section connected to said first section and located more remote from said gasifier than is said first section, a main burner having an inlet opening, a low pressure vaporized fuel supply system for said burner, said supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means connecting said mixing chamber to a source of air, and a nozzle connected to said second section of said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said main burner; a separate auxiliary burner arranged under both said gasifier member and said gas chamber to heat said members to pre-heat the fuel, and a low pressure fuel supply system for said auxiliary burner having an inlet opening, said latter supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means for introducing air
  • a burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member having an inlet and an outlet, a filler comprised of a mass of porous material arranged in said gasifier member between said inlet and said outlet, fuel supply means connected to said inlet to supply liquid fuel at low pressure thereto, a gas chamber connected to said outlet, said gas chamber having a first section adjacent said gasifier member and a second section connected to said first section and remote from said gasifier member, a main burner having an inlet opening, a low pressure vaporized fuel supply system for said burner, said supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means connecting said mixing chamber to a source of air, and a nozzle connected to said second section of said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said main burner; a separate auxiliary burner arranged under both said gasifier member and said gas chamber to heat said members to pre-heat the fuel, and a low pressure fuel supply system for said auxiliary burner having an inlet opening, said latter supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means for introducing air into said latter mixing chamber,

Description

Sept. 23, 1952 1 2,611,425
SELF-GASIFYING HEATING EQUIPMENT Filed Feb. 27, 1947 2 SHEETSSHEET l l l a 5 16 25 14 J ROBERTOJMRTHZI INVENTOR.
Sept. 23, 1952 R. MARTIRI SELF-GASIFYING HEATING EQUIPMENT- 2 SX-lEETS-Sl-IEET 2 Filed Feb. 2'7, 1947 900 oo o OOQOQObOOOOBOOQOO-DGDOO I Ill jifJ 10 .3
7 0AA m Patented Sept, 23, 1952 UNITED snares DFFICE SELF-GASIFYIN G HEATING EQUIPMENT Roberto Martiri, Buenos Aires, Argentina Application February 27, 1947, Serial No. 731,297
Claims. l
This invention relates to a burner system for hydrocarbon fuel, preferably oil, comprising a gasifier which includes a metal gauze, metal wire or similar material and a gas chamber to which the fuel is being supplied at a comparatively low pressure by gravity, at least one main burner provided with a valve and a separate auxiliary burner of considerably smaller capacity for the sole purpose of heating said gasifier and said gas chamber, which are separated from said main burner. As to common subject matter this application is a continuation-in-part of the prior copending applications of Roberto Martiri Serial Nos.'553,043 and 553,04, filed on September '7, 1944, now both abandoned.
The term gasifi'er is understood to refer to an enclosure in which liquid fuel is gasified' by heat. The filling with metal gauze, metal wire or similar material performs a triple function, it
serving as a filter, as a resistance and as a heat' transmitting medium. The filter action has the effect of leaving impurities or other small particles in the filling so as to avoid blocking of fine passages or apertures which have still to be traversed in the system, The mechanical resistance tends to prevent the liquid fuel from being repelled into the reservoir under the pressure of the gases produced in the gasifier, whereby the regular course of the gasifying action and a possibly constant gas pressure would be affected. The filter resistance has a damping effect on variations occuring in the gas pressure within the filter and in addition imparts storage properties to the gasifier. The function of transmitting the heat and of evenly distributing the liquid about a large surface area results in a high efficiency of the gasifying process and in addition in a high capacity for gasifying.
The term gas chamber member is understood to refer to an enclosure which serves to store gas issuing from the gasifier and which has a sufiicient capacity to release sudden load fluctu ations and any irregular production of gas that may'still occur so that the gas supplied to the burners is of practically constant pressure.
The liquid fuel is supplied to the system at a low pressure. Thus several advantages accrue by which the system is essentially distinguished from other systems, in which the liquid fuel is supplied generally under the influence of a comparatively high pressure, by means of gas pressure, compressed air, pumps and similar expedicnts. One of the disadvantages inherent in such systems is that the probability of leakage oc curring is considerably greater, the leaks result ing in unclean operation and being in addition liable to disturb the operation (for example by excessively low gas pressure). To avoid this the fuel reservoir, and also all the pipes which are traversed by the fuel either in the liquid or in the gaseous state; must be of very reliable construction entailing the necessity of involved connections, packings of valve spindles, pressure gauges or the like. Thus, and by the use of the means for obtaining the high gas pressure, which, moreover, can be kept constant with difiiculty only, the system is complicated and rendered expensive.
In the system according to the invention these disadvantages are deliberately avoided by the use of a reservoir for the liquid fuel which by arrangement at a suitable level above the gasifying system, for example at a level of about -400 cms., causes the supply of the fuel to be effected automatically at a low and practically constant pressure. There is therefore no need for the res crvoir to be hermetically closed.
A system of this kind is particularly suitable for use in installations for domestic and cooking purposes which are not apt to be watched expertly, so that comparatively high requirements have to be fulfilled as regards safe Working, safety in view of the possibility of explosion or fire, simplicity in construction and operation and low initial expense.
The invention has for its object to further refine a system of the said kind so as to add to the advantages mentioned above some few important advantages which are most prominent in a domestic use of the apparatus.
According to the invention, in a system of the said kind each of the burners is provided with a separate low pressure fuel supply system constituted by a mixing chamber, an air inlet-duct and a nozzle connected directly to the gas chamher.
The term mixing chamber is understood to refer to an enclosure which is provided with one or more air inlet apertures through which air is sucked in under the elective action of the gas supplied, said air uniting with the gas in the mixing chamber to form a so-called blue-burning mixture.
The combination of features according to the invention oilersimportant advantages compared to known devices of this kind.
In the embodiment according to the invention the auxiliary burner operates irrespective of whether or not the main burners are in operation and provides a sufiicient supply of gas to be capable not only of immediately igniting, if need be, all of the main burners present at the same time, but also of maintaining them in full operation for any length of time without entailing the use of a further source of heat (for example in combination with one or more of the operating main burners). One of the optimum conditions for domestic apparatus is fulfilled in this manner. This is also due to the fact that not only the gasifier but also the gas chamber is heated by the auxiliary burner, which assists in the withdrawal of gas at a practically constant pressure, varying between wide limits and avoids condensation of the gas in the gas chamber. In addition, higher thermal capacity of the aggregate is ensured.
The auxiliary burner having to operate at all times, so as to permit of using instantaneously one, more or all of the main burners, an economical consumption of the fuel by the auxiliary burner is necessary. In the case of a model in which a combination of the above features is embodied in practice the consumption of oil (parafiin oil) of one main burner is about 0.17 litre/hour and of the auxiliary burner about 0.03 litre/hour so that the latter consumes about 16% as much fuel as one of the main burners provided in this apparatus.
Inthe system according to the invention the gasifier member is not heated to redness, as is often the case in devices in which the gasifier is heated by a main burner. Such an extreme heating is a source of danger because the liquid fuel is transferred to the gaseous state comparatively suddenly so that either a very heavy construction is required or particular safety means must be provided. In the system according to the invention such precautions are unnecessary.
The system according to the invention is designed particularly for use as cooking apparatus, kitchen range or similar generally portable domestic devices of comparatively small power and comparatively small size.
The fuel being gasified completely by the emcient combination according to the invention, there is practically no need for the system to be cleaned. The use of needle valves known per se, each of which is provided with a needle provides automatic cleaning of the fine apertures in the nozzles of the burners.
Finally, the fuel being supplied at a comparatively low pressure, the system is limited to the use of low pressure burners which are provided with a number of fine apertures, so that systems for industrial purposes having so-called open burners, where the fuel is injected at a comparatively high pressure by sprayers and is ignited at the open end of the burner with the formation of a blow pipe flame or pilot flame, do not fall within the ambit of the invention.
As the nozzles of the main burners are connected directly to the gas chamber and each nozzle is combined separately with an adjustable supply valve, an air inlet duct and a mixing chamber, this permits of each of the main burners being separately controlled and thus altered to accord with instantaneous requirements (a large, medium-size, or small flame, economical burner) and avoids relative influence on the size of each flame. The direct connection of the nozzles to the gas chamber permits of giving this common space a comparatively small size.
The advantages of a common gas chamber member and separate air inlet ducts and mixing chambers for each burner with respect to the use of a common mixing chamber are the following:
If use is made of a common mixing chamber for all the burners it must have a comparatively large volume to ensure the simultaneous supply of the said burners. This is due to the fact that the gas pressure in the mixing chamber, which communicates with the open air through large air inlet apertures, is considerably lower than the pressure in the gas chamber.
If the main burners are shut off, the fuel supply to the common mixing chamber is too high, so that a regulating valve is required to decrease the fuel supply in order to avoid a too rich mixture of leakage of gas from the mixing chamber to the open air through the large air inlet apertures.
If use is made of a common mixing chamber for all the burners and if only one main burner is in use the clearance space is considerably larger than in the present case, in which only gas is supplied to the much smaller separate mixing chamber of the main burner that is in use. This precaution is also advantageous as regards the formation of an optimum uniform mixture.
If use is made of a large common mixing chamber for all the burners which is not heated supplementarily, the risk of condensation is greater, whereas the use of supplementary heating would result in less economical operation.
The system according to the invention may be preheated and put into use in the usual manner, for example, by heating by means of spirit, alcohol, or the like in a separate small container.
According to a further feature the nozzle of the auxiliary burner is provided with a separate valve, so that it is possible for the auxiliary burner to be adjusted, in some cases in view of differing or varying ambient temperatures, to a consumption as economical as possible.
In the case of a correct adjustment any further control may be omitted irrespective of whether or not the main burners are in use.
The preferred construction of the gasifier and of the auxiliary burner is in the form of long tubes, which is also advantageous as regards the above-mentioned properties.
In order that the invention may be clearly understood and readily carried into effect it will now be described more fully with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which the figures, which are diagrammatically shown, illustrate one embodiment of the invention.
Figure 1 is a perspective view of the burner system according to the invention,
Figures 2 and 3 are a plan and a front view respectively, and
Figures 4 and 5 show a cross-section and a longitudinal section respectively.
Figure 6 is a sectional view in elevation showing the means for preheating the air supply for the main burner.
The liquid fuel is constituted by paraffin oil, which is especially suitable for domestic use. This liquid is supplied to the system at a low practically constant pressure by means of a supply tube I from a reservoir 2 arranged at a level of about cms. above the gasifier. The supply tube is connected to a gasifier tube 3 which is filled with a rolled sheet of metal gauze 4. At the end of the gasifier 3, which is constructed as a long tube, there is a gas chamber 5 to which is connected a nozzle 6 for the auxiliary burner. The nozzle 6 is provided with a needle valve 1, the front part 8 of which serves to enter the aperture 9 of the nozzle and to keep it free from any deposition of impurities. At the fuel supply end portion of the gasifier 3 the valve spindle I is entirely surrounded by the metal gauze 4, which for this purpose is arranged so as to be coiled about the valve spindle. The valve is operated by means of a knob II.
A little beyond the nozzle-6 is arranged a mixing chamber [2 into which air is injected by the gap i3 as a result of the ejective operation of the gas flowing from the nozzle. Next the mixing chamber is bent 180 and passes in the form of a longtime Hi provided with small apertures i5 onward below the gasifier and the gas chamber, thus constituting the auxiliary burner. But smallflames having a height and section of some few millimeters are formed at the apertures. l5, so that a small consumption is safeguarded. A side connection I6 passes from the gas chamber 5 to a second gas chamber H which, also in the form of a long parallel tube, is arranged alongside of the gasifier and is also heated by the auxiliary burner Hi.
The nozzles [8 for the main burners 4B are connected direct to this second gas chamber. These nozzles have small apertures l9 and are connected to the second gas chamber ll by small pipes 20. Here also each nozzle is provided with a needle valve 2 I, a valve spindle 22 and its operating knob 23 and with an air inlet aperture 24 and a mixing chamber 25. The mixing chambers 25 each communicate with a burner head 26 which is provided with apertures covered by metal gauze 21, where the main burners can be ignited. Thesecond nozzle from the right is combined with a mixing chamber which leads to a burner for the furnace and for the sake of simplicity is not shown in detail.
It may be preferable to impart to the nozzles of the main burners and if desired also the aux-- ilia-ry burner, or that part of the housing with which these nozzles are associated, such a thermal capacity and to heat them so that the gas nowing from the gas chamber into the nozzle is subjected to an ultimate subsequent heating whereby all the particles that may still be liquid are gasified completely. The high thermal capacity may be ensured by robust construction with high mass and the heating may be ensured by a suitable arrangement above theauxiliary burner, as is efiected in Figure 4 at l8 and 20. An absolutely dry gas can be produced in this manner.
The air which is supplied to the mixing chambers by sucking-in comes from an enclosure 28 (Fig. 4) which, under the influence of the auxiliary burner is, may be heated to a suflicient extent to safeguard an air temperature which is as appropriate as possible for mixing: This enclosure communicates with the open air by a tube 29. The tube 29 is also heated by the radiation of the main burners and may in view thereof extend close to the main burners.
The space from which the mixing air for the auxiliary heating burner is obtained is indicated by reference numeral 23 in Figure 4 and is constructed so as to be heated mainly by the auxiliary burner itself. As shown in Figure 4 the space 23' completely encloses the gasifier 3 and gas chambers 5 and H. This ensures that the air in this space is maintained at a uniform temperature, because the auxiliary burner, in contradistinction to the main burners, operates at all times. To allow for the supply of air, space 28' is connected to space 28 through an opening 34 as shown in Figure 4, or is connected directly 6. to the atmosphere through an openings; as shown in Figure 6.
A favourable influence on the regular asifying action is ensured when the gasifier is preceded by a pre-heating chamber. This vpre-heating chamber is designated 30 in Figure 5 and is also heated by the auxiliary burner. The liquid which is contained in this chamber is generally'speaking still entirely in the liquid condition, and-is not gasified until in the metal gauze-filled gasifier.
When using a second gas chamber, as indicated in the embodiment shown, the nozzle 6, of the auxiliary burner 14 and the associated components may also be connected to this gas chamber and this readily permits of removing the filter 4 for cleaning purposes.
The use of a second gas chamber H, which is primarily intended for the connection of the nozzles of the main burners with their much larger capacity has the efiect of improving the quality condition of the gas and avoids the penetration of parts that may still be liquid so that a more satisfactory combustion is safeguarded. As may be seen from Figure 4, the small connecting pipe it between the first and the second gas chambers is arranged at a certain levelabove the bottom of the first gas chamber 5 so as to ensure a threshold effect.
When the system is started into operation it may be preheated-by means of spirit or similar fuel in the small container 3|. After ignition of the auxiliary burner the system is ready for immediate use for practically any length of time. The container 3| is in addition provided with a supply chute 32 for filling with spirit,
What I claim is:
1. A burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member in the form of a straight tubular member, a filling of a porous mass of metal within said member, said gasifier member constituting at one end a fuel preheating chamber and at the opposite endfirst gas chamber, fuel conducting means to supply the liquid fuel by gravity to said preheating chamber,
means forming a second tubular gas chamber member connected to said first gas chamber and arranged adjacently to said tubular gasifier memher, a plurality of main burners and a separate auxiliary burner in the form of an elongated tubular member extending in heat transmittin relationship along and below said gasifier member and said first and second gas chambers, eachof said main burners being provided with a separate low pressure vaporized fuel supply system comprising a mixing chamber, an air inlet duct and a nozzle connected directly to said second gas chamber, said auxiliary heating burner being provided with a separate low pressure vaporized fuel supply system comprising a mixing chamber, an air inlet duct and a nozzle connected directly to said first gas chamber.
2. A burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member having an inlet and an outlet, a filler comprised of a mass of porous material arranged in said gasifier member between said inlet and said outlet, fuel supply means connected to said inlet to supply liquid fuel at low pressure thereto, a gas chamber connected to said outlet, a main burner having an inlet opening, a low pressure vaporized fuel supply system for said burner, said supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means connecting said mixing chamber to a source of air, and a nozzle connected to said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said main burner; a separate auxiliary burner arranged'under both said gasifier member and said gas chamber to heat said members to pre-heat the fuel, and a low pressure fuel supply system for said auxiliary burner having an inlet opening, said latter supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means for introducing air into said latter mixing chamber, and a nozzle connected to said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said auxiliary burner.
3. A burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member having an inlet and an outlet, a filler comprised of a mass of porous material arranged in said gasifier member between said inlet and said outlet, fuel supply means connected to said inlet to supply liquid fuel at low pressure thereto, a gas chamber connected to said outlet, a plurality of main burners each having an inlet opening, a low pressure vaporized fuel supply system for each of said burners, each supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means connecting said mixing chamber to a source of air, and a nozzle connected to said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of a main burner; a separate auxiliary burner arranged under both said gasifier member and said gas chamber to heat said members to preheat the fuel, and a low pressure fuel supply system for said auxiliary burner having an inlet opening, said latter supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means for introducing air into said latter mixing chamber, and a nozzle connected to said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said auxiliary burner.
4. A burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member having an inlet and an outlet, 3, filler comprised of a mass of porous material arranged in said gasifier member between said inlet and said outlet, fuel supply means connected to said inlet to supply liquid fuel at low pressure thereto, a gas chamber connected to said outlet, said gas chamber having a first section located near the gasifier member and a second section connected to said first section and located more remote from said gasifier than is said first section, a main burner having an inlet opening, a low pressure vaporized fuel supply system for said burner, said supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means connecting said mixing chamber to a source of air, and a nozzle connected to said second section of said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said main burner; a separate auxiliary burner arranged under both said gasifier member and said gas chamber to heat said members to pre-heat the fuel, and a low pressure fuel supply system for said auxiliary burner having an inlet opening, said latter supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means for introducing air into said latter mixing chamber, and a nozzle connected to said first section of said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said auxiliary burner.
5. A burner system for heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel comprising a gasifier member having an inlet and an outlet, a filler comprised of a mass of porous material arranged in said gasifier member between said inlet and said outlet, fuel supply means connected to said inlet to supply liquid fuel at low pressure thereto, a gas chamber connected to said outlet, said gas chamber having a first section adjacent said gasifier member and a second section connected to said first section and remote from said gasifier member, a main burner having an inlet opening, a low pressure vaporized fuel supply system for said burner, said supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means connecting said mixing chamber to a source of air, and a nozzle connected to said second section of said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said main burner; a separate auxiliary burner arranged under both said gasifier member and said gas chamber to heat said members to pre-heat the fuel, and a low pressure fuel supply system for said auxiliary burner having an inlet opening, said latter supply system comprising a mixing chamber, means for introducing air into said latter mixing chamber, and a nozzle connected to said first section of said gas chamber and directed toward the inlet opening of said auxiliary burner.
ROBERTO MARTIRI.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS
US731297A 1947-02-27 1947-02-27 Self-gasifying heating equipment Expired - Lifetime US2611425A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE944268C (en) * 1952-07-14 1956-06-14 Philips Nv Cooking device for operation with gasified liquid fuel

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1130070A (en) * 1914-05-11 1915-03-02 Wilbur F Day Burner.
US1560367A (en) * 1923-02-05 1925-11-03 Bark Benjamin Production of radiant heat
US1570966A (en) * 1925-03-16 1926-01-26 Everbrite Stove Company Oil burner
US1666069A (en) * 1925-03-24 1928-04-17 John Borkowicz Oil burner
US1669551A (en) * 1926-10-06 1928-05-15 Clayton & Lambert Mfg Co Generator apparatus
US1674746A (en) * 1923-03-24 1928-06-26 James H Smith Oil burner
US1674704A (en) * 1926-03-01 1928-06-26 James H Smith Oil burner
US1686348A (en) * 1926-01-15 1928-10-02 Gustave F Schmidt Generator
US2012464A (en) * 1933-10-09 1935-08-27 Raymond F Blake Liquid fuel burner

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1130070A (en) * 1914-05-11 1915-03-02 Wilbur F Day Burner.
US1560367A (en) * 1923-02-05 1925-11-03 Bark Benjamin Production of radiant heat
US1674746A (en) * 1923-03-24 1928-06-26 James H Smith Oil burner
US1570966A (en) * 1925-03-16 1926-01-26 Everbrite Stove Company Oil burner
US1666069A (en) * 1925-03-24 1928-04-17 John Borkowicz Oil burner
US1686348A (en) * 1926-01-15 1928-10-02 Gustave F Schmidt Generator
US1674704A (en) * 1926-03-01 1928-06-26 James H Smith Oil burner
US1669551A (en) * 1926-10-06 1928-05-15 Clayton & Lambert Mfg Co Generator apparatus
US2012464A (en) * 1933-10-09 1935-08-27 Raymond F Blake Liquid fuel burner

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE944268C (en) * 1952-07-14 1956-06-14 Philips Nv Cooking device for operation with gasified liquid fuel

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