US1330294A - Hydrocarbon-burner - Google Patents

Hydrocarbon-burner Download PDF

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US1330294A
US1330294A US267165A US26716518A US1330294A US 1330294 A US1330294 A US 1330294A US 267165 A US267165 A US 267165A US 26716518 A US26716518 A US 26716518A US 1330294 A US1330294 A US 1330294A
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burner
retort
base
tubes
jets
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US267165A
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William P Wynne
Wynne James Harry
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D11/00Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space
    • F23D11/36Details, e.g. burner cooling means, noise reduction means
    • F23D11/44Preheating devices; Vaporising devices

Definitions

  • the invention relates to burners ofthe type which include a retort and a burner tube.
  • These Iburners are ordinarily provided with mixing chambers in ivliichvapor flowing from a )et orifice of the retort and entrained air are blended together in such proportions as .to produce a heating instead of a luminous i'iame, but the'invention is applicable not only toblue anie burners, but to, burners which produce a luminous name.
  • the object of the invention isto avoid the deposition ivithi'n the retort of a burner of either the luminous or the non-luminous type, of particles of carbon which, under the influencel of high temperatures, are segregated from thev fuel in considerable quantities.
  • the deposits thus produced Within the retort will, in the course of time, choke the retort and thus interfere with the normal operation of the burner.
  • the desired loiv temperature may be maintained by providing a retort with a protective coveringivliichprevents jets of from directly inipinging upon the retort, and-by leaving cer tain portions of the retort exposed to the cooling influence of a medium, such as air.
  • a medium such as air.
  • saine resultinay be Wholly or partly attained by the employment f of means whereby the heating jets for the retort are caused to impinge more or less directly uponV said retort, or whereby certain of said jets may be prevented from impinging upon A said retort.
  • the forni ofburner Whichfina'y 'be ein-- ⁇ lployed includesv a retort consistinfgfof' 'a-di- Y rect tubular passageandgtyvo symmetrically disposed return passages rear end of the direct passage and termifroin Vwhich vaporV may escape under ⁇ pressure perforated or s lifttedv burner With the tubular passages of the retort and. in aline# ment.
  • rllhe burner may contain other'novelv fea-A Figure i is' a frontelevation of a burner equipped with tivoiburner tubes and ein; bodying the principal features lof the in"- veiition. '1
  • Fig. 2 is a plan vievvof the burner shov/-n ⁇ in Fig'. 1. p
  • Fig. QR is a view partly in section revealing the construction of a kcheck valve for the supply pipe of the burner.
  • FIG. 3 is a plan View showing the burner and the retort.y y
  • 5v is a sectional vievv shoivingthe means 'for sustaining andA adjusting the re-V DC closing end fofa burnertube.. Y
  • Fig. ⁇ 6 is,v afvertical sectionall view taken' on the lineGfof Fig', 1
  • l is a supply ypipe leading from a source of liquid fuel which is k,preferably under pressure, the pressure being produced either 105 Fig.V 7 is a sectionalvieiv ofthe burner Y by gravity or by a body of compressed air.
  • the retort of the burner consists of a direct co-ntinuation of the supply pipe 1, and
  • VThe return pipes 3, l of the retort terminate respectively in. upwardly ⁇ extending' portions 10'each of which is provided with a discharge opening 11 for the vapor.Y
  • the burner pipes, 6 and 7 are providedV with main jet orifices 8, and supplemental jet oriiices 9,-and aresupported a suitable distance' above the base 5 by standards 5%;
  • the standard 5a is provided with openings 5d for the reception of the rear ends of the burner tubes, the standards 5b .and 5c beine' arovided rwith Oaeir seats 5e and fwhich yadmit of the withdrawal of the burner tubes'froin their suppoi'ted positions. y
  • a bracket 12 isinounted upon each of the upwardly extending portions l() of the retort, aV sety screw 12a being employed to retain each Vof said brackets in any desired position of adjustment.
  • Each bracket terminates ina collarv 12b which encircles the receiving end of a burner tube. -Should it be desired to remove one of the burner tubes, said tubev may be moved longitudinally to free it from the ⁇ collal1 12b where upon it may bellifted from the seats 5e and 5E and withdrawn from the opening 51 in the standard 5.
  • the adjustable character of the bracket 12 admits of the true centering of the dis'- charge openingof each of the upwardly eX-r tending portions 1() with relationtothe cerf responding burner tube. This is important inasmuch as the character of the flame of the burneris materially altered a faulty adjustment of the discharge openings 11 relatively to the inlet ends of the burner tubes. If the jet of vapor should be projected into one of the burner tubes out of coincidence with the aXis of said tube or if the jet'orifice were improperly distancedV any desired extent, the object of rotating them being to vary the direction of the jets of flame vemanating lfrom the supplemental orifices 9 in order that the heating of the retort may be controlled.
  • each burner tube is preferably provided with a handle 13 which maybe manipulated nby a suitable instrument to cause the burner tube to rotate to justment.
  • the operation of the burner is initiated in a usual manner by heating thesaine until the liquid fuel inthe retort, which may be any volatilizable liquid fuel such as keroany .desired position of ad# sene, isvaporized, and until the resulting vapor escapes under lmore or less pressure from the discharge openings Y11..
  • the oil is preferably introduced' intorthe retort under considerable pressure.
  • the jets of vapor fronithe openings 11 vare projected intof the burner tubes 6 and 7 carrying with them by entrain'ment air which is drawn into the A open ends of the tubes @and Z from the atmosphere.
  • the retort is never heated to as high'a temperature as thewbase, since the contact between the two elements is more or less imperfect.
  • the tubes of the retort may be connected tothe base by a sustaining plate 14: secured in position by bolts 14a extending through and depending from the base. rlhe base may be provided with concavities 15 to increase the area of contact between saidv base andthe retort.
  • Burners of the type to which the invention is applied are prone to operate pulsatively, the pulsations being due to sequential conversions of increments of the fuel into vapor.
  • the sudden increases of pressure due to this phenomenon cause fluctuations in the How of vapor from the openings in the retort which lead to irregularities in the flame jets of the burner.
  • These pulsations may be avoided by the employment of a check valve, such as 1G, in the supply pipe l, this valve being set to be closed by pressure within the retort. The valve when closed prevents the flow of vapor through the supply lpipe 1, although it allows the fuel to flow gradually andL steadily into the retort when the pressure in the retort falls to a certain extent.
  • a burner containing1 only a single burner tube and a retort having two vaporizing passages is shown in Fig. 7. ln -thisform of the device the jet orifices 9a, 9b of the single burner tube are so arranged that each part of the retort will be acted upon bythe flame jets from one set of orifices.
  • the burner may have other jet orifices, such as 8, as in the case of a burner containing a plurality of burner tubes.
  • the object being to so impede the flow of the current of mixed vapor and air as to allow the proximate jet orifices to be adequately supplied, and to jet orifices;
  • a burner includinga retort, a burner tube' providedA withmain .jet orificeswhich Y are directed away fromy said retortjandsupj.-
  • a burner including a retort, aburner tube provided ⁇ withvsupplemental jet orifices vfor varying the Obliquity of said jet orifices relatively to said retort.
  • a burner including a retort Vand al burner tube, the retort having a protective covering upon which supplemental jets from the burner tube may iinpinge, and
  • a burner including a base, a retort having tubularportions disposed below said base, and burner tubes arranged above said base and having main jet orifices, and sup- Y undergroundental jet'orifices directed toward" said base 5.
  • the combination of a retort having spaced tubular portions2 a base disposed above said tubular portions, burner tubes having main and supplemental jet orifices and arranged above said .base and in sub-l stantial parallelism with said tubular portions, and means for adjusting said burner tubes to varyat will the temperature within the retort.
  • An oil-burning device comprising an adl justable burner tube, having main and supplemental jet dutiess,'a shieldedretort, below said supplemental jet orifices, and a permanently open 4orifice ⁇ for discharging vapor from said retort .into said burner tube, said burner tube ⁇ having means for directing the vapor toward said retort.
  • An oil-burning device comprising ⁇ a burner tube, a base, Va retort disposed belowl saidvbase 'and exposed to air on one side Y thereof, andan orifice for discharging val por-from said retort into said burner. tube,
  • said burner tube having main jet orifices di- ⁇ rected away from said retort and additional i means for directing a portion of the vapor i .Y v
  • An oil-burning device comprising a.
  • An oil-burning device,V comprising a burner tube, a .baseiavvziy from which the main jet orifices of the burner are directed,andan'iir-cooled-1etort disposedrbelow 5 Y said base; and having imperfeetthermal con- 'tact with said hase, said burner having meins for discharging relatively ⁇ limited 10 qiiantities of vapor toward said retort,

Description

'W. P. AND J. H. WYNNE.
HYDROCARBON BURNER. APPLICATION FILED4 D,Ec.'l7, |918.
A'1 ,330,294. Patented Feb. 10, 1920.
'fiumi lin the art to which :it
miren ,srnrus rarnivrrrifon WILLInivr i?. WYNNE-ann Janus nenni vviviiii', or rear Woiarn, rituales# nvnnooeniseiteunnnn.
United States', residing at FortpWorth, in" the county of Tarrant and State of Texas,
have invent-ed certain new and useful Improvements We 'do hereby Ydeclare the following to be a full, clear, and exact `description ofthe invention, such as Will enable others skilled appertains to make and use the same.l
The invention relates to burners ofthe type which include a retort and a burner tube. These Iburners, are ordinarily provided with mixing chambers in ivliichvapor flowing from a )et orifice of the retort and entrained air are blended together in such proportions as .to produce a heating instead of a luminous i'iame, but the'invention is applicable not only toblue anie burners, but to, burners which produce a luminous name.
The object of the invention isto avoid the deposition ivithi'n the retort of a burner of either the luminous or the non-luminous type, of particles of carbon which, under the influencel of high temperatures, are segregated from thev fuel in considerable quantities. The deposits thus produced Within the retort will, in the course of time, choke the retort and thus interfere with the normal operation of the burner. v
V e. have discovered that theaforesaid objectionable `formation of car-bon deposits,
may be avoided; by maintaining the temper-V the retort ofv a burner below ature Within I p which dissociation of the the temperature at fuel takes place, and that a burner operatingV under these thermal conditions maybe operated for an indefinite period Without being` cleaned, The desired loiv temperature may be maintained by providing a retort with a protective coveringivliichprevents jets of from directly inipinging upon the retort, and-by leaving cer tain portions of the retort exposed to the cooling influence of a medium, such as air. The. saine resultinay be Wholly or partly attained by the employment f of means whereby the heating jets for the retort are caused to impinge more or less directly uponV said retort, or whereby certain of said jets may be prevented from impinging upon A said retort.
in: Hydrocarbon-Burners; and
`posed in"k substantial` parallelism p p 'speciiicaiion of terrassement. Patented Fb,1(j, 1920, 'Appiiqation slee December ivgieis. seminare/,165.' v v, A
,The forni ofburner Whichfina'y 'be ein--` lployed includesv a retort consistinfgfof' 'a-di- Y rect tubular passageandgtyvo symmetrically disposed return passages rear end of the direct passage and termifroin Vwhich vaporV may escape under `pressure perforated or s lifttedv burner With the tubular passages of the retort and. in aline# ment. With the discharge openings ofthe re` tort,V "said burner tubes being mounted vfor oscillation upon their longitudinal axes, soy that the direction of the flame jets maybe varied; a niass'of refractory inateriahvvhich may constitute the'base of the burner, dis posedv in 'such relation to theretort as to tubes dis-A 'leading from the' v .60V Dating in diminutive discharge openingsv protect it, to a certain extent, from the heat i of the flame j GUS.
p to thereby maintain thetemperature of the oil vapoiuvvithin the re'.`k
tort below theteinperature at which dissociatioii of thevaporand deposition of freeA carbon occur; and means for supporting the burner tubes in proper relationfto the discharoe openings in the retort and for ad- 'b ca Y justing the receiving ends or the burner tubesrkvvith relation to said Vdischarge openings.
rllhe burner may contain other'novelv fea-A Figure i is' a frontelevation of a burner equipped with tivoiburner tubes and ein; bodying the principal features lof the in"- veiition. '1
Fig. 2 is a plan vievvof the burner shov/-n` in Fig'. 1. p
Fig. QR is a view partly in section revealing the construction of a kcheck valve for the supply pipe of the burner.
`Fig. 3 is a plan View showing the burner and the retort.y y
'onal' vieiv taken the vbase of Fig. 4 is a vertical sect1 on the line -f/l of 'Fig'.ll. K'
5v is a sectional vievv shoivingthe means 'for sustaining andA adjusting the re-V ceiving end fofa burnertube.. Y
Fig.` 6 is,v afvertical sectionall view taken' on the lineGfof Fig', 1
provided with a single burner' tube.`
l is a supply ypipe leading from a source of liquid fuel which is k,preferably under pressure, the pressure being produced either 105 Fig.V 7 is a sectionalvieiv ofthe burner Y by gravity or by a body of compressed air.
The retort of the burner consists of a direct co-ntinuation of the supply pipe 1, and
' of return pipes 3, 4l! whichl leadrpfroni the ,modify theV temperature therein, is pref- Verably made of refractory material Yto enable it to withstand, without deterioration,
thehigh temperatures vto which the same isV subjected. Y .j
VThe return pipes 3, l of the retort terminate respectively in. upwardly `extending' portions 10'each of which is provided with a discharge opening 11 for the vapor.Y
The burner pipes, 6 and 7 are providedV with main jet orifices 8, and supplemental jet oriiices 9,-and aresupported a suitable distance' above the base 5 by standards 5%;
5b, 5C, two of which, 5fL and 5c, rise from the ends of the base 5. The standard 5a is provided with openings 5d for the reception of the rear ends of the burner tubes, the standards 5b .and 5c beine' arovided rwith Oaeir seats 5e and fwhich yadmit of the withdrawal of the burner tubes'froin their suppoi'ted positions. y
A bracket 12 isinounted upon each of the upwardly extending portions l() of the retort, aV sety screw 12a being employed to retain each Vof said brackets in any desired position of adjustment. Each bracket terminates ina collarv 12b which encircles the receiving end of a burner tube. -Should it be desired to remove one of the burner tubes, said tubev may be moved longitudinally to free it from the` collal1 12b where upon it may bellifted from the seats 5e and 5E and withdrawn from the opening 51 in the standard 5. In placing the burner tubes in position, care should be takento properly distance the inlet ends of said tubes from the jet orifices, in order to secure a iniXture of the vapor and the air which will produce a flame of the desired quality. If the jet orifices should be too near the inlet ends of the burner tubes, the supply of air would be deficient and the flame will be luminous or smoky.
The adjustable character of the bracket 12 admits of the true centering of the dis'- charge openingof each of the upwardly eX-r tending portions 1() with relationtothe cerf responding burner tube. This is important inasmuch as the character of the flame of the burneris materially altered a faulty adjustment of the discharge openings 11 relatively to the inlet ends of the burner tubes. If the jet of vapor should be projected into one of the burner tubes out of coincidence with the aXis of said tube or if the jet'orifice were improperly distancedV any desired extent, the object of rotating them being to vary the direction of the jets of flame vemanating lfrom the supplemental orifices 9 in order that the heating of the retort may be controlled. If the positions ofthe burner pipes are such as to effectuate a direct impingeinent ofthe llame` jets upon the base 5, the contents of the retort will'bev highly heated,`but if the adjustments of the burner tubesare such to cause the*` flame jets to impinge upon. the ybase 5 Vwith con'-` "siderable Obliquity, the heating ofthe fuel in the retort 'will be vminimized to a considerable extent. Intermediate adjustments of the burner tubes will produce desired variations ofl temperature withinthe retort between the aforesaid eXtreme-s of temper-v ature.- The drawing shows ai ro-w of. laterally disposed inainl jet orifices 8 for each tube, but other .orifices may be provided as may be found necessary. In some cases it` is foundv desirable to employ only laterally arranged orifices in order that the llame jets may effectuate a distribution of the heat in parts of the combustion chamber which might not otherwise be adequatelyY heated. Each burner tube is preferably provided with a handle 13 which maybe manipulated nby a suitable instrument to cause the burner tube to rotate to justment.
The operation of the burner is initiated in a usual manner by heating thesaine until the liquid fuel inthe retort, which may be any volatilizable liquid fuel such as keroany .desired position of ad# sene, isvaporized, and until the resulting vapor escapes under lmore or less pressure from the discharge openings Y11.. The oil" is preferably introduced' intorthe retort under considerable pressure. The jets of vapor fronithe openings 11 vare projected intof the burner tubes 6 and 7 carrying with them by entrain'ment air which is drawn into the A open ends of the tubes @and Z from the atmosphere. During the passage of the vapor and the air through the burner tubes they become more or less thoroughly mixed', and escapel from the varier-.sV orifices of the burnel1 in condition to be consumed by the addition of relatively small quantities of air. The jets of flame originating at the orifices 9 impingeupon the base 5 which by conduction imparts heat received by itV to the adjacent' portions ofthe retort. The retort, as already stated, is exposed in part to atmospheric influences which occasion a certain amount Vof refrigeration. This loss 'of heat has' a tendency to prevent the teni-- nssogasi rising to the dissociating point.l The maintenance' of a relatively low 'temperature `in the retort maybe aided by altering theudi- Under certain conditions thesejets may beV so directed as to escape impingeineiit upon the base 5, although under ordinary cir- Y cumstances it will be found necessary to Y cause the jets to impinge upon said base. The adjustment of the burnerV tubes will be' determined by the apparent temperature of the base 5. lf this base becomes-red hot it y will be known that the impingementof the jets upon the base 5 is toodirect, andthe burner tubes will thenf be adjusted to give more or less Obliquity to said jets. The retort is never heated to as high'a temperature as thewbase, since the contact between the two elements is more or less imperfect. The tubes of the retort may be connected tothe base by a sustaining plate 14: secured in position by bolts 14a extending through and depending from the base. rlhe base may be provided with concavities 15 to increase the area of contact between saidv base andthe retort.
Burners of the type to which the invention is applied are prone to operate pulsatively, the pulsations being due to sequential conversions of increments of the fuel into vapor. The sudden increases of pressure due to this phenomenon cause fluctuations in the How of vapor from the openings in the retort which lead to irregularities in the flame jets of the burner. These pulsations may be avoided by the employment of a check valve, such as 1G, in the supply pipe l, this valve being set to be closed by pressure within the retort. The valve when closed prevents the flow of vapor through the supply lpipe 1, although it allows the fuel to flow gradually andL steadily into the retort when the pressure in the retort falls to a certain extent.
A burner containing1 only a single burner tube and a retort having two vaporizing passages is shown in Fig. 7. ln -thisform of the device the jet orifices 9a, 9b of the single burner tube are so arranged that each part of the retort will be acted upon bythe flame jets from one set of orifices. The burner may have other jet orifices, such as 8, as in the case of a burner containing a plurality of burner tubes.
Those portions of the-burner tubes which intervene between the burner proper and the discharge openings of the retort, are imperforate and of considerable length (16.y
inches, for instance), the object being to so impede the flow of the current of mixed vapor and air as to allow the proximate jet orifices to be adequately supplied, and to jet orifices; t
Having thus described our invention what.,
we claimas new and'desire tov secure by LetT ters Patent is: .Y "f 'I Y Y. 8l
prevent toomuchpressure at-the remote l; A burner,.includinga retort, a burner tube' providedA withmain .jet orificeswhich Y are directed away fromy said retortjandsupj.-
ple'mentalV jet orices whichl are directed toward said retort,a protective covering for a portion of said retort upon which the flame 'i jetsy of the burner may iinpinge and means 2. A burner, including a retort, aburner tube provided` withvsupplemental jet orifices vfor varying the Obliquity of said jet orifices relatively to said retort. v
`directed toward said retort, a `'protective covering for aV portion of said retort upon i' which the flame jets ofthe burner may impinge, and means for varying the pointsV of impingenient of the flame jets.
3. A burner, including a retort Vand al burner tube, the retort having a protective covering upon which supplemental jets from the burner tube may iinpinge, and
means Vfor maintaining the temperature ofV the fuel within the retort below the dis-y sociating point of said fuel.
4.' A burner, *including a base, a retort having tubularportions disposed below said base, and burner tubes arranged above said base and having main jet orifices, and sup- Y pleinental jet'orifices directed toward" said base 5.' The combination of a retort having spaced tubular portions2 a base disposed above said tubular portions, burner tubes having main and supplemental jet orifices and arranged above said .base and in sub-l stantial parallelism with said tubular portions, and means for adjusting said burner tubes to varyat will the temperature within the retort.
6. An oil-burning devicecomprising an adl justable burner tube, having main and supplemental jet orices,'a shieldedretort, below said supplemental jet orifices, and a permanently open 4orifice `for discharging vapor from said retort .into said burner tube, said burner tube` having means for directing the vapor toward said retort.
7. An oil-burning device, comprising` a burner tube, a base, Va retort disposed belowl saidvbase 'and exposed to air on one side Y thereof, andan orifice for discharging val por-from said retort into said burner. tube,
said burner tube having main jet orifices di-` rected away from said retort and additional i means for directing a portion of the vapor i .Y v
toward said retort.`
8. An oil-burning device, comprising a.
burner tube, a base away from which the main jet orifices of the burner are directed and a retort disposed below said base and' having imperfect thermal contact vwith said base,v said 'burner havingrneans for discharging relatively limited quantitiesof vapor toward said retorty Y 9. An oil-burning device,V comprising a burner tube, a .baseiavvziy from which the main jet orifices of the burner are directed,andan'iir-cooled-1etort disposedrbelow 5 Y said base; and having imperfeetthermal con- 'tact with said hase, said burner having meins for discharging relatively` limited 10 qiiantities of vapor toward said retort,
ln testimony whereof, We'aHiX our signa-- tures. Y
WILLIAM P. WY'NNE. JAMES HARRYWYNNE.
US267165A 1918-12-17 1918-12-17 Hydrocarbon-burner Expired - Lifetime US1330294A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2460446A1 (en) * 1979-07-03 1981-01-23 G Pi Liquefied gas burner system - has tubular mixing chamber embodying plate with row of holes as flame holder, with U=shaped tube evaporator legs fixed along it

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2460446A1 (en) * 1979-07-03 1981-01-23 G Pi Liquefied gas burner system - has tubular mixing chamber embodying plate with row of holes as flame holder, with U=shaped tube evaporator legs fixed along it

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