US2577323A - Building wall construction - Google Patents

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US2577323A
US2577323A US703661A US70366146A US2577323A US 2577323 A US2577323 A US 2577323A US 703661 A US703661 A US 703661A US 70366146 A US70366146 A US 70366146A US 2577323 A US2577323 A US 2577323A
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columns
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panels
panel
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/56Load-bearing walls of framework or pillarwork; Walls incorporating load-bearing elongated members
    • E04B2/58Load-bearing walls of framework or pillarwork; Walls incorporating load-bearing elongated members with elongated members of metal
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/02Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials
    • E04C2/04Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials of concrete or other stone-like material; of asbestos cement; of cement and other mineral fibres
    • E04C2/06Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials of concrete or other stone-like material; of asbestos cement; of cement and other mineral fibres reinforced

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  • This invention relates to building construction and parts therefor, and has for an object the provision of a building that can be ,easily constructed by unskilled labor, as the majority of parts are prefabricated and can be made in.
  • Another object is the provision of a building construction wherein the framing is of columnar :construction wherein the columns maybe standard z'fsteelpipe or the like, and where the frame can be put together without threading or joints Lthat require anymetal working on the job.
  • Another object is to provide a building con- :struction in which preformed panels. are employedwhich are placed between columns and ,l ockedl securely in place by locling means extnding between the panels and the columns as hereinafter described.
  • A, vAnother object is the provision of a building :construction of the type described wherein panels are secured to the columns by means ext'en'ding between the'panels and the columns and into' the interior of the latter, said means being locked in position by 'filling' thecolu'mns with a ⁇ pourablematerial such as' concrete' or the like.
  • A' further object is 'the' provision of a prefformed panel for use in building construction which has a central membrane, preferably of waterproof material, 'whereby theefiiciency of "the panel as a wall is' increased'and 'the penetration of'moisture' through the panel is'prevented.
  • Figure 1 isan isometric view of a building embodying the invention.
  • SI Figure 2 is a transverse sectional view of one Lof. the columns and adjacent panels shown in Figure 1.
  • v l f ⁇ Figure ⁇ 3 is' a vertical sectional view on the line 3.
  • Figure 2 ' Figure 4 is a Vertical sectional view on the line 4, 4 of Figure 5 of a concrete beam that may be employed when a second story is added added to the building, Figure 1.
  • Figure 5 is a rear elevation of the beam
  • Fig- Figure 6 is a horizontal sectional view of an alternate form of panel that can be used in the building Figure 1, and also shows a corner column modification.
  • Figure 7 is a transverse Vertical sectional View of the panel shown in Figure 6.
  • the numeral '0 denotes the foundation or base upon which the building rests, and this may be below ground with ahportion H thereof extending above the grade line as. usual.
  • the columnsupports indicated at '2 which may be pieces of ordinary pipe having a suitable insidediameter or borean'd being of a suitabledepth to receive the columns I 3. If these are standard 2" pipe, the length of the supports '2 would be about 1 foot 2" and the bore of these supports would be sufficient to receive the 2" pipe with a little room to spare in order to permit a slight lateral movement of the pipe when the columns are forced downward, as hereinafter described.
  • the supports 42 can be embedded inthe con.- crete foundation or each support may have a separate footing (by being set in a concrete block or the like) or they may be arranged. in any other suitable manner that will hold them rigidly spaced apartin order to support the col umns of the building.
  • the column supports may comprise suitable holes. cored out in the foundation, or could be pins or tubular members extending upwardly therefrom, so that the column '3 would lfitover these pins or tubes instead of into them.
  • Sucha modification is so obvious that it will not bes'hown and described in detail.
  • The'columns. 13 ofthe building may be made of standard 2" steel pipe which is strong enough for the average two story building, but it will be 'observed that' a .column of any v suitablediam- 'eter, either round or of any other cross section may be employed. 7 A
  • Each column I 3 is providedwith a, plurality of longitudinal slots '4 as best seen in Figure 3. These slots are spaced along the length of the column at any desired distance, and theslots are sufiiciently long to permit the head portions '9 of the looking members i 7 attached to the panels to enter these slots as presently described.
  • the beam may, of course, have reinforcements of anysuitable description, such as the rods indicated in dotted lines at 50 in Figures 4 and 5.
  • the beam 40 may be cast as an L-shaped member to form a corner and to have 3 or more sleeves therein.
  • sleeves to receive the upper ends of columns Isa, 'ab, and '30 in Figure 1, or two seotionsor more can be joined in any suitable manner such as by the metal plate 5' secured by bolts 52, embedded in the beams.
  • each panel is, in effect, a hollow shell, in which a dead air space or spaces exist.
  • a membrane 5" is provided, made of felt, roofing paper, or the like, and preferably impervious to moisture and fire-proof.
  • Metal foil, or any other material; may be used.
  • the 'ends of the layers shown at 58-59 in Figure 6 extend outwardly all around the panel, so that they may be folded around the columns '3 to form a substantially moisture-proof joint between the columns and panels.
  • each panel At the bottom and top of each panel the membranes can be turned outwardly to form a molsture-proof joint as best seen in Figure 7. which shows the foot of one of the panels equipped with the membranes 58-59 resting upon the foundation Il.
  • Each side 53-54 of the panel just described may be equipped with any suitable form of reinforcement, such as the wire mesh reinforcement shown at 60.
  • the slabs 53-54 are laid against the membrane or membranes 5" which is given a light coat of mastio or suitable material that will adhere to the slabs and hold them together until the panels can be erected. But obviously, if desired, the slabs can be secured together by bolts or screws or in any other suitable manner.
  • the looking members l 'I' are shown in Figure 6 as embedded directly in the main body of the slabs forming the panel as distinguished from the arrangement shown in Figures 2 and 3 where the members l" are embeclded in the cores '6 forming the Vertical edges of the panels. Either v arrangement can be used, depending upon the ing members l"' not only draw the panels to the' 'columns as 'previously described, but that they also tend to draw the individual slabs 53, 54 towards each other to tightly gripand hold the membrane 5" therebetween.
  • each panel is, in effect, a sealed unit.
  • a break-through through the outer wall of a panel for example, a break through the slab 54 that would permit Water to enter the cavity 56-as this cavity is completely sealed oil not only from the adjaoent cavity 55 in the same panelby reason of the presence of the membrane 5", and also from all other like cavities and all other panels throughout the building, the moisture is confined to a comparatively small area of the broken panel.
  • the supports '2, columns '3 and panels '5 can be made to standard sizes, proper provision being made for standard window and door frames, with the result that a building can be erected with practically no cutting and fitting on the job, and by unskilled labor, and that the resultant structure will possess the advantages herein set forth.
  • Figure' illustrates a form of corner construction that may be employed to advantage in the type of building described.
  • two columns '3 are mounted upon the foundation' as previ ously described, and a corner post 6' of molded material such as concrete or the like, is provided with the looking members Il' and is attached to the two columns as previouslydescribed.
  • the adjaoent panels are then brought against post 6' as shown.
  • the columns '3 are driven downward. thereby looking the slabs and the corner post 6' to the columns in the manner previously described.
  • suitable reinforcement rods as commonly used in concrete building construction can be placed inside the columns '3 in order to strengthen the structure, the columns then being filled with cement grout or the like.
  • the first story frame-work can be erected as previously described, and the columns and panels locked together by pushing the columns downward into the supports '2 and the whole frame-work can be shifted laterally to the degree permitted by the fact that, as previously stated, the bore of the supports '2 is larger than the columns '3 therein.
  • the first story framework having been set up and the panel and columns having been looked together. as previously described.
  • the cement grout may be poured into the columns so that they are securely locked'in thesupports 12 and the grout is poured into the column to, fill them only part, way to, the top, Short reinforcement rode; are then placed within'the: second story columnsls' so as'. to span the, joint. between the were, end'of columns. 46 and the upper, en' 'rcr umns '3 and thenthe columns. 46 are filled with cementasfpreviously described.
  • the inside, diameter of. the sleeves 4' may be larger thanthef outside diameter 'of the columns 13; and 46. in. order to permit' lateral 'movement of; these oolumis'durlifng theadjustment of the columns to thefpanls 'as previously described, in connection, with Sup;- ports '2 and columns ES., 'The collars 394 are made large enough 'to close the annular 'space at the bottom of' the sleeves 4' regardless. of their, diameter, and the bottoms of' columns 46 can, necessary, have cut-away portions as shown at 6' to permit the"grout to.
  • a perforatedplate (not shown) can be put over the upper 'end 48 of column '3 to act as a foot for the lower endv 45 of column 46.
  • first story columns are grouted and then the second' story columns are erected thereon and the second story panels are placed. in position, that the seoond story walls so 'erected can be later-ally acl ju sted* to close all joints before pouring, the grouting 'into the secondstory columns.
  • the walls can be erected. without trimmingthe panels'to fitfixedvspaces between the columns and a minimum of'labor'is requiredto erect the building.
  • L'A building construction including a foundation, equi-spaced upwardly extending open ings in the foundation, Vertical hollowfcolurnns one end ofwhich is received in saidopenings and intially slidably mounted the'ein, 'a, plurality of apertures in the columns, ⁇ panels between the columns, reinforcing elements within thefpanels and extending beyond the; Vertical edges thereof, the ends of the reinforcing elements beins bent. upwardly to form hooie-like, members,

Description

Dec. 4, 1951 E. GOENNER BUILDING WALL CONSTRUCTION 3 sheets sheet 1 Filed Oct. 16, 1946 INVENnm. EUGENE GOENNER BY a,
ATTORNEYS E. GOENNER BUILDING WALL CONSTRUCTION 3 sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 16, 1946 INVENTOR. EUGENE GOENNER ATTORNEYS 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 XNX XXXX E. GOENNER BUJ ILDING WALL CONSTRUCTION INVENTOR.
EUGENE GOE/ VNER ATr'oR /E s Dec. 4; 1951 Filed O'cf. `16,-1946 Patented Dec. 4, l 951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BUILDING WALL CONSTRUCTION Eugene Goenner, Woodside, N. Y. Ap icatioctober 16, 1946, Serial No. 703,661
3 claims. (o. 72 s n This invention relates to building construction and parts therefor, and has for an object the provision of a building that can be ,easily constructed by unskilled labor, as the majority of parts are prefabricated and can be made in.
standard units which are easily put together on the building site with a minimum of labor and x n e V a t Another object is the provision of a building construction wherein the framing is of columnar :construction wherein the columns maybe standard z'fsteelpipe or the like, and where the frame can be put together without threading or joints Lthat require anymetal working on the job.
Another objectis to provide a building con- :struction in which preformed panels. are employedwhich are placed between columns and ,l ockedl securely in place by locling means extnding between the panels and the columns as hereinafter described. A, vAnother object is the provision of a building :construction of the type described wherein panels are secured to the columns by means ext'en'ding between the'panels and the columns and into' the interior of the latter, said means being locked in position by 'filling' thecolu'mns with a `pourablematerial such as' concrete' or the like. "A' further object is 'the' provision of a prefformed panel for use in building construction which has a central membrane, preferably of waterproof material, 'whereby theefiiciency of "the panel as a wall is' increased'and 'the penetration of'moisture' through the panel is'prevented. Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following specification taken together with the accompanying drawings, in which a 'preferredmbodiment*of the' invention is dis- 'closed by way of illustration. 'It will' be understood, however, that many changes and departurs can-be madein the details of construction herein *setforth, the invention bein'g 'as defined in'thelappendantclaimsp r Referring to the accompanying drawingsz Figure 1 isan isometric view of a building embodying the invention. :SI Figure 2 is a transverse sectional view of one Lof. the columns and adjacent panels shown in Figure 1. v l f `Figure` 3 is' a vertical sectional view on the line 3. 3 of Figure 2. 'Figure 4 is a Vertical sectional view on the line 4, 4 of Figure 5 of a concrete beam that may be employed when a second story is added added to the building, Figure 1.
Figure 5 is a rear elevation of the beam Fig- Figure 6 is a horizontal sectional view of an alternate form of panel that can be used in the building Figure 1, and also shows a corner column modification. a
, Figure 7 is a transverse Vertical sectional View of the panel shown in Figure 6.
Referring to Figure 1 wherein is shown one corner of a one-story building embodying ,the
invention, the numeral '0 ,denotes the foundation or base upon which the building rests, and this may be below ground with ahportion H thereof extending above the grade line as. usual.
Embedded at suitable intervals, say at every three feet, are the columnsupports indicated at '2, which may be pieces of ordinary pipe having a suitable insidediameter or borean'd being of a suitabledepth to receive the columns I 3. If these are standard 2" pipe, the length of the supports '2 would be about 1 foot 2" and the bore of these supports would be sufficient to receive the 2" pipe with a little room to spare in order to permit a slight lateral movement of the pipe when the columns are forced downward, as hereinafter described.
The supports 42 can be embedded inthe con.- crete foundation or each support may have a separate footing (by being set in a concrete block or the like) or they may be arranged. in any other suitable manner that will hold them rigidly spaced apartin order to support the col umns of the building. v
If desired, the column supportsmay comprise suitable holes. cored out in the foundation, or could be pins or tubular members extending upwardly therefrom, so that the column '3 would lfitover these pins or tubes instead of into them. Sucha modification is so obvious that it will not bes'hown and described in detail. g j The'columns. 13 ofthe building may be made of standard 2" steel pipe which is strong enough for the average two story building, but it will be 'observed that' a .column of any v suitablediam- 'eter, either round or of any other cross section may be employed. 7 A
Each column I 3 is providedwith a, plurality of longitudinal slots '4 as best seen in Figure 3. These slots are spaced along the length of the column at any desired distance, and theslots are sufiiciently long to permit the head portions '9 of the looking members i 7 attached to the panels to enter these slots as presently described.
The wall panels that lie between the columns will now be described: i
These may be of two typesthat shown in connection 'with Figures 1-2 inclusive, or that shown' in'Figures 6 and 7. i
scribed in' connection with being in all respects similar to those shown :be ,supported by the lower framework composed ;of the. columns I 3 and their supports '2.
It will be understood that the uppercolumns -46 have their interior bores 49 filled with. concrete' or 'other similar material, such as deinteriors of col- .umn '3. r
The beam. may, of course, have reinforcements of anysuitable description, such as the rods indicated in dotted lines at 50 in Figures 4 and 5. v
It will be obvious that the beam 40 may be cast as an L-shaped member to form a corner and to have 3 or more sleeves therein. For example, sleeves to receive the upper ends of columns Isa, 'ab, and '30 in Figure 1, or two seotionsor more can be joined in any suitable manner such as by the metal plate 5' secured by bolts 52, embedded in the beams.
Referring to Figures 6 and`7. in order to form "a panel construction as shown, wherein a membrane is employed, here the looking members I"' are the same as heretofore described, except that one of each pair is embedde'd in one side slab "of thepanel, such as theside 53, while the other member ofthe pair is embedded in the other side of the panel 54.
The slabs 53-54 are cored out as indicated at 55 55,"'so -that when the slabs are placed together to form apanel, each panel is, in effect, a hollow shell, in which a dead air space or spaces exist.
' To break up conduction and convection in the hollow space or spaces within the panel, a membrane 5" is provided, made of felt, roofing paper, or the like, and preferably impervious to moisture and fire-proof. Metal foil, or any other material; may be used.
Preferably two layers of this material are used and the 'ends of the layers shown at 58-59 in Figure 6 extend outwardly all around the panel, so that they may be folded around the columns '3 to form a substantially moisture-proof joint between the columns and panels.
At the bottom and top of each panel the membranes can be turned outwardly to form a molsture-proof joint as best seen in Figure 7. which shows the foot of one of the panels equipped with the membranes 58-59 resting upon the foundation Il. Each side 53-54 of the panel just described, may be equipped with any suitable form of reinforcement, such as the wire mesh reinforcement shown at 60.
The slabs 53-54 are laid against the membrane or membranes 5" which is given a light coat of mastio or suitable material that will adhere to the slabs and hold them together until the panels can be erected. But obviously, if desired, the slabs can be secured together by bolts or screws or in any other suitable manner.
The looking members l 'I' are shown in Figure 6 as embedded directly in the main body of the slabs forming the panel as distinguished from the arrangement shown in Figures 2 and 3 where the members l" are embeclded in the cores '6 forming the Vertical edges of the panels. Either v arrangement can be used, depending upon the ing members l"' not only draw the panels to the' 'columns as 'previously described, but that they also tend to draw the individual slabs 53, 54 towards each other to tightly gripand hold the membrane 5" therebetween.
` If the edges of panel having the overlying membrane are given a light coat of mastic orother bituminous material before erecting .the panels between the columns, each panel is, in effect, a sealed unit.` In the event of a break-through through the outer wall of a panelfor example, a break through the slab 54 that Would permit Water to enter the cavity 56-as this cavity is completely sealed oil not only from the adjaoent cavity 55 in the same panelby reason of the presence of the membrane 5", and also from all other like cavities and all other panels throughout the building, the moisture is confined to a comparatively small area of the broken panel.
Thus air circulation, conduction and' convection in the walls is 'reduced to a minimum, and if the membrane 5" is water-proof, penetration of moisture from the outside of the building is prevented, and yet the form of 'construction is such that these added advantages are secured (and, compared with other forms of construction, without additional cost), without the necessity of the employment of skilled labor to attain them.
In the case of prefabricated buildings, the supports '2, columns '3 and panels '5 can be made to standard sizes, proper provision being made for standard window and door frames, with the result that a building can be erected with practically no cutting and fitting on the job, and by unskilled labor, and that the resultant structure will possess the advantages herein set forth.
Figure' illustrates a form of corner construction that may be employed to advantage in the type of building described. Here, two columns '3 are mounted upon the foundation' as previ ously described, and a corner post 6' of molded material such as concrete or the like, is provided with the looking members Il' and is attached to the two columns as previouslydescribed. The adjaoent panels are then brought against post 6' as shown. The columns '3 are driven downward. thereby looking the slabs and the corner post 6' to the columns in the manner previously described.
It will also be obvious that the membrane, being within the slab, is protected from mechanioal damage in shipment and during erection.
If desired, suitable reinforcement rods, as commonly used in concrete building construction can be placed inside the columns '3 in order to strengthen the structure, the columns then being filled with cement grout or the like.
In the case of a two story structure, the first story frame-work can be erected as previously described, and the columns and panels locked together by pushing the columns downward into the supports '2 and the whole frame-work can be shifted laterally to the degree permitted by the fact that, as previously stated, the bore of the supports '2 is larger than the columns '3 therein.
The first story framework having been set up and the panel and columns having been looked together. as previously described. the cement grout may be poured into the columns so that they are securely locked'in thesupports 12 and the grout is poured into the column to, fill them only part, way to, the top, Short reinforcement rode; are then placed within'the: second story columnsls' so as'. to span the, joint. between the wer, end'of columns. 46 and the upper, en' 'rcr umns '3 and thenthe columns. 46 are filled with cementasfpreviously described.
It will be understood. that the inside, diameter of. the sleeves 4' may be larger thanthef outside diameter 'of the columns 13; and 46. in. order to permit' lateral 'movement of; these oolumis'durlifng theadjustment of the columns to thefpanls 'as previously described, in connection, with Sup;- ports '2 and columns ES., 'The collars 394 are made large enough 'to close the annular 'space at the bottom of' the sleeves 4' regardless. of their, diameter, and the bottoms of' columns 46 can, necessary, have cut-away portions as shown at 6' to permit the"grout to. flow into 'space 62" about the columns 46' and |3 to posi tion same in the sleeve 4,1. A perforatedplate (not shown) can be put over the upper 'end 48 of column '3 to act as a foot for the lower endv 45 of column 46.
It will be observed that if the first story columns are grouted and then the second' story columns are erected thereon and the second story panels are placed. in position, that the seoond story walls so 'erected can be later-ally acl ju sted* to close all joints before pouring, the grouting 'into the secondstory columns. Thus the walls can be erected. without trimmingthe panels'to fitfixedvspaces between the columns and a minimum of'labor'is requiredto erect the building.
What' is claimed' is:
L'A building construction including a foundation, equi-spaced upwardly extending open ings in the foundation, Vertical hollowfcolurnns one end ofwhich is received in saidopenings and intially slidably mounted the'ein, 'a, plurality of apertures in the columns,`panels between the columns, reinforcing elements within thefpanels and extending beyond the; Vertical edges thereof, the ends of the reinforcing elements beins bent. upwardly to form hooie-like, members,
the hook like members` entering. the apertures in the columns with the hook ends extending up wardly and; awayv from, theinner wall, of. thecolumns, whereby when the hook members engage the columns and the columns are forced down.- wardlyinto the openings injthe foundation the panele will be, drawn toward said columns. thus forming a wall' of the building. 2. A construction as claimed'. in claim Lwherein the; reinforcing, members. extend through the penei: with. the ends protrudinggbeyond each of the Vertical edges. saidprotrudin'g. ends; being bent. to -ormzthe hoek-like members. i
3. Aconstruction asgclaimedlin claim I wherein the hoek-like members. are secured. within the column: and the columnsecured within the opening of the foundation by filling the column with. a pourable and settablematerial.
EUGENE'GOENNER.
REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name. Date' 337,591 Lee Mar. 9, 1886 '737,679 Simpsonet. al Sept..1, 1903 932,261 Flynn Aug. 24,,1909 955,401 Horix: w Apr." 19, 1910 962,463 Phillips s r.-- June 28,1910
'l,048,938. Broughton Dec. 31 1912 1.,L11,13l Broughton Sept. 22, 1914 l 1469016 Duarte Jan," 18, 1 916 1231289 Otte June.26,,`1917 'l-,356,34i7 Evans Oct. 19, 1920 l,392,402 Cottman Oct.v 4,. 1921 1579557 Raymond Jan. 1, 1924 1,815,92l Lapo July 28, 1931 1,954,891 v Ross et al. Apr. 17,1934
1,970il4 Brown Aug. 14, 1934 2,169,255 Kotrbaty A ug. 15,.1939
2,22 3,016 Parkhurst Nov. 26,.1940
2241,169 Yokes May 6.,` 19.41
' FOREIGN PATENTS n Number Country Date Italy 1933
US703661A 1946-10-16 1946-10-16 Building wall construction Expired - Lifetime US2577323A (en)

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Cited By (16)

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US2841977A (en) * 1952-07-12 1958-07-08 Meteoor Nv Betonfabriek Welding and assembling floor
US2895324A (en) * 1952-01-23 1959-07-21 Ameray Corp Building constructions
US2924962A (en) * 1954-12-02 1960-02-16 Nettle Lawrence Clarence Wall construction
US3108403A (en) * 1960-04-05 1963-10-29 Thomas J Jackson Foundation column
US3109260A (en) * 1958-11-19 1963-11-05 Cesare Nicholas De Cement block cap plate construction
US3447824A (en) * 1967-05-09 1969-06-03 Roland Brown Space partitioning
US3779523A (en) * 1972-03-08 1973-12-18 Ecodyne Corp Concrete cooling tower
US3902702A (en) * 1973-12-05 1975-09-02 Edna K Kinnaman Interlocking fence
US3971180A (en) * 1974-10-25 1976-07-27 Frederick Charles V Wall structure
US4649677A (en) * 1984-11-07 1987-03-17 Oldham Robert W Building construction and method
US4956953A (en) * 1989-03-08 1990-09-18 Bates Norman H Office panel system incorporating improved locking and alignment mechanism
US5218797A (en) * 1991-11-12 1993-06-15 Ppa Industries, Inc. Prefabricated panel enclosure system
US20070011965A1 (en) * 2005-06-01 2007-01-18 Olson Thomas L Building and method of constructing same
US9194125B1 (en) * 2014-09-12 2015-11-24 Sergei V. Romanenko Construction component having embedded internal support structures to provide enhanced structural reinforcement and improved ease of construction therewith
US9523201B2 (en) * 2014-09-12 2016-12-20 Sergei V. Romanenko Construction components having embedded internal support structures to provide enhanced structural reinforcement for, and improved ease in construction of, walls comprising same
WO2018169510A1 (en) * 2017-03-13 2018-09-20 Janabi Majid Zaydan Khalaf Reproducible building structure with integrated solar energy system

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