US2550880A - Knitted fabric - Google Patents

Knitted fabric Download PDF

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Publication number
US2550880A
US2550880A US16023A US1602348A US2550880A US 2550880 A US2550880 A US 2550880A US 16023 A US16023 A US 16023A US 1602348 A US1602348 A US 1602348A US 2550880 A US2550880 A US 2550880A
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Prior art keywords
yarn
fabric
knitting
yarns
knitted
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US16023A
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Pierre Eugene St
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Hemphill Co
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Hemphill Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes

Description

E. ST. PIERRE KNITTED FABRIC May 1, 1951 Filed March 20, 1948 unfit/$51150? l ll 1 4 Patented May 1, 15951 lOIFllflClfi Y `KNrTTED FABRIC knitting machine of the Banner type but it can Y be carried out as well upon othertypes of circular knitting machines.
When a yarn is substituted for another so that there is no break in the continuity of the knitting, it is customary to introduce'new yarn a few needles before the old yarn is taken out. Consequently, the two yarns are overlapped or spliced and knitted into the fabric together for a distance which effectively locks the respective ends against longitudinal slipping. How- It relates particularly to-a` ever, in certain types of knitting it happens that a yarn is taken out without being spliced to another yarn. In such case, the problem of preventing the end of the yarn from slipping longitudinally after it is cut is more difficult of solution. Two instances of this situation are shown in the accompanying drawing of which:
Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic illustration of plain three feed knitted fabric at the point at which the knitting of three yarns in alternation are discontinued and is succeeded by single feed knitting of a single yarn;
Fig. 2 is a similar view of a fragment of three feed split knit fabric inthe area of the high splice in which one of the three yarns is spliced t another yarn for the high splice, the second of the three yarns is taken out and the knitting of the third of the three yarns is continued in the instep; and
Fig. 3 is a similar view of single feed fabric to which an additional separately fed and knitting yarn is added to change to two feed knitting.
As shown in Fig. l, the fabric is knit of yarns I, 2 and 3 knitted in rotation to form typical three feed fabric. In course 4, yarn 2 is taken out. The last loop to be knit by yarn 2 in this course is indicated at l5. Thereafter, yarn 2 is taken by every other needle. only as indicated at 6 and 'i in such a Way that the usual inlaid construction is produced. In consequence, after the yarn is cut its end is held by successive sinker loops and this is effective to prevent or, at least, limit its longitudinal slipping so that it cannot slip back to the wale represented by loop to Y cause dropped' stitch 2 during pre-boarding or other Vfinishing operations or subsequent use.
Heretofore it has been the practice to feed a yarn .'such as 2 which is to be discontinued-to three. or.. more consecutive needles beyond .the
last needle which knits itxinto the fabric, the threeor` more needlesreferred to being raised above the other sufficiently-.to clear their latches. 'I'his has proved ineffective because the end of yarn\2l isthen held only.` by a single loop and thisiis an insuicient anchorage against slipping. A further objection to this method of attempting to anchor the end of a discontinued yarn is that in certain methods of knitting it tends to break the yarn particularly if it is very sheer such as the nylon customarily used in ladies hosiery. By the method of this invention not only is the anchorage of the end of the yarn secure but greater latitude for self-adjustment of the yarn is provided so that breakage is wholly eliminated.
In Fig. l yarn 3 is also shown as removed in course 8 the last loop of the fabric into which it is knitted being indicated by 9. Thereafter yarn 3 is takenby alternate needles and, as before, is inlaid in the manner previously described respecting yarn 2 also as shown at 6 and 'I. Thereafter the end of yarn 3 may be severed without endangering the fabric since it is securely anchored by the successive sinker wales as already explained. Then the knitting of yarn I is continued the fabric now being single feed fabric knt of yarn I alone, yarns 2 and 3 having been taken out.
The fabric of Fig. 2 also illustrates a three feed fabric composed of yarns I0 and II and I2 knitted in rotation in the usual way. Yarn I D is taken out as shown at I3 and yarn I4 substituted therefor. Yarn I4 is introduced at I5 and is knit together with yarn I0 for three needles so that the two yarns are spliced in the usual manner. As already stated, no problem of yarn slippage arises since the yarns are spliced. Fig. 2 also shows that the knitting of yarn II is discontinued at Wale I6 without being spliced to another yarn. Consequently, its end must be secured to prevent excessive longitudinal slipping and this is done by feeding the yarn to 'the needles knitting alternate wales YI'I---2ll in the usual manner for inlaying a yarn in knitted fabric. In other words, the procedure is the same as that described in respect to Fig. 1. Yarn I4 may be assumed to be that which knits the high splice of a stocking and since the fabric is split fabric the knitting of yarn I2 may be considered as the-instep yarn, the contiguous 3 edges of the tWo sections being interknitted to form a suitable suture.
'Iheliabric of Fig. 3 is assumed to include a section knit of a single yarn 12| at the end of which a second yarn 22 is introduced and two feed knitting begun. The free end of yarn 22 is anchored against longitudinal displacement by feeding it to a few alternate needles such as 23 and 24 ahead of the rst needle 25 which will actually knit it and so manipulating the needles that it is inlaid in consecutive sinker wales ahead of the first knitted Wale.
Although the number of additional needles to which the yarn may be fed for the purpose -oi` 'without'splicing it to another yarn but. also whenever a yarn is introduced without splicing. The only difference is that in the latter case the inlay occurs ahead'nf the actuall knitting: of the yarn .whereas in the former it occurs afterY the actual knitting is discontinued.
Another incidental feature of. this invention is that the inlaidV yarn is eiective to conceal an 'eyelet which may result from the discontinuance of a yarn or from a change in the direction of knitting. Since it 'is' securely held it'will bridge Number 4 any small opening which lies in its path. This is not likely to be so with the other method described herein because of the great probability that the yarn will slip from its anchorage and be entirely free up to the first loop at which it is actually knitted.
I claim: A knitted fabric having a section composed of a plurality of yarns knitted in rotation and a succeeding section in which only one of said yarns is knitted, the exit end of each of the other yarns being inlaid in a plurality of consecutive sinker wales in the rst course of said succeeding section.
EUGENE ST. PIERRE.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Scott Feb. 17, 1914 Getaz Aug. 8, 1939 Marr Oct. 21, 1941 Marr Oct. 21, 1941 Miller Oct. 10, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Australia June 14, 1939 Number
US16023A 1948-03-20 1948-03-20 Knitted fabric Expired - Lifetime US2550880A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2676474A (en) * 1951-02-16 1954-04-27 Hemphill Co Method of knitting
US2886959A (en) * 1954-06-01 1959-05-19 Hemphill Co Yarn controlling device and method of knitting
US3004418A (en) * 1957-01-14 1961-10-17 Scott & Williams Inc Knitted stocking
US3069880A (en) * 1958-06-18 1962-12-25 Levin Nathan Method of preventing eyelets in hosiery
US3080739A (en) * 1958-05-15 1963-03-12 Textile Machine Works Means for and method of attaching yarn ends in tubular fabrics
US3093985A (en) * 1958-07-01 1963-06-18 Stibbe G & Co Ltd Method of knitting fine gauge stockings
US3111826A (en) * 1957-08-14 1963-11-26 S & S Hosiery Mills Method and means for circular multi-feed knitting
US3221517A (en) * 1956-06-22 1965-12-07 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine
US3260072A (en) * 1962-01-10 1966-07-12 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine
US4589267A (en) * 1982-11-01 1986-05-20 Speizman Industries, Inc. Method and apparatus for producing hosiery article

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1087688A (en) * 1910-01-14 1914-02-17 Scott & Williams Inc Knitted web.
US2168868A (en) * 1937-04-17 1939-08-08 Getaz James Louis Plain knit ornamented fabric
US2260118A (en) * 1939-12-15 1941-10-21 Zwicker Knitting Mills Art of ornamented knitted wearing apparel manufacture
US2260117A (en) * 1938-10-24 1941-10-21 Zwicker Knitting Mills Art of ornamented knitted wearing apparel manufacture
US2525704A (en) * 1946-01-16 1950-10-10 Hanes Hosiery Mills Co Knitting machine and method

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1087688A (en) * 1910-01-14 1914-02-17 Scott & Williams Inc Knitted web.
US2168868A (en) * 1937-04-17 1939-08-08 Getaz James Louis Plain knit ornamented fabric
US2260117A (en) * 1938-10-24 1941-10-21 Zwicker Knitting Mills Art of ornamented knitted wearing apparel manufacture
US2260118A (en) * 1939-12-15 1941-10-21 Zwicker Knitting Mills Art of ornamented knitted wearing apparel manufacture
US2525704A (en) * 1946-01-16 1950-10-10 Hanes Hosiery Mills Co Knitting machine and method

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2676474A (en) * 1951-02-16 1954-04-27 Hemphill Co Method of knitting
US2886959A (en) * 1954-06-01 1959-05-19 Hemphill Co Yarn controlling device and method of knitting
US3221517A (en) * 1956-06-22 1965-12-07 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine
US3004418A (en) * 1957-01-14 1961-10-17 Scott & Williams Inc Knitted stocking
US3111826A (en) * 1957-08-14 1963-11-26 S & S Hosiery Mills Method and means for circular multi-feed knitting
US3080739A (en) * 1958-05-15 1963-03-12 Textile Machine Works Means for and method of attaching yarn ends in tubular fabrics
US3069880A (en) * 1958-06-18 1962-12-25 Levin Nathan Method of preventing eyelets in hosiery
US3093985A (en) * 1958-07-01 1963-06-18 Stibbe G & Co Ltd Method of knitting fine gauge stockings
US3260072A (en) * 1962-01-10 1966-07-12 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine
US4589267A (en) * 1982-11-01 1986-05-20 Speizman Industries, Inc. Method and apparatus for producing hosiery article

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