US3111826A - Method and means for circular multi-feed knitting - Google Patents

Method and means for circular multi-feed knitting Download PDF

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US3111826A
US3111826A US678204A US67820457A US3111826A US 3111826 A US3111826 A US 3111826A US 678204 A US678204 A US 678204A US 67820457 A US67820457 A US 67820457A US 3111826 A US3111826 A US 3111826A
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needles
knitting
yarn
auxiliary
cam
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Herman R Branson
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Scott and Williams Inc
S AND S HOSIERY MILLS
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S AND S HOSIERY MILLS
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/42Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration
    • D04B9/46Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof

Description

Nov. 26, 1963 H. R. BRANSON 3, 3
METHOD AND MEANS FOR CIRCULAR MULTI-FEED KNITTING Filed Aug. 14, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet. l
METHOD AND MEANS FOR CIRCULAR MULTI-FEED KNITTING Nov. 26, 1963 H. R. BRANSON Filed Aug 14, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Q Q QM w mlwmlmwi- Q2 E?igi ggii .H: & mgm ggflgwg M 3%; w 5@ 3 5% iiimg i; ,5 f i i f Nov, 26, 1963 H. R. BRANSON METHOD AND MEANS FOR CIRCULAR MULTI-FEED KNITTING 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 14, 1957 lbq- HERMAN R. BRAN SON,
5m, BY
INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Nov. 26, 1963 H. R. BRANSON 3,111,826
METHOD AND MEANS FOR CIRCULAR MULTI-FEED KNITTING Filed Aug. 14, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 F l 6. l6.
INV EN TOR.
HERMAN R. BRANSON United States Patent 3,111,826 METI-IGD AND MEANS FUR (IIRIIULAR MUL'II-FEED KNITTING Herman R. llranson, Snow Camp, N.C., assiguor to S. 3; S. Hosiery Mills, Graham, Nail, a partnership Filed Aug. I4, 1957, Ser. No. 678,294 6 tjlairns. (Cl. 66-42) This invention relates generally to circular knitting machines adapted to knit tubular fabric, such as ladies seamless hosiery, adapted to knit a single course with each rotation of the needle cylinder in some portions of the hose and to knit two or more courses with each rotation of the needle cylinder in other portions of the hosiery.
Heretofore, knitting machines have been provided with removable auxiliary knitting stations in addition to the main feeding station for knitting multiple courses with each rotation of the needle cylinder. In this type of machine, portions of the stocking, such as the welt, heel and toe, have been knit single feed at the main feeding station only, and the auxiliary knitting station introduced during the knitting of the leg and foot to knit these portions two courses with each rotation of the needle cylinder. The use of both knitting stations during the leg and foot portions of the stocking greatly increases the production of the knitting machine. Difficulties in the form of openings, eyelets or cat-eyes have been experienced when introducing and removing the auxiliary knitting station. When introducing the auxiliary knitting station, two courses must be knit where one course was formerly knit and the openings or cat-eyes are formed at this point because the free or leading end of the auxiliary yarn has not been properly tied into the fabric prior to starting the two-course knitting. The openings or cat-eyes also appear when the auxiliary knitting station is removed.
It is therefore the primary object of this invention to provide an improved machine and method for tying the leading and trailing ends of the auxiliary yarn into the stitch loops formed by the yarn fed at the main knitting station to prevent the formation. of openings, eyelets or cat-eyes when two-course knitting is started and ended.
It is another object of this invention to provide a novel method of tying the leading and trailing ends of an auxiliary yarn into the knit fabric prior to and after making independent courses of stitch loops with the auxiliary yarn. The novel method of introducing the auxiliary yarn including knitting the leading end of the auxiliary yarn simultaneously with a few needles as the main yarn is knit at the main knitting station, knitting the auxiliary yarn independently on alternate needles only for a few needles, and knitting the auxiliary yarn inedpendently on all subsequent needles. The novel method of removing the auxiliary yarn including knitting the auxiliary yarn independently on all needles, knitting the auxiliary yarn independently on alternate needles only for a few needles, and removing the auxiliary yarn not knit on any subsequent needles.
t is a more specific object of this invention to provide a novel method and apparatus for controlling the raising and lowering of the needles in the cylinder at the auxiliary knitting station wherein the needles in the cylinder are arranged according to the lengths of their butts in a manner to cooperate with the auxiliary knitting station when the auxiliary yarn is introduced to and removed from the fabric and to provide a novel two-level needle raising cam in advance of the auxiliary knitting station. The two-level needle raising cam is operative to cooperate with the varying length butts on the needles and the movement of the auxiliary knitting station into operative position to securely tie the leading end of the auxiliary yarn into the fabric upon its introduction and to securely 3,111,826 Patented Nov. 26, 1963 tie the trailing end of the auxiliary yarn into the fabric upon its removal.
Some of the objects of the invention having been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the upper portion of a circular knitting machine embodying the present invention;
FIGURE 2 is a sectional plan view taken substantially along the line 2-2 in FIGURE 1;
FIGURE 3 is an enlarged end elevation of the outside of the auxiliary stitch cam block taken substantially along the line 3-3 in FIGURE 2;
FIGURE 4 is a plan view of the auxiliary stitch cam block shown in FIGURE 3 and being removed from the knitting machine;
FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view through the auxiliary stitch cam and being taken substantially along the line 55' in FIGURE 4;
FIGURE 6 is a rear view of a ladys stocking illustrat ing its appearance when worn;
FIGURE 7 is a somewhat schematic developed view of the needle cams and yarn feeding stations which surround the needle cylinder, as though looking outwardly from inside the needle cylinder, and showing the path of travel of the needles during regular two feed knitting;
FIGURE 8 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the portions of the fabric indicated at the dotted rectangles 3 in FIGURE 6 to illustrate the novel method of tying in the auxiliary yarn at the beginning of two feed knitting and showing the relative positions of the hooks of the cylinder needles when they pass the auxiliary feeding station;
FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken substantially along the line 99 in- FIGURE 5;
FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view showing the needle shedding cam and being taken substantially along the line Itl1h in FIGURE 4;
FIGURE 11 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially along the line III1 in FIGURE 4;
FIGURE 12 is an enlarged isometric view of the needle raising cam positioned between the main stitch cams and the auxiliary stitch cams;
FIGURE 13 is a fragmentary schematic view of the needle cams shown in the left-hand portion of FIGURE 7 and showing the path travelled by the various needles during the introduction of the auxiliary yarn at the auxiliary knitting station;
FIGURE 14 is a schematic horizontal sectional view through the needle cylinder and showing the lengths of the butts on the needles and their arrangement in the needle cylinder;
FIGURE 15 is a diagrammatic horizontal section illustrating one phase of operation; and
FIGURE 16 is a diagrammatic section taken on the radial plane In-Iii of FIGURE 15.
Referring to the drawings, the knitting machine is provided with the usual bed plate 2% 'm which a conventional needle cylinder 21 is mounted for rotation or reciprocation. The needle cylinder 21 is driven, at times, to rotate and at other times to reciprocate in the usual manner by conventional means, not shown, and is provided with vertical slots in which a plurality of cylinder needles, indicated broadly at N (FIGURE 7) are adapted to have vertical sliding movement. Alternate cylinder needles N have needle raising jacks, broadly indicated at J, p ositioned therebeneath and which are provided to raise the alternate needles during the make-up, in a conventional manner.
The knitting machine is also provided with the usual sinker cap 25 (FIGURES 1 and 2.) attached to the upper end of the needle cylinder 21 and in which the usual sinkers S are mounted to cooperate with the needles during vertical movement to form stitches with the yarn fed to the needles. A latch ring 26 is spaced above the sinker cap 25 and is pivotally mounted at its rear end on the upper end of a pivot post 27 (FIGURE 2), the lower end of which is fixed on the bed plate 2%. The front end of the latch ring 26 is releasably supported on the upper end of a sinker cap stop post 36, the lower end of which is fixed on the bed plate 2%.
A dial 35 (FIGURE 2) is supported inside of the latch ring 26 and is provided with a plurality of radially movable transfer hooks, not shown, which are used to make the turned welt of the stocking in a conventional manner. The dial 35 also supports a conventional yarn clamp and cutter device 36 which is adapted to cut the yarns as they are moved out of knitting position and hold the yarn ends extending from the yarn feeding fingers. The transfer hooks in the dial 35 are rotated in a conventional manner through dial driving gears, mounted in a dial drive gear housing 4% shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 1.
The latch ring 26 is provided with a main yarn feeding throat opening 42 (FIGURES 2, 7 and 13) in which main yarn feeding fingers 44, 45, 46 and 47 are mounted and an auxiliary throat opening '43 in which auxiliary yarn feeding fingers t and 51 are mounted. The main yarn feeding fingers 4 4 through 47 are oscillatably mounted as at 54 (FIGURE 1) on an upstanding portion of the latch ring 26 and are engaged by the upper end of a plurality of yarn feed finger thrust rods 55 which extend downwardly therefrom to pass through a cut-out portion at the rear of the bed plate 20 and the lower ends thereof are adapted to, at times, engage and be raised by cams, not shown, on a main pattern drum 6%. The pattern drum 66 is adapted to be moved in a conventional step-by-step manner under control of the conventional pattern chain, not shown. The pattern drum 60 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 61, the outer end of which is suitably suported by the lower end of a bracing member 62 and the upper end of the member 62 is fixed on a plate 63. The plate 63 (FIGURES 1 and 2) is suitably secured to the lower rear surface of the bed plate 20.
The auxiliary yarn feeding fingers 5d and 51 are oscillatabiy mounted as at 65 (FIGURE 1) on an upstanding portion of the latch ring '26 and the outer or free ends are engaged by one end of respective finger operating levers 66 and 67. The levers 66 and 67 are oscillatably mounted intermediate their ends on the outer end of a horizontally disposed post 70 (FIGURES 1 and 2), the inner end of which is fixed in the latch ring The rear ends of the levers 66 and 67 have suitable pins therein which are engaged by the upper ends of respective thrust rods 71 and 72 (FIGURE 2). The lower ends of the thrust rods 71 and 72 are adapted to engage and, at times, be raised by cams, not shown, on the pattern drum 66 to move the auxiliary yarn feeding fingers 5d and 51 out of operative or yarn feeding position.
Referring to FIGURE 7, the various cams for acting upon the butts of the needles N include a fixed cam ring broadly designated at 74 and which is supported to surround the needle cylinder 21 in the bed plate 29 by a needle cam supporting ring, not shown, fixed on the bed plate 20. The fixed cam ring 74 comprises a ring cam 75, a cam 76, a cam 77, a cam 76, a removable jack gate cam 80, and a two-leveled end cam 82 which is peculiar to this invention and will be later described in detail (FIGURES 7 and 12). The cams 76 and '77 are cut away at their juncture to accommodate a conventional jack raising cam 85. A conventional widening picker 86 is pivotally mounted in the sinker cap stop post 30 and is movable from operable to inoperable position in a conventional manner. The widening picker $6 is adapted to he moved, when in operative position, into a Widening needle leveling cam 96 fixed on the sinker cap stop post 36.
The machine is also provided with conventional movable cams which are movable into and out of operative position .to engage the butts of the needles extending outwardly from the needle cylinder and which include a switching needle lowering cam 5, a switching needle raising cam 96, a needle lowering transfer cam Q7, a pair of cooperating needle raising and lowering dividing cams 1% and mi, and a needle lowering earn 102. The transfer cam 7 is used in cooperation with dial cams, not shown, when transferring the stitches held on the dial hooks back to the cylinder needles after knitting the required length of fabric to form the turned welt at the top of the hose. The needle raising and lowering dividing cams 1%, Illll cooperate with each other to cause selected ones of the needles to pass through the stitch earn-s at the main knitting station and other needles to pass beneath the stitch cams during the make-up or start of a new hose. The needle raising switch cam 96 is used to switch or raise part of the needles in the needle cylinder out of action above the stitch cams at the beginning of reciprocatory knitting in the heel and toe pockets and the needle lowering switch cam is used to switch or lower the raised needles back into action so they will again pass through the stitch cams upon completion of the heel and toe pockets.
The needle cams also include -a main set of stitch cams comprising a top center cam 110, a bottom center earn 111, a right-hand stitch cam 112, a left-hand stitch cam 113, and a needle butt landing cam 114 positioned beneath the left-hand stitch cam 113. A pair of conventional narrowing picks 116 and 117 adapted to work in conjunction with the right-hand and left-hand stitch cams 112, 113 to progressively decrease the number of needles knitting during reciprocatory knitting, such as during the heel and toe pockets.
The main set of stitch cams are positioned directly therebeneath the main throat opening 42 (FIGURE 7) and both of which may be defined as a first or main knitting station, broadly indicated at 126. The main knitting station 126 will draw stitches with all needles whose butts approach the knitting station at an elevation low enough to engage the top center cam 116 so as to be guided downwardly to stitch drawing level by either the right-hand stitch cam 112 or the left-hand stitch cam 113.
A second or auxiliary knitting station, broadly indicated at 125, includes the auxiliary yarn feeding throat opening 43 as well as a removable auxiliary needle lowering stitch cam 12.6, a needle raising shedding cam 127 and a needle butt landing cam 13% positioned beneath the stitch cam 126. The cams 12-6, 127 and 136 are mounted for radial movement, relative to the needle cylinder 21 in a cam block 13 2 fixed on the bed piate 20.
Referring to FIGURES 4 and 5, it will be observed that the auxiliary stitch cam 126 and the needle landing cam 130 are both suitably secured to the inner end of a slide or stem 13-3 slidably mounted in the cam block 132 which is normally urged inwardly toward the needle cylinder 21 by a pair of compression springs 134, FIG- URE 5. The inner ends of the compression springs 134 bear against the outer end of the slide 133 and the outer ends of the springs 13d bear against a plate 135 suitably secured to the outer surface of the cam block 132. The inner end of a control link 136 is suitably secured to the lower outer portion or" the slide 133 (FIGURE 5) and extends outwardly, through the plate 135, and is bent upwardly to accommodate an adjustment screw 14-9 threadably mounted therein. The adjustment screw 146* may be adjusted to restrict the inward movement of the auxiliary stitch cam 126 and landing cam 13%.
The slide 133, along with the auxiliary stitch cam T26 and landing cam Hit), is, at times, moved outwardly away from the needle cylinder Ed, by a control lever 142 oscillatably mounted as at 142a on the control link 1 36. One end of the lever 142 bears against the plate 135 and the other end thereof has one end or" a control rod 143 connected thereto (FIGURES l and 2). The other end of the control rod 143 is oscillatably connected to the upper end of a bell crank 144 (FIGURE 1) oscillatably mounted intermediate tis ends on a fixed shaft 145 and the opposite free end of the bell crank 144 has an operating pin 14:6 fixed therein. The pin 146 engages a cut-out in e medial portion of a thrust rod 147, the lower end of which at times engages the periphcry of the main pattern drum 60 and at other times engages stepped cams 158 and 151, fixed on the drum 6%.
A second bell crank 155 is oscillatably mounted on the shaft 145 and is operated by a second thrust rod, not shown, and has one end of a connecting rod .156 oscillatably connected thereto and the opposite end of which is connected to the outer end of a bell crank 157 (FIGURES 2, 3 and 4). The bell crank 157 is oscillaitably mounted as at 158 on the upper end of a post 159, the lower end of which is fixed in the bed plate 20. The opposite end of the bell crank 157 straddles and engages an upstanding control pin 16%, the lower end of which is threadably mounted in the medial portion of a stem 161 mounted for radial sliding movement in the cam block 132 and on the inner end of which the shedding cam 127 is fixed. The outer end of the stem 161 is bent downwardly and is threadably penetrated by an adjusting screw 162, the inner end of which at times engages the cam block 132. to restrict inward movement of the shedding cam 127. The lower medial portion of the stem 161 has the upper end of a pin 16% fixed therein and the lower end of which is engaged by one end of a compression spring @164, the opposite end of which bears against a threaded plug M5 mounted in the cam block 132. Thus, the shedding earn 127 is normally resiliently urged inwardly toward the needle cylinder .21 by the compression spring 164 and at times is moved outwardly to inoperative or to partially inoperative position by the bell crank 157 to engage selected needle butts.
The movable cam 13 2 is also mounted for radial movement inwardly and outwardly from the needle cylinder 21 in the cam block 132 and is fixed on the inner end of a stem 176. The stem 170 is slidably mounted in the cam block 132 and the outer end is turned downwardly with a limiting adjustment screw 171 threadably mounted therein and the inner end of which is adapted to at times engage the outer surface of the cam block 132. The cam 102 is normally resiliently moved into close proximity with the needle cylinder 21 by a compression spring .172 (FIGURE 11), one end of which bears against a sleeve member 173 and the opposite end of the spring 172 engages the bottom of a bore in the cam block 132. The cam 162 is at times moved outwardly from the needle cylinder 21 by a bell crank 1'75 (FIGURES 2 and 4), the inner end of which straddles or encircles the upper portion of a pin 1'76 fixed at its lower end in the stem 17%. The bell crank 175 is oscillatably mounted intermediate its ends as at 177 on the cam block 132 and its outer end is oscillatably connected to one end of a control rod 189 which extends rearwardly and is connected at its other end to the upper end of a bell crank 1821 (FIGURE 1), identical to the bell cranks 144 and 155 and is operated by a thrust rod, controlled by the main pattern drum.
As is well known, the sinkers, not shown, in the sinker cap 25 must be moved outwardly from their normal fabric-engaging position when a yarn is fed to the needles, as the needles are drawn to stitch drawing level, and then moved inwardly to shed the loops from the needles before the needles are again raised with the new loop thereon. This is usually accomplished by a sinker cam, not shown, mounted in the sinker cap 25 and above the main knitting station 120 and the auxiliary knitting station 12-5. When the auxiliary knitting station 1 25 is moved to stitch drawing position, it is necessary to move the sinker withdrawing cam to operative position. The sinker withdrawing cam, not shown, is fixed on the inner end of a sinker pull-back arm (FIGURES l, 2 and 3) and the outer end of which has a downwardly depending p-in 186 fixed therein and which is engaged by one end of a control rod 137. The other end of the control rod 187 is fixed onthe upper end of a sleeve 190 (FIGURE 3) which is oscillatably mounted on a post 7191, the lower end of which is fixed in the upper surface of the cam block 132. The lower end of the sleeve 190 has one end of an outwardly extending arm 192 fixed thereon and the free end of which has one end of a control rod 1% oscillatably mounted therein. The other end of the control rod 193 is suitably connected to the upper end of a 'bell crank 195, which is oscillatably mounted intermediate its ends on the shaft 1-4-5 and the bell crank 1% is controlled through a thrust rod by the main pattern drum 6%).
It is with a knitting machine of the type thus far described that the present invention is adapted to be associated and all of the parts heretofore described, with the exception of the two-level end cam 82, are conventional parts of a Scott & Williams Model K knitting machine which has been modified, by the addition of the auxiliary feeding station 125 and which machine is commercially available.
The present invention comprises the novel arrangement of the cylinder needles in the needle cylinder 21 according to the lengths of the butts on the needles, the manner of moving the auxiliary shedding cam 127 and auxiliary stitch cam 126 into and out of operative position, and the use of the two-level needle raising cam 82'.
p The particular needle cylinder shown (FIGURE 14) is grooved to accommodate a total of 400 needles N arranged in eight alphabetical groups A through H. The needles N are designated according to the lengths of their butts, there being needles of five diiferent butt lengths.
The needles which have the longest butts are designated at LN, that is the needles whose butts extend further out of the grooves of the needle cylinder 21 than do the butts of any of the other needles below described. The needles having the next shorter butts are designated at MLN, the needles having the next shorter butts designated at MN, the needles having the next shorter butts designated MSN and the needles having the shortest butts designated at SN.
The group A includes 200 LN needles, group B includes 15 M'LN needles, the group C includes 15 MN needles alternating with 15 SN needles for a total of 30 needles, the group D includes 55 SN needles, the group B includes 3 MSN needles alternating with 3 SN needles for a total of 6 needles, the group P includes 3 MN needles alternating with 3 SN needles for a total of 6 needles, the group G includes 73 MN needles, and the group H includes 15 MLN needles.
Referring to FIGURES 7, l2 and 13, it will be noted that the two-level needle raising end cam 82 has a needle raising surface 206 which is inclined upwardly and which terminates at a high or first level 291. The inner upper portion of the cam 82 is out away to provide a low or second needle raising level 2%2. The cut away portion of the cam is sufficient to allow any short butt needles SN which ride up the inclined surface 260 to level off at the low or second level 2 02 and all other needles will lie raised up the inclined surface 20% to the high or first level 2%. Thus, as the successive needle butts engage and ride up the two-level cam 82, all of the needles in the needle cylinder except the short butt needles SN will be raised up the inclined surface 209 and released at the high level 201 while the short butt needles SN will ride up the inclined surface 200 and be released at the low level 262. The high level 2&1 may be termed an auxiliary yarn receiving level since the hooks of the needles raised to the level Ztll are raised high enough to pick up the auxiliary yarn fed at the throat opening 43 and the hooks of the needles raised to the level 262 are not raised high enough to pick up the auxiliary yarn.
fl/Iethod of Operation A ladys seamless stocking such as is indicated at S FIGURE 6) is ordinarily knit by first knitting a turned welt 210 with a relatively heavy yarn on the order of 40 denier nylon. In starting the stocking S, the shedding cam l-.27 and auxiliary stitch cam 12.6 as well as the auxiliary yarn feeding fingers and 5d are in withdrawn or inoperative position and the make-up is made by dividing the needles with the dividing cam 1% so that alternate needles pass over the right-hand stitch cam 1 12, engage the center cam Mil, pick up the yarn w from yarn feeding finger 46, and then draw the yarn down as the needle buts are lowered by the left-hand stitch earn 113 while-the butts of intervening needles pass below the righ hand stitch earn 112 so that they do not pick up the yarn w. During t s make-up, conventional transfer hooks, not shown in the dial 65, are moved outwardly over the intervening needles to receive and hold the yarn w until completion of the desired length of fabric has been knit to form the turned welt 21%. After the make-up courses are made, all or" the needles draw stitches at the main knitting station 12% and when the desired length has been knit, single feed, the intervening cylinder needles are raised and the yarn, held on the transfer hooks, in the dial is transferred back to the cylinder needles to form a tubular welt Still at the top of the stocking S.
Rotary knitting is continued to form an after-welt 21% with the yarn w. After completing the after-welt 211, it is the conventional practice to change the yarn feeding fingers at the main throat opening 42 (FIGURES 7 and 8) so that the leg 212 of the stocking S may be knit with a light yarn. This is usually accomplished by moving a yarn feeding finger such as the finger 47 into operative position which is threaded to feed a main body yarn in, such as denier nylon. With both the yarn feeding fingers 46 and 47 in feeding or operative position, the needles passing through the main knitting station 120' will pick up and knit stitch loops with both yarns w and m, such as those indicated in needle wales W-l through Vii-.24 in course C-2 of the fabric illustrated in FIGURE 8. These two yarns may be knitted together for as long as is desired, in this case for nine needles, in order to tie the two yarns together before the heavy denier yarn w is removed by raising the yarn feeding finger 46 t0 inoperative position and clipping the end of the yarn as it is passed across the dial by the clipping mechanism 36.
in order to increase the speed of knitting the leg 212 of the stocking S, the auxiliary feeding station 12-5 is moved into operative position during the formation of the stitch loops in course 0-2. in order to prevent the formation of openings, eyelets or cat-eyes at the point at which two-course knitting commences, a novel method has been proy ided for introducing an auxiliary yarn to start twocourse or multiple course knitting from single course knitting. Two-course knitting is started by moving the yarn feeding finger 5i) into operative position while the SN needles in group D are passing the throat opening 43 and the sinker withdrawing cam, not shown, is moved to operative position at the same time. The feeding finger is threaded with an auxiliary yarn a, such as 15 denier nylon yarn. The yarn a will not be picked up by the needles in the group D since their hooks are not raised high enough by the cam 32 to pick up yarn at the auxiliary throat opening While the short butt needles SN in group D are passing the withdrawn shedding can: 127 and auxiliary stitch cam 126 with the needle cylinder rotating in a counter-clockwise direction in 14, both the cams 12.6 and 127 are moved inwardly toward the needle cylinder by movement of the main pattern drum till and through the link- 8 age previously described. The shedding earn 127 is moved inwardly far enough so it will engage and raise the MN needles in group E but will miss the MSN needles in group E and miss all the short butt needles SN in both of the groups E and F. At the same time, the auxiliary stitch earn 126 is moved inwardly towards the needle cylinder far enough to engage the butts and lower the MSN needles in group E and the MN needles in group P.
Thus with rotation of the needle cylinder, the butts of the MSN needles in group E will ride up the cam 32 to the yarn receiving level 201 to travel a pathway P2 and then engage and pass beneath the auxiliary stitch earn 126. The butts of the needles SN in group E will ride up the inclined surface of the two-level cam 82, to the low level 2522 and travel a level pathway P3 (FIGURE 13) since the butts of the SN needles are not long enough to engage the shedding cam 127 or stitch cam 126 when in their present positions. Since none of the needles in group E are raised by the shedding cam 127, the stitch loops thereon, which were formed at the main knitting station llZ-tl in the course 0-2 and wales W-4 through W-9, will not be moved below the latches of these needles and therefore will not be shed as these needles are lowered by the auxiliary stitch cam 126. The yarn a fed to the MSN needles in group E at the auxiliary throat opening 43 will be laid in the hooks of the SN needles in group E also as it is drawn down by the MSN needles in group E. Stitches are not drawn at this point with the yarn a but laid in the hooks of all the needles in group E to join with the main yarn in in drawing stitches in course C3, as more fully described hereinafter.
Since the needle shedding cam 127 and stitch cam 126 are both moved inwardly far enough to engage the MN needles in group F, the butts of these needles will follow a pathway P 1 (FIGURE 13), over the shedding cam 127 and beneath the stitch cam 126 to draw stitches in wales W-Iid, V i-l2 and W-Il l in the auxiliary course C2a (FIGURE 8). The butts of the SN needles in group P will follow the pathway P3 and will pick up yarn in their hooks as the yarn is pulled down by the MN needles. As group F passes the knitting station 125, the SN needles will not be lowered by the stitch cam 126 so that the yarn a is merely held in the hooks of these SN needles in group F and shed when these needles draw stitches at the main knitting station. This shed yarn is illustrated passing behind the stitches in wales W41, W433 and (V-l5 in course C2a and the beginning of course (2-3.
When the MN needles in group G reach the shedding cam 127, they will all be raised to take yarn from the auxiliary finger 5i and then lowered by the stitch cam to draw stitches therewith and form the stitch loops in wales V i-l6 through W-Zd and succeeding wales, not shown, in course C2a. After the groups E and F have passed the auxiliary knitting station 125', the shedding cam 127 and stitch cam 126 are moved inwardly to fully operative position to engage the butts of all of the various length needles in the needle cylinder 21 so that with each succeeding rotation of the needle cylinder, all of the needles will pass through and draw stitches at the auxiliary knitting station 125.
As the needles in group E approach the main knitting station 12%), when knitting the course C3, the needles in group E, all of which have the aum'liary yarn a already held in their hooks, will pick up the main body yarn m from the yarn feeding finger 47 and pass through the stitch earns to thus draw the stitches indicated in wales W-d through W-9 with both yarns a and m. All the needles in group F will take the main body yarn m at the yarn feeding finger 47 and draw single stitches in every wale W49 through W-l5 therewith. As the SN needles are raised by the earn 112 the yarn a will be moved below the latches of the needles and will be shed when the stitches of the yarn in in wales W-ll, W43 and W-le" are drawn. All the needles in the group G and succeeding groups will pass through the main knitting station to draw single stitch loops as shown in the wales W-16 through W-24 in course 03.
Since, by this time the shedding cam 127 and auxiliary stitch cam 126 will have moved into fully operative position, all of the needles in all groups will pass over the shedding cam 127 and below the stitch cam 126 to form a course of single yarn stitch loops from the yarn a as illustrated in course C-3a. Thus with each revolution of the needle cylinder, two courses are formed. This double course knitting is continued throughout the length of the leg 212 (FIGURE 6) and before starting the heel pocket, indicated at 213 (FIGURE 6), the machine again switches to single feed knitting.
The foregoing matter of eyelet closure may be summarized with particular reference to the yarn handling involved as follows:
As the needles of group E leave the stitch cam 113, having drawn main yarn, the longer butt needles of group E rise up cam 20%! to the level 1 -2, which is a tuck level (though tucking is not produced on these needles), i.e., an uncleared level. They pass the earn 127 without further rise and are then depressed by the stitch cam 126 drawing the auxiliary yarn over the ledges of the sinkers but without drawing stitches since the loops drawn at the main feed have not been cleared and accordingly have not been cast off, still remaining in the hooks of the needles as the needles reach the bottom of cam 126. As the longer butt needles of group E pass the level P-3 of the shorter butt needles of the same group E, the auxiliary yarn passes outside the hooks of these shorter butt needles, the path of the auxiliary yarn at this point being still outward and away from the needle shanks in its tangential approach from the feed throat to the needle circle. Thus, as the drawing of the auxiliary yarn is completed it is outside the shanks of the shorter butt needles, and when both sets of needles of this group join each other beyond cam 125, the auxiliary yarn has the same relationship to both sets. In the subsequent rise to the level of approach to am 112 the needles of the group B now contain both the loops of main yarn previously drawn at the main feed and a length of auxiliary yarn drawn at the auxiliary feed. As the sinkers are withdrawn in the reapproach to the main feed the loose length of the auxiliary yarn, which is not bound in any way to the needles moves outwardly with the sinkers to a radial position beyond the spoons of the open latches. As clearing takes place over the cam 112 the loops of main yarn pass below the latches but, of course, tightly engage the shanks of the needles.
Now, as the needles pass down the cam 12% and the cam 1.13 the lower ends of the latches pass within the outwardly bowed length of the auxiliary yarn, as shown in FIGURES 15 and 16, so that this yarn is again positioned above the needle latch and during this downward movement of the needles, the sinkers are moved inwardly to carry the auxiliary yarn into the hooks of the needles of group E. In the same operation the main yarn is taken by the needles of this group, and at the bottom of earn 113 loops of the auxiliary yarn and of the portion of the main yarn most recently introduced are drawn together through the cleared loops of main yarn previously positioned on the needle shanks. There thus follows the double loops shown in FIGURE 8 in the wales W-4 to W-9.
When switching from multiple feed knitting to single feed knitting, the trailing end of the auxiliary yarn a is again tied in with the main yarn in before removing this yarn to prevent openings, eyelets or cat-eyes in the fabric at the juncture of the leg and heel pockets 213. As is well known, the heel pocket 213 is knit by reciprocatory knitting on only a portion of the needles in the needle cylinder, and in this case, a conventional Y heel is knit on the needles in groups C, D, E, F and G. In order to knit the heel pocket on only these five groups of needles,
it is necessary to switch the needles in groups A, B and H upwardly to inoperative position by use of the switching cam 96 (FIGURE 7) which is moved into operative position, during the last counter-clockwise rotary movement of the needle cylinder, far enough to engage and raise the needles MLN in group H, the LN needles in group A and the MLN needles in group B.
When the needles in groups A, B and H are raised, during the last counter-clockwise movement of the needle cylinder, the auxiliary shedding cam 127 and auxiliary stitch cam 126 are moved outwardly to partially inoperative position to engage only a few of the MN needles in group C and thus only alternate needles will take and draw stitches to form stitches in a pattern similar to that shown in wales W1tl through W45 in course C-Za. As the cams 127 and 126 are withdrawn to fully inoperative position, the yarn a in the feeding finger 50 will be laid in the hooks of a few of the needles in group C to be knit with the yarn from the main feeding finger during the first reciprocatory course of the heel pocket 213.
During this last rotary course of the leg 212, the yarn feeding fingers at the throat opening 42 are again changed so that the welt yarn w in the finger 45 is moved into operative position a few needles before the yarn feeding finger 47 with the main yarn m removed to thus form double yarn stitch loops similar to those shown in wales W-16 through W14 in course (3-2 to completely tie in the welt yarn w before removing the body yarn m.
The heel pocket 213 is started by single feed knitting with the welt yarn w on the needles in the groups C, D, E, F and G and the usual narrowing operation is started. The narrowing is accomplished by the use of the narrowing picks 16 and '17 to reduce the number of needles knitting each successive partial course for a predetermined number of partial courses. A widening operation is then started by utilizing the widening pick 86 (FIGURE 7) to increase the number of needles knitting in each successive partial course and continued until the desired number of needles have been moved back into operative position and the desired number of partial courses have been knit. In order to complete the Y heel, it is again necessary to narrow and then widen. The driving mechanism is then switched to drive the needle cylinder in rotary motion and all the needles are switched to lowered or operative position to start the rotary knit foot portion 214.
Two-course knitting may again be started in the rotary knit foot portion indicated at 214- (FIGURE 6) and in a manner identical to that which the multi-feed knitting was started following the knitting of the after-welt 211. Since the manner in which the two-course knitting is started in the foot pocket 214 is identical to the manner it was started in the leg 212 and heretofore described, it is not deemed necessary to again repeat this cycle.
After completing the foot 214 the usual toe pocket 215 is made by reciprocatory knitting and in single feed knitting. It is customary to make a few, and in this case four ring toe courses before starting the toe pocket 215. These four ring toe courses are made with the welt yarn w and this yarn is exchanged for the body yarn m in an identical manner to that above described and it is at this point that the auxiliary yarn feeding finger and auxiliary stitch cam are removed and in the same manner in which the auxiliary yarn was removed prior to knitting the heel pocket 213.
Although a particular arrangement of needles in the cylinder 21 is described for use in making the ladys stocking S, it is to be understood that the arrangement of the needles in the cylinder 21 may be used and still come within the scope of this invention. For instance, a greater or less number of needles may be provided in the groups B and F than shown and although the MSN and MN needles singly alternate with the SN needles, this alternation may be double if desired. In this case, in group E there would be two SN needles together, followed by two MSN needles, etc. and in group F there would be two SN needles together, followed by two MN needles, etc. it is also to be understood that this invention is not limited to machines having 490 cylinder needles, since machines having a greater or less number of needles may be used equally as well.
It is thus seen that a novel apparatus and method for tying in the leading and trailing ends of an auxiliary yarn have been provided wherein both ends of the auxiliary yarn m'e knit in with the main yarn to prevent cateyes, eyelets and openings where rnulti-feed knitting commences as well as where multi-feed knitting ends.
In the drawings and specification there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention and, although specilic terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being defined in the claims.
I claim:
1. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine having vertically movable independent cylinder needles, radially movable sinkers, and first and second knitting stations adjacent the needle cylinder comprising the steps of feeding a main yarn to all of the needles and drawing stitches therewith at the main knitting station during rotary knitting of a first fabric section, during a single rotation of the needle cylinder, introducing and feeding an auxiliary yarn to uncleared needles in a first group of needles at the auxiliary knitting station without drawing stitches therewith, feeding the auxiliary yarn to alternate cleared needles in a second group and drawing said alternate needles to stitch level to carry said yarn into the hooks of intervening uncleared needles, feeding the auxiliary yarn to all succeeding needles and drawing stitches with all of said succeeding needles at the auxiliary knitting station, and during subsequent rotations of the needle cylinder, feeding the auxiliary yarn to draw stitches with all of the needles in the needle cylinder including all of the needles in the first and second groups.
2. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine having vertically movable independent cylinder needles, radially movable sinkers, and first and second knitting stations adjacent the needle cylinder comprising the steps of feeding a main yarn to all of the needles and drawing stitches therewith at the main knitting station during rotary knitting of a first fabric section, knitting a second fabric section by introducing and feeding an auxiliary yarn to uncleared needles in a first group of needles at the auxiliary knitting station without drawing stitches therewith, feeding the auxiliary yarn to alternate cleared needles in a second group and drawing said alternate needles to stitch level to carry yarn into the hooks of intervening uncleared needles, feeding the auxiliary yarn to all succeeding needles and drawing stitches with all of said succeeding needles at the auxiliary knitting station during a single rotation of the needle cylinder, during subsequent rotations of the needle cylinder feeding the auxiliary yarn to draw stitches with all of the needles in the needle cylinder including all of the needles in the first and second groups, and knitting a third fabric section by single course knitting by first feeding the auxiliary yarn to a few alternate needles only and thereafter withdra ing the auxiliary yarn to draw stitches with the main yarn on all cylinder needles at the main knitting station only.
3. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine having vertically movable independent cylinder latch needles, radially movable sinkers, and main and auxiliary knitting stations adjacent to the needle cylinder comprising the steps of feeding a main yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith at the main knitting station during single feed knitting of a first fabric section; during a single rotation of the needle cylinder introducing and feeding an auxiliary yarn to uncleared needles of a group of needles at the auxiliary knitting station and drawing said auxiliary yarn Without drawing stitches therewith, the last mentioned feeding being accomplished by raising certain needles of sai group to a tuck level to receive said auxiliary yarn while other interspersed needles of said group move past the auxiliary knitting station at a lower level, and by then lowering said certain needles below said lower level to canry the auxiliary yarn into the hooks of said interspersed needles, and feeding the aux-iliary yarn to cleared needles succeeding said group and drawing stitches with said succeeding needles at the auxiliary knitting station; and during subsequent rotations of the needle cylinder feeding main and auxiliary yarns to draw stitches with all of the needles in the needle cylinder to produce multifeed knitting of another fabric section.
4. A circular knitting machine comprising a needle cylinde independent latch needles mounted in said cylinder, radially movable sinkers, and devices associated with said needles to effect knitting including main and auxiliary knitting stations, each including yarn feeding means, and means for controlling knitting, the last mentioned means comprising: means for effecting needle movements at the main knitting station and feed of yarn thereto to produce stitches thereat during single feed knitting of a first fabric section; means for effecting at said auxiliary knitting station during a single round of knitting rise of certain needles of a group to a tuck level, without clearing, rise of other interspersed needles of the same group to a lower level without clearing, feed of auxiliary yarn to said contain needles, lowering of said certain needles below said lower level to carry the auxiliary yarn into the hooks of said interspersed needles, and clearing of needles succeeding said group, feed of auxiliary yarn thereto, and drawing of stitches thereby at the auxiliary knitting station; and means for effecting during subsequent rounds of knitting feed of both main and auxiliary yarns to needles and formation of stitches from both of said yarns to produce multifeed knitting of another fabric section.
5. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine having vertically movable independent cylinder needles, radially movable sinkers and main and auxiliary knitting stations adjacent to the needle cylinder comprising the steps of feeding main and auxiliary yarns to draw stitches with all of the needles in the needle cylinder to produce rnultifeed knitting during rotations of the needle cylinder; then raising certain needles of a group to receive the auixiliary yarn while other interspersed uncleared needles of the group move past the auxiliary knitting station at a lower level, lowering said certain needles below said lower level to carry the auxiliary yarn into the hooks of said interspersed needles, and withdrawing the auxiliary yarn following its reception by said certain needles; and then feeding a main yarn only to needles including those of said group and drawing stitches therewith at the main knitting station during single feed knitting of a fabric section.
6. A circular knitting machine comprising a needle cylinder, independent latch needles mounted in said cylinder, radially movable sinkers, and devices associated with said needles to effect knitting including main and auxiliary knitting stations, each including yarn feeding means, and means for controlling knitting, the last mentioed means comprising: means for effecting during rounds of knitting feed of both main and auxiliary yarns to needles and formation of stitches from both of said yarns to produce multifeed knitting; means for effecting at said auxiliary knitting station rise of certain needles of a group to one level, rise of other interspersed needles of the same group to a lower level without clearing, feed of auxiliary yarn to said certain needles, lowering of said certain needles below said lower level to carry the auxiliary yarn into the books of said interspersed needles, and removal of the auxiliary yarn following its reception by said certain needles; and means for thereafter effecting movements of needles, including those of said groups, at the main knitting station and feed of yarn thereto to produce stitches thereat during single feed knitting of a fabric section.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Miller Jan. 28, 1930 14 Goyette Apr. 21, 1942 Miller Oct. 10, 1950 St. Pierre May 1, 1951 McDonou-gh Feb. 14, 1961 Mahler June 13, 1961 -Belford Oct. 17, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS Australia June 14, 1939

Claims (1)

  1. 5. A METHOD OF KNITTING ON A CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINE HAVING VERTICALLY MOVABLE INDEPENDENT CYLINDER NEEDLES, RADIALLY MOVABLE SINKERS AND MAIN AND AUXILIARY KNITTING STATIONS ADJACENT TO THE NEEDLE CYLINDER COMPRISING THE STEPS OF FEEDING MAIN AND AUXILIARY YARNS TO DRAW STITCHES WITH ALL OF THE NEEDLES IN THE NEEDLE CYLINDER TO PRODUCE MULTIFEED KNITTING DURING ROTATIONS OF THE NEEDLE CYLINDER; THEN RAISING CERTAIN NEEDLES OF A GROUP TO RECEIVE THE AUIXILIARY YARN WHILE OTHER INTERSPERSED UNCLEARED NEEDLES OF THE GROUP MOVE PAST THE AUXILIARY KNITTING STATION AT A LOWER LEVEL, LOWERING SAID CERTAIN NEEDLES BELOW SAID LOWER LEVEL TO CARRY THE AUXILIARY YARN INTO THE HOOKS OF SAID INTERSPERSED NEEDLES, AND WITHDRAWING THE AUXILIARY YARN FOLLOWING ITS RECEPTION BY SAID CERTAIN NEEDLES; AND THEN FEEDING A MAIN YARN ONLY TO NEEDLES INCLUDING THOSE OF SAID GROUP AND DRAWING STITCHES THEREWITH AT THE MAIN KNITTING STATION DURING SINGLE FEED KNITTING OF A FABRIC SECTION.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3226953A (en) * 1964-08-04 1966-01-04 David S Good Two-feed knitting machine

Citations (10)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US705203A (en) * 1901-08-01 1902-07-22 Daniel A Buoker Knitting-machine.
US1192329A (en) * 1912-06-14 1916-07-25 John Lawson Circular-knitting machine.
US1216374A (en) * 1914-03-09 1917-02-20 Kilbourn Mfg Corp Seamless-fashioned stocking and process of knitting and fashioning the same.
US1744789A (en) * 1926-09-15 1930-01-28 Max C Miller Knitting machine
US2280698A (en) * 1941-09-30 1942-04-21 Scott & Williams Inc Circular knitting machine
US2525704A (en) * 1946-01-16 1950-10-10 Hanes Hosiery Mills Co Knitting machine and method
US2550880A (en) * 1948-03-20 1951-05-01 Hemphill Co Knitted fabric
US2971358A (en) * 1957-01-14 1961-02-14 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine
US2987900A (en) * 1956-10-15 1961-06-13 Singer Fidelity Inc Circular knit stockings
US3004412A (en) * 1956-03-02 1961-10-17 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US705203A (en) * 1901-08-01 1902-07-22 Daniel A Buoker Knitting-machine.
US1192329A (en) * 1912-06-14 1916-07-25 John Lawson Circular-knitting machine.
US1216374A (en) * 1914-03-09 1917-02-20 Kilbourn Mfg Corp Seamless-fashioned stocking and process of knitting and fashioning the same.
US1744789A (en) * 1926-09-15 1930-01-28 Max C Miller Knitting machine
US2280698A (en) * 1941-09-30 1942-04-21 Scott & Williams Inc Circular knitting machine
US2525704A (en) * 1946-01-16 1950-10-10 Hanes Hosiery Mills Co Knitting machine and method
US2550880A (en) * 1948-03-20 1951-05-01 Hemphill Co Knitted fabric
US3004412A (en) * 1956-03-02 1961-10-17 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine
US2987900A (en) * 1956-10-15 1961-06-13 Singer Fidelity Inc Circular knit stockings
US2971358A (en) * 1957-01-14 1961-02-14 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3226953A (en) * 1964-08-04 1966-01-04 David S Good Two-feed knitting machine

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