US2515403A - Back presser mop - Google Patents

Back presser mop Download PDF

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US2515403A
US2515403A US66454A US6645448A US2515403A US 2515403 A US2515403 A US 2515403A US 66454 A US66454 A US 66454A US 6645448 A US6645448 A US 6645448A US 2515403 A US2515403 A US 2515403A
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mop
sponge
mopping
head
presser
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US66454A
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Nathaniel B Greenleaf
Leonard C Webster
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SPONGE PRODUCTS Corp
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SPONGE PRODUCTS CORP
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L13/00Implements for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L13/10Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing
    • A47L13/14Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing combined with squeezing or wringing devices
    • A47L13/146Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing combined with squeezing or wringing devices having pivoting squeezing plates

Description

July v18, 1950 N. B. GREENLEAF x-:T A1. 2,515,403
BACK PRESSER MOP Filed Dec. 2l, 1948 3730 E8 ao Patented July 18, 1950 BACK PRESSE!! MOP Nathaniel B. Greenleaf and Leonard C. Webster,
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, assignors, by direct and mesne assignments, to Sponge Products Corporation, Chicago, Ill.
Appueeuen neeember 21, 194s, sei-a1 No. 66,454
(cl. 11s-11s) 8 Claims. l
This invention relates to improvements in mops, particularly of the self-wringing type, and the principal object of the invention is to provide a mop of simplified and extremely economical construction which will enable the wringing of the mopping element or sponge to be more expeditiously and efficiently accomplished. than with previous mop constructions to effectively flush the dirt out of the mopping element rather' than force it deeper into the mopping element as occurs in present self-wringing mops.
A further important object is to eliminate the expensive double-hinge arrangement of the wringing element previously required.
A further object of importance is to provide a mop in which the mopping element can be quickly secured to the head of the mop and will be positively retained against accidental dislodgement or it can be readily removed and replaced with a minimum of eifort.
Another object is to provide a mop which will be extremely convenient to use and which will not scratch or mar the furniture or other woodwork during use.
A still further object contemplated is to provide a mop of the type referred to which will eliminate scufiing of the floor by the mop head even when the handle is inclined at a small angle to the flooring when mopping under furniture or other objects.
The principal feature of the invention consists in hinging the wringer element or presser at the Yrear of the mop head to swing about a single axis fixed relative the mop head to compress the mop- -vping element progressively from-rear tofront to flush the dirt accumulating under normal mopping at the forward edge of the mopping element back out the front, making use of the water reservoir provided by the rear of the mopping element by forcing the rearward lower edge forwardly as the element is compressed at the same f time bodily repositioning the element forwardly from rearward displacement under normal mopping action. V
A further important feature consists in curving the presser plate or wringer element and shaping the mopping element carried by the mop head to incline rearwardly whereby the mopping element and presser plate whenswung to thewringing position are in a co-ope'rative relation for optimum wringing. 4
Afurther feature consists in forming the mop-v ping element to overlap the mop head to provide a cushioning bumper surface ,around the mop head and reinforcing the forward edge of the lo mopping element to prevent this portion from yielding under sharp impact to expose the hard surfaces of the mop head.
A still further feature of importance consists in providing a hinge structure for the presser plate in which the hinge thereof is arranged above the mop head and clear of the flooring when the mop is used under furniture or other obstacles with the handle inclined at a small angle to the flooring.
Referring to the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view ofthe mop head showing in full lines the mopping element in interlocked relation therewith and showing in dotted line the mop head and mopping element relatively displaced in an intermediate position of separation.
Figure 2 is a side elevational view .of the mop of Figure 1 with the presser or s queezer plate in a retracted inoperative position with the handle fragmented.
Figure 3 is a side elevational view showing the presser or squeezing plate forming the wringing element in position to compress the mopping element, with the wringing action initiated and with the handle fragmented. y
Figure 4 is an elevational view of a slightly modified form of mop with the handle fragmented and showing a different interlock between the mopping element and mop head.
Figure 5 is a fragmentary plan view of the presser plate and mop head of the mop of Figure 4 with the wringer element swung to an inter-4 mediate position between the retracted and wringing positions.
'I'here are several self-wringing mops available, the most eil'ective of which are the "front presser mops wherein a presser or wringer is hinged in some suitable manner to the front edge of the mop head. While these front presser mops do enable the sponge to be thoroughly compressed, they have several very serious disadvantages. One of the most serious is that under all mopping actions the dirt collects and ac-l cumulates at the forward edge of the mopping element or sponge while very little dirt is picked up by the trailing edge. When squeezing the sponge with the presser plate hinged to the front of the mop head the sponge is squeezed in a direction from front to rear and the result is that dirt accumulations at the front edge are flushed back into the sponge, eliminating only that dirt than can bel actually flushed through the width of the sponge and merely distributing the remainder throughout the body thereof. Again under all mopping actions the mopping element is forced rearwardly out. of position, and with the front presser mops the wringing action further deforms the mopping element or sponge as it is forced rearwardly as it is compressed.
With our present invention we effect the squeezing of the sponge progressively from back to front while leaving the forward face of the sponge unobstructed, whereby the water in the body of the sponge reservoir is forced out the forward edge to flush out the dirt accumulations at the forward edge or face, enabling the element to be squeezed clean instead of merely distributing the dirt as in previous mop constructions.
Other important advantages of our mop will be understood from the following description.
Referring to Figures l, 2 and 3 of the drawings, it will be seen that the head of the mop comprises a flat plate I to which is secured centrally of its length a screw socket 2 to receive the handle 3.
As will be seen from Figures 2 and 3, the handle and socket extend upwardly at approximately right angles to the plane of the mop head or plate I.
At the rear, edge portions'of the plate I, which are cut back into the metal of the plate, are kturned upwardly above the plane of the plate and .are formed into the hinge barrels I leaving the straight guide edge portions 5 therebetween, as shown clearly in Figures 2 and 3.
The mopping element 6 is formed of a highly absorbent sponge material and preferably of cellulose sponge. This mopping element is in the f orm of a quadrangular block which, as will Iseen' in Figure 2, has the upper surface 1 slabbed rearwardly and with the front and rear surfaces at right angles to the bottom 8. The block is thus considerably thinner at the rear than at the front.
- Secured to the upper surface 'I is a plate 9 having the rolled longitudinal edges I0 forming locking channels to receive the longitudinal straight edges of the mop head plate I to form a sliding interlock therewith with the edges I0 extending inwardly over the top of the mop head.
The plate 9 is of an area less than the area of the mopping element surface 1. Thus as seen in Figure 1 the mopping element extends beyond the mop head around the complete perimeter thereof to provide a cushioning effect when the mop is swung into engagement with the furniture or other wood surface, the sponge thus forming a protection therefor.
Secured to the upper forward longitudinal edge of the mopping element 9 is a longitudinal fabric strip I I, between the folds of which is ineluded a compressed fold of the sponge material I2. Both the fabric strip II and the plate 9 are adhered to the sponge material with a suitable heat-resistant adhesive, such as cellulose acetate or the like, so that the mopping element will be permanently adhered to its backing plate and the strip II will be permanently secured in position throughout the life of the mopping element even when used with boiling or extremely hot water.
The cellulose sponge material upon becoming wet is exceedingly pliable and offers relatively little resistance to displacement when struck violently against a solid obstacle. However, the folded fabric strip II, even though being of a flexible material, greatly increases the resistance to yielding of the mopping element at the critical upper forward edge where the large proportion of the sharp impacts are assumed. Thus the fabric strip, while yielding to prevent damage of resistance to yielding that the edge of the backing plate orv mop head will not be exposed to direct contact with the furniture surface.
Each end of the mop head plate I is shown formed with a curved indent I3. while the metal at each end of the backing plate 9 is arcuatelv slotted to form the tongues Il which are bent upwardly out of the plane of the plate and engage in the indents I3 to prevent longitudinal relative movement of the mop head and mopping element when the members are in normal interlocked relation, as shown in solid line Figure 1.
Due to the vresiliency of the metal material forming the plate 9 the deformed tongues I4 can. be readily depressed to clear the mop head and the mopping element and mop head then slid relatively longitudinally to remove the mopping element.
To replace'the mopping element the tongue at one end is depressed to initiate the sliding interlock and the parts will slide freely until the mopping element is positioned, at which point the tongue will clear the end of the mop head and spring up into the indent I3.
Secured to the rear of the mop head is a presser or squeezer platel I5 which forms the wringing element of the mop. This plate is of arcuate or angular formation and is formed of a metal grid having spaced openings I6 and reinforcing ribs I'I, although other forms of presser grids may of course be utilized.
The presser plate is formed with rolled extensions forming hinge barrels I9 along one longitudinal edge which interleave-with the barrels 4 of the mop head to receive the hinge pintle I9 to connect the presser plate for hlnsing movement to the mop head.
As shown in Figures 2 and 3, the presser plate is bent vor curved adjacent to but spaced from the longitudinal hinged edge to present at the rear an obtuse angle to provide a wide portion 20 for engaging the undersurface l of the mopping element when the presser plate is swung from the position of Figure 2 to the position of Figure 3, the forward edge 20' of the plate being bent upwardly to constrain the mopping element when pressing.
Secured to'the presser plate I5 is a handle 2| which is engaged by the spring clip 22 when swung to the inoperative position of Figure 2 during the normal operation of the mop.
When it is desired to wring the mop the wringing element as formed by the presser plate is readily released from the clip 22 and swung to the position of Figure 3.
In the wringing action as will be seen from Figure 3, the presser plate I5 upon being swung rearwardly about the hinge pintle I9 first contacts the sponge 6 at the rearward lower edge and then engages the under surface of the sponge to progressively compress the sponge from back to front while displacing the rearward lower edge forwardly. Under wringing the forward edge or face of the sponge is unobstructed. The result is that, as the sponge is progressively compressed from back to front, dirt which accumulates at the forward edge of the sponge under mopping action is forced out the unobstructed forward sponge face or edge. By virtue of the progressive compression from back to front and the initial compression of the rear lower sponge edge forwardly the entire sponge forms a water reservoir, with the wateiin reservoir being forced to flow as a heavy flush towards and out the front sponge face.
The wringing action is further enhanced by the inclining of the sponge and the curvature of the presser plate in which the portion 20 is inclined rearwardly from the hinge portion I8,
Figure 2, at a distance from the hinge less than the thickness of the sponge at the rear. \Upon increased pressure the presser plate moves from the position of Figure 3 until the sponge is substantially uniformly compressed.
With the shape of the presser plate and sponge there is little tendency to tear or damage the sponge by excessive lateral movement.
It will be appreciated that the wringing action is very easily accomplished and with the provision of the single hinge arrangement of the presser plate the construction of the mop is greatly simplified from the double hinge arrangements previously required to bring the wringing element. into proper co-operation with the mopping element.
I n addition to the more positive simplified wringing action the location of the presser plate I at the rear of the mop eliminates contact of the plate with the furniture when mopping the surface therebelow.
Further, the raised hinge arrangement which places the hinge barrels l above the plane of the mop head ensures that the hinge is maintained clear of the flooring even with the handle swung at a low angle to the flooring to guide the mopping element beneath furniture or the like.
The bevelling of the upper surface 1 of the mopping element, in addition to locating the mopping elemnt in an incline co-operative relation relative the presser plate, locates the handle of the mop with the mopping element flat on the flooring surface at a convenient angle for the operator so that a maximum force may be imparted in the scrubbing action with the minimum of ei'fort on the handle. This force is transmitted substantially at right angles to the :nop head even though at the required acute angle relative the flooring. and therefore the tendency todeform the socket 2 and destructive forces on the mop head are reduced to a minimum considerably less than in mops of the type where the socket is inclined at an angle relative the mop head.
Figures 4 and 5 relate to a modified form of interlock between the mopping elementl and the mop head. In this case the mopping element 23 is provided with a backing plate 24 which has the rounded or beaded longitudinal edges 25, while the mop head 26, which carries the handle 21 and socket 28, has channel-shaped edges 29 which engage over and interlock with the rounded edges 25 of the backing plate. Y
A suitable interlocking spring clip arrangement equivalent to the tongues Il of the mop shown in Figure 1 may b utilized to releasably interlock the mop head and mopping element against accidental displacement.' However also convenient for use are the wing nuts or screws 30 which extend through the mop head and engage in the threaded orifices 3| provided in the backing plate 2l. Again the upstanding hinges 4 are provided to carry the presser plate I5.
In either of the modifications illustrated the effective squeezing action is accomplished through the simple swinging of the presser plate through approximately 270 to bring the compression throughout the sponge material of the mopping element to a substantially uniform value, and during this swinging movement the on a floor surface.
trailing edge of the sponge material adjacent the hinge of the presser plate is in no way displaced laterally from its normal position on its backing plate and the thinnest portion of the sponge which is adjacent the hinge of the presser plate permits the presser plate to thoroughly compress the thickest portion of the sponge at the forward edge of the mop head without setting up excessive compressive forces at any one portion of the mopping element.
Importance of the mop will therefore be understood from its simplicity of construction and efciency of operationl and the value of the mop is further enhanced and the protection it affords the furniture or baseboard surfaces and the facility with which the mop parts can be interchanged or renewed.
A further important function of the fabric strip Il in addition to the protection afforded thereby is the reinforcing effect given to the sponge material to prevent its displacement over the forward edge of the mop head during wringing to facilitate and increase the wringing action.
The squeezing of the mopping element from the rear of the mop is also an important function as the squeezing action acts to force forwardly and reposition the sponge element which is displaced rearwardly under the normal working of the mop This repositioning of the sponge maintains the shape and increases the life of the mopping element indefinitely. During repositioning however the upturned edge 20' of the wringer element constrains the forward edge of the mop from deforming forwardly out of the normal shape of the element and additionally increases the effectiveness of the wringing.
What we claim as our invention is:
1. In a mop including a handle and a head secured to said handle and presenting a front edge forward of said handle in relation to direction of mop advance under normal mopping action, and a rear edge at opposite side of said `handle, a compressible sponge block releasably secured to said vhead and presenting at the front of said head a dirt accumulating face of substantial depth and at thel rear of said head a rear face,
. and having a bottom working face presenting at the rear an edge displaced below said head, a presser element pivoted adjacent the rear edge of said head to swing about an axis fixed relative said headand above said bottom working face and at right angles to said handle said presser element having a pivot connecting portion and a sponge pressing portion in angular relation to said pivot connecting portion and spaced thereby from said axis a distance less than the thickness of said sponge at the rear face, and an operating handle for said presser element to swing said element against the undersurface of said sponge to compress said sponge against said head with said sponge pressing portion rst contacting said sponge at said rearward edge below said head and displacing said latter edge forwardly and progressively compressing said sponge from rear to front while leaving the front face of said sponge substantially unobstructed to flush-dirt accumulations out said front face.
2. In a mop including a handle and a head secured to said handle and presenting a front portion forward of said handle in relation to direction of mop advance under normal mopping action, and a rear portion at opposite side of said handle, a compressible sponge block releasably secured to said head and presenting at the front of said head a front dirt accumulating face animos means maintaining said presser element in an upright mopping position adjacent said handle, said presser element being bent to provide an obtuse angle rearwardly of said handle when in said upright mopping position adjacent the pivot axis and at a distance therefrom less than the thickness of said sponge at the rear face whereby upon swinging said presser element rearwardly said sponge is engaged initially at the rear lower edge below said head and compressed progressively from back to front to force water stored in reservoir in said sponge out said substantially unobstructed forward face.
3. A device as claimed in claim 2 in which said presser element has a right angularly vturned forward edge, to engage said front sponge face following initial compression of the rear of said block to maintain said block from excessive forward displacement.
4. In a mop including a handle and a head, a compressible sponge block bevelled rearwardly to have a thickness at the rear less than the thickness at the front releasably secured to said head, a presser element -pivoted at the rear of said head adjacent the edge thereof to swing initially rearwardly about an axis fixed relative said head against the undersurface -of said sponge to compress said sponge against said head while leaving the forward face of said sponge substantially unobstructed, means maintaining said presser element in an upright mopping position against said handle, and an operating handle for said presser element, said presser element being bent to provide an obtuse angle rearwardly of said mop handle when in said upright mopping position adjacent the pivot axis and at a distance therefrom less than the thickness of said sponge at the rear whereby upon swinging said presser element rearwardly said sponge is engaged initially at the rear lower corner and Vcompressed progressively from back to front to force water stored in reservoir in said sponge out said substantially unobstructed forward face.
`5. A device as claimed in claim 4 in which the upper head abutting surface of said sponge block is bevelled and the front and rear faces of said block are vertical.
6. A mop including a handle and a head secured to said handle and presenting a front portion forward of said handle in relation to direction of mop advance under normal mopping action and a rear portion at opposite side of said handle, a sponge block releasably secured to said head at the underside thereof and having a front and rear in respect to said head and a bottom working face presenting at the rear an edge displaced below said head, a presser plate having a. pivotal connection at the rear of said head to swing about an axis xed relative said head and above said bottom working face and substantially at right angles to said handle, and means to maintain said presser plate in a mopping position above and in angular relation to said block, the relative disposition of said pivotal connection and presser plate positioning said plate upon swinging movement from said mopping position to first' engage only the rearward lower block edge below said head, and to thereafter compress said block in a direction forwardly and against the underside of said head progressively from rear to front of said head and including the front of said block to flush said block towards the front.
7. A mop including a handle and a head secured to said handle and presenting a front portion forward of said handle in relation to direction of mop advance under normal mopping action and a rear portion at opposite side of said handle, a sponge block releasably secured to said head at the underside thereof and having a front and rear in respect to said head and a bottom working face presenting at the rear an edge displaced below said head, said block having a maximum vertical dimension at the front, a presser plate having a pivotal connection at the rear of said head to swing about an axis fixed relative said head and above said bottom working face and substantially at right angles to said handle,
and means to maintain said presser plate in a mopping position above and in angular relation to said block, the relative disposition of said pivotal connection and presser plate positioning said plate upon swinging movement from said mopping position to flrst engage only the rearward lower block edge below said head, and to thereafter compress said block in a direction forwardly and against the underside of said head progressively from rear to front of said head and including the front of said block to ush said block towards the front.
8. A device as claimed in claim 7 in which the front of said sponge block is vertical.
NATHANIEL B. GREENLEAF. LEONARD C. WEBSTER.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PA'I'ENTS Number Name Date 1,466,052 Kroll Aug. 28, 1923 1,551,668 Johnson Sept. 1, 1925 2,153,601 Vaughn Apr. 11, 1939 2,165,319 Vaughn July 11, 1939 2,196,837 Rader Apr. 9, 1940 2,199,147 Bates Apr. 30, 1940 2,288,647 Reynolds July 7, 1942 2,418,802 Bendar Apr. 8, 1947 2,442,467 Lux June 1, i948 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 6,435 Great Britain Mar. 17, 1902 2,504 Great Britain Jan. 31, 1912 396,469 Great Britain Aug. 10, 1933 411,314 Great Britain June 7, 1934
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GB1151849A GB659943A (en) 1948-12-21 1949-04-29 Mops
FR1000238D FR1000238A (en) 1948-12-21 1949-11-22 Mop upgrades

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Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2594553A (en) * 1948-12-21 1952-04-29 Sponge Products Corp Sponge element and backing therefor for removable attachment to a mophead
US2632192A (en) * 1949-11-04 1953-03-24 Mallory George Raeburn Floor mop and attached wringer
US2660747A (en) * 1950-03-25 1953-12-01 Sidney P Vaughn Sponge cleaning device
US2667653A (en) * 1949-01-07 1954-02-02 Fuller Brush Co Combined mop and wringer
US2677837A (en) * 1950-08-02 1954-05-11 Channell Charles Arthur Mophead and refill assembly
US2683887A (en) * 1950-03-13 1954-07-20 Ira M Jones Self-wringing mop
US2694824A (en) * 1952-02-16 1954-11-23 Kalinowski Joseph Combination mop, scrubbing brush, and wringer
US2716768A (en) * 1952-04-01 1955-09-06 Empire Brushes Inc Wringer mop
US2730741A (en) * 1950-12-01 1956-01-17 Gantz Harry Combined cleaning mop and wringer
US2731658A (en) * 1950-08-31 1956-01-24 Walter F Miller Floor mop having a detachable cleaning element
US2742659A (en) * 1951-11-30 1956-04-24 George J Mcgraw Lever-wringing sponge mop
US2761161A (en) * 1950-01-14 1956-09-04 Joseph H Trindl Mop and refill therefor
US2774091A (en) * 1951-07-31 1956-12-18 Nathaniel B Greenleaf Wringer type mop
US2779959A (en) * 1952-06-30 1957-02-05 Ekco Products Company Mop with folding squeezer head
US2835910A (en) * 1953-04-20 1958-05-27 W E Kautenberg Co Wringer mop hinging construction
US2899698A (en) * 1959-08-18 Sponge cleaning elements for mops
US3026554A (en) * 1950-12-02 1962-03-27 American Marietta Co Self-wringing mop
US3178748A (en) * 1963-03-19 1965-04-20 Ideal Rubber Products Co Floor mop with wringer attachment
US3251087A (en) * 1964-02-19 1966-05-17 Jr Arthur G Platt Apparatus for wall washing or the like
US3717896A (en) * 1971-01-26 1973-02-27 Shur Line Mfg Paint applicator

Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB190206435A (en) * 1902-03-17 1903-02-19 Arthur Robert Davies Hillier A Linoleum or Floor Washer
GB191202504A (en) * 1912-01-31 1913-01-31 Catherine Ayton Moffat Improved Device for use in Cleaning Floors and the like.
US1466052A (en) * 1922-09-30 1923-08-28 Harry Weiner Mop
US1551668A (en) * 1924-11-24 1925-09-01 Johnson James Pierson Combined floor scrubber and mop
GB396469A (en) * 1932-02-24 1933-08-10 Michael Kupinsky Cooper Improvements in or relating to washing and/or renovating devices or appliances
GB411314A (en) * 1933-01-21 1934-06-07 Heinrich Blume Improvements in cleaning instruments, particularly for floors
US2153601A (en) * 1937-06-17 1939-04-11 Sidney P Vaughn Wringer mop
US2165319A (en) * 1937-07-15 1939-07-11 Sidney P Vaughn Mop
US2196837A (en) * 1938-09-28 1940-04-09 Lee P Rader Mop
US2199147A (en) * 1937-05-17 1940-04-30 Joseph D Bates Mop
US2288647A (en) * 1938-11-23 1942-07-07 Henry V Reynolds Wringer type mop
US2418802A (en) * 1944-10-02 1947-04-08 Arthur Z Bendar Compressible mop and wringer
US2442467A (en) * 1945-12-08 1948-06-01 Lux Company Inc Retainer for mop wringer plates

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB190206435A (en) * 1902-03-17 1903-02-19 Arthur Robert Davies Hillier A Linoleum or Floor Washer
GB191202504A (en) * 1912-01-31 1913-01-31 Catherine Ayton Moffat Improved Device for use in Cleaning Floors and the like.
US1466052A (en) * 1922-09-30 1923-08-28 Harry Weiner Mop
US1551668A (en) * 1924-11-24 1925-09-01 Johnson James Pierson Combined floor scrubber and mop
GB396469A (en) * 1932-02-24 1933-08-10 Michael Kupinsky Cooper Improvements in or relating to washing and/or renovating devices or appliances
GB411314A (en) * 1933-01-21 1934-06-07 Heinrich Blume Improvements in cleaning instruments, particularly for floors
US2199147A (en) * 1937-05-17 1940-04-30 Joseph D Bates Mop
US2153601A (en) * 1937-06-17 1939-04-11 Sidney P Vaughn Wringer mop
US2165319A (en) * 1937-07-15 1939-07-11 Sidney P Vaughn Mop
US2196837A (en) * 1938-09-28 1940-04-09 Lee P Rader Mop
US2288647A (en) * 1938-11-23 1942-07-07 Henry V Reynolds Wringer type mop
US2418802A (en) * 1944-10-02 1947-04-08 Arthur Z Bendar Compressible mop and wringer
US2442467A (en) * 1945-12-08 1948-06-01 Lux Company Inc Retainer for mop wringer plates

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2899698A (en) * 1959-08-18 Sponge cleaning elements for mops
US2594553A (en) * 1948-12-21 1952-04-29 Sponge Products Corp Sponge element and backing therefor for removable attachment to a mophead
US2667653A (en) * 1949-01-07 1954-02-02 Fuller Brush Co Combined mop and wringer
US2632192A (en) * 1949-11-04 1953-03-24 Mallory George Raeburn Floor mop and attached wringer
US2761161A (en) * 1950-01-14 1956-09-04 Joseph H Trindl Mop and refill therefor
US2683887A (en) * 1950-03-13 1954-07-20 Ira M Jones Self-wringing mop
US2660747A (en) * 1950-03-25 1953-12-01 Sidney P Vaughn Sponge cleaning device
US2677837A (en) * 1950-08-02 1954-05-11 Channell Charles Arthur Mophead and refill assembly
US2731658A (en) * 1950-08-31 1956-01-24 Walter F Miller Floor mop having a detachable cleaning element
US2730741A (en) * 1950-12-01 1956-01-17 Gantz Harry Combined cleaning mop and wringer
US3026554A (en) * 1950-12-02 1962-03-27 American Marietta Co Self-wringing mop
US2774091A (en) * 1951-07-31 1956-12-18 Nathaniel B Greenleaf Wringer type mop
US2742659A (en) * 1951-11-30 1956-04-24 George J Mcgraw Lever-wringing sponge mop
US2694824A (en) * 1952-02-16 1954-11-23 Kalinowski Joseph Combination mop, scrubbing brush, and wringer
US2716768A (en) * 1952-04-01 1955-09-06 Empire Brushes Inc Wringer mop
US2779959A (en) * 1952-06-30 1957-02-05 Ekco Products Company Mop with folding squeezer head
US2835910A (en) * 1953-04-20 1958-05-27 W E Kautenberg Co Wringer mop hinging construction
US3178748A (en) * 1963-03-19 1965-04-20 Ideal Rubber Products Co Floor mop with wringer attachment
US3251087A (en) * 1964-02-19 1966-05-17 Jr Arthur G Platt Apparatus for wall washing or the like
US3717896A (en) * 1971-01-26 1973-02-27 Shur Line Mfg Paint applicator

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB659943A (en) 1951-10-31
FR1000238A (en) 1952-02-11

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