US2496992A - Antisiphoning device - Google Patents

Antisiphoning device Download PDF

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Publication number
US2496992A
US2496992A US70331246A US2496992A US 2496992 A US2496992 A US 2496992A US 70331246 A US70331246 A US 70331246A US 2496992 A US2496992 A US 2496992A
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Prior art keywords
pipe
device
helix
end
section
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Arthur R Glidden
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Arthur R Glidden
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60KARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PROPULSION UNITS OR OF TRANSMISSIONS IN VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PLURAL DIVERSE PRIME-MOVERS IN VEHICLES; AUXILIARY DRIVES FOR VEHICLES; INSTRUMENTATION OR DASHBOARDS FOR VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH COOLING, AIR INTAKE, GAS EXHAUST OR FUEL SUPPLY OF PROPULSION UNITS, IN VEHICLES
    • B60K15/00Arrangement in connection with fuel supply of combustion engines or other fuel consuming energy converters, e.g. fuel cells; Mounting or construction of fuel tanks
    • B60K15/03Fuel tanks
    • B60K15/04Tank inlets
    • B60K15/0403Anti-siphoning devices

Description

Feb. 7 W50 A. R. GLIDDEN ANTISIPHONING DEVICE Filed Oct. 15, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet l I N VEN TOR.

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 15, 1946 INVENTOR.

Patented Feb. 7, 1950 2,496,992 1 Arthur R. Glidden, Seattle, Wash.

Application October 15, 1946, Serial No. 703,312

2 Claims.

This invention relates to a perfected protective device for the gasoline tanks of automotive vehicles, and has for its objects to provide a guard structure arranged and adapted to occupy a position within the filling pipe of the tank, one which may be installed with ease and expedition, which may thereafter be withdrawn only with considerable difilculty, and which most emciently performs its intended end and namely that of permitting relatively free introduction of gasoline through the pipe into the tank while effectively blocking the admission of a siphon tube.

With the foregoing and other more particular objects and advantages in view, and which will appear and be understood in the course of the following description and claims, the invention consists in the novel construction and in the adaptation and combination of parts hereinafter described and claimed.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of my improved guard device shown applied to the filler pipe of a gasoline tank, the filling cap for the pipe being deleted and only the upper end of the pipe being represented in the view.

Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view on line 2-2 of Fig. 1 with the section confined to the device itself and which is to say separate and apart from the pipe.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view looking in the direction of the arrows 3-3 of Fig. 2; and

Fig. 4 is a reduced-scale side elevational view of the pipe-and-guard assembly to indicate the manner in which the guard is precluded from being pushed downwardly into the tank.

The device of the present invention is produced from one continuous piece of spring wire bent from one end to the form of a receding or incurved helix, denoted by the numeral 5, and with the initiating convolution, as 6, having a diameter somewhat larger than the inside of the filler pipe to which the device is to be applied. From the terminating convolution the wire is caused to extend diametrically, as at 1 (Fig. 2), at substantial right-angles to the axis of the helix, and thence is bent downwardly for an appreciable distance whereat the wire is doubled back upon itself to produce parallel branches 8 and 9 leading to and from a terminal loop III. The return branch 9 is caused to again enter the helix and is carried upwardly as a prolongation l I with the upper end terminating in the plane of origination of the helix.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 4 for an understanding of the installation and functioning of the device, the numerals l2 and 13 represent the in-line sections of the usual filler pipe for a gasoline tank (not shown), and which customarily are coupled by a flexible hose connection I4. At the head end of the outermost pipe section typical construction provides an integral capping sleeve l5 bent over at the top to present an in-turned flange IS. The filler cap (not shown) for this type of filler pipe usually has horns upon its underside which hook under the flange for holding the cap in place.

Assuming now that it is desired to install my device to a filler pipe it is only. necessary that the small end of the unit be fitted into the open top of the pipe, and a screwdriver is then applied to bear by its end against the diametrical crossarm I and the unit can be easily threaded into the pipe. As the convolution 6 finally snaps into position below the flange It the device is thereupon caused to be locked against withdrawal. It is quite evident that any attempt to introduce a siphon tube is blocked by the progressively smaller convolutions of the helix and the crossarm I which lies at the base of the latter. Should an individual attempt to push the device downwardly, the loop [0, being held by the spring characteristic of the wire in bearing engagement against the wall of the pipe, will ultimately hang up as it moves below the pipe I2 and then engages with the end shoulder i! of the lower pipe section I3.

While there is herein shown and described the embodiment of the invention now preferred by me, it is obvious that numerous modifications might be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention, and it is my intention that no limitations be read into the hereto annexed claims other than such as are expressly introduced to diflerentiate the present advance from prior knowledge in the art.

What I claim is:

1. A device for theft-proofing a gasoline tank's filler pipe of the described character, and namely a filler pipe composed of joined in-line upper and lower pipe sections of which the upper section has a curve within its length and the lower section presents an upwardly exposed shoulder at its point of juncture with the upper section, said device comprising one continuous piece of spring wire bent to the form of an incurved helix with the initiating convolution having a normal diameter somewhat larger than the inside diameter of the upper pipe section, and with the opposite end of the wire being carried for an appreciable distance beyond the apical end of said inturned helix as a substantial axial prolongation of the said helix, the projecting end of said axial prolongation protecting the device against being pushed downwardly through the pipe and into the tank by coming into contact with and hanging up againstsaid upwardly exposed shoulder of the lower pipe section.

2. The theft-proofing device of claim 1 in which the wire section which forms said axial prolonga- 7 tion is bent back upon itself with the free end thereof re-entering the helix and within the lat-' ter running generally longitudinal to the axis for very nearly the full length of the helix.

ARTHUR R. GLIDDEN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS 10 Number Name Date 1,925,079 Allred Sept. 5, 1933 '2,007,805 Lippert et a1 July 9, 1935 2,017,837 Ansehicks Oct. 22, 1935 Ritz-Weller Oct. 18. 1938

US2496992A 1946-10-15 1946-10-15 Antisiphoning device Expired - Lifetime US2496992A (en)

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3892330A (en) * 1974-04-24 1975-07-01 Manford D Hotchkiss Vehicle anti-siphoning device
US3985259A (en) * 1974-03-18 1976-10-12 Zell George A Anti-siphoning device
US4326641A (en) * 1980-08-28 1982-04-27 Wilken Robert J Liquid tank anti-theft device
US4343410A (en) * 1980-12-22 1982-08-10 Warehouse Bus Parts, Inc. Anti-siphon device
US4344544A (en) * 1980-11-24 1982-08-17 Austin Victor L Fluid pipe guard device
US5303842A (en) * 1992-07-23 1994-04-19 Tammie Harp Fuel meter and theft prevention device
US5752553A (en) * 1996-11-13 1998-05-19 Ford Motor Company Fuel tank filler pipe
WO2005032876A1 (en) 2003-10-07 2005-04-14 Michael Lawrence Webster Fuel tank security device
WO2007104104A1 (en) * 2006-03-15 2007-09-20 Fuel Protection Systems Pty Ltd Anti-siphon system
US20070295725A1 (en) * 2006-06-27 2007-12-27 Neffco Technologies Fuel anti-siphon device
US20100224260A1 (en) * 2009-03-09 2010-09-09 Avakian Gregory K Anti-Siphoning Device And System
US20100264138A1 (en) * 2009-04-21 2010-10-21 Eric David Bramson Fuel Filler Tube Anti-Siphon Device
US20100282757A1 (en) * 2009-05-11 2010-11-11 Eaton Corporation Anti-siphon device
US20120181275A1 (en) * 2011-01-13 2012-07-19 Gerard Bisaillon Anti-siphoning device for fuel tanks
USD753281S1 (en) * 2014-03-28 2016-04-05 Roberto Baston Air circulator

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1925079A (en) * 1932-04-09 1933-09-05 William R Allred Gasoline tank closure
US2007805A (en) * 1932-06-30 1935-07-09 Norlipp Company Self-locking cap for gas tanks and the like
US2017837A (en) * 1934-04-18 1935-10-22 Protectoseal Company Of Americ Attachment for gas tanks
US2133520A (en) * 1933-03-17 1938-10-18 Oliver C Ritz-Woller Gasoline tank closure means

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1925079A (en) * 1932-04-09 1933-09-05 William R Allred Gasoline tank closure
US2007805A (en) * 1932-06-30 1935-07-09 Norlipp Company Self-locking cap for gas tanks and the like
US2133520A (en) * 1933-03-17 1938-10-18 Oliver C Ritz-Woller Gasoline tank closure means
US2017837A (en) * 1934-04-18 1935-10-22 Protectoseal Company Of Americ Attachment for gas tanks

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3985259A (en) * 1974-03-18 1976-10-12 Zell George A Anti-siphoning device
US3892330A (en) * 1974-04-24 1975-07-01 Manford D Hotchkiss Vehicle anti-siphoning device
US4326641A (en) * 1980-08-28 1982-04-27 Wilken Robert J Liquid tank anti-theft device
US4344544A (en) * 1980-11-24 1982-08-17 Austin Victor L Fluid pipe guard device
US4343410A (en) * 1980-12-22 1982-08-10 Warehouse Bus Parts, Inc. Anti-siphon device
US5303842A (en) * 1992-07-23 1994-04-19 Tammie Harp Fuel meter and theft prevention device
US5752553A (en) * 1996-11-13 1998-05-19 Ford Motor Company Fuel tank filler pipe
WO2005032876A1 (en) 2003-10-07 2005-04-14 Michael Lawrence Webster Fuel tank security device
WO2007104104A1 (en) * 2006-03-15 2007-09-20 Fuel Protection Systems Pty Ltd Anti-siphon system
US20070295725A1 (en) * 2006-06-27 2007-12-27 Neffco Technologies Fuel anti-siphon device
US7721902B2 (en) 2006-06-27 2010-05-25 Neffco Tech, Llc Fuel anti-siphon device
US20100224260A1 (en) * 2009-03-09 2010-09-09 Avakian Gregory K Anti-Siphoning Device And System
US8550279B2 (en) * 2009-03-09 2013-10-08 Gregory K. Avakian Anti-siphoning fuel device, system, and method
US20100264138A1 (en) * 2009-04-21 2010-10-21 Eric David Bramson Fuel Filler Tube Anti-Siphon Device
US8794468B2 (en) 2009-04-21 2014-08-05 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Fuel filler tube anti-siphon device
US20100282757A1 (en) * 2009-05-11 2010-11-11 Eaton Corporation Anti-siphon device
US8281947B2 (en) 2009-05-11 2012-10-09 Eaton Corporation Anti-siphon device
US20120181275A1 (en) * 2011-01-13 2012-07-19 Gerard Bisaillon Anti-siphoning device for fuel tanks
US8459483B2 (en) * 2011-01-13 2013-06-11 Les Aciers Robond Inc. Anti-siphoning device for fuel tanks
USD753281S1 (en) * 2014-03-28 2016-04-05 Roberto Baston Air circulator

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