US2420239A - Convalescent shoe - Google Patents

Convalescent shoe Download PDF

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Publication number
US2420239A
US2420239A US59165345A US2420239A US 2420239 A US2420239 A US 2420239A US 59165345 A US59165345 A US 59165345A US 2420239 A US2420239 A US 2420239A
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Prior art keywords
shoe
upper
split
back
heel
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Expired - Lifetime
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Hack Nathan
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HACK SHOE Co
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HACK SHOE Co
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C1/00Shoe lacing fastenings
    • A43C1/006Rear lacing, i.e. with a lace placed on the back of the foot in place of, or in addition to the traditional front lace
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements

Description

May 6, 1947. N. HACK CONVALESCENT SHOE Filed May 3, 1945 INVENTOR. NET hiaax Arraengsf Patented May 6, 1947 CONVALESCENT SHOE Nathan Hack, Detroit, Mich., assignor to Hack Shoe Company, Detroit, Mich., a partnership Application May 3, 1945, Serial No. 591,653

Claims.

The present invention pertains to a novel surgical shoe for use on injured feet and particularly in cases of injury to the heel.

The principal object of the invention is to provide for adjustment of the shoe at both front and back to compensate for changes in the size of swelling, bandages, casts and the like. This object is accomplished generally by the use of a split at both the back and front of the upper, in each case extending preferably as far as the sole. Thi arrangement is particularly advantageous at the heel base inasmuch as it permits adjustment along the entire height of the heel. Moreover, the heel portion of the upper is left in a soft condition by omission of the rigid conventional counter and, if desired, substitution of soft upper leather or conventional hard split counters.

In order to leave the heel structure of the upper in an entirely unrestrained condition, the tongue for the back split is fastened between the inner sole and heel base so that it clears the back slit completely. In a preferred construction the upper is slit laterally from the extreme lower end of the back slit, and the lower end of the tongue is passed outwardly through the slit and then inserted and fastened between the insole and the outsole of the shoe.

Each of the slits or openings is provided with two rows of eyelets. The outer rows are used for normal lacing and the inner eyelets when the foot is swollen or enlarged. A stagg ed arran ement of the eyelets may be desirable for the purpose hereinafter set forth. A slide fastener may be provided along each side of the upper to permit taking off and putting on the shoe without disturbing the laces.

The invention is fully disclosed by way of example in the following description and in the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure l is a side elevation of a shoe built according to the invention;

Figure 2 is a vertical longitudinal section; Figure 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Figure Figure 4 is a detail elevation of a modification, and

Figure 5 is a rear elevation of the shoe.

Reference to these views will now be made by use of like characters which are employed to designate corresponding parts throughout.

In Figure 1 is shown a shoe having, as usual, an insole I, an outsole 2 and a heel 3 of any suitable construction, such as a plurality of layers 2 fastened beneath the outsole at the heel end thereof.

The upper 4 of the shoe consists preferably of a soft material and is split at -5 along the front center downwardly through the vamp 6 substantially as far as the insole I, in the manner of a bicycle shoe, surgical shoe or the conventional blucher type shoe. At each side of the slit or opening 5 is provided a row of eyelets spaced closer than usual to the adjacent edge of the opening. A similar row of eyelets 8 is provided at a slight distance outward from the eyelets I for a purpose that will presently be described. Corresponding eyelets I and B are horizontally staggered.

The upper 4 is approximately the height of a conventional boot, although the height may be determined according to the purpose or case for which the shoe is to be used. At the opening 5 there is provided a tongue 9 within the upper and having its lower end fastened preferably to the vamp 6. The tongue herein disclosed is of the loose type but may if desired be of the bellows type having its longitudinal edges fastened respectively to the sides of the opening 5.

The back quarter of the upper 4 is also slit vertically at Ill downward through the heel and substantially as far as the insole I. The heel portion of the upper does not have the usual stifi counter and can be reinforced on the inside by a soft split heel grip I I or a conventional hard split counter at each side of the slit or opening Ill. The split heel grip affords the necessary degree of reinforcement in this quarter area, Without discomfort, and serves also as gripping pads. As at the front, two rows of eyelets I2 and I3 are provided at both sides of the opening I0 and staggered relatively to each other. The side edges of the insole I and lining I may be arched upward at I4 if desired. I

At the extreme lower end, or at the heel seat,

. the opening I0 is widened at I5 at both sides.

The tongue I6, disposed within the shoe, has its lower end disposed adjacent to the widened end of the slip I5 and inserted and fastened, as shown in Figure 2, between the insole I and the outsole 2.

One of the principal uses of the shoe is in connection with heel injuries such as bullet wounds. In such cases it is highly desirable to avoid restraint in the heel area of the shoe and to provide for expansion along the entire height of the heel. It is now evident that these qualities are incorporated in the shoe herein described. The slit or opening I0 along the entire height of the heel is unrestrained by the tongue due to the fact that the lower end of the tongue is not attached to the upper but rather to the soles.

The outer rows of eyelets 8 and I3 are used in lacing the shoe when the foot is not excessively swollen or enlarged by a cast. The lacing then has a substantially normal appearance. However, in case of swelling or a cast foot, the inner rows of eyelets I and I2 close to the openings 5 and in are used, thereby permitting a larger actual opening than if only normally positioned eyelets were provided.

Along each side of the shoe is provided a slide fastener l1 permitting the shoe to be put on or taken off the foot without disturbing the laces. This arrangement is particularly desirable when a careful and accurate adjustment of the shoe by means of the laces is required for a seriously injured and sensitive foot and where lacing and unlacing would be painful to the patient.

In Figure 4 is shown a modified arrangement of eyelets. An inner row and an outer row are provided at each side of one or both openings, as previously set forth. The eyelets I8 of the inner row are horizontally alined with the eyelets IQ of the outer row rather than being staggered as in the first described construction. In the staggered arrangement, however, spacing of the eyelets in each row is greater than in the alined arrangement so that less eyelets are required. In normal or nearly normal lacing the laces may be threaded through the eyelets -8 or through both sets of eyelets I and 8, furnishing close lacing in the latter case. For a wide opening however only the inner eyelets 1 are used.

Although specific embodiment of the invention have been illustrated and described, it will be understood that various alterations in the details of construction may be made without departin from the scope of the invention as indicated by the appended claims.

What I claim 1. A surgical shoe comprising an insole, a relative stiff outsole and an upper, said upper having a split at the front and at the back, the back split extending entirely from the top of the upper to said sole, a tongue in the shoe at each split, the tongue at the back split having its lower end fasten-ed between said insole and outsole, whereby to clear the lower end of said back split.

2. A surgical shoe comprising an insole, a relative stiff outsole and an upper, said upper having a split at the front and at the back, the back split extending entirely from the top of the upper to said sole, a. tongue in the shoe at each split, said upper being slit laterally from the lower extremity of the back split, the tongue at the back split covering said slit and inserted and fastened between said insole and outsole.

3. A surgical shoe comprising a sole and an upper, said upper having a split at the front and at the back, the back split extending entirely from the top of the upper to the said sole, a tongue in the shoe at each split, the tongue at the back split having its lower end fastened to said sole, whereby it is free of the lower end of said back split, the heel portion of said upper being relatively soft, and a soft heel grip within said heel portion at each side of the back split.

4. A surgical shoe comprising a relatively stiff sole and an upper, said upper having a split at the front and at the back, the back split extending entirely from the top of the upper to said sole, a tongue in the shoe at each split, said upper being slit laterally from the lower extremity of the back split, the tongue at the back split covering said slit and fastened to the heel portion of said sole, the heel portion of said upper being relatively soft, and a soft heel grip within said heel portion at each side of the back split.

5. A surgical shoe comprising a sole and an upper, said upper having a split at the front and at the back, the back split extending entirely from the top of the upper to said sole, a tongue in the shoe at each split the tongue at the back split having its lower end fastened to said sole, whereby it is free of the lower end of said back split, and a slide fastener along each side of said upper from the top thereof substantially to said sole.

NATHAN HACK.

REFERENCES CITED The following references file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS are of record in the Brit Dec. 14, 1916

US2420239A 1945-05-03 1945-05-03 Convalescent shoe Expired - Lifetime US2420239A (en)

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US2420239A US2420239A (en) 1945-05-03 1945-05-03 Convalescent shoe

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US2420239A true US2420239A (en) 1947-05-06

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2601162A (en) * 1947-04-25 1952-06-17 Edward F Mclaughlin Safety shoe
US2619744A (en) * 1951-05-10 1952-12-02 William T Mattes Foot enclosing device
US2952082A (en) * 1957-12-20 1960-09-13 Alan E Murray Molded shoe
US2973589A (en) * 1959-02-09 1961-03-07 Rowena N Rigsby Adjustable baby shoe
US3545106A (en) * 1967-04-26 1970-12-08 Hans Martin Ski boot with mechanism for tightening the closure flaps
FR2295709A1 (en) * 1974-12-26 1976-07-23 Auxenfants Nicole Expandable weather proof shoe for injured foot - has two piece uppers with laced fastenings and cover flaps along foot and behind heel
FR2345098A1 (en) * 1976-03-26 1977-10-21 Inst Nat Sante Rech Med Orthopaedic boot for paralysed person - has vertical opening at back of leg portion and chamfered heel
US4255876A (en) * 1979-05-31 1981-03-17 Brs, Inc. Athletic shoe having an upper toe section of stretchable material, external reinforcing strips and improved lacing
USD291021S (en) 1984-06-04 1987-07-28 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed shoe
US4972613A (en) * 1989-10-10 1990-11-27 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Rear entry athletic shoe
US5384971A (en) * 1993-12-10 1995-01-31 Ferry; James E. Boots for outdoor use by sports persons
US5669160A (en) * 1993-03-25 1997-09-23 Noridica S.P.A. Innerboot particularly for skates
US6272773B1 (en) * 1999-11-08 2001-08-14 Mountain Horse Intl. Ab Riding shoe
US20070180730A1 (en) * 2005-06-20 2007-08-09 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having an upper with a matrix layer
US20090025256A1 (en) * 2007-07-26 2009-01-29 Luca Bizzo Dual zipper boot construction method and system
WO2011047711A1 (en) * 2009-10-19 2011-04-28 Würzburg Holding S.A. Easy-to-wear lace up article of footwear
US20110119961A1 (en) * 2007-09-27 2011-05-26 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear for riding
US20110296711A1 (en) * 2010-06-04 2011-12-08 Linda Jo Nelson Overboot
US20140360049A1 (en) * 2013-06-10 2014-12-11 Nike, Inc. Article With Adjustable Rearward Covering Portion
US20150216252A1 (en) * 2014-01-31 2015-08-06 Zubits, Llc Footwear with magnetic closures
US20160166006A1 (en) * 2014-06-26 2016-06-16 Joseph DiFrancisco Easy Access Footwear with Zipper Closure

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US341004A (en) * 1886-05-04 Laced boot or shoe
US470316A (en) * 1892-03-08 Boot or shoe
US1114435A (en) * 1914-06-01 1914-10-20 Annie H Batten Shoe.
US1172770A (en) * 1915-10-23 1916-02-22 Max Deutsch Maternity-shoe.
GB102603A (en) * 1916-10-26 1916-12-14 George James Baseley An Improved Boot.

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US341004A (en) * 1886-05-04 Laced boot or shoe
US470316A (en) * 1892-03-08 Boot or shoe
US1114435A (en) * 1914-06-01 1914-10-20 Annie H Batten Shoe.
US1172770A (en) * 1915-10-23 1916-02-22 Max Deutsch Maternity-shoe.
GB102603A (en) * 1916-10-26 1916-12-14 George James Baseley An Improved Boot.

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2601162A (en) * 1947-04-25 1952-06-17 Edward F Mclaughlin Safety shoe
US2619744A (en) * 1951-05-10 1952-12-02 William T Mattes Foot enclosing device
US2952082A (en) * 1957-12-20 1960-09-13 Alan E Murray Molded shoe
US2973589A (en) * 1959-02-09 1961-03-07 Rowena N Rigsby Adjustable baby shoe
US3545106A (en) * 1967-04-26 1970-12-08 Hans Martin Ski boot with mechanism for tightening the closure flaps
FR2295709A1 (en) * 1974-12-26 1976-07-23 Auxenfants Nicole Expandable weather proof shoe for injured foot - has two piece uppers with laced fastenings and cover flaps along foot and behind heel
FR2345098A1 (en) * 1976-03-26 1977-10-21 Inst Nat Sante Rech Med Orthopaedic boot for paralysed person - has vertical opening at back of leg portion and chamfered heel
US4255876A (en) * 1979-05-31 1981-03-17 Brs, Inc. Athletic shoe having an upper toe section of stretchable material, external reinforcing strips and improved lacing
USD291021S (en) 1984-06-04 1987-07-28 Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc. Pocketed shoe
US4972613A (en) * 1989-10-10 1990-11-27 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Rear entry athletic shoe
US5669160A (en) * 1993-03-25 1997-09-23 Noridica S.P.A. Innerboot particularly for skates
US5384971A (en) * 1993-12-10 1995-01-31 Ferry; James E. Boots for outdoor use by sports persons
US6272773B1 (en) * 1999-11-08 2001-08-14 Mountain Horse Intl. Ab Riding shoe
US20070180730A1 (en) * 2005-06-20 2007-08-09 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having an upper with a matrix layer
US9681708B2 (en) 2005-06-20 2017-06-20 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having an upper with a matrix layer
US8850723B2 (en) * 2005-06-20 2014-10-07 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having an upper with a matrix layer
US20120030965A1 (en) * 2005-06-20 2012-02-09 Nike, Inc. Article of Footwear Having an Upper with a Matrix Layer
US8065818B2 (en) 2005-06-20 2011-11-29 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having an upper with a matrix layer
US20170251766A1 (en) * 2005-06-20 2017-09-07 Nike, Inc. Article of Footwear Having an Upper with a Matrix Layer
WO2008079872A3 (en) * 2006-12-20 2009-01-29 Nike Inc Article of footwear having an upper with a matrix layer
WO2008079872A2 (en) 2006-12-20 2008-07-03 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having an upper with a matrix layer
JP2010514473A (en) * 2006-12-20 2010-05-06 ナイキ インコーポレーティッド Articles of footwear having uppers with a matrix layer
JP2013240709A (en) * 2006-12-20 2013-12-05 Nike Internatl Ltd Article of footwear having upper with matrix layer
JP2010042270A (en) * 2006-12-20 2010-02-25 Nike Inc Article of footwear having upper with matrix layer
US8510972B2 (en) * 2007-07-26 2013-08-20 Aerogroup International Holdings Llc Dual zipper boot construction method and system
US20090025256A1 (en) * 2007-07-26 2009-01-29 Luca Bizzo Dual zipper boot construction method and system
US8448356B2 (en) * 2007-09-27 2013-05-28 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear for riding
US20110119961A1 (en) * 2007-09-27 2011-05-26 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear for riding
US20120204450A1 (en) * 2009-10-19 2012-08-16 Wurzburg Holding S.A. Easy-to-wear lace up article of footwear
WO2011047711A1 (en) * 2009-10-19 2011-04-28 Würzburg Holding S.A. Easy-to-wear lace up article of footwear
US20110296711A1 (en) * 2010-06-04 2011-12-08 Linda Jo Nelson Overboot
US20140360049A1 (en) * 2013-06-10 2014-12-11 Nike, Inc. Article With Adjustable Rearward Covering Portion
US9474330B2 (en) * 2013-06-10 2016-10-25 Nike, Inc. Article with adjustable rearward covering portion
US20150216252A1 (en) * 2014-01-31 2015-08-06 Zubits, Llc Footwear with magnetic closures
US20160166006A1 (en) * 2014-06-26 2016-06-16 Joseph DiFrancisco Easy Access Footwear with Zipper Closure

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