US2416546A - Liquid fuel burning apparatus - Google Patents

Liquid fuel burning apparatus Download PDF

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US2416546A
US2416546A US479037A US47903743A US2416546A US 2416546 A US2416546 A US 2416546A US 479037 A US479037 A US 479037A US 47903743 A US47903743 A US 47903743A US 2416546 A US2416546 A US 2416546A
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bowl
fuel
sump
burner
liquid fuel
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US479037A
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Resek Marc
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Perfection Stove Co
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Perfection Stove Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D5/00Burners in which liquid fuel evaporates in the combustion space, with or without chemical conversion of evaporated fuel

Description

Feb. 25, 1947. -M. RESEK LIQUI D FUEL BURNING APPARATUS s sheets-sheet- 2 Filed march 13; 1943 mmvrqx Mam Essa/K Feb. 25, 1947. M. RESEK LIQUID FUEL BURNING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 13, 1943 mwsuron. MAM: Pas-5K flrramvsva Patented Feb. 25, 1947 2,416,546 I LIQUID FUEL BURNING APPARATUS Marc Resek, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, assignor to Perfection Stove Company, Cleveland, Ohio, a

corporation '01. Ohio Application March 13, 1943, Serial No. 479,037

4 Claims. 1

This invention relates to improvements in liquid fuel burners of the pot type, its general purpose being to better adapt burners of this character to use on conveyances; and it had its conception in the development of the heating apparatus that constitutes the subject matter of my application Serial No. 479,038, filed concurrently herewith.

The apparatus disclosed in the above mentioned application is intended primarily for installation on military motor vehicles, such as trucks and tanks, for warming the internal combustion engines thereof in cold weather to facilitate starting. Accordingly, the apparatus is used only when the vehicle is standing, and it frequently happens that vehicles of the class referred to are parked on unlevel ground. It is the prime object of the present invention, therefore, to provide a pot type. burner that will operate safely and satisfactorily when tilted at considerable of an angle to the horizontal, as well as when level.

A more specific object of the invention is the production of a pot type burner in which the the fuel in the bottom of the bowl, parts of my improved construction serving this purpose.

Other objects will appear as I proceed to describe the present preferred embodiment of I the invention by reference to the accompanying drawings wherein Fig. 1 is a central vertical section through the lower portion of a heating apparatus, similar to that disclosed in the above identified application, incorporating my present improvements; Fig. 2 is a horizontal section through the burner bowl on the line 2--2 of Fig. 1; Figs. 3 and 4 are sectional details on the lines 3-3 of Fig. 2, .and l---! of Fig. 3, respectively; Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view including the liquid fuel supply and the burner bowl and showing the same as though the apparatus were tilted perceptibly in a direction away from the fuel supply means, and Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic representation of a modification of the invention.

bottom portion of the pot or bowl is so constructed as to provide a sump of less area than said bottom portion and to which the liquid fuel is fed and wherein it is confined when the burner is tilted within practical limits as, for example, up to 7 from the horizontal; and a further object is to include in such a construction, overflow means through which excess liquid fuel may be carried away and beyond the danger point of ignition from the burner in the event of abnormal tilting and a consequent spilling over of a considerable amount of the fuel from the sump into the adjoining portion of the bowl.

It may be explained that the apparatus, when used as an engine heater on motor vehicles, as above set forth, is desirably supplied with fuel from the same source as the engine. When, under these conditions, a highly volatile liquid fuel is employed, the vapors generated therefrom will readily diffuse throughout the bowl. However, in the event that heavier fuel oils are used it is desirable to transfer some of the liquid fuel from the sump to the adjacent portion of the bowl, and it is a further object of the invention to provide means for this purpose, desirably in the nature of a wick, siphon.

A still further object of the invention is to increase vaporization of the fuel by providing means additional to the usual metal burner parts for conducting heat to and diffusing it through The burner bowl, designated generally by the reference numeral I, is located within a casing 2 in spaced relation to the walls thereof. The casing is separated into a combustion chamber 3 and an air compartment 4 by a transverse partition 5 having a central opening 6 that is surrounded by a depending flange 1.

By means of a suitable number of tie-andspacer elements In, the bowl I is suspended and so properly spaced from the partition 5. The reduced upper and lower ends of said elements project through openings in the partition 5 and the top wall ll of the burner bowl and are suitably connected to said parts, as by welding. Said top wall II has a central opening I2 in axial alignment with and somewhat larger than the previously mentioned opening 6 and is surrounded by 8. depending flange I3. An annular slot I5 is thus provided between the flanges 1 and I3 through which secondary air is admitted to the burner bowl from the aforesaid air compartment 4.

According to the. embodiment shown, which, as above stated, is taken from the previously mentioned application, a liquid circulating unit, designated generally by the reference numeral I6, is

situated in the combustion chamber v3, and any condensate dripping therefrom is prevented from reaching the interior of the burner bowl by a ring-like condensate arrester I! that is mounted on the partition 5 about the opening 6.

The peripheral wall of the burner bowl I is provided with three circumferential series of air admitting openings, those of the v upper series being designated 20, and those of the intermediate nd. lower series,-2l and 22, respectively. The

low the bottom plane of the bowl and is surrounded in about said plane by a plate 28 that is fastened, by welding or otherwise, to the bottom wall of thebowl, .The lower end of the lighting tube 25 is provided with an outwardly extending.

flange 28, and a closure 29 is sustained in operative relation to the lower end of the lighting tube by a member 30, shown in the form of a channel, that is hingedly connected to the burner bowl structure and releasably supported in a horizontal position below the lighting tube as set out in detail in the before mentioned application.

member 38 is provided by a pin 3| which has its A loose connection between the closure 29 and the upper end riveted or otherwise secured to the cloi sure and passes freely through an opening in the web of the member 30, beyond which it is provided with a head 32. A helical spring 33 surrounds the pin 3| and is compressed between the web of the member 30 and the closure 29 for urging the closure in a direction to engage the flange 28 of the lighting tube 25. By means of an adjustable shim 35 that is pivotally attached to the closure,

the latter' may be spaced different distances from the flange 28, thereby to admit air in varible controlled quantity through the lighting tube to the interior of the burner, should conditions require. To prevent chilling, of the lower portion of the burner bowl by cold air entering the open bottom of the compartment 4, such as would unduly retard vaporization. of the fuel in the bottom portion of the bowl, a shell 38 is applied to the lower end of the bowl and is sustained in spaced relation thereto by a suitable number of L-shaped brackets 39 that are carried by and extend inwardly from the casing 2. I

A sump 40 is set on within the annular troughlike bottom of the bowl by dams 42 and 43. Each dam consists of a plate fitted radially within the bottom of the bowl and having its upper edge in about the planeof the upper end of the lighting tube 25. A flange 44 of each dam 42 and 43 is secured, as by spot welding, to the peripheral wall of the bowl, while the edge portion of the dam-,'downwardly and inwardly beyond the flange,

is sealed to the bottom wall 23 and the frusto conical wall 24 by suitable means, such as silver solder. Extending through vertically aligned openings in the bottom wall 23, plate 28 and shell 1 38, opposite the sump 48, is an overflow pipe 48,

the same being suitably sealed within the opening of the bottom wall of the bowl. The top of j the pipe is in approximately 'the plane of the upper edges of the dams 42' and 43, while its lower end is well below the bottom of the bowl.

, To prevent air entering the bowl through the overflow pipe in sufficient amount to adversely affect operation of the burner, a baffle 41 is sup- Liquid fuel is supplied to the bowl through a chamber by an element 53 having a fuel port 54 and a vent port 55. The float chamber with its appurtenances may be of any approved type.

.mentioned connection 58 communicates.

chamber and the feed orifice 58 of which is controlled by a needle point valve 59. A float 88 is carried by an arm 8| that is pivotally supported at 82 from a convenient part of the float chamber. A helical spring 83 is interposed between the float arm 8| and the valve 59. Through the intervention of this spring the valve is seated when the float is lifted by an accumulation of fuel within the chamber 52 to the elevation shown in the drawings. Communlcatively connected to the fitting 58 is a fuel supply pipe' 85, shown as equipped with a valve 88.

Returning to the fuel feed chamber 5|, a partition 18 extends from side to side of the same and rises from the bottom thereof to an elevation con siderably above the liquid level maintained in the float chamber and divides the fuel feed chamber into a receiving compartment 1|, to which fuel flows through the aforesaid port 54, and a delivery compartment 12 wherewith the previously Supported by a carrier 15 astride the partition I0 is an inverted U-shaped wick 18 which, by capillary and siphonic action, transfersfuel from the receiving compartment II to the delivery compartment 12. ally from the-upper. end of the carrier 15 is an arm 11 that is swiveled to the top end of a wick adjustingscrew 18 that carries a nut assembly 19 with respect to which the screw may be fed up or down by turning the screw in one direction or the other, the screw having a head 89 for such purpose. A spring 82 surrounds the screw 18 and is interposed between the head 80 and -an abut merit provided by a bushing that surrounds the from the bottom of the chamber 5| to an elevation a suitable distance above the possible maximum fuel level in the delivery compartment 12. The nut assembly 19 has a lateral extension that cooperates with a guide 85 on the side of the chamber 5| in such manner as to prevent the nut justed to obtain the desired rateof feed, the

1 ported in slightly spaced relation to the top of the pipe.

assembly from turning. It is apparent from the construction Just described that the 'wick 18 may be adjusted vertically of the partition 10 by turning the screw 18 so as to feed-the screw up or down through the nut assembly. This adjustmentis for the purpose of changing the rate of fuel feed from the receiving compartment II to the delivery compartment 12, and the rate of feed is indicated by indicia on a cylinder 88, that is suitably fastened to the head of the screw, and

which indicia may be read in conjunction with the lower edge of a skirt 8! on the bottom of the chamber 5| as an index. With the wick adfuel will flow by gravity from the delivery compartment 12 through the connection 50 to the sump 40. While, for. the present purpose, it is assumed that the burner is in operation and that the fuel is being consumed at the rate at which it is being fed, it may be explained that. if the burner were not in operation, the fuel would accumulate within the delivery-compartment I2 and the sump to the same level as that prevailing in the receiving compartment 1| and float chamber 52.

When the lighter and more volatile hydrocarbons are employed as fuel, such, for example,

the structure shown including a fuel inlet fitting Incorporated in and extending later- 7 Such means may consist of an inverted U- shaped wick 90, shown as engaged over one of the dams-dam 43 in the present arrangementand which is fastened thereto by a clip 8|. The wick is desirably of such length that its ends may rest on or near the bottom wall of the bowl on' opposite sides of the dam. By this. means,

when the burner is either level, or is tilted withinpractical limits, liquid fuel will be transferred by capillary and siphonic action from the sump 40 to the adjoining bottom portion of the bowl, and

when the bowl is. tilted as aforesaid, the liquid fuel, by reason of the fact that it is divided into two bodies, will not accumulate in either the sump or the adjoining part of the bowl-in sufficient amount to overflow. In the case of abnormal tilting, however, the excess fuel will escape through the overflow pipe 46.

To light the burner, the closure 29 is dropped and a lighted torch or the like is projected upwardly through the lighting tube 25 and held in igniting relation to the fuel in the sump 40. Upon withdrawal of the torch, the closure 29vis returned to its former position, and, as combustion progresses, the burner parts.become heated. As a consequence, vapors are generated from the fuel in the sump, this action being enhanced by the presence of the dams 42 and 43 which increase the heat conducting capacity of the burner parts. The vapors thus generated will mix with primary air entering through theopenings 20, 2|. and 22, thereby to produce a combustible mixture which, upon reaching the upper portion of the bowl will commingle with secondary air entering through the slot IS. The resultant highly combustible mixture will burn vigorously in the region of the upper portion of the bowl and in the combustion chamber 3. When the wick'li is adjusted to feed the fuel at a relatively high rate, so that a large volume of combustible vapors is produced, secondary air in sufficient amount to support combustion under these conditions may be admitted through the lighting tube 25 by adjusting the shim 35 to space the closure 29 more or less from the flange 28. A small amountof air will also enter the bowl through the overflow pipe 46, and will be deflected toward. the center of the bowl by the baffle 41.

Throughout the above discussion it has been assumed that the apparatus, if tilted at all, is

tilted generally toward the side opposite the fuel supply. If, on the other hand, the apparatus is tilted toward the other side, i. e. the side on which the fuel supply is located, the burner will be I robbed of fuel and will burn with a low fire, or

not at all, depending upon the angle to which it is tilted.

When the apparatus is approximately level and is in operation, a small amount of fuel will be present in the sump 40, the amount being dependent upon two-factrs, namely, the rate of fuel feed and the rate of combustion. It will be obvious from a consideration of the'foregoing that if the apparatus be tilted within practical limits in the general direction opposite the fuel supply there will be no pronounced increase in the amount of fuel in the sump nor danger of the and 43. The vapors generated from the body of fuel in the sump, whether the apparatus be level or tilted, will diffuse throughout the interior of' the bowl and, mixing with the primary and secondary air, burn in normal fashion. In case the apparatus is tilted, in the direction aforesaid to such a degree that the liquid fuel overflows from the sump 40 into the adjoining bottom portion of the bowl, the excess fuel will be carried off through the overflow pipe 46 and thus beprevented from attaining the elevation of and from spilling through the openings 22 on the low side of the bowl. Even under these undesirable extreme conditions the apparatus may continue to function, the liquid fuel that escapes through the overflow pipe being carried beyond the danger point of ignition from the combustion occurring inside the bowl and in the combustion chamber.

The purpose of the diagram of Fig. 5 is to indicate what happens when the apparatus is tilted perceptibly in a direction away from the liquid fuel supply means, the angle of tilt being indicated by the relationship of the dot-and-dash vertical line a and the inclined dotted line b. When the apparatus is in operation and the fuel is being consumed, the liquid level in the delivery compartment 12 of the fuel feed chamber 5|, and likewise in the sump 40, is some distance below the liquid level in the receiving compartment H factors responsible for this condition. In this connection it will be noted that, in the illustration, the wick I6 is in its lowest position and consequently functions to transfer the fuel at the highest rate. Elevation of the wick would create a greater difference between the levels of the fuel in the two compartments of the fuel feed chamber. The dot-and-dash line 0 in Fig. 5 represents a projection of the liquid level in the sump and, as will be noted, it is well above the row of air admitting openings 22 and considerably higher than the top of the overflow pipe 46. Consequently, under these conditions, if it were not for my improvements, the burner'would overflow through said openings. As it is, the burner will functionnormally when tilted within practical limits, the volume of combustion depending upon the extent and direction of tilt. The vapors that are generated from the fuel in the sump will diffuse throughout the interior of the bowl and combustion will proceed in the manner already described. The presence of the overflow pipe 46 insures against a dangerous condition in case of extreme tilting, the pipe carrying the fuel beyond where it would be liable to be ignited from the burner. It is understood, however, that, even with this safeguard, such a condition should.

identical withthat hereinbefore described. In this construction, the overflow level of the sump 92 may be above the plane of the lowest of the air admitting openings in the peripheral wall of the bowl 93. The bowl, on the side opposite the fuel supply means is provided with an overflow pipe 95, the overflow level of which is somewhat below the plane of the lowest of the air admitting openings. In this form of the invention, the fuel in the, sump may be lighted from. above, as by a torch or other igniting means inserted through an opening or door in the wall of the combustion chamber, as will-be readily under stood.

Having-thus described my invention, what I claim is: 1 1. In liquid fuel burning apparatus, a burner of the pot typecomprising a bowl so constructed that its lower portion forms an annular trough, the peripheral wall of the bowl being provided above said trough with air admitting means, dams disposed across the trough adjacent one side of the bowl and in spaced relation to each other thereby to provide a sump, liquid fuel suply means in fixed relation to the bowl and located adjacent the side thereof aforesaid, communicative connections between said supply means and the burner for conveying fuel to thebowl exclusively through the sump, means main-. taining a substantially constant quantity of liquid fuel in said supply means, the surface of said fuel being in a plane considerably below the top of the dams when the apparatus is level, and a U- .shaped wick engaged over and suitably attached to one of the dams with its ends adjacent the bottom of the bowl.

2. In liquid fuel burning apparatus of a kind subjected to tilting in the course of its intended use, a burner bowl having air admitting means spaced above the bottom thereof and constructed to provide a relatively deep sump within the bowl contiguous to, and of lesser area than, the bottom of the bowl, the top of the sump being below the top of the bowl and being wide open and in unobstructed communication withthe interior of the bowl; liquid fuel supply means in fixed relation to the bowl and located adjacent one side thereof, the aforesaid sumpbeing spaced a substantial distance inwardly from the opposite side of the bowl, communicative connections between said supply means and the ap paratus'forconveying fuel to the bowl exclusively through said sump, means maintaining a substantially constant quantity of liquid fuel in said supply means, the surface of said fuel being in a plane considerably below the top of the sump when the apparatus is level whereby the apparatus-may be tilted perceptibly toward the side opposite the fuel supply means without the sump overflowing into the adjacent bottom portion of the bowl, and overflow means for said adjacent bottom portion contiguous to the side of the apparatus remote from the fuel supply means for carrying off excess fuel in the case of extreme tilting of the apparatus, the overflow level of the last mentioned means being such as will define a possible maximum' liquid level in said bottom portion below the aforesaid air admitting means.

3. In liquid fuel burning apparatus of the kind I subjected to tilting in the course of its intended use, a burner bowl constructed to provide a relatively deep sump within the bowl contiguous to, l and of lesser area than, the bottom of the bowl,

the top of said sump being below the top of the bowl and being wide open and in unobstructed 5 communication with the interiorof the, bowl;

' liquid-fuel supply means in fixed relation to the bowl and located adjacent one side thereof, the

aforesaid sump being spaced a substantial distance inwardly from the opposite side of the bowl, communicative connections between said supply means and the apparatus for conveying fuel to the bowl exclusively through the sump, means maintaining a substantially constant quantity of liquid fuel in said supply means, the surface of said fuel being in a plane considerably below the top of the sump when the apparatus is level, and means having a small conductive capacity for transferring fuel inlimited quantity from the sump to the adjacent bottom portion of the bowl.

4. In liquid fuel burning apparatus of a kind subjected to tilting in the course of its intended use, a burner bowl provided with air admitting means spaced a substantial distance above the bottom of the bowl, means comprising a dam setting off a sump within the bowl, the top of which is below the top of the bowl, liquid fuel supply means in fixed relation to the bowl and located adjacent one side thereof, said sump being spaced a substantial distance inwardly from the opposite side of the bowl, communicative connections between said supply means and the apparatus for conveying fuel to the bowl exclusively through the sump, means maintaining a substantially constant quantity of liquid fuel in said supply means, the surface of said fuel being in a plane considerably below the top of the aforesaid dam when the apparatus is level whereby the appa-' REFERENCES CITED,

The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,075,242 Todaro Mar. 30, 1937 2,253,056 Ullstrand Aug. 19, 1941 2,286,497 Miceli et al June 16, 1942 2,293,697 Chadwick Aug. 25, 1942 1,752,000 Home Mar. 25, 1930 231,730 Rippingille Aug. 31, 1880 1,536,705 De Florez May 5, 1925 353,276 Walton Nov. 23, 1886 2,086,885 Sherman July 13, 1937 2,086,884 Sherman July 13, 1937.

646,368 Egle Mar. 27, 1900 1,486,103 Milnes Mar. 4, 1924 2,063,847 Lavigne 1 Dec. 8, 1936 2,067,666 Jungers Jan. 12, 1937 2,344,177

Sherman Mar. 14, 1944

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2509399A (en) * 1946-06-03 1950-05-30 Perfection Stove Co Means for controlling the supply of fuel to liquid fuel burners of heating systems for automotive engines or the like
US2536257A (en) * 1946-06-13 1951-01-02 Skuttle Mfg Company Humidifying apparatus
US2680478A (en) * 1951-03-21 1954-06-08 Perfection Stove Co Fuel and air feeding means for liquid fuel burning apparatus, and mounting for said means and associated elements
US2730079A (en) * 1951-10-01 1956-01-10 Universal Engine Heater Compan Oil burning water heater
US4788963A (en) * 1986-07-21 1988-12-06 Engineered Air Systems, Inc. Fuel supply system for heater
US20110192477A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2011-08-11 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Passive-siphoning system and method

Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US231730A (en) * 1880-08-31 rippingille
US353276A (en) * 1886-11-23 Apparatus for manufacturing h eating-vapors
US646368A (en) * 1899-07-19 1900-03-27 William Egle Burner.
US1486103A (en) * 1923-02-01 1924-03-04 Jr John Joseph Milnes Oil burner
US1536705A (en) * 1922-10-26 1925-05-05 Florez Luis De Oil burner
US1752000A (en) * 1925-08-19 1930-03-25 William O Horne Liquid-fuel burner
US2063847A (en) * 1931-02-02 1936-12-08 Marvin M Taylor Oil burner
US2067666A (en) * 1934-04-19 1937-01-12 Jungers Stove And Range Compan Liquid fuel burner
US2075242A (en) * 1934-08-10 1937-03-30 Vincent S Todaro Liquid fuel burner
US2086884A (en) * 1932-05-24 1937-07-13 Silent Glow Oil Burner Corp Apparatus for controlling liquid fuel burners
US2086885A (en) * 1933-01-13 1937-07-13 Silent Glow Oil Burner Corp Liquid fuel burner
US2253056A (en) * 1937-10-05 1941-08-19 Servel Inc Liquid fuel burner
US2286497A (en) * 1938-09-21 1942-06-16 G & J Teller Pot type vaporizing oil burner
US2293697A (en) * 1939-10-20 1942-08-25 Perfection Stove Co Flame propagator for pilot burners
US2344177A (en) * 1940-04-18 1944-03-14 Rallston M Sherman Burner

Patent Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US353276A (en) * 1886-11-23 Apparatus for manufacturing h eating-vapors
US231730A (en) * 1880-08-31 rippingille
US646368A (en) * 1899-07-19 1900-03-27 William Egle Burner.
US1536705A (en) * 1922-10-26 1925-05-05 Florez Luis De Oil burner
US1486103A (en) * 1923-02-01 1924-03-04 Jr John Joseph Milnes Oil burner
US1752000A (en) * 1925-08-19 1930-03-25 William O Horne Liquid-fuel burner
US2063847A (en) * 1931-02-02 1936-12-08 Marvin M Taylor Oil burner
US2086884A (en) * 1932-05-24 1937-07-13 Silent Glow Oil Burner Corp Apparatus for controlling liquid fuel burners
US2086885A (en) * 1933-01-13 1937-07-13 Silent Glow Oil Burner Corp Liquid fuel burner
US2067666A (en) * 1934-04-19 1937-01-12 Jungers Stove And Range Compan Liquid fuel burner
US2075242A (en) * 1934-08-10 1937-03-30 Vincent S Todaro Liquid fuel burner
US2253056A (en) * 1937-10-05 1941-08-19 Servel Inc Liquid fuel burner
US2286497A (en) * 1938-09-21 1942-06-16 G & J Teller Pot type vaporizing oil burner
US2293697A (en) * 1939-10-20 1942-08-25 Perfection Stove Co Flame propagator for pilot burners
US2344177A (en) * 1940-04-18 1944-03-14 Rallston M Sherman Burner

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2509399A (en) * 1946-06-03 1950-05-30 Perfection Stove Co Means for controlling the supply of fuel to liquid fuel burners of heating systems for automotive engines or the like
US2536257A (en) * 1946-06-13 1951-01-02 Skuttle Mfg Company Humidifying apparatus
US2680478A (en) * 1951-03-21 1954-06-08 Perfection Stove Co Fuel and air feeding means for liquid fuel burning apparatus, and mounting for said means and associated elements
US2730079A (en) * 1951-10-01 1956-01-10 Universal Engine Heater Compan Oil burning water heater
US4788963A (en) * 1986-07-21 1988-12-06 Engineered Air Systems, Inc. Fuel supply system for heater
US20110192477A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2011-08-11 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Passive-siphoning system and method

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