US2214420A - Oilstove - Google Patents

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US2214420A
US2214420A US169218A US16921837A US2214420A US 2214420 A US2214420 A US 2214420A US 169218 A US169218 A US 169218A US 16921837 A US16921837 A US 16921837A US 2214420 A US2214420 A US 2214420A
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bowl
air
burner
compartment
stove
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US169218A
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Charles J Kessler
Joseph R Kirkpatrick
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Perfection Stove Co
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Perfection Stove Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24CDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES ; DETAILS OF DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F24C5/00Stoves or ranges for liquid fuels
    • F24C5/02Stoves or ranges for liquid fuels with evaporation burners, e.g. dish type

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  • This invention relates to oilstoves of the class in which the oil is fed to the bottom of a burner bowl where it is vaporized and burned in the presence of air admitted to the bowl through primary and secondary air inlets from a space below and aboutthe bowl.
  • the rate of flow of the oil and consequently the size of the fire are controlled by a suitable valve; and to avoid overflow or undue flooding of the bowl, especially when.the
  • liquid level control means is employed.
  • the burner bowl in the type of stove wherewith we have shown our improvements associated and to which they are peculiarly applicable, has a relatively large lateral dpeningthrough which, upon removal of a closure, access maybe had to the interior of the bowl for lighting and cleaning purposes.
  • burners of the class under consideration have been designed to operate efficiently and satisfactorily on an oil of l .a given grade or volatility, and any appreciable deviation from the prescribed grade, especially in the direction of heavier oils of less volatility,
  • our burner bowl-or 10 the vaporizing parts or walls thereof-of relatively thin sheet metal so that, upon thefire being lighted, the vaporizing parts will quickly attain the high temperature necessary to vaporize the heaviest of oils suitable foruse in the stove, and 15 inorder to prevent the bottom of the bowl from being chilled by the air as it approaches the air inlets, we insulate the bottomportion'of the bowl, preferably by applying one or more plates thereto in spaced relation to said bottom wall and to go one another so as to provide a like number of dead air spaces,
  • This arrangement is peculiarly suited to ourpurpose because the insulating medium does not to any appreciable extent interfere with prompt heating of the relatively thin wall 25 of the bowl, yet itis more effective in preventing H the air outside the bowl than solid insulation would be.
  • Fig.- 1 is a fragmentary sectional'side elevation of a stove incorporating our improvements
  • Fig. 2 is a horizontal section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, 5
  • FIG. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 1 of a simplified form of the invention, this embodiment suited to smaller stoves, andFig. 4 .is an enlarged section on the line 4-4 of Fig; 3, lookijig upward.
  • I represents the stove base that is supported a suitable distance above the floor by legs 2; and over an upstanding cylindrical part 3 of the base is engaged the lower end of a drum or casing 5, the parts being suitably connected together in accordance with common practice.
  • the interior of the drum or casing 5 is divided into a combustion chamber 5 and a.- burner compartment 1 by a horizontal annular partition 3 which; in the present embodiment, includes a ring-like member 9 that. is detachably connected to the outer part of the partition by fastening means or bolts I0.
  • Oil is delivered to a sump 25 in the bottom wall of the burner bowl l3 through a supply pipe 26 that leads from a. valve 21, which, in turn,
  • a reservoir 23 is adapted to be sustained in inverted position by a carrier 30.
  • the carrier is hingedly supported at 3
  • annular flange 40 extends inwardly from the top edge of the cylindrical part 3 of the base I and to this flange is secured, by fastening means or screws 4! a.
  • circular plate or diaphragm .42'th'at is shown as surrounded by a relatively deep flange 43.
  • Mounted upon and welded or otherwise secured to the plate or diaphragm 42 and desirably in concentric relation therewith and with the burner bowl i3 is an air bailie 45, the same flaring outwardly at a rather abrupt angle to the plate 42 from its point of connection therewith to where it terminates in a cylindrical portion 41.
  • a substantially cylindrical air guide 48 that is flanged inwardly at its lower end and rests upon the plate 42 to which it issultably fastened, as by welding.
  • the plate 42 is provided with a circular series of holes 50, certain of which are provided with dampers 51, as is best shown in'Fig. 2. It is the feature just described, involving the baille 45 and the air guide 48, that has previously been referred to as the rising air outwardly and away from the bowl and smooths it out into a relatively thin sheet in spaced relation to the peripheral wall of the bowl.
  • this air directing and control means causes the burner to operate quietly and with an even or steady flre because it obviates excessive fluctuating pressures ordinarily resulting from the invariable irregullarities of the flue draft, wherefore the spasmodic action heretofore common in stoves of this class is eliminated.
  • the burner responds more readily and accurately to adjustments of the valve 21, and because the fire is more uniform and steady the plug it that constitutes the closure of the relatively large lighting and cleaning opening of the burner bowl may be removed with safety at any time.
  • insulator plates or shells and 56 Applied to the bottom of the burner bowl l3 are insulator plates or shells and 56, provided with apertures for the passage oi.” the oil supply pipe 26, and with central air inlet openings that register with the air tube IS, the plates or shells being otherwise imperforate so as to enclose dead, air spaces, respectively, between the two platesand between plate 55 and the bottom wall of the burner bowl I3.
  • the valve 21 is opened to permit' oil to flow from the receptacle 23 to the sump 25 in the bottom of the burner bowl, and the door 23 is opened, and the plug ll removed.
  • the oil in the burner bowl is, then ignited by projecting a lighted match or taper into the bowl or by throwing into the bowl a piece of burning paper, after which the plug II is replaced and the door closed.
  • fAir enters through the inlet openings i5 to support initial. combustion and as the fire gets under way additional air is drawn in through, the slot between the topwall of the bowl and the partition I and through the air tube II.
  • the side. and bottom walls of the burner bowl become heated sufllciently to vaporize the oil practically as fast as it enters the .sump 25 from the pipe '23, and the size .of the fire may be governed by the adjustment of the valve 21.
  • a part of the air that enters the compartment 1 sweeps down beneath the burner bowl and enters the bowl through the air tube It, and this rounding air is prevented from having any cooling effect upon the bottom wall of the bowl by the dead air spaces provided by the insulator plates or shells 55 and 56.
  • dampers are provided for partially or completely shutting off certain of the holes 50 in the plate 42.
  • the plate 42 is integral with the upstanding cylindrical part 3 of the base I. Since, in the present embodiment, the drum or casing 5 is of small diameter relative to that of the burner bowl I3, an air director, such as in the former embodiment,
  • air baffle 45* is arranged in closely spaced relation to the adjacent portion of the drum or casing 5 to L fifect the narrow annular slot through which air, admitted through the holes 50, enters the burner chamber 1.
  • a single insulator plate or shell, designated 55, is applied to the bottom of the bowl l3.
  • A'stove of the our invention comprising a casing enclosing a combustion chamber and a burner compartment therebelow, a partition separating the chamber from the compartment and having a relatively large opening, an open top burner bowl sustained in the compartment with its opentop in register with 'said opening and its rim in spaced relation tothe partition, the bowl, having air inlet means disposed circumferentially thereof and opening into said compartment, a diaphragm defining the bottom of the burner compartment through which air is admitted to the compartment, air directing means associated with said air openings for distributing air about the burner bottomof the burner bowl in outward spaced relation to .the peripheral wall thereof, an insulator shell applied to the liveiing oil to the bowl.
  • baflle rising from the diaphragm inwardly of the series of openings and flaring outwardly over said openings and thence upwardly in closely spaced relation to said cylindrical wall, an insulator'shell applied to the bottom of the burner bowl, and means for delivering oil to the bowl.
  • a casing enclosing a burner compartment, a cylindrical burner bowl situated within said compartment in materially spaced relation to the surrounding walls thereof, the burner bowl having air admitting openings in its peripheral wall, an air opening through the bottom wall of the bowl, a diaphragm defining the bottom of the burner compartment and having a circular series of holes for. admitting air to the compartment, a baffle rising from the diaphragm inwardly of said series of holes and flaring outwardly and 'thence upwardly above the bottom plane of'the bowl and in substantial outward spaced relation to the peripheral wall of the bowl,
  • a casing enclosing a burner compartment, a cylindrical of said air director thereby to provide a restricted slot through which air adburner bowl situated within said compartment in materially spaced relation to the surrounding walls thereof, the burner bowl having air admitting openings in its peripheral wall, a diephragm'defining the bottom of the burner compartment and having a circular series oi' holes for admitting air to'the compartment, a baiiie rising from the dia'phragm inwardly of said series of holes and flaring outwardly and thence upwardly above the bottompiane of the bowl and in substantial outward; spaced relation to the peripheral wall of the bowl, and a cylindrical air director rising trom the diaphragmoutwardly of said'series of openings in closely spaced relation to the upper end of the baiiie, and means for de-' livering oil to the bowl.
  • a stove or the class described comprising a structure enclosing a combustion chamber and a burner compartment below said chamber, a

Description

Sept- 10. 0- c. JQKESSLER ET AL OILSTOVB 4 Sheets-Sheet l -Filed Oct. 15, 1937 INVENIOR5 a d in W ATTORNEYS.
Sept. 10, 1940.
C. J. KESSLER ETF AL OILSTOVE Filed 001;; 15, 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS ATTORNEYS,
Sept. 10, 1940- c. J. KESISLER AL OILSTOVE 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 15, 1937' INVENTORS BY. JW M Mm ATTORNEY. 5.
Se t. 10, 1940.
c. J. KESSLER ET AL 2,
O'ILSTOVE Filed 001;. 15, 1937 4 Sheefis-Sheet 4 ATTORNEYS- 1NVENTOR5,V v
Patented Sept. 10, 194i) UNITED STATES OILSTOVE Charles J. Kessler, Cleveland Heights, and Joseph R. Kirkpatrick, South Euclid, Ohio, assignors to Perfection Stove Company,
corporation of Ohio Cleveland, Ohio, a
Application October 15, 1937, Serial No. 169,218
7 Claims.
This invention relates to oilstoves of the class in which the oil is fed to the bottom of a burner bowl where it is vaporized and burned in the presence of air admitted to the bowl through primary and secondary air inlets from a space below and aboutthe bowl. The rate of flow of the oil and consequently the size of the fire are controlled by a suitable valve; and to avoid overflow or undue flooding of the bowl, especially when.the
fire is out and the valve is open, liquid level control means is employed.
The burner bowl, in the type of stove wherewith we have shown our improvements associated and to which they are peculiarly applicable, has a relatively large lateral dpeningthrough which, upon removal of a closure, access maybe had to the interior of the bowl for lighting and cleaning purposes.
Inasmuchas vaporization of the oil is dependent very largely upon heat being conducted to the oil from the flame above through the side and bottom walls of-the bowl, it is essential that these walls be maintained at high temperature while the stove is in normal operation, and that they attain such high temperature as soon after the fire is started as possible in order that combustion may be quickly advanced to a satisfactory stage. Y
It is a well known fact that the heavier or less volatile the 'oil is, the greater is the heat required to'vaporize it. Heretofore, burners of the class under consideration have been designed to operate efficiently and satisfactorily on an oil of l .a given grade or volatility, and any appreciable deviation from the prescribed grade, especially in the direction of heavier oils of less volatility,
resulted in inferior operation.
In order to adapt a single stove to oils of different grades, a vaporization control was invented by Lee S. Chadwick and one of the present applicants, Charles J. Kessler, as disclosed. in their application Serial No. 138,168, filed April 21, 1937,
inwhich a regulator is employed for varying the temperature of the burner .bowl to meet the different vaporization requirements of light, medium; and heavy oils. Through indifference to directions on. the part of the users, failure to identify the grades of oils, or other causes, the
invention just mentioned cannot be relied upon to 'solve the problem presented by the different kindsof oils available to stove users.
Looking toward a solution of the difficulty, it is the primary purpose of the presentinvention to provide a stove of the aforesaid class' that will, without change or adjustment, operate eflichilling of saidwall by ciently, economically and satisfactorily on all grades of oil within a practical range, producing approximately complete combustion, and consequently a clean fire; and that will quickly attain normal operating condition upon being lighted. 5 Another object of the invention is to provide -a stove of the class described that will operate quietly, and with a steady fire that is readily responsive to adjustments of the control valve.
To these ends we form our burner bowl-or 10 the vaporizing parts or walls thereof-of relatively thin sheet metal so that, upon thefire being lighted, the vaporizing parts will quickly attain the high temperature necessary to vaporize the heaviest of oils suitable foruse in the stove, and 15 inorder to prevent the bottom of the bowl from being chilled by the air as it approaches the air inlets, we insulate the bottomportion'of the bowl, preferably by applying one or more plates thereto in spaced relation to said bottom wall and to go one another so as to provide a like number of dead air spaces, This arrangement is peculiarly suited to ourpurpose because the insulating medium does not to any appreciable extent interfere with prompt heating of the relatively thin wall 25 of the bowl, yet itis more effective in preventing H the air outside the bowl than solid insulation would be.
As a further means of protecting the burner bowl fromthe cooling influence of the incoming 30 air, we shield the bottom of the bowl by air directing and control means that deflects the rising air outwardly and away from the bowl and smooths it out into a relatively thin sheet. in I spaced relation to the peripheral wall of the 5 'burner' bowl. Besides protecting the bowl as aforesaid, this air directing and control means causes the burner. to operate quietly and with an even or steadyflre'because it obviates excessive fluctuating pressures ordinarily resulting from m the invariableirregularities of the flue draft,
. wherefore the spasmodic action heretofore-com- Fig.- 1 is a fragmentary sectional'side elevation of a stove incorporating our improvements; Fig. 2 is a horizontal section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, 5
on a somewhat larger scale, looking upward; Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 1 of a simplified form of the invention, this embodiment suited to smaller stoves, andFig. 4 .is an enlarged section on the line 4-4 of Fig; 3, lookijig upward.
In the form of the invention illustrated in Figs.
1 and 2, I represents the stove base that is supported a suitable distance above the floor by legs 2; and over an upstanding cylindrical part 3 of the base is engaged the lower end of a drum or casing 5, the parts being suitably connected together in accordance with common practice. The interior of the drum or casing 5 is divided into a combustion chamber 5 and a.- burner compartment 1 by a horizontal annular partition 3 which; in the present embodiment, includes a ring-like member 9 that. is detachably connected to the outer part of the partition by fastening means or bolts I0.
Connected to and spaced .from 'the underside of the partition 8 by fastening means or rivets II is the annular top wall 12 of the burner bowl I 3. The inner edges of the partition and top wall l2 are turned downwardly, and the space between these parts constitutes a secondary air inlet; The peripheral wall of the burner has rows of perforations [5 that serve as additional air inlets, essentially for primary air. Air is also admitted to the central region of the burner bowl through a tube 16 that opens through the I plug I8 is normally concealed by a door 23 that may be hingedly and removably connected at 24 to the top of the front leg of the stove.
Oil is delivered to a sump 25 in the bottom wall of the burner bowl l3 through a supply pipe 26 that leads from a. valve 21, which, in turn,
communicates with a. distributing'receptacle 23,
over which a reservoir 23 is adapted to be sustained in inverted position by a carrier 30. The carrier is hingedly supported at 3| in operative relation to the receptacle and may be swung by means of a handle 32 from the position shown in the drawings to a reversed position rearwardly of the stove so that the reservoir 23 may be placed therein and when'the carrler'is returned to upright position the reservoir 23 will beautomatically inverted over the receptacle 23 and whose stem 35 projects above the top plane of the carrier 30 where it is equipped with an operati g handle 36.
An annular flange 40 extends inwardly from the top edge of the cylindrical part 3 of the base I and to this flange is secured, by fastening means or screws 4! a. circular plate or diaphragm .42'th'at is shown as surrounded by a relatively deep flange 43. Mounted upon and welded or otherwise secured to the plate or diaphragm 42 and desirably in concentric relation therewith and with the burner bowl i3 is an air bailie 45, the same flaring outwardly at a rather abrupt angle to the plate 42 from its point of connection therewith to where it terminates in a cylindrical portion 41. Rising in relatively closely spaced and concentric relation to the cylindrical portion 41 of the bailie 45 is a substantially cylindrical air guide 48 that is flanged inwardly at its lower end and rests upon the plate 42 to which it issultably fastened, as by welding. Between the baflie 45 and the air guide 48, the plate 42 is provided with a circular series of holes 50, certain of which are provided with dampers 51, as is best shown in'Fig. 2. It is the feature just described, involving the baille 45 and the air guide 48, that has previously been referred to as the rising air outwardly and away from the bowl and smooths it out into a relatively thin sheet in spaced relation to the peripheral wall of the bowl. Besides protecting the bowl from the cooling influence of the incoming air, this air directing and control means causes the burner to operate quietly and with an even or steady flre because it obviates excessive fluctuating pressures ordinarily resulting from the invariable irregullarities of the flue draft, wherefore the spasmodic action heretofore common in stoves of this class is eliminated. By reason of this fact the burner responds more readily and accurately to adjustments of the valve 21, and because the fire is more uniform and steady the plug it that constitutes the closure of the relatively large lighting and cleaning opening of the burner bowl may be removed with safety at any time.-
Applied to the bottom of the burner bowl l3 are insulator plates or shells and 56, provided with apertures for the passage oi." the oil supply pipe 26, and with central air inlet openings that register with the air tube IS, the plates or shells being otherwise imperforate so as to enclose dead, air spaces, respectively, between the two platesand between plate 55 and the bottom wall of the burner bowl I3. e
Preparatory to lighting the stove, the valve 21 is opened to permit' oil to flow from the receptacle 23 to the sump 25 in the bottom of the burner bowl, and the door 23 is opened, and the plug ll removed. The oil in the burner bowl is, then ignited by projecting a lighted match or taper into the bowl or by throwing into the bowl a piece of burning paper, after which the plug II is replaced and the door closed. fAir enters through the inlet openings i5 to support initial. combustion and as the fire gets under way additional air is drawn in through, the slot between the topwall of the bowl and the partition I and through the air tube II. Soon after the fire starts, the side. and bottom walls of the burner bowl become heated sufllciently to vaporize the oil practically as fast as it enters the .sump 25 from the pipe '23, and the size .of the fire may be governed by the adjustment of the valve 21.
It is evident from the foregoing that all. grades of oil at all suitable for use. in-the stove will perform in substantially the same way inasmuch as the oil is immediately converted into vapor which commingles. with the incoming air to form a combustible mixture; and the rate :of flow'in all instances is dependent upon the two factors, viscosity and valve adjustment,, and. the latter, being manually controlled, may-be'varied to compensate for differences in viscosity.
Air entering the burner compartment 1 through tween the adjacent cylindrical parts of the baffle l5, and the air guide 48, the air is sufilciently throttled to prevent its influx from being appreciably affected by differences in pressure resulting from variations in the chimney draft, it being understood that stoves of this class have flue connections with chimneys. A part of the air that enters the compartment 1 sweeps down beneath the burner bowl and enters the bowl through the air tube It, and this rounding air is prevented from having any cooling effect upon the bottom wall of the bowl by the dead air spaces provided by the insulator plates or shells 55 and 56.
' that designated 48 .is omitted, and the cylindrical portion l'I' of the In order to vary the air supply to the burner to meet possible differences in conditions encountered in different installations, and which may affect the operation of-the stove, dampers are provided for partially or completely shutting off certain of the holes 50 in the plate 42.
In describing the embodiment of the invention illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4, the same reference numerals, augmented by the letter a, will be used to designate the parts corresponding to those indicated by the same numerals in the embodiment shown in Figs.'1 and 2. As'previously pointed out, the construction disclosed in Figs. 3 and 4 is especially suited to small stoves.
In this case, the plate 42 is integral with the upstanding cylindrical part 3 of the base I. Since, in the present embodiment, the drum or casing 5 is of small diameter relative to that of the burner bowl I3, an air director, such as in the former embodiment,
air baffle 45* is arranged in closely spaced relation to the adjacent portion of the drum or casing 5 to L fifect the narrow annular slot through which air, admitted through the holes 50, enters the burner chamber 1. In the present case, a single insulator plate or shell, designated 55, is applied to the bottom of the bowl l3.
From the previous detailed explanation of the first described form of the invention, the remaining structural features, and the mode of operation, of the present'embodiment will be readily understood.
Having thus described claim-is:
1. A'stove of the our invention, what we class described comprising a casing enclosing a combustion chamber and a burner compartment therebelow, a partition separating the chamber from the compartment and having a relatively large opening, an open top burner bowl sustained in the compartment with its opentop in register with 'said opening and its rim in spaced relation tothe partition, the bowl, having air inlet means disposed circumferentially thereof and opening into said compartment, a diaphragm defining the bottom of the burner compartment through which air is admitted to the compartment, air directing means associated with said air openings for distributing air about the burner bottomof the burner bowl in outward spaced relation to .the peripheral wall thereof, an insulator shell applied to the liveiing oil to the bowl.
2. In a stove of the class described, a structure enclosing "a burner compartment including a cylindrical wall, a cylindrical burner bowl situor the surtube rising within and and having openings bowl, "and means for de-' I 3. In a stove of the class described, a structure enclosing a burner compartment including a cylindrical wall, a cylindrical burner bowl situated substantially centrally within said compartment and having air inlet holes in its peripheral wall, a diaphragm defining the bottom of the burner compartment, the diaphragm having a circular series of air admitting openings, and
a baflle rising from the diaphragm inwardly of the series of openings and flaring outwardly over said openings and thence upwardly in closely spaced relation to said cylindrical wall, an insulator'shell applied to the bottom of the burner bowl, and means for delivering oil to the bowl.
4. Ina stove of the class described, a casing enclosing a burner compartment, a cylindrical burner bowl situated within said compartment in materially spaced relation to the surrounding walls thereof, the burner bowl having air admitting openings in its peripheral wall, an air opening through the bottom wall of the bowl, a diaphragm defining the bottom of the burner compartment and having a circular series of holes for. admitting air to the compartment, a baffle rising from the diaphragm inwardly of said series of holes and flaring outwardly and 'thence upwardly above the bottom plane of'the bowl and in substantial outward spaced relation to the peripheral wall of the bowl,
and a cylindrical air director rising from the diaphragm outwardly in said compartment having an open topcommunica'tt'ng withthe combustion chamber, an insulator shell applied tion to the bottom wall thereof, a diaphragm definingthe bottom of the burner compartment, the
\ of said series of openings in i closely spaced relation to the upper end of the to the bowl in spaced relasame having a series of holes for admitting air to said compartment, an air director rising from said diaphragm outwardly of said holes, an air the diaphragm inwardly of said holes and having its upper end substantial ly parallel with and .in closely spaced relation to v the upper portion mitted through said holes enters the burner compartment in a thin sheet, theair directorand the bailie being so related in size to the burner bowl as to dispose said sheet of air a. material distance outwardly of the peripheral wall of the bowl, an air tube within the burner bowl inspaced relation to the peripheral wall thereof and opening through the bottom wall of the bowl'and through said insulator shell, and means for deliverins'oil to the bowl.
6. In a stove .of the,class described, a casing enclosing a burner compartment, a cylindrical of said air director thereby to provide a restricted slot through which air adburner bowl situated within said compartment in materially spaced relation to the surrounding walls thereof, the burner bowl having air admitting openings in its peripheral wall, a diephragm'defining the bottom of the burner compartment and having a circular series oi' holes for admitting air to'the compartment, a baiiie rising from the dia'phragm inwardly of said series of holes and flaring outwardly and thence upwardly above the bottompiane of the bowl and in substantial outward; spaced relation to the peripheral wall of the bowl, and a cylindrical air director rising trom the diaphragmoutwardly of said'series of openings in closely spaced relation to the upper end of the baiiie, and means for de-' livering oil to the bowl. a
7. A stove or the class described comprising a structure enclosing a combustion chamber and a burner compartment below said chamber, a
' 2,214,42o v U burner bowl within said compartment, the portion of the structure defining the bottom of the combustion chamber and the top of the bowl including a throat through'which the bowl and chamber communicate, there being means for'admitting air from said compartment to the burner bowlabout the sides thereof and about said throat, a diaphragm forming the bottom of they burner" compartment and having openings through which air is admitted to the compartment, air directing means associated with said air openings for distributing air about the burner bowl in outward spaced relation to the peripheral wall thereof; an insulator shell applied to the bottom of the burner bowl, and means for delivering oil to the bowL- CHARLES J. KESSLER. JOSEPH R. HRKPATRICK.
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2483925A (en) * 1947-01-07 1949-10-04 Nagel Theodore Apparatus for burning gas oil
US2508818A (en) * 1946-01-05 1950-05-23 Motor Wheel Corp Base structure for heating apparatus
US2837149A (en) * 1953-03-24 1958-06-03 Carl B Richardson Top plate air deflector for pot burners

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2508818A (en) * 1946-01-05 1950-05-23 Motor Wheel Corp Base structure for heating apparatus
US2483925A (en) * 1947-01-07 1949-10-04 Nagel Theodore Apparatus for burning gas oil
US2837149A (en) * 1953-03-24 1958-06-03 Carl B Richardson Top plate air deflector for pot burners

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