US2403341A - Grinding machine - Google Patents

Grinding machine Download PDF

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US2403341A
US2403341A US538816A US53881644A US2403341A US 2403341 A US2403341 A US 2403341A US 538816 A US538816 A US 538816A US 53881644 A US53881644 A US 53881644A US 2403341 A US2403341 A US 2403341A
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Prior art keywords
grinding
wheel
work
billet
machine
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US538816A
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Carl A Carlson
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Saint Gobain Abrasives Inc
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Norton Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B24GRINDING; POLISHING
    • B24BMACHINES, DEVICES, OR PROCESSES FOR GRINDING OR POLISHING; DRESSING OR CONDITIONING OF ABRADING SURFACES; FEEDING OF GRINDING, POLISHING, OR LAPPING AGENTS
    • B24B27/00Other grinding machines or devices
    • B24B27/033Other grinding machines or devices for grinding a surface for cleaning purposes, e.g. for descaling or for grinding off flaws in the surface
    • B24B27/04Grinding machines or devices in which the grinding tool is supported on a swinging arm

Description

11 Sheets-Sheet 1 July 2, 1946. c. A. CARLSON GRINDING MACHINE Filed June 5. 1944 July 2, 1946. c. A. CARLSON GRINDING MACHINE l Filed June 5, 1944 11 sheets-'sheet 2 July 2, 1946. c. A. CARLSON GRINVDING MACHINE Filed June 5, 1944 NwN 11 Sheets-Sheet 3 QCA/QL A. 'PEARLSDN \o l July 2, 1946;
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11 Sheeis-Sheet 5 EARL A Filed June 5. 1944 ni- @-E July 2, 194e.
C. A. cARusoN GRINDING MACHINE July 2, 1946.
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July 2, 1946.
c. A.y cARLsoN GRINDING MACHINE 11 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed June 5, 1944 July 2, 194e.
c. A. CARLSON 'GRINDING MACHINE Filed June 5, 1944 11 shet-sheet. s
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4 WW MN h |J bm( QS 9E -:July 2, 1946.- c. A. CARLSON GRIDING MACHINE Filed June 5. 1944 VCARL A. EA RL SUN Y 1 July 2, 1946. c. A. cARLsoN- 2,403,341 GRINDING uAcHINE Filed .me s, 1944 11 sheets-sneer 11 '66 A-RL' A. C A L SUN' aw y HG. 4E @QH f wheel which is so arranged and operated that the one another Iand that the work lie-passed PatenteculrJuly 2,1946
PATENT ori-*ice 2,403,341 GRINDING MACHINE Carl A. Carlson,
Norton Company. tion .of Massachusetts Worcester, Mass., assignor to Worcester, Mass., a corpora- Appucau'on .mme4 V5, 1944, serial No. 538,816
'19 Claims. 1
This invention relates to an apparatus for grinding a non-rotatable work piece and espea grinding operation. It is customary to grind off the surface portion of a billet by means of a swing frame grinder operated manually. This opera,- tion has involved back-breaking labor and the waste of considerable time and expense. p
The primary object of this invention is to provide an apparatus for grinding off the surface layer of billets and the like by means of a grindingl layer may be removed/almost,automatically and with a minimumof attention and effort on the part of the operator.
Another object is to provide a grinding apparatus in which a grinding wheel carried on a movable frame is held automatically under pressure, and especially a yielding pressure, against a work surface of irregular contour.
Another object is to provide an apparatus of this type in which the grinding wheel may be oscillated to improve the grinding action.
Another object is to provide a grinder for billets and the like in which the work is subjected to the action of a series of relatively stationary wheels so arranged as to remove the entire work surface.
Other objects are to provide adjustments andv compensating features which make machines of this type capable of satisfying many requirements. Further objects will be pointed out or made apparent in the following disclosure.
In accordance with one aspect of this invention, I propose to grind of! the surface layer of a longitudinaliy movable but non-rotatable work piece by means of a grinding wheel mounted with its axis parallel with the For a wide work piece, a plurality of wheels may be arranged to cut parallel paths; and the wheels may be offset so that they do not interferewith the work is introduced into each grinding zone progressively. Each wheel is held against the work under pressure which may be varied. Also, for grinding billets, it is preferred to oscillate each wheel through an angle which apexos at the work surface. It is also preferred progressively through the direction of work travel. 4
Fig. 18 is a fragmentary plan view,
(Cl. Sil-33) machine .by driving mechanism which permits or provides for several passes oi the work through the grindingzone, ically turns the work over after each pass to bring a new surface into contact with the wheel or wheels.
Referring to the drawings which illustrate a preferred embodiment of the machine as applied to grinding billets by a succession of abrasive wheels, the figures are as follows:
Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic plan view illustrating the method of procedure; l
Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic front elevation suppleinenting Fig. l;
Fig. 3 is an exaggerated elevation of the work, showing the grinding wheel paths;
Fig. 4 is'a diagrammatic showing of the work travel in a modiiled procedure;
Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic showing of another procedure wherein the work starts its travel at the reversing end of. the machine Fig. 6 is a plan view of the right hand end of y the machine;
Fig. 7 is a plan view of right hand intermediate portion of the machine which joins onto the left end of Fig. 6;
Fig. 8 is a plan View of the next portion of the machine joining onto the left end of Fig. 7;
Fig. 9 is a plan view of the left hand end of the 0 machine, Joining onto the left end of Fig. 8;
Fig. 10 is a fragmentary front elevation of the machine, showing the parts between the lines llil0 ofFigs.6 and';
Fig. 11 isan elevation, partly in section, taken on the lines Il-Il of Fig. 7 and l0;
Fig. 12 is a pian v iew, Vpartly'in section, of the swing frame grinder of Fig. 11; s
Fig. 13 is a fragmentary'sectional view taken on the line l3-l 3 of Fig. 11 showing the flanged rollers which serve as a guide;
Fig. 14 is a sectional view taken on the line H-l-I of Fig. 11 showing the mounting of the guide plate which is on the first grinding unit only:
Fig. 15 is a ISL-I5 of Fig. 10 showing the means whereby the spring support is held non-rotatable;
Fig. 16 1s ssectionai view taken on the une IS-IB of Fig. 11 showing the slideway for vertical movement of the grinding wheel;
Fig. 17 is a sectional view taken on the line I1I1 of Fig. 11 showing the motor slide and its supporting guide member;
partly in and preferably which automatsectional lview takenkon the line 2li-214 of Fig. 11 showing the support for two horizontal rollers unit,
section, on the line I 8 1 8 of Fig. 11 showing the f positioning roller l l and its adjustments;
Fig. 19 is a sectional viewtaken on the line i9|9 of Figs. 11 and 18 showing the slideways and the vertical adjustment of the' positioning roller;
Fig. 22 is asectional view taken on theline 22-22 of Fig. 11 showing the adjustable yrollers and their mounting which prevents thetrolley from lifting;
Fig. 23 is a sectional view taken on the line 23-23 of Fig. 11 showing'the Ilanged trolley wheels and their members;
Fig.' 24 is a sectionalV view taken on the lge e plunger which controls the trolley;
Fig. 25 is a sectional view taken on the line 25-25 of Fig. 11 showing the mounting for the stops which position the trolley; Fig. 26 is an elevation View partly in section taken on the line 2li-26 of Fig. 8, which shows the swing frame grinder that grinds the corner of the work;
Fig. 27 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 21-21 of Fig. 26, showing the mounting for the spring pressed plunger which prevents the work from skewing;
Fig. 28 is a fragmentary'plan view taken on the line 28-28 of Fig. 26 showing the positioning roller and its mounting;
Fig. 29 is a sectional viewl taken on the line 29- 29 of Figs. 26 and for adjusting the positioning roller;
Fig. 30is a sectional view taken on'the line `311-30 of Fig. 26 showing the slideway for positioning the grinding wheel;
Fig. 31 is a sectional view of the grinding wheel and its mounting'taken on` the line 3I3| `oi! Fig. y12;
Fig. 32y is a 32`-32 of Fig. 10 showing the lever arrangement for tilting the grinding wheel;
Fig. 33 isk a fragmentary sectionalview taken on the line 33-33 of Fig. 6 showing the crank for tilting the grinding Wheel;
Figs. 34 and 35 are diagrammatic views showing the eiTect of the tilting motion of the grinding wheel as it wears away;
Fig. 36 is a similar view for the wheel which grinds the corner;
Fig'. 37 is a. diagrammatic showing of the positions of the grinding wheel and pivot support as the wheel wears away;
Fig. 38 is a diagrammatic showing of the relationship of the positions of the swing frame pivot to the wheel which maintains a straight wheel .path as the wheel wears away;
Fig. 39 is a sectional view of a work driving unit, taken on the line 39-39 of Figs. 7 and 10;
` Fig. 40 is a sectional view taken on the line 40-40 of Fig. 39 showing vthe mounting of the of the `work driving unit;
Fig. 41 is a fragmentary in section, viewed on the line 4I-4l of Fig. 40, showing the rear side roller of the work driving Fig. 42 is aI fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 42-42 of Fig. 39 showing the slideplate supports and controlling rear elevation, partly 'l invention,
alignment; but they are offset tionship relative to the line 28 showing the slideway sectional view taken on the line through a suitable angle work deector; and
Fig. 47 is a fragmentary sectional adjustable deector for the line A"-47 of Fig. 9. Referring ilrst to there illustrated view of the lbillet taken onthe my method diagrammatically.
the grinding wheels I6 are not in axial of travel of the work.
wheel of position I will grind an elongated.V transversely That is, the rst grinding (Fig. 1)
ly stationary, except as they may be oscillated as diagrammatically shown by the dotted lines in Fig. 2 and later deback,such as by an elevator system, to the rst grinding position for passing again through the machine. At this time, the billet is turned over,
Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive, I have wheelsto the position 25 where is turned over through a quarter turn. reversing the power it is traversed back through the of abrasive wheels to where the work is again turned over. Thus, it is ground during each traverse as it goes from positions 24 to 28 and completed at ing end of the m In the arrangement shown in Fig. 5, the work is traversed and quarter turned as shown by the arrows.- In this procedure, it starts at position 29 and is finished in position 30 at the same end of the machine.
`This process may be carried outby various types and prefer to employ the procedure or Figs. -1 and 2 and the construction illustrated in the remaining the drawings. The entire assembly of the machine is shown in Figs. 6, '1, 8 and 9 in an end to end relationship in the order of the iigure' numbers starting at the right hand end of the machine. In this machine, the billet I2 loaded onto the platform I3 (Fig. 6) is suitably moved onto the freely movable rollers I4 and then manually or mechanically conveyed endwise along these rollers towards the lef-t where driven rollers I5 (Figs. 10 and 39) two intermediate sections of the machine, shown in Figs. 7 and 8. Thera the billet I2 is moved longitudinally whil 'its top face is subjected to the abrading yaction bi' the grinding wheels I6 in the positions I to 'I0 of Figs. 1, 2 and 3. Ulti- Then, by
same succession mately, the billet .I2 is traversed by the rollerl driving mechanism im` its final pass `to the left hand end of the machine where it is diverted into the position I8- (Figs. 1 and 2) byan. adjustable Fig. 9). The billet I2 slides down an inclined chute 35 (Fig. 45) which may be provided with frep rollers. The rolls 2li-then serve to return the billet under the influence of gravity to the position 2| (Fig. l) where it strikes a lengthwi'sefadjustable deiector plate 36 (Fig. 6) and isv thrust into engagement with' prongs on an elevator conveyor chain 31 (Figs. 6 and. 4 which thus returns'the billet I2 to the starting position and at the same time turns it over for a second griding operation.
The work driving mechanism at each of the stations I to 9 inclusive, not including'station I0, is illustrated in Figs. 10, 11 and associated iigures. As shown in Fig. i0, the billet I2 passes .from 'the first set of free rolls I4"into engagement with the iirst power driven roller I5, thence over a free roll 39 (Fig. 43) which is similar to the roll I4, and then over the pressure roller I1 beneath the grinding wheel I6. The pressure roller I1 is vertically movable in such a manner that the weight of the billet serves wheel down in grinding contact with the top surface of the billet. The billet I2 travels then onto another power driven roll I5 and so on along this succession of rollers throughthe grinding stations I to I0.
Although various types of grinding apparatus may be employed within the scope of this invention, a construction oi the general type lmown as a swing frame grinder may be utilized because of the flexibility of adjustment and the ease with which the grinding wheel may be osclllated or tilted through a desired arc. As illustrated in Figs. 11 and 12, the grinding wheel. IB is removably mounted on suitable roller bearings (Fig. 31)
, carried in a hood 4I) having a demountable part installing the drivingV belts. The
arranged for the starting position 26' arrangements o! mechanisms, but I to hold the abrasive the work piece driven supporting rolls I5, l
the normal loadkeyed on the shaft .periphery of the..
downwardly against the pressure of the spring. The roller support 55 carries the sleeve bearings is positioned by means of two pairs of flanged* the underside of obtain proper c ured in a bottom plate 4e by means of two -tion of the support 55. A screw 1l) ljournalled on a trolley support 4I arranged to carry the swing frame grinder. To the right of the ball joint 42 is mounted an extension'frame 44 supporting and/,a clamping a motor slide -45 (Fig. 17) carrying vconstant speed electric motor 48. The grinding heel I6 is driven by the motor V belts 41 running over a V pulley 48 on the grinding wheel mount (Fig. 31) and a two-stepped reversible pulley 49 (Fig. 11)
of the motor 1l and 17) has an lug 50 engaging a flanged screw 5I which is rotatably mounted in af slotted stationary integral 4 'mounted near the other electrical control appar t a us. is desirable to prevent the forward end of the billet I2 -from .striking 4the side of the grinding wheel I6. This is accomplished by a spring pres sure mechanism shown particularly in Figs. l0 and 1l, which holds the wheel out of the way and. permits the weight of the billet to pull the wheel down intol grinding contact, The pressure roller I1 is normally positioned by a spring .54 (Fig. il) so that the high point A what above the plane of travel of the bottom face of the billet I2. When the billet I2 strikes the roller I1,` it forces the roller supporting the pressed on journal shaft 50 of the pressure roller I1. The support 55 is connected to cause a compression spring 56 to move downwardly a -vertical slide frame 51. The frame is connected through a pivot pin 5B with a tilting or rocking frame 59 which pivotally supports an extension of the hood 40.
The support 55 is fixed on a depending tube 6I of square cross section (Figs. 11 and 13) which rollers 62. Each roller 62 is journalled on a shaft 63 carried between a pair of brackets B4 secured on the inner sides of I beams 65 of the framework, The I beams 65 are attached to plates 56 which are secured to the concrete foundation for the machine. The pressure of the spring 54 is adjusted by means of a anged screw 61 threaded into a square plate 68 sliding within the square tube 6I! and engaging the top of the spring 54. The flange of the screw 61 supports the member 55. It is adjusted by an integral extension having a square top for a wrench. An adjustable screw 69 secured to the support 55 and `freely movable through an opening in the top of the front I-beam 65 serves to limit the upward mo- 1Il is adjustably carried in the top of the support 55 and engages the mount 1I which carries the pivot pin 58, and which is integral vwith the vertical slide frame 51, This serves downward movement ofthe slide frame 51 and the grinding wheel IB. The pressure of the spring 56 in the slide frame 51 may be also adjusted to grinding action by means of a a sleeve nut 15 suitably seof the slide 51. The
screw 12 actuated by 46.V The V pulley take up for grinding wheel integral depending threaded y of its periphery is somei* to limit the i .v
14 (Figs, 11. and'12) cured onto the hood 40,l
' ating a screw 86 passing top plate 814 (Fig. 11) suitably connected t0 the gaging a vertical slot be, of suitable construction, duction direct current gear 'is'controlled by a push button .and a suitable rheostat 91 which vcarry the four flanged trolley Y 7 screw 12 has an which slides inv the frame bottom of the spring '56. v
Although the method of grinding and the apparatus may be'employed without oscillating or tilting the wheel I9, I preferably oscillate the wheel through a suitable angle such as and this is permitted by thepivot pin 58 connecting the frame parts 51 and 59. The axigof the pivot pin 58 is substantially aligned with the top face of the billet during grinding. The rocking frame 59 is a' U shaped member having side'slide straps which form guides for the vertically movabletwo piece slide 15 that pivotally mounts a swivel guide 16 (Fig. 12) having an aperture which slidably but non-rotatably engages, by means of a fixed key. a guide' bar 11 sewheel I6 will tilt with the rocking frame 59. i
'I'he wheel I6 is fed towards the work as it vwears'away by means of a handwheel 85 operthrough the threaded slide l15 which carries the swivel guide 1li.` The latter (Fig. 12) allows the guide barv11'to telescope therethrough asthe grinding Wheel I6 be.l comes smaller in diameter, or when its grinding station is changed, s The rocking frame 59 is oscillated by means of a pin 88 vcarried by the plate 81 (Fig. 11),- and eni'n a slide bar 89 connected to a lever 90 (Fig. l0) fulcrumed to a bracket 9| and connected by a link 92 to the slide bar 89.
The lever 90 is oscilla This driving mechanism may such as a double remotor. which drives speed. The motor switch 96 (Fig. 10) thus controls the rate at which the grinding wheels Vare oscillated. The degree of oscillation may be controlled by electric motor 95.
at a constant or adjustable using an adjustable variable throw eccentric.
By this constructionffthe rocking frame 59 that guides the grinding wheel I6 mayloscillate for tilting the wheel as verticalmovement of the slide frame 51v and the support 55 or the pressure roller I1, Before the grinding wheel comes into contact with the pres- .sure roller, the spring 56 positions the grinding wheel above the normal plane of contact with the ted by a link 93 connected -f to an eccentric 94 mounted on the` shai't of an required without aiecting the' integralsquareshaped head 81 and supports ther inverted L-shaped roller mount I so that the grinding Ationed 'against the under` s. and-I8) mounted to -ride against are guided and ride on the rails I 0| ofthe I beam. Two rollers |08 (Figs. l1 and 22) suitably pivotally carried by the plates |04 are. adjustably posiside of the trolley rails I 0I and prevent lifting of the support 48 under the pressure of grinding.
The position of the grinding wheel the billet is controlledy by a roller relative to the rear side ot the billet. The roller ||0 is carried by an adjusted to cause the grinding wheel to grind in tions is made billet I2, and the wheel continues to oscillate in that position. when the biuet pushes down the pressure roller I1, this forces the rocking frame 59. downwardly and brings the wheel into contact with the top of the work and causes it to grind an arcuate path on its top face as the billet progresses through each grinding zone. The contact of the wheel with the work is under the resilient pressure of the spring 56 so thatthe wheel s I6 cannot be forced into the work at too rapid a rate.
The grinding wheel is secured in one of the positions I to ||l by mechanism shown particularly in Fig. l1. The support 43 which journals the ball joint 42 of the swing frame grinder is constructed like a trolley and is carried on the trolley rails I0| formed by the .two bottom flanges of a trolley I beam |02 suitably carried on the framework over the rear of the machine. As shown particularly in Figs. 11, 21, 22 and 23,-
varatey lock sleeves 'and nuts |30.
any of the positions I to I0, I I0 is positioned bythe side of the billet, these paths will have a dennite relationship. l
The adjustment of the grinding wheel across the' face of the work I2 to -thesevarious posi'- rst by crudely adjusting the posiplates |04 (Fig.
23) engage two separate plungers |28 slidably left by the springs |25. `The are held by means of the two 'sep- The springs |26 push the plungers |28 and support 43 towards the left and thereby maintain the-roller I|0 against the billet I2.
Two separate stops |33 adjustably positioned on ings |26, and
are compressed to increase their pressure. By
loosening the clamping screws |21 the plungers the trolley comprises two separate plates |04 l 43. These plates |04 wheels |05 which integral with the support |28 may be moved forward into contact with the trolley plates |04.- n. plished, the clamping screws I|8 and there locked in which is-integral with a y the roller ||0 may be and sincethe roller" (Figs. 1l. 23 and 25) are the trolley rails IOI and When this 'has 'been accomrophosphate and the remainder of the ethyl cellulose solution are added and agitation is continued until a uniform'mixture results. Thereat about upon the product is dried under vacuum '170 vll. to remove the ethyl cellulose solvent vapoi-s.
The material is screened through a' 20- has several advantages from the procedural mesh sieve to form a granulation and stored until used. s I
The observations relative to the action taking place at the various stages and the ingredients and amounts noted previously in connection with ascorbic acid are similarly applicable here. l
In an alternative method, all of the ingredients of the B complex formulation above noted, except 4 ground to a uniform mix- In this alternative not coated and in the ethyl cellulose, are ture and stored for use. method the B vitamins are some embodiments of the invention this is not o necessary if the other means of achieving isolation and protection are utilized.
' non coating and granulazam Kilos Sodium iron pyrophosphate 21.333
Ethyl cellulose dissolved in ethyl alcohol to l make a 5% solution .907 Calcium pyrophosphate The sodium iron pyrophosphate is added to a mixer 'and coated with the ethyl cellulose solution as described above in connection with the foregoing granulations. Alifter thorough coating, the calcium pyrophosphate is added gradually, and agitation is continued until mixing is complete. The resulting moist material is subsequently passed through an oscillating granulator and dried at 160 F. in air. The material may be sieved through a 60-mesh screen an'd stored for use. l
The observations as to the actions taking place at the various stages, as well as the ingredients used on their amounts noted above in connection with the B and C granulations are also applicable to the iron granulation.
Water-soluble binder dissolved in water to make 24 gallons The calcium pyrophosphate and coated iron granulationsfare added gradually with the binder solution to a mixer until all of thematerials have been added. The final product is a caky and cohesive mass, and may be passed through an oscillating granulator and dried in an oven at' 160 F. In the final step the material is passed through a 20,-mesh sieve and thereupon is stored for processing.
The binder is included so that the tablet will hold together during the stamping and coating operations. The amount used and the amount of water used are not critical as long as the desired result is obtained.
The amount of calcium pyrophosphate is that necessary, in addition to that used in the previously described granulations Aor mixtures, to achieve' the desired amount of calcium in the 'complete mixture.
If desired, the iron may not be included in thisgranulation in which event only. the calcium pyrophosphate and the binder would be granulated. The preferred method described, however,
standpoint. v
All of the above ingredients, granulations or mixtures, depending on exact method selected for processing the various ingredients, are placed in a mixer from which the air may be evacuated. All of the materials are thoroughly mixed, After initial mixing and during continued mixing. the oil-soluble vitamins, such as A and D, in the form of a concentrate or in an oil, are sprayed over the granulation. If desired, the concentrate may be applied to one or a granulations and the remaining materials then added. The addition of the concentrate in the preferred manner, however, has the advantage of obtaining a thorough mixture during the addition.
Flavoring material may also be added, before,
I after, or during-the addition lol the concentrate. 20
' The complete mixture is then ready for stamp-4 ing into tablets. In the specific illustrative examplethe amount in eachtablet would be adjusted so as to make a million tablets,
'I'he completed tabletsy are given a series of protective coatings.. The first of these coatings may comprise a solution of a cellulose ester or ether, such as ethyl cellulose or collodion. If the tablet has any voids into which4 air may penetrate, the coating penetrates into such voids thereby eliminating and excluding air. Although this material resists air and moisture. as has been pointed out heretofore, X-ray analysis shows that the coating is suillciently penetrated under conditions prevailing in the alimentary canal to permit disintegration of the tablet and the release of all of lisation by the body.` The'second coating may consist of a cellulosic solution with which a vegetable shellac ing may be repeated any number of desired times, for example four additional coats have been found to be desirable. The substitution of a part vof the cellulosic material by shellac is desirable from the dietary point of view, b ut yeither may be used. It is desirable to dust each ofthe coatings with a calcium salt in order to facilitate the coating, This also permits the inclusion of a larger amount of calcium in the tablet,
If desired, one or more ofthe coatings dusted with an compound containing the ample, citric acid.
Following the coatings with cellulosic material and shellac, it may be desirable to coat the tablets with a gelatin and .sugar solution as is conventional in the tablet coating art.
Following this treatment the tablets may be waxed with a solution of wax in a suitable volatile solvent to provide 4a polished surface, as is conventional in the tablet coating art.
Although the use of antioxidants and other additional agents 4is not necessary in forming the tablets of the present invention, it is to be understood thatl eluded. p
As illustrative of the effectiveness of theprotection againstloss of potency afforded by the coating of ethyl cellulose, lvitamin tablets were prepared 'following the general technique described above,` including the application of a iinal sugar coating. Immediately upon their completion the vitamin tablets were analyzed by conventional quantitative analysis techniques to determine the vitamin A content as expressed' in U. SfP. units, `and the vitamin B1, vitamin C,
acidic material or with a calcium saine, such as for. ex-
mixture of two or more its constituents for utihas been mixed.v This second coatmaybe4 the use of such materials is not ex- |61 (Fig. 10) to regulate the speed of traverse. dotted line positionof Fig. 9, it engages a slotted of the billets I2 to obtain the desired grinding lug 206. Then the deectorarm 34 lies out of y results. Thev motor |65 drives a spur gear,|10 the path of the billet' and the latter passes onto `meshing with a spur gear |1| mounted on a shaft a. further' set of free rollers 206 outside of the |12 which mounts at its forward end a bevel-gear 5 machine. By lifting the lever 202 (Fig. 47) whose |13 arranged todrive a bevel gear |14 keyed to positionv is limited by the upper corner which a two piece shaft |15 (Fig. 7) -coupled together strikes the mounting for the pin 200, it may be and which is suitably mounted in bearing bracks moved from engagement with the right hand'anets |16. (Fig, l1) arranged lengthwise of the magularly adjustable'lug 204 and the ldellector arm chine on the rear I beam 65. The shaft |15 car- 10' 34 is then thrown to an inoperative position when ries a set of bevel gears |11 which, with the bevel the lever 202 engagesr lille S1017 in l9lle1ug2ll5.l The gear |14 drive the bevel gears |18 (Fig. 39) on outer SideS 0f the SloS in the lugs 204 dhd12 the short shaft |19 suitabi i mountedin sleeve are muchl higher than the inner bevelled sides.
f bushings in the unit. Each shaft |19 has a power 'thereby limiting the lSWillg 0f the leVel 202- This vtwo separate upright framesl88. A spring |88, Illi-Ve Certain ones `pOWel dliV driven roller I5 pressedvinto position for feeding 15 Permits the billet to be moved endWiSe from the the billet 2 endwise.-
' machine onto the free rollers 206 which carry it 'e A pair of rollers isn and Isl (Figs. 39 ana 4o)- to the ynext operation Before the billetI reaches, are also mounted in suitable bearings to rotate 'the defleto arm 34, it iS Supported on the freely freely about vertica1 axes and engage the vertical rotatable rollers 208 some of which may be powsides ofthe billet l2. The right hand roller lsu 20 er driven, Wliioh are mounted on the I beam e5 is preferably mounted in n xed bracket, While the and have the same construction as shown in Fig.
-left hand roller |8| is preferably carried in a ,43- An `angie iron 207 is mounted nealtue Toumove. le slide |82 (Fig. 40) to compensate for ers 208 (Fig. 45) to serve as a guide for the billet .variations in the width and shape of the billet. l2 before it strikes the delieotor arm 34- The roller |8| is held under the pressure of an 25 `Whol1 the billet has' Siii down the Chute -35 adiustabie'spring las to counteract the thrust of (Fier 45') it cornes to yrest against' ,an angle iron the springs |2Y5 The spring is suitably mounted 2|0 which extends to the adjustable deflector 36.
, in the slide 32 and ltighnsned byv a suitable ad The billet is nowin position onl the rollers 20 to .instable screw supported by a two part bracket be moved back toward the starting end ofthe |84. The rolls |80 and |8| position the billet rel- 30 maohinel Likewise, all angle ,il0l1-2| l Which` ative to the grinding Wheel,- i guides the billet I2 extends from the first roller A pressure roller |35 engaging the'top of the 20 under the framework' (Fig. 8) at the left end billetk (Figs. 39 and 42')V is pressed on a shaft |86 to just beyond the oieoi'fi'io motor 45 foi' the third having a horizontalaxis which .is rotatable in grinding stationl (Fig. 7). Thereafter anat plate sleeve bushings in a slide block |s1 which is freely 35 2l2 is usedto allow the billet I2 to swing when movable vertically in a slideway formed bythe it engelgeSs-the delleetol 36. These rollers may en or they may` be which' countemets the upward pressure of the arranged in an inclined position; as indicated in spring s4. presses against the slide block |81,- Fig- 2, so as to act as a gravity oonveyor'system and its tension may be suitably adjusted by 9, 40 witha horizontal sectionbeyond the right hand check nuttediscrew |00' threaded Ain a top plate ond of the guide 2H (Fig- 6lthat connects the frames |33 It will thus be When the billet reaches the starting end of the seen thatthese four rolls located in the upright machine, ii? iS doiiooted by the arcuate and ad' frames las posltionlthe billet as it moves through instable deileotor plate 36 (Fig. 6) into a Posithe machine. This construction as above detion Where it may be Seized uy the prongs 2'5 .of
scribed is dupiioated at non sideof the grinding i the endless conveyor chains 31,v shown particustations. larly in' Figs. 6 and 44. The conveyor chains 31 When the billet has' passed ne last grinding are mounted on sprockets 2|6 and 2|1 carried on wheel and reaches the final position or Fig, 9, two suitably mounted parallel shafts 2l8 and 2l@- the leading end of the billet l2 strikes the des The shaft 2li is 'adinstably mounted to take up Hector arm 34 (Figs. 45, 46 and 47) which is arthe vSlack of the conveyor chains 31, and it lis 'y ranged tt such an angle as to shove the billet to i driven by a double reduction direct current gear the position 13 (Fig, 1) where if, shoes down the motor 220 adapted for a constant or an adjustable incline'chute 35 (Fig. 45). The deilector arm 34 Speed. The motor-may be Controlled by 2 Epu-S11 is shown at the maximum adjustment at which button SWCh. 22| and an adjustable I'hEOSt'art 22.2 position the billet l2 still has a slight clearance (Fig- 44) to-regulate the 4sioeedof the conveyor in the opening formed by the upright frames |33 chains 31 to lift-l the billet l 2. The electric motor (Fig, `40) as it is skewed and fed by the power 220' drives 'a sprocket 223 which drives a linkl driven roller l5 and fulcrumed on the nxed .roller Chainv 224 which runs on a sprocket 225 keyed 0n lao in the last work feeding station. 'rhe'deflec-- co the shaft 2l8 (Fig-44)- Various otherfeatures f tor arm 34 may be made movable to and from an 0f COIlStIuCliOn and adjustment may be employed operative, positionby pivoting if; on a pin 200 in connection with this elevator mechanism as suitably carried on a xed bracket 20| mounted Well as. the motor drives 0f the llftehllle,- 2S Will on the frontI beam 65. A lever 202 is pivotally 'be leedily' apparent t0 011e Skilled in the art. connected at right angles to the deflector arm The upper chain Sprockets 2 ll mounted on the 34 by means of a pivot pin'203. The iever 202 shaft 2| 9 ofthe lifting conveyor are elevated iS held` in a slotted pivotally mounted lug 204 somewhat above the working level of the grindingv (Figs. 9 and 47) on a movable bracket 205 which Wheel, and the parts are so arrangedk that when 1 is adjustablymounted byv means of anelongated: the billet is discharged from the pronged elevator slot (Fig. 9) and two bolts engaging the support- 70 Chains it Will be turned through a quarter turn so i ing front I beam' 65 to vary the angle of the -as to present a new face to the grinding wheels. 1 deector arm 34. When the deector arm is in The billet is pushed by the prongs 2|5 of the con- 1 they full line position of Fig. 9, the billet ls deveyor chains-31 along the receiving chute toward l nected onto the chute 35?, but when the deilector the face rollers I4 (Figs. 6 and 44) At this point g arm 34 is moved so that the lever 2021s in the 75 the operator may manually pull the billet-,Johto amaca the rollers I4 and finally beneath the grinding wheel. It may be fed automatically by means of -power driven rolls to the'rst grinding station if desired. This sequence of operations goes on until the four sides of the billet have been ground, and then the operator causes the billet to be discharged from the machine by swinging the defiector arm 34.
It will now be appreciated, in view of the description of a billet grinding machine, that various aspects of this invention may beemployed in simplified types of grinding machines. For ex-4 ample, a single swing frame vgrinder may be used for grinding or snagging the surface of a casting, and wherein the grinding wheel is forced under a controlledpressure against the work surface without theoperator having 'to apply effort on his part. This is accomplished by using a construction of the type shown primarily in Figs. 11 and 26, wherein the wheel is mounted for a reciprocating or a universal movement over a stationary or a movable work piece. The work may be reciiprocated by the mechanism indicated in the drawings, and the wheel may be reciprocated crosswise of the Work by suitable power connections to the trolley or manually by means 'of the rod |45 of Fig. 26.
Also, in such a simplified construction, the grinding wheel may be oscillated through an angle which apexes on the work surface, so that one 'may accomplish automatically the present day practice in which a workman swings manually a swing frame grinder in such a way as to give a tilting and sweeping action of the wheel across the work. Furthermore, a work piece having an irregular contour, such as a billet or a casting,
to grind transversely of its travel of the work: but for some types of work it is entirely feasible to h'ave the grinding wheel axis arranged at right angles to the direction of work travel and thu's v grind flat plane paths of the work surface.
The operations of these various parts of the mechanisms have been fully set forth above andv vneed not be repeated. It will be understood that the machine operator may vary the operation of the machine widely in accordance with the various adjustments permitted in this construcion.
It will also be appreciated that various mechanlcal equivalents may be substituted for the mechanisms above described, and that one may add other automatic features or eliminate some of those herein described without departing from the broad Aprinciples of this invention. Hence `the above disclosure is to be interpreted as setting forth those principles and as describing a preferred embodiment of this machinevand not as imposing y limitations on thev claims appended hereto.
I claim: y 1. A grinding machine comprising power driven resiliently mounted rollers for supporting a noni-rotatable long work piece and traversing it may be safely ground without applying undue i pressure on the grinding wheel, since the vertically movable and pivotal frame 51, 14 which controls the'oscillation and up and down movement of the grinding wheel is so constructed that the grinding wheel may move in acco-rdance with the work contour as permitted by the springs which control its `position and so will not be forced too deeply into the Work.
A further important feature in such machines wherein the grinding wheel axis is parallel to the direction of travel of the work lies in the fact that the work is not permitted to strike the grinding wheel as it approaches the same. An abrasive wheel is especially vulnerable to a blow on its side. In my preferred construction, is held away from the path of the Work until the work itself causes the wheel to move forward into grinding contact. When a-heavy work piece is being ground, I use the weight of the -work itself to hold the wheel in that contact, although resilient means such as springs are provided which compensate for irregularities in contour ofthe Work surface. In this way. I have provided a, construction involving one or several swing frame grinders in which the highly difficult and objectionable operational features of that type of apparatus are eliminated, and the operator of the machine is required to do no more than 4minor operations and to control the various adjustments of the machine.
Accordingly, this invention applies both to a simplified type of machine involving one or it small number ofwheels as well as a complex ma..
through a plurality of grinding zones, and power -driven grinding wheels having their axes parallel with the direction of work travel which are arfor grinding simultaneously a plurality of paral-l lel arcuate contiguous paths on one side of the traversing work piece.
2. A grinding machine comprising means for supporting a non-rotatable long work piece and traversing it progressively into a plurality of grinding zones, an independent power driven grinding whee1 arranged in' each of said zones for grinding one side of the work simultaneously, said wheels having their axes-parallel with the direction of work travel and arranged offset relative to each other to grind parallelcontiguous'arcuate paths on one work surface during a single work traverse, means for holding each wheel resiliently against the work under a predetermined adjustable pressure, and means for oscillating the vwheel through' an angle apexed at the work surthe wheel face which maintains the path of Agrinding substantially straight.
y 3. A machine for grinding `the surfaces of nonlroiuatable long discontinuous work pieces comprising means yfor traversing al succession of said work pieces in one direction, a set of power driven grinding wheels arranged offset relative to each other and with their axes substantially parallel with the direction of travel of the work so as to `grind simultaneously a'plurality of paralvlel contiguous arcuate paths on one side of each work piece, and means for selectively removing any work piece or alternatively returning it in the opposite direction and again presenting it to the wheels. for another grinding operation. y
4. A grinding machine comprising power driven'mechanism for traversing a long non-rotatable work piece endwise in .one direction through a grinding zone, a series of grinding wheels arranged cis'et relative to one another for grinding simultaneously one face of the traversing work piece, mechanism for returning the work piece to its initial starting position and mechanism for turning the work piece to present another face to said wheels for a further grinding action.
5. A machine for grinding the surface of a nism yieldingly urging the i the wheel tively removing the billet from the machine r alternatively returning it for another grinding' operation and means for automaticallyturning the billet and presenting a newface for grinding during a. -second pass through' the grinding zone.
6. A grinding machine comprising mechanism `for traversing a work piece into and through a grinding zone, a grinding wheel arranged with its axis substantially parallel with the direction of travel of the work piece, and automatically actuated means which normally holds the side of the grinding wheel out of the path of the advancing work piece and which relatively moves the wheel and work into contact for lthe grinding operation as the leading edge of the work passes the side faceof the wheel.
7. A grinding machine comprising means for traversing a work piece into and through a grinding zone, a power driven grinding wheel mounted to rotate aboutan axis which is substantially parallel with the direction of the movement of the work, means which normally holds the wheel out of the path of movement of the work as the latter enters the grinding zone and thereby prevents thefwork from striking the side of the Wheel and means operated by the weight of the work entering th'e 'grinding zone which causes the wheel to move into grinding contact therewith.
8. A grinding machine comprising a grinding wheel arranged to grind an arcuatefpath on a work piece, means for traversing an'elongated work piece parallel with the wheel axis, mechanormal grinding position and means actuated by the forward end of the moving work piece which' forces the grinding wheel forward and holds it in a resilient grinding contact with the work while the latter is traversing through the grinding zone.
9. A grinding machine comprising-means for supporting a non-rotatable work piece and traversing it through a grinding zone, a power driven grinding wheel arranged with its axis substan- 'tially parallel with the direction of travel of the work piece, and means for oscillating the grinding wheel through an angle apexed at the work surstantially straight.
automaticallyI actuated means for oscillating the wheel during the grinding operation.
12. A grinding machine comprising a pivotally mounted frame, a grinding wheel rotatably mounted thereon and arranged for tilting through an langle apexed on the work surface, means for traversing a work piece parallel with the 'wheel axis so that the wheel grinds an elongated arcuate r path, means for adjusting the frame to vary the wheel path, a swinging lever pivoted in substantial alignment with the work surface, means for adjustably connecting the frame to the lever so that swinging the lever tilts the wheel for any wheel away from its face and maintaining its path of grinding sub- 10. A grinding machine comprising a power driven grinding wheel, means for traversing a work piece in a direction parallel with the wheel axis so as to forman .arcuate grinding path on the work surface, -a pivotally mounted support arranged for oscillating the vwheel about an axis passing substantially through the line of grinding. contact and at right angles to the path of travel of the work, means for adjusting the wheel so that it will grind a pre-determined path, and automatically actuated means for oscillating the wheel during the grinding operation.
` 11. A grinding machine comprising a'powerv ydriven grinding wheel,
means for traversing a work piece 'in adirection parallel with the wheel axis so as to form an arcuate grinding path on the work surface, a pivotally mounted support arranged for oscillating the wheel about an axis i passing substantially through the line of grindj ing contact and at right angles to the path of travel of the work, resilient means for holding under pressure against the work, and
grinding position thereof and means for swinging the lever and oscillating the wheel 4through, said angle.
1'3. A grinding machine comprising a pivotally mounted frame, a grinding wheel thereon arranged for tilting through an angle apexed at the angle for different sizes and paths of the wheel, means for oscillating the lever and said wheel, a resiliently mounted support 'for the pivot of the lever, and means actuated by entry of the work into the grinding zon'e which moves the lever support and causes the 4work under a yielding pressure.
14. `A grinding machine comprising a swing frame grinder having a pivotal support, a 'motor and a driven grinding wheel mounted on oppok pivot,` means for traversing a work piece in grinding contact with the wheel and substantially parallel with the wheel axis so that the wheel will grind an elongated arcuate path, means whereby the wheel may be moved transversely of the ydirection of work travel, and
pressure means for holding the work and the wheel in grinding contact. 15. A grinding machine elongated arcuate path, means whereby the wheel maybe moved transversely of the direction of' comprising a series of power driven rolls'which move the work arranged alternately with resiliently mounted pressure rolls and means associated with the pressure rolls which holds the wheel in grinding contact with the work.
17. A grinding machine comprising mechanism for traversing a work piece in one direction, a trolley rail and a trolley movable thereon transversely of the direction of work travel, a frame universally pivoted on the trolley, a power driven grinding wheel carried by the frame with its axis substantially parallel with the direction of work travel and arranged to grind an arcuate path on the work, means associated with the trolley for moving the wheel and locating the -wheel path, and means for oscillating the wheel through an angle apexed on the work surface.
the wheel to be held againstv 18. A4 grinding machine according to claim 17 comprising means for adjusting the wheel position to compensate for wheel wear.
19. A grinding machine comprising mechanism for traversing a work piece into and through a vplurality of grinding zones, a set of movable frames carrying independent power driven grinding wheels arranged in a series for grinding -the work progressivelyl in said zones, the Wheels being substantially parallel axially with the direc- 10 f 18 tion of work travel and so arranged as to grind parallel, adjacent, arcuate paths along the traversing Work, resilient; acting .pressure means controlled by the work for holding each wheel under -a lyielding pressure against the work and which
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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2442042A (en) * 1946-03-19 1948-05-25 Alfred E Hamilton Grinding apparatus
US2643490A (en) * 1950-12-05 1953-06-30 Burroughs Optomat Inc Lens finishing machine
US2718732A (en) * 1952-05-01 1955-09-27 Norton Co Snagging grinder
US2726490A (en) * 1951-10-26 1955-12-13 Crucible Steel Co America Billet grinder
US2741070A (en) * 1953-03-30 1956-04-10 Mid West Abrasive Co Swing grinder
US2750714A (en) * 1950-12-04 1956-06-19 Mid West Abrasive Co Swing grinder
US2767413A (en) * 1952-03-27 1956-10-23 Fuller Brush Co Apparatus for removing scale from a metallic surface
DE1013987B (en) * 1952-12-10 1957-08-14 Wilhelm Schlueter Schleifmasch Coarse grinding machine with pendulum support
US2850848A (en) * 1955-01-11 1958-09-09 Donald A Boltz Grinding machines
DE1082153B (en) * 1953-09-12 1960-05-19 Mid West Abrasive Co Billet grinder
DE1082829B (en) * 1955-01-10 1960-06-02 Mid West Abrasive Co Machine tool, in particular a billet grinder
DE1135333B (en) * 1954-08-10 1962-08-23 Jean Henri Marie Joseph Bouche Cut-off machine
DE1239212B (en) * 1961-03-22 1967-04-20 Bliss E W Co Billet grinding machine
US4330961A (en) * 1980-05-19 1982-05-25 Litton Industrial Products, Inc. Swing type internal grinding fixture for cylindrical grinding machines
EP0458758A1 (en) * 1990-05-24 1991-11-27 Mapos Italiana S.R.L. Multiple operating head apparatus for cleaning metal pieces
US20070082586A1 (en) * 2005-10-06 2007-04-12 Scm Group S.P.A Abrading group

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2442042A (en) * 1946-03-19 1948-05-25 Alfred E Hamilton Grinding apparatus
US2750714A (en) * 1950-12-04 1956-06-19 Mid West Abrasive Co Swing grinder
US2643490A (en) * 1950-12-05 1953-06-30 Burroughs Optomat Inc Lens finishing machine
US2726490A (en) * 1951-10-26 1955-12-13 Crucible Steel Co America Billet grinder
US2767413A (en) * 1952-03-27 1956-10-23 Fuller Brush Co Apparatus for removing scale from a metallic surface
US2718732A (en) * 1952-05-01 1955-09-27 Norton Co Snagging grinder
DE1013987B (en) * 1952-12-10 1957-08-14 Wilhelm Schlueter Schleifmasch Coarse grinding machine with pendulum support
US2741070A (en) * 1953-03-30 1956-04-10 Mid West Abrasive Co Swing grinder
DE1082153B (en) * 1953-09-12 1960-05-19 Mid West Abrasive Co Billet grinder
DE1135333B (en) * 1954-08-10 1962-08-23 Jean Henri Marie Joseph Bouche Cut-off machine
DE1082829B (en) * 1955-01-10 1960-06-02 Mid West Abrasive Co Machine tool, in particular a billet grinder
US2850848A (en) * 1955-01-11 1958-09-09 Donald A Boltz Grinding machines
DE1239212B (en) * 1961-03-22 1967-04-20 Bliss E W Co Billet grinding machine
US4330961A (en) * 1980-05-19 1982-05-25 Litton Industrial Products, Inc. Swing type internal grinding fixture for cylindrical grinding machines
EP0458758A1 (en) * 1990-05-24 1991-11-27 Mapos Italiana S.R.L. Multiple operating head apparatus for cleaning metal pieces
US20070082586A1 (en) * 2005-10-06 2007-04-12 Scm Group S.P.A Abrading group

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