US2396675A - Liquid fuel burner - Google Patents

Liquid fuel burner Download PDF

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US2396675A
US2396675A US518047A US51804744A US2396675A US 2396675 A US2396675 A US 2396675A US 518047 A US518047 A US 518047A US 51804744 A US51804744 A US 51804744A US 2396675 A US2396675 A US 2396675A
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air
pot
burner
fuel
chamber
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US518047A
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James L Breese
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OIL DEVIEES
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OIL DEVIEES
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D5/00Burners in which liquid fuel evaporates in the combustion space, with or without chemical conversion of evaporated fuel

Definitions

  • the present invention relates to an improvement ingenerator type burners in which a substantial supply of liquid fuel is maintained in a storage zone or container adjacent the mixing chamber.
  • One purpose is to provide an improved means for controlling the air supply to such a burner.
  • Another purpose is to provide air supply control means responsive to changes in heat conditions adjacent the burner.
  • Another purpose is to provide means for Preheating the air delivered to a generator burner.
  • Figure 1 is a vertical axial section
  • Surrounding its open top is a removable band '22 which pivotally supports a cover plate 23 which may be rotated into and out 5 of closing position about the center 24.
  • the tube I is also provided adjacent its top with an air inlet opening'25 which may be controlled by a flexing leaf or bi-metal bar 26.
  • the member 26 is shown as riveted or otherwise secured to the drum l8 as 10 at 21. It is provided at its outer end with a curved tially complete closing of the aperture when the Figure 2 is a partial plan view on an enlarged ally cylindrical upwardly extending flange 5.
  • leaf 28 flexes to closing position.
  • I employ the drum l8 and its top l9 has means for controlling or modulating the inflow of air through the tube la.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates the tube as having secured thereto a cover is apertured as at 6 to permit the passage of a generally vertical air inlet duct 1, the bottom of which is'formed with air outlet slots 8 shown as "extending above and below the level of fuel 2 in closely spaced secondary air inlets I2 shown as upwardly and inwardly'tilted.
  • the pot is shown as having an outwardly extending flange IS on which is mounted a downwardly depending skirt M, the bottom of which is open at 15 to permit air to enter the space about the pot.
  • I8 is an upper drum or combustion chamber closed by a top ill from which extends upwardly any suitable outlet 20.
  • the air tube 1 is shown as ter-.
  • I provide a generator burner which includes a Jerusalem a final and fully combustible mixture which then flows into the combustion chamber l 8. Combustion of the final mixture begins substantially at 'tain the combustion necessary for the vaporizathe level of the secondary air inlets l2 and the flame risesa substantial distance upwardly into 6 the chamber 18, which serves as a heat radiating body for the space to be heated.
  • combustion is varied by varying the initial air supplied to the chamber I.
  • This can be done by manual setting, as by employment of the cover plate 23 which can be manually moved from, full closing to full opening position; I preferably employ in addition to means for manual adiustment, automatic means for modulating or controlling the supply of air in response to changes in heat conditions in the burner.
  • I provide, in addition V to the manually controllable member 23, an air inflowaperture 25 which is controlled by the flexure of the naming bar 28. At one limit of the movement of the bar, the curved portion 28 engages the exterior of the tube 1 and com-.
  • I illustrate a purely thermal control, subject to a manualsetting by variation of the location of the collar 34.
  • the rate of air flow or the variation of the rate of air flow, into the lower chamber I controls the amount offuel that is burned. It may be advantageous for starting, to employ a wide open air inlet passage.
  • the cover 23 may bemoved to the wide open position. It must be kept in mind that there must be some flow at all times if continuous operation is to be maintained. Since the only means for getting fuel into the pot lilis to convert the fuel into a gas or vapor, enough air must be admitted to the chamber l to maintain the combustion necessary for the vaporization of the fuel. The more.
  • the air admitted through the slots '8 should be in suflicient quantities not merely to maintion of fuel from the body 2, but also to provide an excess supply of oxygen. It is essential not. 1
  • the member 2l may be moved to vclosed or partially closed position and the further operationofw the burner may be left to the operation of the bi-metal bar 26.
  • the warping bar can be set to move toward aperture closing position in relation to the aperture 25.
  • An increase in the heat ofthe burner thus reduces the supply of air flowing downwardly through the tube and this in turn reduces the amount of fuel vaporized and thus cuts down the fire.
  • th bi-metal bar 26 tends to move toward the open position and admit more air.
  • thermally responsive control is provided.
  • the minimum supply of air may be varied by variation of the position of the closure 23 or in the. form of Figure 4 by varying the position of the member 34.
  • liquid fuel vaporizing burner efuel con .tainer and a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a. substantial supplyof liquidfuel
  • a heater drum located above the fuelcontainer.
  • a hydroxylating burner pot interposed between theheater drum and the fuel container, the interior of the pot, being in communication with the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of the heater drum, said pot having a plurality of air inlet apertures therein, a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber, mounted on said container and extending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto,
  • a liquid fuel vaporizing burner a fuel container and a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a substantial supply of liquid fuel, a heater drum located above the fuel container, a hydroxylatingburner pot interposed between the heater drum and the fuel container, the
  • a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber, mounted on said container and extending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto, and means for varying the inflow of air through said duct to the interior of the fuel container in response to changes in temperature of said heater drum, said air supplying duct having an inletaperture located adjacent an upper portionof said heater drum and a valve therefor and means for moving the valve in response to changes in temperature of the heater drum.
  • a fuel container and a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a substantial supply of liquid -fuel
  • a t heater drum located above the fuel containena' .hydroxylating burner pot interposed between the heater drum and the fuel container, the interior vaporization chamber.
  • the pot being in communication with the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of the heater drum, said pot having a plurality 1 of air inlet apertures therein, a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber, mounted on saidcontainer and extending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto, and
  • said air supplying duct having an inlet aperture located adjacent an upper portion of said heater drum and a valve thereforfland means for moving the valve in response to changes in temperature of the heater drum, including an actuating connection between said valve and the heater drum.
  • a liquid fuel vaporizing burner a fuel container and a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a substantial supply of liquid fuel, a heater drum located above the fuel container, a hydroxylating burner pot interposed between the heater drum and the fuel container, the interior of the pot being in communication with the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of the heater drum, said pot having a plurality of air inlet apertures therein, a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber, mounted on said container andextending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto,
  • a liquid fuel storage and vaporization chamber adapted to serve as the base of the burner, a burner potv mounted on said chamber, said burner pot having a bottom wall, a circumferential side wall and an open top, said side wall being provided with a plurality of air inlet apertures located at various levels and spaced circumferentially about the pot, the bottom wall of said not being apertured to provide communication between the inmeans for varying the inflow of air through said duct to the interior of the fuel container in response to changes in temperature of said heater drum, and additional manually controllable means for varying the inflow of air'through said duct.
  • a liquid fuel storage and vaporization chamber adapted to serve as the base of the burner, a burner pot mounted on said chamber, said burner pot havg chamber in volume sumcient to support a' partial vaporizing combustion, including an air inlet duct 5 the lower end of which extends'downwardly into teriors of v the vaporization chamber and of the burner pot, a radiator positioned above the pot and in communication with the interior of the pot, a centrally apertured flame ring partly closing the otherwise open top of the pot, and means for delivering air to the interior of the vaporization chamber in volume suiiicient to support a partial vaporizing combustion, including an air inlet duct the .lower end of whichextends downwardly into the vaporization chamber, an-
  • a liquid fuel containing vaporization chamber a liquid fuel containing vaporization chamber, aburner pot mounted on said chamber, said burner pot having a circumferential side wall provided with a plurality of air inlet apertures located at varthe vaporization chamber, an upper portion of said duct being located closely adjacent to and being subjected to the heat of the radiator and valve means for varying the rate of flow of air through said air inlet duct'to the interior of the 6.
  • a liquid fuel storage and vaporization chamber adapted to serve as the base of the burner, a burner pot mounted on said chamber, said burner pot having a bottom wall, a circumferential side wall and an open top, said side wall being provided with a plurality of air inlet apertures located atv various levels and spaced circumferentially about the pot, the bottom wall of said pot being apertured to provide communication between the interiors of the vaporization chamber and of the burner pot, a radiator positioned above the pot and in communication with the interior of the ,flow of air through said 'air inlet ious levels and spaced circumferentially about the pot, a combustion chamber the interior of which is. in.
  • duct means for connecting the in terior of the burner pot with the interior of the vaporization chamber, and means for delivering air to the vaporization chamber in volume suf- ,flcient to support a partial vaporizing combustion, including an air inlet duct adjacent and subjected to the heat of the combustion chamber, and valve means for varying the rate of duct tothe interior of the vaporization chamber 9.
  • a fuel I container and liquid fuel vaporizing chamber [adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a substantial supply of liquid fuel,'a heater drum located above the fuel container, a hydroxylating burner pot interposed between the heater drum and the fuel container, the interior 'of the pot being in communication with the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of theheater drum, said pot having a plurality of airinlet a'perturestherein, a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber mounted on said container and extending upwardly along said heater drum and inclose proximity thereto, and means for varying the inflow of air through said duct to the interior of the fuel container in reradiator, and heat responsive means subjected sponseto changes-in temperature of said heater drum, the air supplying ductterminating, at its lower end with an air "deiive'ring' aperture iocated above the normal level of liquid iiiei in the iuei container.
  • liquid fuel vaporizing burner a fuel container and liquid fuel vap rizing chamber to serve as a base for the burner and to fcoiitain a substantial suppifoi liquid fuel, a "heater drum locatedabove the'tuei container, a.
  • a valve seat at the upper end of said air supplying duct, a valve opposed to said seat and a warping bar on which said valve is mounted.
  • said warping bar being adjacent to and responsive to changes in the temperature oi the heater JAMES L. BREESE.

Description

aiented Mar. 19, 1946 James L. Breese, Santa Fe, N. Mex'., assignor to I Oil Devices. Santa Fe, N.
'nership of Illinois Mexi, a limited part Application January 13, 1944,,Scrlal No. 518,047
10 Claims.
The present invention relates to an improvement ingenerator type burners in which a substantial supply of liquid fuel is maintained in a storage zone or container adjacent the mixing chamber. One purpose is to provide an improved means for controlling the air supply to such a burner.
Another purpose is to provide air supply control means responsive to changes in heat conditions adjacent the burner.
Another purpose is to provide means for Preheating the air delivered to a generator burner.
Other purposes will appear from time to time throughout the specification.
I illustrate the invention more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawing, wherein:
Figure 1 is a vertical axial section;
may be secured to the drum by any suitable surrounding strap 2|. Surrounding its open top is a removable band '22 which pivotally supports a cover plate 23 which may be rotated into and out 5 of closing position about the center 24. The tube I is also provided adjacent its top with an air inlet opening'25 which may be controlled by a flexing leaf or bi-metal bar 26. The member 26 is shown as riveted or otherwise secured to the drum l8 as 10 at 21. It is provided at its outer end with a curved tially complete closing of the aperture when the Figure 2 is a partial plan view on an enlarged ally cylindrical upwardly extending flange 5. The
leaf 28 flexes to closing position.
In the form of Figure 4, I employ the drum l8 and its top l9 has means for controlling or modulating the inflow of air through the tube la. I
illustrate the tube as having secured thereto a cover is apertured as at 6 to permit the passage of a generally vertical air inlet duct 1, the bottom of which is'formed with air outlet slots 8 shown as "extending above and below the level of fuel 2 in closely spaced secondary air inlets I2 shown as upwardly and inwardly'tilted. The pot is shown as having an outwardly extending flange IS on which is mounted a downwardly depending skirt M, the bottom of which is open at 15 to permit air to enter the space about the pot.
It indicates a flame ring partiallyclosing the top of the pot and centrally apertured as at I'I. I8 is an upper drum or combustion chamber closed by a top ill from which extends upwardly any suitable outlet 20. The air tube 1 is shown as ter-.
minating adjacent the top N of the drum l8. It tilted secondary air inlet apertures l2. This probracket 30 to which is pivoted as at 3| a closure 32. At the opposite side of the pivot 3| is the counterweight 33. 34 is an adjustable collar, shown as screw threaded at the top of the member la. It will be understood that variations in the height of the drum l8 occur upon changes in its temperature and the expansion of the material of which ,it is composed, and such variations are employed to move the member 32 toward and away from closing position in relation to the collar 36.
It will be realized that whereas I have shown and described an operative device, still many changes in the size, shape, number and disposition of parts may be made without departing ma- The use and operation of the invention are as follows:
fuel container I, a burner pot Ill, and a. combustion chamber l8. A supply of air is admitted to the fuel chamber I through the air inlet tube 1. This air flows into the chamber I at the level of the fuel and is effective to maintain partial combustion which produces sufilcient heat to vaporize liquid fuel from the surface of the fuel body, 2. This vaporized liquid fuel flows, upwardly through the neck 4 into the mixing chamber l0. It there receives a supply of primary air through the inlets II which produce a primary mixture of vaporized fuel and air. This mixture continues its upward .or forward flow until it receives the secondary air delivered upwardly and inwardly through the terially from the spirit of. my invention and I wish,
I provide a generator burner which includes a duces a final and fully combustible mixture which then flows into the combustion chamber l 8. Combustion of the final mixture begins substantially at 'tain the combustion necessary for the vaporizathe level of the secondary air inlets l2 and the flame risesa substantial distance upwardly into 6 the chamber 18, which serves as a heat radiating body for the space to be heated.
Since the exposed area of liquid fuel. from which vaporization takes place is substantially constant, combustion is varied by varying the initial air supplied to the chamber I. This can be done by manual setting, as by employment of the cover plate 23 which can be manually moved from, full closing to full opening position; I preferably employ in addition to means for manual adiustment, automatic means for modulating or controlling the supply of air in response to changes in heat conditions in the burner. In
the form of Figures 1 to 3, I provide, in addition V to the manually controllable member 23, an air inflowaperture 25 which is controlled by the flexure of the naming bar 28. At one limit of the movement of the bar, the curved portion 28 engages the exterior of the tube 1 and com-.
pletely closes the aperture 25. At the other limit of movement of. the bi-metal bar 26, it is moved as in Figure 3, to a position which leaves the aperture 25 substantially unrestricted.
In considering the general theory of the oper- 80 it is not the level of the fuel or the mass of 4 fuel in the storage zone which determines the rate of combustion. The amount of fuel burned is controlled by the amount of air admitted through the tube 1.
In Figures 1 to a, I illustrate the inlet inflow of airto this tube as controlled both manually and thermally.
In Figure 4, I illustrate a purely thermal control, subject to a manualsetting by variation of the location of the collar 34. The rate of air flow or the variation of the rate of air flow, into the lower chamber I controls the amount offuel that is burned. It may be advantageous for starting, to employ a wide open air inlet passage. In the form 01' Figure 1, the cover 23 may bemoved to the wide open position. It must be kept in mind that there must be some flow at all times if continuous operation is to be maintained. Since the only means for getting fuel into the pot lilis to convert the fuel into a gas or vapor, enough air must be admitted to the chamber l to maintain the combustion necessary for the vaporization of the fuel. The more.
air which is admitted, the greater the rate of combustion. It is impractical to rely on radiant 5 heat thrown down from the bumer.above to vaporiz the fuel in the chamber I.
The air admitted through the slots '8 should be in suflicient quantities not merely to maintion of fuel from the body 2, but also to provide an excess supply of oxygen. It is essential not. 1
'merely to maintain a fuel vaporization flame in the container. I but also to carry some flame and unburned oxygen up into the pot Ill so that 75 2,896,675 v when the additional supply of oxygen is provided through the apertures II and i2, combustion will take place. In eflect, the ignition of the final mixture may take place from the tip. of flame extending upwardly or outwardly from the vaporization zone ofthe container I to the mixing zone in the pot Ill. 3
After combustion has been initiated, the member 2lmay be moved to vclosed or partially closed position and the further operationofw the burner may be left to the operation of the bi-metal bar 26. When the drum heats abov a predetermined temperature, the warping bar can be set to move toward aperture closing position in relation to the aperture 25. An increase in the heat ofthe burner thus reduces the supply of air flowing downwardly through the tube and this in turn reduces the amount of fuel vaporized and thus cuts down the fire. -As the temperature in the drum l8 drops, th bi-metal bar 26 tends to move toward the open position and admit more air. Thus a modulating, automatic,
thermally responsive control is provided. The minimum supply of air may be varied by variation of the position of the closure 23 or in the. form of Figure 4 by varying the position of the member 34.
'Iclaim: I
1. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, efuel con .tainer and a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a. substantial supplyof liquidfuel,
a heater drum located above the fuelcontainer. a hydroxylating burner pot interposed between theheater drum and the fuel container, the interior of the pot, being in communication with the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of the heater drum, said pot having a plurality of air inlet apertures therein, a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber, mounted on said container and extending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto,
. and means for varying the inflow of air through said duct to the interior of the fuel container in response to changes in temperature of said heater drum.
2. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a fuel container and a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a substantial supply of liquid fuel, a heater drum located above the fuel container, a hydroxylatingburner pot interposed between the heater drum and the fuel container, the
interior of the pot being in communication with. the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of the heater drum, said pot having a plurality of air inlet apertures therein. a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber, mounted on said container and extending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto, and means for varying the inflow of air through said duct to the interior of the fuel container in response to changes in temperature of said heater drum, said air supplying duct having an inletaperture located adjacent an upper portionof said heater drum and a valve therefor and means for moving the valve in response to changes in temperature of the heater drum.
3. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a fuel container and a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a substantial supply of liquid -fuel, a t heater drum located above the fuel containena' .hydroxylating burner pot interposed between the heater drum and the fuel container, the interior vaporization chamber.
of the pot being in communication with the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of the heater drum, said pot having a plurality 1 of air inlet apertures therein, a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber, mounted on saidcontainer and extending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto, and
means for varying the inflow of air through said duct to the interior of the fuel container in response to changes in temperature of said heater drum, said air supplying duct having an inlet aperture located adjacent an upper portion of said heater drum and a valve thereforfland means for moving the valve in response to changes in temperature of the heater drum, including an actuating connection between said valve and the heater drum.
4. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a fuel container and a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a substantial supply of liquid fuel, a heater drum located above the fuel container, a hydroxylating burner pot interposed between the heater drum and the fuel container, the interior of the pot being in communication with the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of the heater drum, said pot having a plurality of air inlet apertures therein, a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber, mounted on said container andextending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto,
pot, a centrally apertured flame ring partly closing the'otherwise open top of the pot, and'means for delivering air to the interior of the vapori- 4 zation chamber in volume sufficient to support a partialvaporizing combustion, including an air inlet duct the lower end of which extends downwardly into the vaporization chamber, an upper portion of said duct being located closely adjacent to and being subjected to the heat of the to the heat of the radiator for varying the rate of flow of air through said air inlet ductto the interior of the vaporization chamber.
; 7. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a liquid fuel storage and vaporization chamber adapted to serve as the base of the burner, a burner potv mounted on said chamber, said burner pot having a bottom wall, a circumferential side wall and an open top, said side wall being provided with a plurality of air inlet apertures located at various levels and spaced circumferentially about the pot, the bottom wall of said not being apertured to provide communication between the inmeans for varying the inflow of air through said duct to the interior of the fuel container in response to changes in temperature of said heater drum, and additional manually controllable means for varying the inflow of air'through said duct.
5. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a liquid fuel storage and vaporization chamber adapted to serve as the base of the burner, a burner pot mounted on said chamber, said burner pot havg chamber in volume sumcient to support a' partial vaporizing combustion, including an air inlet duct 5 the lower end of which extends'downwardly into teriors of v the vaporization chamber and of the burner pot, a radiator positioned above the pot and in communication with the interior of the pot, a centrally apertured flame ring partly closing the otherwise open top of the pot, and means for delivering air to the interior of the vaporization chamber in volume suiiicient to support a partial vaporizing combustion, including an air inlet duct the .lower end of whichextends downwardly into the vaporization chamber, an-
upper portion of said duct being located closely adjacent to and being subjected to the heat of the radiator, and heat responsive means sub- -jected to the heat. 'of the radiator for varying the rate of flow of air through said air inlet duct to the interior of the vaporization chamber; and additional manually controllable means for varying said rate of air flow.
8. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a liquid fuel containing vaporization chamber, aburner pot mounted on said chamber, said burner pot having a circumferential side wall provided with a plurality of air inlet apertures located at varthe vaporization chamber, an upper portion of said duct being located closely adjacent to and being subjected to the heat of the radiator and valve means for varying the rate of flow of air through said air inlet duct'to the interior of the 6. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a liquid fuel storage and vaporization chamber adapted to serve as the base of the burner, a burner pot mounted on said chamber, said burner pot having a bottom wall, a circumferential side wall and an open top, said side wall being provided with a plurality of air inlet apertures located atv various levels and spaced circumferentially about the pot, the bottom wall of said pot being apertured to provide communication between the interiors of the vaporization chamber and of the burner pot, a radiator positioned above the pot and in communication with the interior of the ,flow of air through said 'air inlet ious levels and spaced circumferentially about the pot, a combustion chamber the interior of which is. in. communication with the interior of the burner'pot, duct means for connecting the in terior of the burner pot with the interior of the vaporization chamber, and means for delivering air to the vaporization chamber in volume suf- ,flcient to support a partial vaporizing combustion, including an air inlet duct adjacent and subjected to the heat of the combustion chamber, and valve means for varying the rate of duct tothe interior of the vaporization chamber 9. In a liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a fuel I container and liquid fuel vaporizing chamber [adapted to serve as a base for the burner and to contain a substantial supply of liquid fuel,'a heater drum located above the fuel container, a hydroxylating burner pot interposed between the heater drum and the fuel container, the interior 'of the pot being in communication with the interior of the fuel container and with the interior of theheater drum, said pot having a plurality of airinlet a'perturestherein, a duct supplying air to the vaporizing chamber mounted on said container and extending upwardly along said heater drum and inclose proximity thereto, and means for varying the inflow of air through said duct to the interior of the fuel container in reradiator, and heat responsive means subjected sponseto changes-in temperature of said heater drum, the air supplying ductterminating, at its lower end with an air "deiive'ring' aperture iocated above the normal level of liquid iiiei in the iuei container. I i
10. In a, liquid fuel vaporizing burner, a fuel container and liquid fuel vap rizing chamber to serve as a base for the burner and to fcoiitain a substantial suppifoi liquid fuel, a "heater drum locatedabove the'tuei container, a.
,s9.'o,67c
air inlet apertures therein, a duct supp fl l to the vaporizing chamber mounted on said container and extending upwardly along said heater drum and in close proximity thereto, and means for varying the inflowoi' air throu h said duct to the interior of the idei container in response to changes in temperature oi said heater drum, in-
eluding a valve seat at the upper end of said air supplying duct, a valve opposed to said seat and a warping bar on which said valve is mounted. said warping bar being adjacent to and responsive to changes in the temperature oi the heater JAMES L. BREESE.
US518047A 1944-01-13 1944-01-13 Liquid fuel burner Expired - Lifetime US2396675A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2574358A (en) * 1946-12-11 1951-11-06 Coleman Co Vaporizing pot type burner and pilot burner therefor
US2595448A (en) * 1949-07-23 1952-05-06 Breese Burners Inc Portable military burner unit
US2721608A (en) * 1950-09-22 1955-10-25 Elmer E Chinn Orchard heater
US4177792A (en) * 1978-03-20 1979-12-11 Finch Clyde E Jr Drilling rig heater

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2574358A (en) * 1946-12-11 1951-11-06 Coleman Co Vaporizing pot type burner and pilot burner therefor
US2595448A (en) * 1949-07-23 1952-05-06 Breese Burners Inc Portable military burner unit
US2721608A (en) * 1950-09-22 1955-10-25 Elmer E Chinn Orchard heater
US4177792A (en) * 1978-03-20 1979-12-11 Finch Clyde E Jr Drilling rig heater

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