US2355417A - Liquid fuel burner and thermal control valve therefor - Google Patents

Liquid fuel burner and thermal control valve therefor Download PDF

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US2355417A
US2355417A US411329A US41132941A US2355417A US 2355417 A US2355417 A US 2355417A US 411329 A US411329 A US 411329A US 41132941 A US41132941 A US 41132941A US 2355417 A US2355417 A US 2355417A
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passage
liquid fuel
air inlet
valve
fuel
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US411329A
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James L Breese
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OIL DEVICES
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23CMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR COMBUSTION USING FLUID FUEL OR SOLID FUEL SUSPENDED IN  A CARRIER GAS OR AIR 
    • F23C99/00Subject-matter not provided for in other groups of this subclass
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23CMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR COMBUSTION USING FLUID FUEL OR SOLID FUEL SUSPENDED IN  A CARRIER GAS OR AIR 
    • F23C2700/00Special arrangements for combustion apparatus using fluent fuel
    • F23C2700/02Combustion apparatus using liquid fuel
    • F23C2700/026Combustion apparatus using liquid fuel with pre-vaporising means

Definitions

  • Another purpose is to provide improved means for supplying a burner through a single passage or inlet member with all 01- the air necessary to support the primary combustion of the fuel.
  • Another purpose is to provide improved means for regulating or cutting oil the fuel supply in response to'heat conditions.
  • Another purpose is to provide means for adlusting such regulating or onion! feature.
  • I generally indicates a combustion chamber, herein shown in the form of a drum, having a bottom or base pcrtion s and, if desired, a bottom body 8 of fire brick or the like, of any suitable material.
  • the burner may be applied to a wide variety of heaters, furnaces and the like.
  • I illustrate it, however, in connection with a water boiler 5 having a central flue passage I.
  • I employ a single air and fuel inlet member having an outer portion I, herein shown as vertical, and with an open top, or any other suitable means for admitting air. It has a horizontal portion I, which extends inwardly through the wall of the member i, and is hereinshown as terminating in adownward elbow ll axially aligned with the flue passage I.
  • FIG. l, 1 illustrate fuel supply means in the form of an lnlet'passage II from any suitable source of fuel not herein shown, which communicates, as at l2,
  • valve means may be em- I 1 is a vertical axial section of the burnerf ma' in the accompanying drawings wherej ployed ror controlling or varying the flow of fuel.
  • any suitable means may be employed for delivering secondary air to the space within the drum I.
  • I illustrate, for example, inlii'g. 2 inlet passages il and II, which unite at' the union or neck II and deliver outside air to'the head II, with its air'discharge apertures ll.
  • adequate secondary air is supplied for the mixture of primary air and vaporized liquid hydrocarbon which is discharged from the downturned end IQ of the passage 9.
  • I illustrate aiorm of Iris control which includes an adjustable Invar 20, secured to the'hot end of the passage I, at
  • I may employ any suitable adjusting means, but I illustrate the rod II as screw threaded at its end, as at H, toreceive adjusting and locking nuts 22.
  • the rod is shown with a generally conic valve tip 23, opposed to a valve seat 24 at the end of an inwardly extendingfuel inlet II.
  • This fuel inlet may itselibe adjustable, being screw threaded, as'at 28, in relation tothe fixed outer end wall 21 of the passage Q.
  • is any suitable collar surrounding and'locked to the outer ,end of the passage 9 and supporting a stufl'ing box 29 for the end of the fuel supply line III.
  • II is a handle adapted for the convenlent rotation oi the member 2!, whereby the valve may be exteriorlyadjusted.
  • FIG. 6 I illustrates safety device which may be applied tovor employed with I the form of any of the above described figures.
  • the bucket arm 40 carries a bucket I, aligned with the delivery end of the tube or nozzle 0.
  • the spring 46 is effective normally to hold the bucket arm and bucket in the full line positon of Fig. as long as the bucket is empty.
  • the delivcry of a predetermined quantity of liquid fuel to the bucket I! is sufficient to overcome the tension the spring ll and cause the arm and bucket to fall to the dotted line position of Fig. 5.
  • worm 4i Associated with the inner end of the arm 4. is the worm 4i, rotatablein the nut 42, on the fuel pipe as, which is mounted in the stuffing box 2!.
  • terminates at its inner end in a valve element It, herein shown as conic. It is opposed to a valve seat 44 in communication with the liquid fuel line Ila. It will be understood that the parts are so proportioned and the pitch of the worm is such that, when the bucket 45 and armn min the full line position of Fig. 5, the valve 0 is in the position in which it is shown in Fig. 8,
  • I provide a heating device in which a liquid fuel, such as liquid hydrocarbon, may be burned.
  • I employ an inlet passage of substantially greater capacity than is necessary for the mere supply of a liquid fuel to be burned.
  • device I illustrate the air inlet passage 1 of substantial cross sectional area, which may receive air at its open top or end and deliver the air inwardly along the passage is
  • the liquid fuel is admitted either by the junction of the liquid fuel line H with the bottom of the passage I or else through the oil inlet tube 2! and past the valve 23.
  • As a substantial length of the passage is subjected to the heat of combustion 2,sss,417
  • I may employ any suitable means for controlling the rate of fuel flow inwardly along the lines I I or 80.
  • float chambers and the like are well known in the art, I am not indicating any particular means in the drawings.
  • valve means are provided, one of which is directly controlled by the bucket II and itscontrolling lever, and the other by the Invar rod II and its cooperation with the passage member I.
  • I provide anInvar rod II and a valve member which is opposed to a valve seat 24 'on the oil inlet 2
  • the valve II When the burner is cool, no oil can pass by the valve II. In other words, to start the burner oil would have to be bypassed around the valve 28 in sumcient quantity partially to fill the bucket ll, which would then shut off the supply through the stem 4 I. As soon as the liquid fuel in the cup ll hasburned away, the cup will raise and open the valve II.
  • I may employ a motor-driven fan, or other suitable means not herein shown.
  • Fuel is supplied in sufilcient volume to' maintain a fire which will subject the passage member 0 to a temperature sui'ilcient to vaporize the liquid fuel and to superheat the final mixture.
  • the mixture escapes from the downturned end It of the passage 9, it receives suiiicient secondary air in the space defined by the drum I to produce 28, it will then drop down into the bucket I5 and shut off any further supply until the liquid fuel in the bucket has been burned.
  • inlet pipe extending generally horizontally a substantial distance into the chamber at a level intermediate the top and bottom of the chamber and terminating in a discharge end, said air inlet pipe having an exterior air inlet portion adapted to admitoutside air for movement through the pipe and into the burner chamber, a liquid fuel pipe, of substantially smaller diameter than the air inlet pipe, in'communication with the interior of the air inlet pipe, at a point substantially heatioi' combustion in the, Iii-outside connection for liquid fuel pipe of substantially smaller diameter 7 element and having 0.
  • the bottom of the air inlet pipe being generally horizontal, the liquid fuel being in contact with the bottom of said air inlet pipe, and the air inlet pipe being directly subjected to the heat of combustion taking place within the burner chamber.
  • an air inlet pipe extending generally horizontally a substantial distance into the chamber at a level intermediate the top and bottom of the chamber and terminating in a discharge end, said air inlet pipe having an exterior air inlet portion adapted to admit outside air for movement through the pipe and into the burner chamber, a liquid fuel pipe, of substantially smaller diameter than the air inlet pipe,,in communication with the interior of the air inlet pipe, at a point substantially spaced from the discharge end of the air inlet pipe, and means for controlling the flow of liquid fuel through said fuel pipe and into the air inlet pipe, including a fixed valve element, and an Invar rod secured to the air inlet pipe and having a valve portion opposed to said fixed valve element, the bottom of the air inlet pipe being generally horizontal to cause a relatively slow flow of the liquid fuel 'therealong, in contact with the bottom of said air inlet pipe, and the air inlet pipe being directly subjected to the heat of combustion taking place within the burner chamber.
  • a combustion chamber-and fiue means therefor, an air inlet passage element 4 extending a substantial distance into the combustion chamber, and subjected directly to the heat of combustion in the combustion chamber, an outside connection for said air passage, a liquid fuel pipe of substantially smaller diameter than the air inlet passage in communication with the interior of the air inlet passage, a normally fixed valve element for the pipe and'an Invar rod normally fixed in relation to the air inlet passage element and having a valve member at one end thereof adapted to be opposed to said normally fixed valve element, the length of the air inlet passage element between said fixed valve element and theinner end of the passage, along which the fuel which passes said valve flows, being sumcient in relation to the cross sectional area of the passage element to permit the vaporization of said liquid fuel in the interior of said air inlet passage, in response to the heat to which the passage is subjected. 4.
  • a combustion chamber and means therefor, an air inlet passage element extending a substantial distance into the combustion chamber, and subjected directly to the combustion chamber
  • a combustion chamber and flue means therefor an air inlet passage element extending a 'substantial'distance into the combustion chamber, and subjected directly to the heat of combustion in the combustion chamber, an outside connection for said air passage, a liquid fuel pipe of substantially smaller diameter a than the air inlet passage in communication with the interior of the air inlet passage, a normally.
  • a combustion chamber and flue means therefor an air inlet passage element extending a substantial distance into the combustion chamber, and subjected directly to the heat ofcombustion in the combustion chamber, an outside connection for said air passage, a liquid fuel pipe of substantially smaller" diameter than the air inlet passage in communication with the interior of the air inlet passage, a normally fixed valve element for the pipe and an Invar rod normally fixed in relation to the air inlet passage element and having a valve member at one end thereof adapted to be opposed to said.

Description

1944- J. 1.. BREESE 2,355,417
' LIQUID FUEL BURNER AND THERMAL CONTROL VALVE THEREFOR Filed Sept. 18, 1941 3 Sheets-Sheet l jfiyefifar 17477265 lfireese 1944- .].L. BREESE 2,355,417
LIQUID FUEL BURNER AND THERMAL CONTROL VALVE THEREFOR Filed Sept. 18, 1941 3 Sheets-SheetZ Patented Aug. 8, 1944 mum FUEL BURNER-AND THERMAL comaor. vALva 'rm-zanroa James LBreese, Santa Fe, N. Men, assignor -to Oil Devices, Santa I'e nership of Illinois N. Mex., a limited part- Application September is, 1941, Serial No. 411,329 6 Claims. (01. 158-91) My invention relates to an improvement in hydrocarbon burners and has for one purpose to provide a burner for burning liquid hydrocarbon fuels which shall be simple, economical and ellicient in operation. I
Another purpose is to provide improved means for supplying a burner through a single passage or inlet member with all 01- the air necessary to support the primary combustion of the fuel.
Another purpose is to provide improved means for regulating or cutting oil the fuel supply in response to'heat conditions. a g
Another purpose is to provide means for adlusting such regulating or onion! feature.
. Other purposes will appear from timeto time in the course of'the specification.
I illustrate my invention more or less diagramfurther variant form; Md
g. '6 is an enlarged section taken on the line of Fig. 5. I Like parts are indicated by like symbols throughout the specification and drawings;
Referring to the drawings, I generally indicates a combustion chamber, herein shown in the form of a drum, having a bottom or base pcrtion s and, if desired, a bottom body 8 of fire brick or the like, of any suitable material.
It will-be understood that the burner may be applied to a wide variety of heaters, furnaces and the like. I illustrate it, however, in connection with a water boiler 5 having a central flue passage I. I employ a single air and fuel inlet member having an outer portion I, herein shown as vertical, and with an open top, or any other suitable means for admitting air. It has a horizontal portion I, which extends inwardly through the wall of the member i, and is hereinshown as terminating in adownward elbow ll axially aligned with the flue passage I.
Referring specifically tothe form of Fig. l, 1 illustrate fuel supply means in the form of an lnlet'passage II from any suitable source of fuel not herein shown, which communicates, as at l2,
with the bottom of the passage 9 and delivers a flow of liquid fuel along the bottom of the passage 9. Any suitable valve means may be em- I 1 is a vertical axial section of the burnerf ma' in the accompanying drawings wherej ployed ror controlling or varying the flow of fuel.
I illustrate a conventional valve it, but it will be understood that any control meansmay be emgloyled, such as float chambers familiar in this It will be understood that the parts are so proportioned that all of the primary air necessary for combustion is supplied by' means or the passage 1 to the portion oi the passage I where the' liquid fuel flows, the inlet passage being of substantially greater capacity than is necessary for the mere supply of the liquid fuel to be burned.
Any suitable means may be employed for delivering secondary air to the space within the drum I. I illustrate, for example, inlii'g. 2 inlet passages il and II, which unite at' the union or neck II and deliver outside air to'the head II, with its air'discharge apertures ll. Thus, adequate secondary air is supplied for the mixture of primary air and vaporized liquid hydrocarbon which is discharged from the downturned end IQ of the passage 9. a
Referring to Fig. 4, I illustrate aiorm of Iris control which includes an adjustable Invar 20, secured to the'hot end of the passage I, at
' the outer end of the downwardly turned portion ll. I may employ any suitable adjusting means, but I illustrate the rod II as screw threaded at its end, as at H, toreceive adjusting and locking nuts 22. The rod is shown with a generally conic valve tip 23, opposed to a valve seat 24 at the end of an inwardly extendingfuel inlet II. This fuel inlet may itselibe adjustable, being screw threaded, as'at 28, in relation tothe fixed outer end wall 21 of the passage Q. 2| is any suitable collar surrounding and'locked to the outer ,end of the passage 9 and supporting a stufl'ing box 29 for the end of the fuel supply line III. II is a handle adapted for the convenlent rotation oi the member 2!, whereby the valve may be exteriorlyadjusted.
It will be understood that the tube] is ex-.
posed to substantial heat, and when it expands under heat, it opens oil flow by unseating the needle valve 23 from the seat 24. 'Itwillbe understood, of course, that any additional oil flow control means may be employed, manual or auto matic, such as the conventional float-valve.
Referring to Figs. Sand 6, I illustrates safety device which may be applied tovor employed with I the form of any of the above described figures. The bucket arm 40 carries a bucket I, aligned with the delivery end of the tube or nozzle 0. The spring 46 is effective normally to hold the bucket arm and bucket in the full line positon of Fig. as long as the bucket is empty. The delivcry of a predetermined quantity of liquid fuel to the bucket I! is sufficient to overcome the tension the spring ll and cause the arm and bucket to fall to the dotted line position of Fig. 5. v
Associated with the inner end of the arm 4. is the worm 4i, rotatablein the nut 42, on the fuel pipe as, which is mounted in the stuffing box 2!. The worm 4| terminates at its inner end in a valve element It, herein shown as conic. It is opposed to a valve seat 44 in communication with the liquid fuel line Ila. It will be understood that the parts are so proportioned and the pitch of the worm is such that, when the bucket 45 and armn min the full line position of Fig. 5, the valve 0 is in the position in which it is shown in Fig. 8,
permitting the liquid fuel to flow from the liquid fuel supply line Ila into the fixed fuel pipe Illa and thence into the member ll, which is screw threadedor otherwise adiustablymounied, as, at II, in relation to the outer end of the tube 0.
It will be realized that, whereas Ihave described and illustrated a practical and operative device,
- matic, rather than as limiting me to my precise The use and operation of my invention are as follows:
I provide a heating device in which a liquid fuel, such as liquid hydrocarbon, may be burned.
I have illustrated my device in connection with a structure suitable for a hot water heater, but it will be understood that I may app y it to space heaters, furnaces, or the like, or any other heating means. I
Basically. I employ an inlet passage of substantially greater capacity than is necessary for the mere supply of a liquid fuel to be burned. In all forms of my, device I illustrate the air inlet passage 1 of substantial cross sectional area, which may receive air at its open top or end and deliver the air inwardly along the passage is The liquid fuel is admitted either by the junction of the liquid fuel line H with the bottom of the passage I or else through the oil inlet tube 2! and past the valve 23. As a substantial length of the passage is subjected to the heat of combustion 2,sss,417
ary air as to maintain a zone of combustion directly adJacent the passage 9,. It, so that the liquid fuel is properly vaporized and the primary mixture superheated.
I may employ any suitable means for controlling the rate of fuel flow inwardly along the lines I I or 80.,As float chambers and the like are well known in the art, I am not indicating any particular means in the drawings.
I find it" advantageous to provide meansfor H cutting ed the supply of. fuel, which means is efl'ective bothwhen the flame is extinguished and when for any reasontoo much liquid fuel passes the valve 23, which last condition may arise from adjustment or mal-adiushnent or the various valves.
In other words, two valve means are provided, one of which is directly controlled by the bucket II and itscontrolling lever, and the other by the Invar rod II and its cooperation with the passage member I. Q
' As illustrated in l ig. 4, I provide anInvar rod II and a valve member which is opposed to a valve seat 24 'on the oil inlet 2|, the Invar rod being adiustably mounted on the'paasage member 0. When the burner is cool, no oil can pass by the valve II. In other words, to start the burner oil would have to be bypassed around the valve 28 in sumcient quantity partially to fill the bucket ll, which would then shut off the supply through the stem 4 I. As soon as the liquid fuel in the cup ll hasburned away, the cup will raise and open the valve II. In the meantime, however, the tube I, having expanded, will "open the If ,the adjustment of the various valves is such that too much liquid fuel passes the valve member within the member I, the area through which the mixture of primary air and liquid fuel flows is particular situation natural draft is not sumcient,
I may employ a motor-driven fan, or other suitable means not herein shown. I
I Fuel is supplied in sufilcient volume to' maintain a fire which will subject the passage member 0 to a temperature sui'ilcient to vaporize the liquid fuel and to superheat the final mixture. When the mixture escapes from the downturned end It of the passage 9, it receives suiiicient secondary air in the space defined by the drum I to produce 28, it will then drop down into the bucket I5 and shut off any further supply until the liquid fuel in the bucket has been burned.
If the flame is extinguished, both safety devices come into play. By the contraction of the tube I, the valve 23 is closed. But should this not close fast enough and a certain amount of liquid enters the .cup or bucket 4|, then the bucket drops to the dotted line position of Fig. 5 and closes the master valve 4|.
I claim:
inlet pipe extending generally horizontally a substantial distance into the chamber at a level intermediate the top and bottom of the chamber and terminating in a discharge end, said air inlet pipe having an exterior air inlet portion adapted to admitoutside air for movement through the pipe and into the burner chamber, a liquid fuel pipe, of substantially smaller diameter than the air inlet pipe, in'communication with the interior of the air inlet pipe, at a point substantially heatioi' combustion in the, Iii-outside connection for liquid fuel pipe of substantially smaller diameter 7 element and having 0.
spaced from the discharge end of the air inlet pipe, and means for controlling the how of liquid fuel through said fuel pipe and into the air inlet pipe, the bottom of the air inlet pipe being generally horizontal, the liquid fuel being in contact with the bottom of said air inlet pipe, and the air inlet pipe being directly subjected to the heat of combustion taking place within the burner chamber.
2. In combination, in a liquid fuel burner, a burner chamber, and flue means therefor, an air inlet pipe extending generally horizontally a substantial distance into the chamber at a level intermediate the top and bottom of the chamber and terminating in a discharge end, said air inlet pipe having an exterior air inlet portion adapted to admit outside air for movement through the pipe and into the burner chamber, a liquid fuel pipe, of substantially smaller diameter than the air inlet pipe,,in communication with the interior of the air inlet pipe, at a point substantially spaced from the discharge end of the air inlet pipe, and means for controlling the flow of liquid fuel through said fuel pipe and into the air inlet pipe, including a fixed valve element, and an Invar rod secured to the air inlet pipe and having a valve portion opposed to said fixed valve element, the bottom of the air inlet pipe being generally horizontal to cause a relatively slow flow of the liquid fuel 'therealong, in contact with the bottom of said air inlet pipe, and the air inlet pipe being directly subjected to the heat of combustion taking place within the burner chamber.
3. In combination, a combustion chamber-and fiue means therefor, an air inlet passage element 4 extending a substantial distance into the combustion chamber, and subjected directly to the heat of combustion in the combustion chamber, an outside connection for said air passage, a liquid fuel pipe of substantially smaller diameter than the air inlet passage in communication with the interior of the air inlet passage, a normally fixed valve element for the pipe and'an Invar rod normally fixed in relation to the air inlet passage element and having a valve member at one end thereof adapted to be opposed to said normally fixed valve element, the length of the air inlet passage element between said fixed valve element and theinner end of the passage, along which the fuel which passes said valve flows, being sumcient in relation to the cross sectional area of the passage element to permit the vaporization of said liquid fuel in the interior of said air inlet passage, in response to the heat to which the passage is subjected. 4. In combination, a combustion chamber and means therefor, an air inlet passage element extending a substantial distance into the combustion chamber, and subjected directly to the combustion chamber, said air passage, a
than the airinlet passage in communication with the interior of the air inlet passage, a normally fixed valve element for the pipe and an Invar rod normally fixed in relation to the air inlet passage valve member at one end thereof adapted to be opposed to said normally fixed valve element, the length of the air inlet passage element between said fixed valve element and the inner end of the passage, along which the fuel which passes said valve flows, being sufllcient in relation to the cross sectional area of the passage element to permit the vaporization of said liquid fuel in the interior of said air'inlet passage, in response to the heat to which the passage is subjected, and means for adjusting said normally fixed valve element toward and away from said valve member.
5. In combination, a combustion chamber and flue means therefor, an air inlet passage element extending a 'substantial'distance into the combustion chamber, and subjected directly to the heat of combustion in the combustion chamber, an outside connection for said air passage, a liquid fuel pipe of substantially smaller diameter a than the air inlet passage in communication with the interior of the air inlet passage, a normally. I
fixed valve element for the pipe and an Invar rod normally fixed in relation to the air inlet passage element and having a valve member at one end thereof adapted to be opposed to said normally fixed valve element, the length of the air, inlet passage element between said fixed valve element and the inner end of the passage, along which thefuel which passes said valve flows, being sufficient in relation to the cross sectional area of thepassage element to permit the vaporization of said liquid fuel in the interior of said air inlet passage, in response to the heat to which the passage is subjected, and additional means for cutting of! 85 or reducing the fuel flow upon the delivery to the burner 01' an excess of liquid fuel.
6; In combination, a combustion chamber and flue means therefor, an air inlet passage element extending a substantial distance into the combustion chamber, and subjected directly to the heat ofcombustion in the combustion chamber, an outside connection for said air passage, a liquid fuel pipe of substantially smaller" diameter than the air inlet passage in communication with the interior of the air inlet passage, a normally fixed valve element for the pipe and an Invar rod normally fixed in relation to the air inlet passage element and having a valve member at one end thereof adapted to be opposed to said. normally fixed valve element, the length of the air inlet passage element between said fixed valve element and the inner end of the passage, along which the fuel which passes said valve flows, being sufllcient in relation to the cross sectional area of the passage element to permit the vaporization of said liquid fuel in the interior of said airinlet passage, in response to the heat to which the passage is subjected, and additional means for cutting of! or reducing the fuel fiow upon the delivery to the burner 01' an excess of liquid fuel, including bucket means adapted toreceive excess liquid fuel, said bucket means being adjacent and beneath the discharge end of the air inlet passage element, and a valve in said liquid fuel pipe, and an actuating connection between said valve and said bucket means.
James L. BREESE.
US411329A 1941-09-18 1941-09-18 Liquid fuel burner and thermal control valve therefor Expired - Lifetime US2355417A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2514891A (en) * 1946-05-09 1950-07-11 Charles J T Mcpherson Gravity feed wickless fuel oil fired heater
US2518364A (en) * 1946-10-19 1950-08-08 Surface Combustion Corp Direct fired air heater
US2716975A (en) * 1951-11-14 1955-09-06 Hartzell Industries Combustion type air heater for drying purposes
DE1052044B (en) * 1957-03-20 1959-03-05 Eugen Laible K G Bowl burner
US4401101A (en) * 1980-12-01 1983-08-30 Lunde Martin R Wood-fired boiler and storage system

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2514891A (en) * 1946-05-09 1950-07-11 Charles J T Mcpherson Gravity feed wickless fuel oil fired heater
US2518364A (en) * 1946-10-19 1950-08-08 Surface Combustion Corp Direct fired air heater
US2716975A (en) * 1951-11-14 1955-09-06 Hartzell Industries Combustion type air heater for drying purposes
DE1052044B (en) * 1957-03-20 1959-03-05 Eugen Laible K G Bowl burner
US4401101A (en) * 1980-12-01 1983-08-30 Lunde Martin R Wood-fired boiler and storage system

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