US2193085A - Liquid fuel burner - Google Patents

Liquid fuel burner Download PDF

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US2193085A
US2193085A US120901A US12090137A US2193085A US 2193085 A US2193085 A US 2193085A US 120901 A US120901 A US 120901A US 12090137 A US12090137 A US 12090137A US 2193085 A US2193085 A US 2193085A
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conduit
pipe
fuel
burner
plate
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US120901A
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Beetschen Charles
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D5/00Burners in which liquid fuel evaporates in the combustion space, with or without chemical conversion of evaporated fuel

Definitions

  • Another object of the invention is to provide a burner of the kind referred to operating without example, two preferred forms of the burner according to the invention.
  • Fig. 1 shows a vertical sectional view of one form for use in connection with a small sized stove for heating a room for example.
  • Fig. 2 is a vertical section, according to the median plan of the second preferred form of burner to be used with a boiler furnace.
  • Fig. 3 is an outside front view of this second embodiment.
  • the stove shown diagrammatically in Fig. 1 consists of a stove body I, provided with an exhaust chimney 2.
  • the stove may be of the kind commonly used for heating a room andoperated either by coal or wood, but in the use of the burner according to the invention, the discharge door and the ashpit are kept closed to prevent the air as far as possible from entering through said openings.
  • the burner shown in Fig. 1 comprises a substantially cylindrical, and vertical air admission conduit 3 substantially cylindrical in shape, vertical and it being preferably located centrally in the top portion of the furnace I.
  • This conduit is provided with a flange 4, extending at a right angle of the conduit body 3, and replacing.
  • a vertical pipe 5 constitutes the means for supplying the liquid fuel.
  • This pipe carries a funnel 6 at its upper end, into which the fuel issupplied by means of a device (not shown) for causing the fuel to drip, the amount of flow being adjustable.
  • the pipe 5 is arranged axially within the conduit 3 and is maintained in place by screw means I, mounted in a collar 8, carried by a supportil secured to the flange 4; thereby rendering the position of the outlet end of the pipe 5 V 5 relative to the outlet of the conduit 3.vertically adjustable.
  • a perforated baffle plate l9, carried by the lower endof the pipe 5 is disposed between said end and the outlet opening of the conduit 3. 10
  • a circular solid plate ll smaller in diameter than the baflie plate [5 and carried by the latter, is disposed slightly beneath the outlet end of the pipe 5.
  • a perforated support [2 carrying a cup l3 1 is fixed to the conduit3 by means of the two arms M, attached in any convenient manner to a flange l5 enclosing the conduit in an adjustable manner by means of a bolt 16 and its nut l1, thereby also regulating the space between the 20 cup l3 and plate ll. 1
  • the liquid fuel dripping into the funnel 6 flows through the pipe 5 to the lower end of the 35 outlet of the pipe, where said fuel is ignited.
  • a pad which is carried by an iron wire, soaked in a liquid fuel, ignited and which is then introduced through the conduit 3 to be discharged onto the bafile plate l0.
  • the bafile plate l0 prevents the admission of air current from blowing out the initially small flame.
  • the burner shown in Fig. 1 can easily be used for all kinds. of stoves, boilers, and the like and does not require to be constructed in a great variety of sizes; in fact, the flange l can be of k 5 to a boiler l designating the wall of the boiler furnace.
  • This boiler and its furnace can be of the type commonly used, but the discharge door and the ash pit are kept closed to prevent the air as far as possible from entering through said openings.
  • the air conduit for this burner comprises a vertical cylinder 3a terminating at its upper end in a slanting cylindrical portion 3b extending in an inclined plane from the body portion .3a.
  • the portion 3b of the air admission pipe carries a plate or flange 4 near its inlet opening thus forming a substantial support for the burner on a heater.
  • Plate 4 engages the wall I of the furnace and takes the place of a door for closing the discharge opening 4a of the furnace.
  • the fuel pipe comprises a vertical body portion 5a and a slightly slanting branch portion 5b extending in an inclined plane from the body portion and terminating at its upper free end in a funnel 6 which receives the liquid fuel to be sup-plied by means of a fuel dripping device (not shown) the rate of flow of which is adjustable.
  • the portion 5a of the pipe 5 passes through the axis of the conduit 3a and is kept in place by means of a 1 nut 1 adjustable on the upper threaded end of the a bore in the plate 9.
  • an outlet opening 50 At the lower end of the portion 5a is an outlet opening 50, the position of which can be adjusted in height by means of the nut I.
  • This baflle plate is ordinarily disposed between the outlet opening 50 of the fuel and the outlet opening of the conduit.
  • At its upper end the rod 20 slides freely within
  • This cranked lever has a slot 25 in which a projection of the rod 20 is engaged. It will easily be seen that by pulling or pushing the knob 2
  • the admission end of the conduit formed by the free end of the portion 3b, has bifurcated part 26 serving to guide the portion of the pipe 5 situated just below the funnel ii, when the nut 1 is operated.
  • the lower end of the portion 50 has attached thereto a cup 13, resting on the bottom of a basin l2, formed by a curved plate, the object conduit 30. admitting natural air and of the outlet 5c of the pipe 5 supplying the fuel.
  • This conduit 21 likewise comprises a slanting portion 21b in parallel with the portion 31); the free end of the portion 211) extends through the plate 4 and opens freely in the open like portion 3b.
  • the lower end of the portion 21a. or outlet end of the conduit 21 is flattened to cause the air issuing from said conduit to assume the shape of a fanlike jet sliding along the wall of the basin I2, before passing to the outlet opening of the conduit 3 and of the pipe 5.
  • the plate 4 has an opening which is ordinarily closed by a door 28.
  • the burner operates as follows:
  • the door 28 is opened to introduce a small quantity of easily inflammable liquid such as petroleum in the cup I3, or a wisp of tow is placed in the basin l2.
  • the liquid or the tow is ignited and the fuel dripping device, supplying the ordinary fuel to the funnel 6 is opened,
  • the fuel dripping into the funnel flows throughthe pipe 5 to the outlet opening 50.
  • it is vaporized by the petroleum or by the burning tow and thus the burner is ignited. Once the ignition.
  • a draught is produced through the main air admission conduit Band through the supplementary air admission conduit 21, owing to the natural draught of the chimney.
  • the liquid fuel continuing to reach the opening 50 is vaporized and. burns owing; to the air arriving through the admission pipes.
  • the supplementary air admission ,2? causes the air it supplies to act on theflame so asto spread it,
  • the burners shown and described are simple in construction and permit of burning liquid fuels, of a great variety which need not necessarily be pure; in fact, these fuels may contain solid bodies without their interfering withthe operation of the burner, the latter not having any spraying means'with an opening of small size so as to be likely to become obstructed. Contrary, in the burners shown, the outlet of the conduit supplying the fuel is of large size, it providing a sure passage without restriction for the fuel, even if bafile relatively to said delivery ends thereby to.
  • baflle plate pre- I v2,193,085 conduit being so directed that the air issuing therefrom is delivered in the same direction as that delivered by the first conduit.
  • a burner for liquid fuels comprising in combination, a fuel-supply pipe and an airadmission conduit disposed in coaxial relation and coextensive throughout the major portion of their length, said fuel-supply pipe having an outlet orifice disposed slightly below the delivery end of said conduit, a liquid fuel combustion basin secured to said pipe below said .outlet orifice, a baifi-e plate movably encircling said pipe between said basin and the delivery end of the conduit, and means operable outside of the burner for moving said battle plate to vary its position between the outlet orifice of the fuel pipe and the delivery end of the conduit, the delivery of air through said conduit being effected by naturaldraft.
  • a burner for liquid fuels comprising in combination, a fuel-supply pipe and an airadrnission conduit disposed in coaxial relation and coextensive throughout the major portion of their length, said fuel-supply pipe having an outlet orifice disposed slightly below the delivery end of saidconduit, a liquid fuel combustion basin secured to said pipe'below said outlet orifice, means for moving said fuel-supply pipe thereby to vary the distance between its outlet orifice and the delivery end of the conduit Without changing the relation between said orifice and the combustion basin, a baflie plate movably encircling said pipe between said basin and the delivery end of the conduit, and means operable outside of the burner for moving said bafile plate to vary its position between the outlet orifice ofthe fuel pipe and the delivery end of the conduit, the delivery of air through said conduit being effected by natural draft.

Description

March 12, 1940.
c. BEETSCHEN 2,193,085
LIQUID FUEL BURNER Filed Jan. 16. 1937 2 Shets-Sheet 1 DINVENIOR: CHHRLES BEETSCHEN HTTORNEY' March 12, 1940. c. BEETSCHEN LIQUID FUEL BURNER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 16, 1937 INVENTORI m u 5 H E B. S
FITTORNE Y Patented lVlar. 1 2, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFEE LIQUID FUEL BURNER Charles Beetschen, Les Plantaz", Nyon, Switzerland Application January 16, 1937, Serial No. 120,901
In Switzerland January 20, 1936 l 3 Claims.
, the small passages by impurities contained in the fuel.
Another object of the invention is to provide a burner of the kind referred to operating without example, two preferred forms of the burner according to the invention.
Fig. 1 shows a vertical sectional view of one form for use in connection with a small sized stove for heating a room for example.
' Fig. 2 is a vertical section, according to the median plan of the second preferred form of burner to be used with a boiler furnace.
Fig. 3 is an outside front view of this second embodiment.
In the drawings, thesame reference numerals designate like parts.
The stove shown diagrammatically in Fig. 1 consists of a stove body I, provided with an exhaust chimney 2. The stove may be of the kind commonly used for heating a room andoperated either by coal or wood, but in the use of the burner according to the invention, the discharge door and the ashpit are kept closed to prevent the air as far as possible from entering through said openings.
The burner shown in Fig. 1 comprises a substantially cylindrical, and vertical air admission conduit 3 substantially cylindrical in shape, vertical and it being preferably located centrally in the top portion of the furnace I. This conduit is provided with a flange 4, extending at a right angle of the conduit body 3, and replacing. the
ordinary furnace closure, or cover.
A vertical pipe 5 constitutes the means for supplying the liquid fuel. This pipe carries a funnel 6 at its upper end, into which the fuel issupplied by means of a device (not shown) for causing the fuel to drip, the amount of flow being adjustable. The pipe 5 is arranged axially within the conduit 3 and is maintained in place by screw means I, mounted in a collar 8, carried by a supportil secured to the flange 4; thereby rendering the position of the outlet end of the pipe 5 V 5 relative to the outlet of the conduit 3.vertically adjustable. o
A perforated baffle plate l9, carried by the lower endof the pipe 5 is disposed between said end and the outlet opening of the conduit 3. 10
.A circular solid plate ll, smaller in diameter than the baflie plate [5 and carried by the latter, is disposed slightly beneath the outlet end of the pipe 5.
A perforated support [2 carrying a cup l3 1 is fixed to the conduit3 by means of the two arms M, attached in any convenient manner to a flange l5 enclosing the conduit in an adjustable manner by means of a bolt 16 and its nut l1, thereby also regulating the space between the 20 cup l3 and plate ll. 1
The operation of the burner shown in Fig. 1 is as follows: v
The liquid fuel dripping into the funnel 6 flows through the pipe 5 to the lower end of the 35 outlet of the pipe, where said fuel is ignited. To ignite it, use can be made of a pad which is carried by an iron wire, soaked in a liquid fuel, ignited and which is then introduced through the conduit 3 to be discharged onto the bafile plate l0.
The normal draught of the chimney 2'causes fresh air to enter for combustion, through the conduit 3 in the direction of the arrow I8. The
fuel therefore ignites on issuing from the pipe 5 andaccording to the amount of the fuel fed, the combustion will be limited at the outlet end of said pipe, or will extend over the plate H. In some cases, it could terminate in the cup 13. If
due, toan excessive supply the fuel should fill qt up the cup pan and overflow, it would finish burning on the perforated table H. The flames rise around the conduit 3, but cannot within the conduit owing to the draught of the stove. The bafile plate l0 prevents the admission of air current from blowing out the initially small flame.
The adjustment in height of the baiile plate l0 and of the plate H as well as the table I2 is efiected generally only once according to the nature of the draught of the stove to which the burner is applied.
The burner shown in Fig. 1 can easily be used for all kinds. of stoves, boilers, and the like and does not require to be constructed in a great variety of sizes; in fact, the flange l can be of k 5 to a boiler l designating the wall of the boiler furnace. This boiler and its furnace can be of the type commonly used, but the discharge door and the ash pit are kept closed to prevent the air as far as possible from entering through said openings.
The air conduit for this burner comprises a vertical cylinder 3a terminating at its upper end in a slanting cylindrical portion 3b extending in an inclined plane from the body portion .3a. The portion 3b of the air admission pipe carries a plate or flange 4 near its inlet opening thus forming a substantial support for the burner on a heater. Plate 4 engages the wall I of the furnace and takes the place of a door for closing the discharge opening 4a of the furnace. The fuel pipe comprises a vertical body portion 5a and a slightly slanting branch portion 5b extending in an inclined plane from the body portion and terminating at its upper free end in a funnel 6 which receives the liquid fuel to be sup-plied by means of a fuel dripping device (not shown) the rate of flow of which is adjustable. The portion 5a of the pipe 5 passes through the axis of the conduit 3a and is kept in place by means of a 1 nut 1 adjustable on the upper threaded end of the a bore in the plate 9.
pipe portion 5a. This threaded portion freely extends through a plate 9, closing the upper end of the conduit 3a. It will easily be seen that by burning the nut l in either direction, the section 5a can be axially displaced either upward or downward.
' At the lower end of the portion 5a is an outlet opening 50, the position of which can be adjusted in height by means of the nut I.
A perforated bailie plate ll], secured to bythe lower end of a vertical rod 20, is adapted to slide freely over the part adjacent the lower end of the pipe section 5a of the pipe 5. This baflle plate is ordinarily disposed between the outlet opening 50 of the fuel and the outlet opening of the conduit. At its upper end the rod 20 slides freely within In order to operate the rod 20 axially, a bar 22 linked to a crank lever 23 pivoted at 24 to the conduit section 31); extends through the plate 4 and carries at its outer free end a knob 21. This cranked lever has a slot 25 in which a projection of the rod 20 is engaged. It will easily be seen that by pulling or pushing the knob 2|, the cranked lever 23 is made to oscillate either in one direction or in the other,
thereby causing an upward or downward movement both of the rod 20 and of the bafiie plate Ill. The admission end of the conduit, formed by the free end of the portion 3b, has bifurcated part 26 serving to guide the portion of the pipe 5 situated just below the funnel ii, when the nut 1 is operated. i
The lower end of the portion 50. has attached thereto a cup 13, resting on the bottom of a basin l2, formed by a curved plate, the object conduit 30. admitting natural air and of the outlet 5c of the pipe 5 supplying the fuel. This conduit 21 likewise comprises a slanting portion 21b in parallel with the portion 31); the free end of the portion 211) extends through the plate 4 and opens freely in the open like portion 3b. The lower end of the portion 21a. or outlet end of the conduit 21 is flattened to cause the air issuing from said conduit to assume the shape of a fanlike jet sliding along the wall of the basin I2, before passing to the outlet opening of the conduit 3 and of the pipe 5.
The plate 4 has an opening which is ordinarily closed by a door 28.
The burner operates as follows:
The door 28 is opened to introduce a small quantity of easily inflammable liquid such as petroleum in the cup I3, or a wisp of tow is placed in the basin l2. The liquid or the tow is ignited and the fuel dripping device, supplying the ordinary fuel to the funnel 6 is opened, The fuel dripping into the funnel flows throughthe pipe 5 to the outlet opening 50. Here, it is vaporized by the petroleum or by the burning tow and thus the burner is ignited. Once the ignition.
being effected, a draught is produced through the main air admission conduit Band through the supplementary air admission conduit 21, owing to the natural draught of the chimney. The liquid fuel continuing to reach the opening 50 is vaporized and. burns owing; to the air arriving through the admission pipes.
The flamesrise around the conduit 3, but cannot ascend inside the conduit l owling to the draught of the furnace. vents the admission current of ordinary airfrom blowing out the flame, yet small in size. The supplementary air admission ,2? causes the air it supplies to act on theflame so asto spread it,
so that a complete combustion and a satisfactory...
operation of the burner are obtained.
Although the burner described with reference to Figs. 2 and 3 is advantageously applied in connection with the heating of boilers (either boilers with central heating or steam engines for example) it is of course to be understood that it may likewise be applied to furnaces of various types.
The burners shown and described are simple in construction and permit of burning liquid fuels, of a great variety which need not necessarily be pure; in fact, these fuels may contain solid bodies without their interfering withthe operation of the burner, the latter not having any spraying means'with an opening of small size so as to be likely to become obstructed. Contrary, in the burners shown, the outlet of the conduit supplying the fuel is of large size, it providing a sure passage without restriction for the fuel, even if bafile relatively to said delivery ends thereby to.
regulate the flame according to the draft, and a supplementary air-admission conduit coextensive with said first conduit and having its delivery end disposed adjacent to the delivery ends of said first conduit and said pipe, said.s'upplementary;-
The baflle plate pre- I v2,193,085 conduit being so directed that the air issuing therefrom is delivered in the same direction as that delivered by the first conduit.
2. A burner for liquid fuels, comprising in combination, a fuel-supply pipe and an airadmission conduit disposed in coaxial relation and coextensive throughout the major portion of their length, said fuel-supply pipe having an outlet orifice disposed slightly below the delivery end of said conduit, a liquid fuel combustion basin secured to said pipe below said .outlet orifice, a baifi-e plate movably encircling said pipe between said basin and the delivery end of the conduit, and means operable outside of the burner for moving said baiile plate to vary its position between the outlet orifice of the fuel pipe and the delivery end of the conduit, the delivery of air through said conduit being effected by naturaldraft.
3, A burner for liquid fuels, comprising in combination, a fuel-supply pipe and an airadrnission conduit disposed in coaxial relation and coextensive throughout the major portion of their length, said fuel-supply pipe having an outlet orifice disposed slightly below the delivery end of saidconduit, a liquid fuel combustion basin secured to said pipe'below said outlet orifice, means for moving said fuel-supply pipe thereby to vary the distance between its outlet orifice and the delivery end of the conduit Without changing the relation between said orifice and the combustion basin, a baflie plate movably encircling said pipe between said basin and the delivery end of the conduit, and means operable outside of the burner for moving said bafile plate to vary its position between the outlet orifice ofthe fuel pipe and the delivery end of the conduit, the delivery of air through said conduit being effected by natural draft.
CHARLES BEETSCHEN. so
US120901A 1936-01-20 1937-01-16 Liquid fuel burner Expired - Lifetime US2193085A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2418709A (en) * 1944-03-18 1947-04-08 Oil Devices Inverted pot type burner
US3021833A (en) * 1958-10-20 1962-02-20 Kohorst Joseph Heater

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2418709A (en) * 1944-03-18 1947-04-08 Oil Devices Inverted pot type burner
US3021833A (en) * 1958-10-20 1962-02-20 Kohorst Joseph Heater

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