US2342154A - Machine for operating on the back parts of shoe uppers - Google Patents

Machine for operating on the back parts of shoe uppers Download PDF

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US2342154A
US2342154A US418236A US41823641A US2342154A US 2342154 A US2342154 A US 2342154A US 418236 A US418236 A US 418236A US 41823641 A US41823641 A US 41823641A US 2342154 A US2342154 A US 2342154A
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machine
movement
head
mold
plate
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US418236A
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Lester S Macdonald
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D11/00Machines for preliminary treatment or assembling of upper-parts, counters, or insoles on their lasts preparatory to the pulling-over or lasting operations; Applying or removing protective coverings
    • A43D11/12Machines for forming the toe part or heel part of shoes, with or without use of heat

Description

MACHINE FOR OPERATING oN THE'BACK PARTS 0F SHOE UPPERs Filed NOV. 7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet l l l l l I I l l Feb. L S. MACDONALD MACHINE FOR OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS OF SHOE UPPERS Filed Nov. 7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 2 Feb. 22, 1944. L. s. MACDONALD 2,342,154
MACHINE FOR OPERATING oN THE BACK PARTS oF SHOE UPPERS Filed Nov. 7. 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 5 E TignL Feb. 22, 1944. s. MACDONALD 2,342,154
MACHINE FOR OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS OF SHOE UPPERS Filed Nov. 7, 1941 12 sheets-sheet 4 Ti g5.
Feb- 22, 1944- L. s. MACDONALD MACHINE FOR OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS OF SHO UPPERS Filed Nov. "7, i941 v 12 sheets-sheet s *wm i g7 NVE/www 4.2m
Feb. 22, 11944. L.. s. MACDONALD 2,342,154 MACHINE FOR'OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS OF SHOE UPPERS Filed Nov. '7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 6 Fi gt3.
Feb 22 1944- L s. MAcDoNALD MACHINE FOR OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS OF SHOE PPERS Filed Nov. 7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet '7 Feb. 22, 19.44. L, s MACDQNALD y 2,342,154
Av1/ENTE@ QQSRLMM k y I V AF1 gwl Feb."22, 1944. L, s, MACDQNALD 2,342,154
MACHINE FOR OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS OF SHOE UPPERS Feb 22, 1944-` l. s. MAcDoNALD MACHINE FOR OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS OF SHOE UPPERS Filed Nov. 7. 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 10 VEN TU@ Fb. 22, 1944. i s. MAcDoNALD 2,342,154
MACHINE FOR OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS OF SHOE UPPERS Filed NOV. 7, 1941. 12 SheebSi-Sheelb 11 Fi y 205 z/z Feb. 22, 1944. L s. MACDONALD l2,342,154 MACHINE FOR OPERATING ON THE BACK PARTS 0F SHOE UPPERS l Filed Nov. .7., 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 12 mmmmrum Sm ovm owmnw QN SNSN QS es Q QQQSSQNC utul. UZEEU to the crimping plate.
Patented Feb. 22, 1944 MACHINE FOR OPERATING 0N THE BACK PARTS OF SHOE UPPERS Lester 'S. Macdonald,
United Beverly, Mass., assignor to Shoe Machinery Corporation,
Flemington,`N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application November 7, 1941, Serial No. 418,236
72 Claims.
This .invention relates toma'chines for operating upon shoe parts and more particularly to machines for shaping the back parts of shoe uppers. The invention is herein illustrated with reference to that type of machine having provisions vfor molding the back part .of a shoe upper substantially to final shape and forming thereon a heel-attaching flange.
In the Amolding the back parts of shoe vuppers with a heel-attaching flange, it is desirable to crimp or corrugate the lasting margin around the heel end prior to forming Vthe flange in order to insure uniform pleating around the heel end when the lasting margin is subsequently turned inwardly to avoid the formation of wrinkles the outer surface of the upper which would impair the appearance of the finished shoe. To this end and as a feature of the invention the machine herein illustrated includes a work support or inner mold shaped like the heel portion of a last, adjacent to which is a crimping plate arranged to support the overhanging lasting margin of an upper mounted on the support. Wipers cooperate with the crimping plate to preform the lasting margin by forming heightwise corrugations therein after which the crimping plate is retracted to permit the wipers to turn the lasting margin inwardly over the adjacent face of the inner mold.
In order to produce a well-denned heel-seat line further to improve the appearance of the nished shoe, it is desirable to stretch the upper slightly relatively to the lasting margin. This is accomplished in accordance 4with a further feature of the invention by .mounting the work support or inner mold for movement relatively After the lasting margin has been crimped by the wipers on the crimping plate, the inner mold is moved rearwardly of the shoe which stretches the upper relatively to the lasting margin and produces a well-defined heel-seat line. This movement `of the .inner mold may also be utilized in accordance with another feature of the invention to stretch an intramarginal portion of the 'back part during the formation of the heel-seat line. By so stretching an intramarginal portion of the back part, the danger of the back part losing its shape after the molding operation has been completed will be minimized. As herein illustrated, this stretching of the intramarginal portion may be accomplished by providing the inner mold with a movable plug in an intramarginal portion of the heel end. 'This plug is normally urged to a position in which it extends outwardly of the inner mold but may be moved inwardly until .it forms a continuation of the surface of the mold. When the back part its mounted on the inner mold it will rest on the movable plug and the crimping plate with the portion between these members being unsupported. As the wipers move to crimp the lasting margin on the crimping plate an outer mold clamps the back part on the plug so that upon movement of the inner mold to stretch the back part and form the heel.
seat line, that portion of the back part bridging the plug and the crimping plate will also be stretched.
The outer mold may be made in two parts which are hinged together and are arranged to be moved toward each other `to apply molding pressure to the sides of the back part. While this type of mold is generally satisfactory, when operating on certain kinds of work a nn or ridge may be formed in the outer surface of the back part along `the line between the two parts of the mold which may impair the appearance of the finished shoe. To insure against this, and .in accordance with another feature of the invention, the outer mold may be made solid thereby eliminating any joint at the back which might pinch the leather `and form a projecting fin or ridge. To permit relative movement of the inner and outer molds to mold the backpart between them, the walls of the solid outer mold are made divergent from the back end of the mold, which is in turn curved sharply to conform to the shape of 'a last. The sides of the outer mold may be made somewhat yielding so that after the work has been clamped between the inner and outer molds, the sides of the outer mold may be moved inwardly to mold the corresponding portions of the backpart.
To facilitate loading the machine and in accordance with a still further feature of the invention, the inner mold on which the Work is supported is mounted for movement from aposition in which it underlies the outer mold to a position in which it is out of register therewith As the outer mold moves downwardly to grip the work between it and the inner mold and to clamp the lasting margin on the crimping plate the inner mold is moved inwardly into the path of movement of the outer mold.
The wipers by which the lasting margin is initially corrugated and later turned inwardly to form an attaching flange are carried for movement with a head which also supports the outer mold, the wipers also being movable relatively lfo the head. The wipers are normally held in separated relation as they move with the head but upon relative movement between the wipers and the head they are moved inwardly toward each other. Accordingly, as the head moves the outer mold and wipers toward the inner mold and crimping plate, the wipers initially contact the extreme heel end of the lasting margin, after which they are unable to move as a unit with the head. Accordingly, further movement of the head causes the wipers to move inwardly and close around the crimping plate thereby to grip the lasting margin rmly and crimp it.
In accordance with a further feature of the invention, means under the control of the operator are provided whereby the machine may go through its entire cycle of operation automatically, or may be caused to come to rest prior to the stretching operation, to permit the operator to inspect the work.
Various novel features of the invention are further to be recognized in the fluid-pressure means by which the various working parts of the machine are operated, and valves for controlling the ow oi uid under pressure to the fluid-pressure means to cause the parts of the machine to be operated automatically in a predetermined time relation.
The above and other features of the invention, including various novel details of construction and combination of parts, will now be more particularly described by reference to the accompanying drawings and pointed out in the claims.
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a front elevation of one form of machine in which the invention is embodied;
Fig. 2 is a side elevation partly in section of the machine shown in Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a front elevation partly in section of a portion of the machine, this View being taken on a larger scale than Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a section on the line IV-IV of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a sectional view through the lower portion of the machine, illustrating a portion of the fluid-pressure operated mechanism of the machine;
Fig. 6 is a vertical section through an intermediate portion of the machine, illustrating more of the fluid-pressure mechanism, this section being taken at a right angle to that of Fig. 5;
Fig. '7 is a sectional view of the control valves by which each portion of the cycle of operation is started;
Fig. 8 is a front elevation partly in section of the upper portion of the machine illustrating a work piece positioned in the machine and the parts in their initial positions before operation of the machine is started;
Fig. 9 is an exploded view of the mechanism by which the lasting margin of the back part is first crimped and subsequently anged;
Fig. 10 is a plan view partly in section of the inner mold, the crimping plate and the mechanism for moving the crimping plate toward and away from the mold;
Fig. l1 is a section taken on the line XI-XI oi Fig. 4;
Fig. 12 is a section through one of the valves of the machine;
Fig. 13 is a section taken on the line XIII- XIII of Fig. 6 and illustrating the mechanism for operating the distributor valve;
Figs. 14 to 18 inclusive are sectional views taken through the ports A to E respectively of the rotary distributor valves, the valves being in the positions assumed at the beginning of the cycle of operation;
Fig. 19 is a vertical section through the inner and outer molds, showing a modified form of outer mold;
Fig. 20 is a front elevation of the molds of Fig. 19;
Fig. 21 is a section on the line XXI- EQU of Fig. 19;
Fig. 22 is a vertical section through the upper portion of the machine illustrating a further modification of the invention; and
Fig. 23 is a chart illustrating graphically the sequence of operations of the machine, the letters thereon corresponding to the similarly identified parts of the valves in Fig. 6.
The machine illustrated herein includes a frame composed of a lower casing member or base I0 (Figs. 1 and 2), an intermediate casing member I2 and an upper casing member I4. Since the machine herein illustrated is operated by power through the action of fluid-pressure means, the upper portion of the lower casing member i0 is formed to provide a reservoir or sump for the operating fluid, preferably oil. Seated on the casing I0 and located within the casing I2 is a housing I6 having formed therein a plurality of cylinders to be hereinafter described. The upper casing section I4 supports a vertically slidable head I8 which carries an outer mold 2U (Fig. 4) and a pair of wiper plates 22. The work to be operated upon is supported upon an inner mold 24 which is shaped substantially like the heel portion of a last. The inner mold is mounted at the upper end of a jack 2E arranged for vertical movement, and just rearwardly of the inner mold is supported a crimping plate 28 mounted for rearward movement relatively to the inner mold. The wipers 22 cooperate with the crimping plate 28 upon downward movement of the head I8 to crimp the lasting margin of the back part of a shoe upper which has been placed on the inner mold 24, after which the back part is stretched relatively to the lasting margin and molded between the inner and outer molds as will be more fully described hereinafter. The crimping plate is then moved away from the inner mold to permit further downward movement of the wipers to turn in the llange against the adjacent surface of the inner mold after which pressure is applied by the inner mold and the wipers to mold or set the flange.
The head I8 is provided at its upper portion with extensions or tongues formed by the projecting edges of a plate 3U (Figs. 1, 3 and 9) secured to the head. These tongues are arranged to slide in ways formed between flanges I9 (Fig. 2) projecting laterally from the upper casing member I4 and plates 32 secured thereto. Pairs of spaced ears 34 extending laterally from each side of the head I8 are pivotally connected to the upper ends of vertically extending rods 36 the lower ends of which extend downwardly through the housing I6 (Fig. 5) and are secured by yokes 38 and pins 40 to laterally extending arms 42 of a piston 44. The head I8 is normally maintained in its uppermost position as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 by springs 46 surrounding the rods and acting between collars 43 (Fig. l) secured to the rods and bushings 50 (Fig. 5) having flanges at their upper ends which rest upon the adjacent surfaces of the housing I6 and the casing I4. Near the lower ends of the rods and above the yokes 38 are provided metallic washers 52 between which are interposed washers 54 of felt or like material. These washer assemblies` .engage shoulders in thecasis'ng I4 Vand housing 'I6 to limit' The. outer mold 2|!v comprises a pair of mold members 56 (Fig. 3J) pivoted at their upper ends by pins '58 (Figs. 3 and 4) to a support 60. The support 6I) is in turn secured to a slide 62 by a retractible pin 64 which permits ready removal of the outer mold assembly to permit replacement thereof; The pin 64 is normally held in position (shown in; Fig. 4) by a locking pin 66 the lower end of which lits into an annular groove 68 in the pin 64, the pin 66 being vertically slidable in a plate 'Ill movable with the slide 62 in a slide-way formed` inthe front of the head |8i. A spring l2 urges the pin 66 into locking engagement with the pin 64.. The slide 62 is formed at the `lower end of an upwardly extending rod I4 slidable in a vertical; bore formed in thek head |8' and provided ati-ts upper end with lock nuts 'I6 which limit down; ward movement of the slide 62 relatively to the head. The upward movements of the slide 62 vand the outer mold members carried thereby relatively to the head are opposed by compression springs I8 acting between thev head I8 and the slide 62'.`
The outer mold members 56 are normally held apart by a hairpin spring 80 (Fig. 3) the lower ends of which are connected by pins 8l to the mold members so that upon Ydownward movement of the head and of the outer mold, the heel portion of the upper near the back seam will be engaged before the Outer mold applies any pressure along the sides of the Aback part to mold it to the shape of the inner mold. n The lower portions of the outer mold are not moved toward each other until sufficient pressure is applied between the inner and outer molds to cause relative movement between the outer mold and the head 8 and compression of the springs 18. The outer surfaces of the mold members 56 have cams 82 formed thereon which cooperate with cam rolls 84 mounted on levers 86 pivoted at v88 to the head I 8.
rlhese levers are normally held in the positions .5.
illustrated in Fig. 3 by tension springs 98 which hold the outer ends of the levers against yieldable stops S2, mounted for sliding movement in the head I8. The stops 92 are provided'with reduced upwardly extending shank portions 94 which eX- c' tend through plugs 96 threaded into the head. Springs S8 acting between the stops ,92 and the plugs 96 force the stops downwardly to aposition determined by lock nuts |80 threaded onto the upper ends of the shanks 94. moved downwardly relatively to the outer mold, the cam rolls 84 ride over the cam surfaces 82 to force the lower portions of the outer mold toward each other against the action of the spring Bil. This movement of the portions of the outer mold acts to force the sides of the backpart .against the sides of the inner mold 24 to conform the back part. to the shape of the. innermold. lTo prevent the pressure between the lower portions of the outer moldand the back part from becoming excessive. the levers will yield by compressing the springs 98 which back up the stops 92 thus preventing damage to the back part or to the machine.
'I'he wiper plates 22 (Fig. 4) Yare carried for downward movement with the head I8 and the outer mold 20 and are also movable relatively to the mold. These wiper plates are pivoted together at |82 (Figs. 4 and 9) and are mounted on a pair of plates |94. The plates |04 have rear- As the head is wardly extending sleeves |06 within which are mounted retractible pins I |18 normally urged forwardly by springs H8 (Fig. 4). Handles |I'2 on the. rearward ends of the pins I 8.8 permit their retraction to facilitate replacement of the wiper members on the supporting plates |84.
The supporting plates |84 are provided with circular peripheral grooves I|3 (Fig. 9) arranged to t over correspondingly shaped tongues II4 on a plate I6 arranged for vertical movement relatively to. the head I8. The platev IIB is mounted between the head I8 and the plate 38 which is secured to the head by screws |22 (Fig. 8). The plate H6 is connected to the plate 3|) for downward movement with the head by pins |24 (Figs. 4 and 9), passing through slots |26 in the plate 30, the pins being normally maintained against the lower ends of the slots by springs |28 acting between the pins |24 and pins |38 in the plate 38. The plate |I|- is thus conned between `the head I8 and the plate 3l) and normally moves downwardly with the head. However, the pinand-slot connection between the plate l||6 and theplate 3l) permits downward movement of the head and the outer mold relatively to the plate lI. The wipers being secured by pins l 88 to the plates |84 which are in turn mounted for arcuate movement on the plate ||6Nwill move vertically with the plate, these wipers being confined between the plates |84 and the head I8. As shown in Fig. 9, corrugations or ribsI32 are formed part way around the work-engaging surfaces of the wipers to crimp the lasting margin of the upper around the heel end as the wiper members move downwardly to esseri-,pressure on that portion of the lasting margin which overlies the crimping plate 28.
The peripheral portions of the wiper-supporting plates Hill are providedl with teeth |34 which mesh with rack teeth |36 at the lower portions of gear racks |38. These racks are confined between the outer edges of the plate H6 and the contiguous portions of the head I8 andthe plate 30, but lare arranged for vertical sliding movement relatively to the head. On'the samel side of the racks |36 as the teeth |36 are second sets of rack teeth its arranged for engagement with gears |42 'having pivots |44 passing through bearings it@ in the plate H6. The gears |42 also enga-ge .teeth M8 on a floating rack |58 arranged to slide between tongues |52 and |54 on the-plate i i8. The upper rearward sides of the racks |33 are provided with third sets of rack teeth M6 which mesh with gear segments |58 mounted on the forward ends of arms |60 which pass through slots |62 in the plate 38. The arms |58 are each lJ-shapedr when viewed in plan asvindicated in 9 and embrace rearwardly extending bearing members |64 on the plate 30 to which they are pivcted. The adjacent legs of the U-sha`ped arms carrying the gear segments connected together by a web |66 so that the segments will move as a unit. I
The adjacent portions of the arms |68 extend upwardly to form `bearings |68 (Fig. 4) in which is journaled a shaft il@ supporting a slide |12. This .slide embraces an upwardly extending arm |714 mounted on the forward end of a rod |16 slidably mounted in a bearing |'l8 in the upper vcasing member |4. This construction permits downward movement of the head I8 with its plate 3,8 carrying the gear segments |58 as a unit relatively to the rod |15 while permitting pivotal movement of the gear segments relatively to the head upon sliding movement of the rod When the head I8 is rst moved downwardllT from the position shown in Figure 4, the plate H8 carrying the wiper members and associated parts will move with the head as a unit as long as no resistance to such movement is encountered. During this time the slide |10 connected to the gear segments |58 will move downwardly relatively to the arm |14 extending upwardly from the rod |18. The wiper members 22 are so held during the initial downward movement, as will be later described, that they will initiall-y contact only the extreme back part of the lasting margin of the upper which overlies the crimping plate 28. The crimping plate is so arranged relatively to the inner mold 24 that the lasting margin is engaged by the wipers before that portion of the back part overlying the inner mold 24 is engaged by the outer mold. After the wipers have thus engaged the lasting margin they will not move further downwardly as the head continues to descend so that the head and the plate 30 secured thereto will descend relatively to the plate H6 carrying the wipers. During this time, however, the gear segments |58 carried by the plate 30 fast to the head will continue to descend, thus moving the racks |38 downwardly relatively to the wiper-supporting plate IIS. racks |38 will cause the wiper-supporting plates |04 to move arcuately on the plate I I8 so that the lower portions of the wipers will approach each other thereby to clamp the lasting margin along the sides of the crimping plate 28 and to conform the lasting margin to the crimping plate. The floating rack |50 which engages the adjacent portions of the gears |42 will be caused to move upwardly in response to downward movement of the racks |38, such upward motion being transmitted to the floating rack through the gears |42. The function of this center floating rack will appear as the description proceeds. It will thus be apparent that as the head descends to mo-vethe wipers and the outer mold into engagementfwith the work supported on the crimping plate and the inner mold, the lasting margin will rst be clamped between the crimping plate and the wipers and then the plate 30 carried by the head will move downwardly relatively to the plate H carrying the wipers so that the pins |24 which pass through the slots |28 in the plate 38 will no longer be seated in the bottoms of these slots. Downward movement of the outer mold and head as a unit relatively to the wipers during the rst part of the cycle of operation of the machine continues until a surface |18 (Fig. 4) on the inner end of the slide 82 engages an adjacent surface of the wipers.
This downward movement of the f .The position of the wipers when the ma- Y vchine is at rest is determined by the position of the rod |16 (Fig. 4) by which movement is later imparted through the gear segments |58 to the racks |38. This rod extends rearwardly outside of `the casing I 4 and passes through a cap |80 secured to the rear portion of the casing I4. The rearward Yend of the rod is reduced at |83 and a collar |85 provided with a flange |81 is mounted on the reduced portion. A spring |82 coniined between the flange on the collar and nuts |84 threaded onto the outer end of the rod maintains the shoulder on the rod |16 formed by the reduced portion |83 in contact with the flange on the collar |82. A bell crank lever |88 (Fig. 4) is pivoted at |88 to the casing I4, the upper arm of this bell crank lever being pivotally connected by a crosshead |90 to the rod |16. The other arm of the bell crank lever is urged downwardly by a pair of springs |92 connected between the bell crank lever and a pin |04 secured to the frame of the machine. The springs |02 urge the rod forwardly of the machine and maintain the flange |81 of the co1- lar in engagement with the cap |80. These springs are of less capacity than the spring |82 which is thus effective to maintain the shoulder of the rod in engagement with the ilange of the collar in the absence of a force additional to the force of the springs`|92 acting on the rod, so that the rod assumes the position illustrated in Fig. 4 with the wipers in open positions when the machine is at rest.
The extreme upper end of the head I8 is slotted at |96 (Figs. 3 and 8) and the upper end of this slot is closed by a block |98 secured to the head by screws 200. An adjustable stop screw 202 is threaded through the block in alinement with the floating rack |50 (Figs. 4 and 8) and acts by engagement with the top face of the oating rack |50 to limit its upward movement as the racks |38 are lloeingfmoved downwardly in response to forward movement of the rod |16 (Fig. 4). Pivoted to the block |98 is a latch 204 (Fig. 9) which is normally urged inwardly of the machine by springs 206 having their upper ends secured by pins 208 to forwardly extending arms oi the latch 204. The lower ends of these springs are secured to pins 2|0 secured to the block |98 so that thesel springs urge the latch in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 4 from the position illustrated. When the head I8 is in its uppermost position the latch 204 is held in the position illustrated in Fig. 4 against the force of the springs 208 by engagement of a rearwardly extending arm 2I2 secured to the latch with the under surface of a bracket 2I4 secured to the top of the casing I4. Upon downward movement of the head I8 the arm 2 I2 moves out of engagement with the bracket 2|4 so that the latch is moved rearwardly to its locking position by the springs 288. When the latch is in its normal position, its lower end is arranged to engage a notch 2I6 (Fig. 9) formed in the upper portion of the rack |50 so that the rack will be held by the latch in its uppermost position after it has been moved thereto through the action of the racks |38, the purpose of which will appear more fully hereinafter.
Carried by the latch are a pair of rearwardly extending screws 220 (Fig. 9.) on which are slidably mounted sleeves 222 (Fig. 4) urged rearwardly by springs 224 conned between the forward ends of the sleeves and the back surface of the latch. These sleeves form resilient abut-v ments arranged to be engaged during a certain part of the cycle of operations of the machine by the slide |12 upon forward movement of the rod |16 to move the latch out of engagement with the rack |50.
The inner mold 24 and the crimping plate 28 are mounted at the upper end of the jack 26, the lower end of which is connected to a piston 230 by a T-slot connection 23| (Figs. 3 and 5). This piston is slidable in a cylinder 232 (Fig. 4) formed in the upper part of the housing I6. When the machine is in its loading position, the jack and piston are held by gravity in the positions illustrated, these positions being determined by the adjustment of a wedge 234. This wedge .thereof with which engage plates 24| (Figs.
is adjustably securedrtoV the casing I4 by alserew 23S the body portion of which extends through an elongated slot 238 in the wedge and is threaded into the casing |4. The wedge has an inclined surface 2461 on which a vsimilarly inclined surface of the jack 26 rests when the jack is in its lowermost position. T o prevent any rotative movement of the jack and the piston relatively to the cylinder 232 the piston is provided with at surfaces 239 (Figs. 4 and 5) at opposite sides The lower portion ofthe mold 24 has an aper-v ture 256 which receives a spring-pressed detent 252 (Figs. 4 and 9) on the supporting plate 246 removably to secure the inner mold thereon. To facilitate removal of the inner mold from the supporting plate 246 a slidable pin 254 is mounted in the mold 24 in alinement with the springpressed detent 2,652 to facilitate moving the detent rearwardly out of locking engagement with the mold.
At the forward edge of the inner mold 24 is mounted a gage plate `256 for facilitating positioning of the back part on the inner mold with its back. seam centrally disposed thereon. The gage plate 2.56 is mountedv on a pin 256 adjustably held in, a bore in the mold 24 (Fig. 4) by a set screw 256. The gage plate l256 may also serve if desired. tov determine the heightwise position of the back parten the mold. n
The crimping plate 23 straddles the inner moldsupporting plate 24.6 ,(Fig. 9) so that it maymove rearwardly with respect to the mold 24 from 4the position of Figure 4. This crimping plate has `a tongue-andgroove connection 26| with a `supporting member 266' (Fig. 4). Adjustab'ly secured to the upper surface of the supporting member 266 by a screw-and-slot connection 262 is a plate 264 which forms a support for a gage plate 266. This gage plate (Fig. 10) is yieldingly mounted on the supporting member 264 by a pair of pins 268 passing rearwardly through thesupporting member 264 and being threaded at their rearward ends to receive nuts 216. Springs 212 are positioned between the gage plate 266 and the supporting member 264 to urge vthe gage plate forwardly to a position determined by the nuts. This gage plate serves vto locate the lasting inargin on the crimping plate and may yield rearwardly if necessary during the crimping operation when thel wiper plates 22 exert pressure on the lastingmargin.
The supporting member 266 is provided at its rearward end with a T-shaped tongue 214 (Fig.
10) which fits into a vertical, correspondingly shapedslot `in the forward portion of a cylinder housing 216. The supporting member Vis rigidly secured in position to the forward-- portion of the cylinder housing by screws 218 (Figs.
l4 and 9) so that the cylinder housing, the supplate. `vthe'jawsA away from the crimping plateas indigrooved portions 2814 and 286 respectively of the machine frame. This construction permits forward and rearward movement of the cylinder housing 216 while preventing vertical movement thereof. This cylinder housing is normally 'maintained in a forward position as shown in Fig. 4 by a spring 288 connected between the rearward portion of the. cylinder housing and the pin |94 in the frame.
The cylinder housing encloses a double piston member 290 (Fig. 4) having a large piston 292 and a small piston 294 received by cylindrical portions 296 and 293 respectively of the cylinder The forward' end of the piston member 266 has av vertical T-shaped slot 362 (Fig. 10) for receiving a correspondingly shaped tongue 364 (Fig. 4) of the supporting plate 246 for-the inner mold. Thus the inner mold .and
the piston member 290 are locked together against relative horizontal movement whereas vertical movement of the inner mold relative to the piston member and the crimping plate 28 is permitted. The vpiston member 296 is slotted at 366 n ear the forward portionto receive cylindrical members 36.8 at the lower end of an. arm SID (Figs. 4 and 10), the upperend of which is pivoted at 3| 2 to an arm 3|4 depending from the` bearing |18. Between `the Yends of the larm 3|0 there is pivoted a Vrocl '3|6 which extends through a bushing 3|8 engaging the outer sur.- `faceof the frame, the rod being threaded at' its outer end to receive nuts 32|] which engage the outer surface of the bushing to prevent movement 4of the rod forwardly of the machine. Thus, movement of the arm 3|!) forwardly ,of the machine or to the left as viewed in Figure 4l is prevented so that the piston member 2861s constrained against movement'forwardly of the machine from the position `ofF'igure 4. Al spring 322 positioned between the cylinder housing 216 and the piston member 290. urges vthe piston member rearwardly of the cylinder housing but when the machine is at rest' the cylinder' housing is maintained by the spring 28B' in the position shown in Figure 4; in which position the .crimping plate is adjacent to the inner mold 24.
AProvision is made for l'iojlding the lining of the `back part tight after thek back' part .has been placed on the inner mold 2.4V to prevent of the lining during vthe molding operation. Also, by applying a heightwise tension to the llining relatively to the upper; the top edge of the upper ispulled tightly against the mold and curled inwardly sufficiently to'hide the 190D edge of the lining. For this purpose thesides4 of the crimping `plate at their lower -portions are provided with vertical groovesv 329 (Fig. 9;) with which cooperate gripper jawsj adjustably secured by screws 332 1:0 blocks 334- which are pivotedat 336150 the memberg266 supporting `the crimping plate. Spring-pressed'piungers 328 (FigsfS and 10) interposed between the forwardl edge` of the cylinderV housing l.216. and the rearward 4surface of the blocks 364;A urge'thebloclzsl in a direction to move the gripper jaws toward 'the crimping Provision is made, however-)for holding cated in Fig. 10V when the machiney is at rest.
' lliepending from lthe blocks 334- which support 7ol flanges `3464 the rearwardgportions' of which en- .theygripper` Ljaws' are rearwardiy converging.
he gripper vjawstoward V,the crimping facilitate moving the latches 342 out of engage- A ment with the flanges 346 of the gripper-supporting blocks so that the spring plungers 338 (Fig. 9) acting on the gripper-supporting blocks 346 are effective to move the grippers toward the crimping plate and to grip a lining which has been inserted between the gripper jaws and the crimping plate to hold it rmly on the crimp'- ing plate. Upon release of the latches, their upper surfaces will engage the under surfaces of the flanges 346 as shown in Fig. 8. During the operation of the machine, as will be later described, the crimping plate and the latches are moved rearwardly of the inner mold 24. The
work is firmly held at this time between the inner and outer molds and the grippers slide over the lasting margin and out of contact therewith. The flanges 346 are more widely spaced at their forward portions than at their rearward portions, and move out of the way of the latches 342 during rearward movement of the grippers. The latches will accordingly be returned by the springs 356 to the positions of Fig. 3. Accordingly, upon movement of the crimping plate and grippers forwardly to their initial positions, the
latches will act on the flanges 346 to open up ,Y
the grippers in readiness for another cycle of t operation.
The inner mold 24 and the crimping plate 26 are in the positions illustrated in Fig. 4 during lthe rst part of the cycle of operations of the machine, the crimping plate underlying the wipers 22 so that the lasting margin of the back part is crimped by downward movement of the wipers to facilitate subsequent turning in of the flange. At the proper time in the cycle, the..
crimping plate is moved rearward relatively to the inner mold 24 to permit further downward movement of the wipers to turn in the flange against the rearward portion of the inner` mold.
This rearward movement of the crimping plate v 'is effected, as will be later described, by the action of uid under pressure in the chamber between the rear end face of the small piston p 294 and the rear closed end ofthe cylinder housing 216, the operating fluid being admitted intot .I
ythe chamber through a tube 366 and acting to l move the cylinder housing 216 and the crimping plate rearwardly since the piston 294 is at this time constrained against forward movederstood that the inner mold is at this time in pressure engagement with the outer mold 26 thus effectively preventing forward movement of the plate 246 and the. piston member 296. In order to permit rapid rearward movement of the cylin- Vder housing 216, provision is made for allowing any of the pressure fluid in front of the large piston 292 to flow intov the space rearwardly of the large piston. This latter space is connected by a pipe 368 to the oil reservoir in the base I6. To permit flow of fluid from the space in front of the piston 292 to the space rearwardly thereof, ports 310 and 312 connected by a passageway 314 are formed in the large piston member. Flow of fluid through the passageway 314 con- `ment by reason of its connection to the platey 246 supporting the inner mold. It will be un-` y pipe 426.
necting the ports is controlled by a slide valve 316 located in a bore 316 extending through the large and small pistons. A valve actuating member 386 is located in the small piston and is connected by a reduced stem 382 to the valve. The valve is urged rearwardly to closed position by a spring 384 seated in a counterbore in the slide valve, its forward portion engaging a shoulder in the end of the valve chamber. As soon as fluid under pressure is admitted to the chamber in back of the small piston 294 to movethe cylinder housing 216 rearwardly, the pressure also acts on the outer end of the member 386 to force the valve forwardly into open position so that the operating fluid in front of the large piston may flow through it and through the pipe 368 to the sump to permit rapid movement of the cylinder housing to move the crimping plate rearwardly of the inner mold. After the crimping plate has been retracted, the wipers move downwardly and turn in the flange against the rearward surface of the inner mold, after which pressure is applied, as will be described, througha tube 396 into the chamber in front of the large piston. At this time the pressure through the tube 366 will be cut off so that the valve 316 is moved toward the right (Fig. 4) under the influence of the spring 318 to close the passageway between the ports 316 and 312 in the large piston. The cylinder housing and the crimping plate are now moved forwardly until the crimping plate engages the wipers. As the pressure in front of the large piston continues to build up after the crimping plate has been forced against the wipers, the pressure between the inner mold and the outer mold is reduced somewhat, as will appear hereinafter, so that the piston 292 is then moved rearwardly to force the inner mold toward the wipers, thereby causing molding pressure to be applied to the inwardly turned marginal portion or flange of the upper.
Initial downward movement of the head I8 to move the outer mold and Wipers into engagement with the inner mold and the crimping plate, respectively, is effected by a pair of small pistons 392 and 394 (Fig. 5). These pistons ar@ movable in cylinders 396 and 398 in the housing I6 and are connected by rods 466 to the arms 42 of the piston,44. The lower ends of the rods 466 are iianged at 462 and are received in T- slots in the upper surfaces of the arms 42. Flow of fluid under pressure to the chambers above the pistons 392 and 394 causes downward movement of the large piston 44 which, through its connection to the head I8 by the arms 36, moves the head downwardly against the force exerted by the springs 46. Fluid under pressure is supplied above the small pistons through pipes 464 connected to the outlets of a valve 466. This valve has an inlet 468 (Fig. '1) connected by a pipe 4I6 to the high pressure side of a pump 4I4 (Fig. 2) located in the lower casing member I6. The valve 466 includes a valve sleeve 4I6 which, when in the position shown in Fig. '7, permits oil to flow from the pump through the valve inlet 468 (Fig. '1) directly back to the sump in the casing I6 through ports 4I8 and This makes it impossible to build up any pressure through the passage of oil outwardly through the valve outlets 422 and pipes 464 to the pistons 362 and 394 so that the head is maintained in its uppermost position by the springs 46. However, upon movement of the sleeve 4I6 to the right (Fig. 7), communication between the portsl 448 and the' sump through pipe42il is cut off and pressure is applied through the pipes 464 to the pistons 392v and 394 to move them` and the head downwardly. e f
The valve sleeve 4|6 is connected by alink 424 (Fig. 6) to an arm 426 the upper end of which is secured to a cylindrical member 428 journaled in a housing 436 (Fig. '7). The member 428 is rocked. in a counterclockwise direction to move the .sleeve 4|6 to the right upon depression of a treadle 432pivoted on a rod 434 in the base of the machine. The rearward end of the treadle is pivoted at 436 to an upwardly extending rod 4.66. This rod extends upwardly through a pipe 446 which is threaded into the bottom wall of the casing i6 (Fig. 5) to prevent leakage of oil from the casing around the treadlerod. The upper end of the rod 438 lits intoV and is secured to a cap 442 slidable over the pipe 440 and to the cap is connected an upwardly extending arm 444. This arm has a shoulder 446 acting as a pawl to impart a rocking movement to a ratchet 448 secured by a screw 456 to the outer end of the cylindrical valve-actuating member 428. It will thus be seen that upon depression of the treadle 432 the rod 436 will move upwardly and act through the cap 442 and the pawl 446 to move the ratchet 448 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 6, whereupon the valve sleeve 4 l 6 will be moved toward the right (Figs. 6 and 7) to admit uid under pressure .to the chambers .above the pistons 392 and 394 to cause downward movement of the head I8. The ratchet 448 is normally maintained in the position illustrated in Fig. 7, by a torsion spring 452 one end of which is secured to the ratchetand the other end of which engages a pin 454 fixed to the frame of the machine. This pin also forms a stop to limit the clockwise movement of the ratchet under the iniluence of the torsion spring normally to hold the valve sleeve 4i6 in the position shown in Fig. '7. A latch 456 pivoted to `the frame of the machine at 458 engages a'shoulder 46E) on the ratchet 448 after the ratchet has been rocked to move the valve sleeve to the right so as to hold the sleeve in this position without requiring the operator to maintain his foot on the treadle. This latch 456 is urged by a spring 462 into latching position.
The upper end of the latch 466 has a lost motio-n connection 464 with one end of a link 466, the other end of which is pivoted at 468 to the upper end of thearm 444. As the latch is moved by the spring 462 into locking engagement with the ratchet 44S, a screw 4l!! in the upper end of the latch moves from one end of a slot in the link 466 toward the left into engagement with an abutment screw 412. Accordingly, when the link 466 is moved toward .the right it will move the latch out of engagement with the shoulder 460 o-n the ratchet, thereby permitting movement of the valve sleeve 416 into the position illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7 to relieve the pressure above the pistons 392 and 394. Provision is made for mov-I treadle 432, thereby causing the treadle rod 438 to be swung in a clockwise direction. This movement of the treadle rod will cause movement of the arm 444 extending upwardly from the cap 442 secured to the treadle rod to the right, thus moving the link 466 to the right and retracting the latch 456. A link 486 is also connected to the upper end of the arm 444 and is connected to mechanism to be hereinafter described for automatically retracting the latch 466 at the completion of the cycle of operations. of the machine to cause the return of the various parts to vtheir initial starting positions.
As the head is moved downwardly by the application of pressure above the pistons 392 and 394 the large piston 44 (Fig. 5) moves downwardly away from the piston 236 carrying the jack 26. To permit immediate upward movement of the piston 236 upon the application of pressure thereto and to prevent creation of a partial vacuum between the pistons 44 and 236 provision is made for admitting oil between the pistons during the descent of the head. Oil is drawn from `the sump into the space between the pistons valve chamber to prevent ilow of the operating fluid through a port 496 during the descent of the head. rThe oil is drawn upwardly through the pipe 482, passageways 496 and 566 (Fig. 5)', a port 562 near the upper end of the valve housing, and thence downwardly through the valve member 48E, ports 488 and a passageway 563, which communicates with the ports 468 and the cylinder 232 below the piston 236 so that the space between the pistons 236 and 44 will be maintained full of oil as the head descends. The piston 44 is hollow and slides over a pipe 564 secured by screws 506 (Fig. 5) to the bottom of the casing I6, the
pipe being provided with apertures 568 so that the oil may flow thereinto. This pipe forms a guide for the piston 44 and being in communication with the sump prevents building' up of pressure within the piston during its descent.
After the head has descended and the lasting margin has been gripped by the'wipers 28 and the back part has been clamped between the inner and outer molds, the machine may be caused to come to rest to permit the operator to inspect the work, after which the operator may start the machine again to complete the molding operation, or the machine may continue through its cycle of operations without any pause. Further operation of the machine is initiated by movement of a slide valve member 5H) (Fig. 7) to the right to permit oil under pressure to flow from the pump 4|4 through the pipe 4 l il upwardly into a distributor chamber 562. To the right end-of the valve member El!) is pivoted one end vlever has pivotally connected to it .a link 520 which is in turn pivotally connected to an up'- wardly extending rod 522 guided for 'vertical movement in a boss 524 (Fig. 2) on the frame of the machine. The lower end of the rod 522 is connected to the link 528 by a member 526 clamped to the rod and underlying the boss 524.
This member forms a stop to limit upward movement of the rod 52 2. The rod is urged upwardly by a spring 528 conned between a portion of the frame of the machine and the upper end of the rod normally to hold the valve 5I8 in the position illustratedin Fig. '7. The action of the spring 528 may be augmented by a spring 529 (Fig. 6) connected between the bell crank lever 5I6 and the frame of the machine at 53| further to insure that the valve will normally be held in this position. When in this position the oil within the distributor chamber 5I2 is permitted to pass to the sump by way of a port 530 in the valve and a pipe 532. Downward movement of the rod 522 to move the valve 5I8 to the right is caused by movement of a lever 534 (Fig. 2) pivoted on a shaft 536 rotatably mounted in the casing I4. The forward end of the lever 534 is provided with a hand grip 538 by which the operator may move the lever 534 downwardly if the second part of the cycle of the machine -is to be initiated manually. The rearward end of the lever is connected by links 548 and 542 to an arm 544 fast on the shaft 536. An arm 545 also fast to the shaft 536 is connected by a link 546 to one end of a bell crank lever 548, the other end of which is connected to the upper end of a link 558. The lower end of this link is pivoted at 552 to the upper end of the rod 522. Upon counterclockwise movement of the arm 545 a downward force is exerted on the rod 522 to move the valve 5I8 to the right. The link 542 connected to the upper end of the arm 544 has an upwardly extending projection 554 for engagement with the undersurface of a bracket 556 secured to the side of the housing I4. Engagement of this portion of the link 542 with the bracket during the first part of the downward movement of the lever 534 prevents relative movement of the links 548 and 542 so that they,
lever 534 and the arm 544. Accordingly, during the first part of the movement of the lever 534, movement will be imparted to the arm 544,
shaft 536 and arm 545 to connect the pipe 4I8 valve 5I8. After sufficient movement has been imparted to the arm 544 thus to move the valve, the extension 554 of the link 542 moves into a recess 568 in the bracket 556 which permits fur--i the machine should the lever 534 be moved downwardly farther than necessary.
When it is desired to eliminate the pause and have the cycle of operations continue automatically, the lever 534 is actuated during the final downward movement of the head I8 by the pistons 392 and 394. A bracket 562 (Fig. 3) is secured to the lever 534 and is provided at its upper end with a boss 564 for slidably supporting a pin 566. When the pin is in the position shown in Fig. 3 it is located in the path of movement of a rod 568 depending from the head so that during the final portion of the downward movement of the head the lever 534 will be moved downwardly by engagement of the rod 568 with the pin 566. If, however, it is desired to stop the;
in effect, form a rigid connection between the 5:45
and the distributor chamber 5I2 to operate the En machine at this time, the pin 566 may be rel tracted or moved to the right as viewed in Fig. 3 and then turned so that a shoulder 518 at the right end thereof engages a shoulder 512 on the boss 564 to hold the pin out of the path of movement of the rod 568 carried by the head.
The distributor 5I2 (Figs. 6 and 7) includes three upwardly extending fluid passageways 588, 582, and 584. The passageway 582 communivCates through a pipe 586, a valve 588 (Figs. 2
and 12), and a pipe 598, with a uuid-actuated motor 592 for turning at a predetermined rate a pair of rotary valves 594 and 596 (Fig. 6). The valve 588 through which the fluid passes to the motor 592 is illustrated in detail in Fig. 12 and includes a passageway 688, the rate of :flow through which is controlled by a valve member 682. A second passageway 684 bypasses the valve member 682 and includes a check valve 686 urged to closed position by a spring 681. When iluid under pressure passes through pipe 586, the spring is effective to maintain the check valve closed. Accordingly, the passageway 688 affords the only path for fluid pressure to the motor 592 and the rate of flow to the motor is thus readily controlled by the valve member 682 by turning it to restrict the passageway as desired. However, upon completion of the cycle of operations of the machine and the release of pressure in the pipe 588 by movement of the Valve 5I8 to the position illustrated in Fig. 7, the pressure behind the check valve 686 is relieved so that this valve is opened by the pressure at the opposite side in the pipe 598 against the action of the spring 681 inasmuch as the pressure in the large pipe 586 will drop more rapidly than the pressure in the passageway 688, thereby permitting rapid release gzpressure through the valve 588 from the motor The motor 592 comprises acylinder 6I8 (Figs. 6 and 13) containing a piston 6I2, biased toward the left, as viewed in Fig. 13, by a spring 6I4 conned between the piston and a plug 6 I 6 at the opposite end of the cylinder secured thereon by a collar 6I8. The plug 6I6 provides communication between the interior of the piston and the sump, so that there will be no change in pressure Within the piston as it is moved within the cylinder. The pipe 588 is connected to the cylinder by a fitting 628, secured thereon by a collar 622. Upon movement of the valve member 5I8 to the right (Fig. 7) and ilo-w of pressure fluid through the valve 588 and pipe 598 to the cylinder 6I8, the piston 6 I 2 is moved toward the right (Fig. 13) against the force of the spring 6I4. This movement of the piston is slow, the rate of such movement being controlled by the setting of the small valve member 682 of the valve 588.
The upper surface of the piston 6I2 is formed with rack teeth 624, which engage a gear 626 pinned to a shaft 628 extending rearwardly from the rotary valve member 596 (Fig. 6). The rotary valve 596 is connected to the valve 594 by an Oldham coupling 638, whereby these two valvesare turned, as a unit, by movement of the piston 6I2 of the motor 592.
The rotation of the valves 594 and 596 controls the remainingsteps in the Cycle of operations of the machine, as will be presently described. At theconclusion of the remaining steps in the cycle the latch 456 (Fig. 6) is automatically retracted by the following mechanism, thereby releasing the ratchetA 448, which causes movement of the parts of the machine to their initial positions by moving the valve sleeve 4 I 6 back to the position shown
US418236A 1941-11-07 1941-11-07 Machine for operating on the back parts of shoe uppers Expired - Lifetime US2342154A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2484876A (en) * 1946-05-21 1949-10-18 Milton L Dodge Machine for shaping shoe end portions
US2712663A (en) * 1952-01-19 1955-07-12 United Shoe Machinery Corp Prewelt upper shaping machines
US2719992A (en) * 1953-12-15 1955-10-11 United Shoe Machinery Corp Backpart molding machines
US2885699A (en) * 1957-03-28 1959-05-12 Anthony F Ronza Method for making shoes
US3007182A (en) * 1959-05-05 1961-11-07 Lauretti Piacentino Shoe upper shaping machine
DE1169337B (en) * 1958-08-05 1964-04-30 Eugene Alphonse Gabriel Bertra Press for loose shoe caps
DE1194736B (en) * 1959-08-12 1965-06-10 Edgar Eugene Howe Device for molding shoe uppers with an inner shape and an outer shape that can be moved against the inner shape by means of a mold clamping device
DE1225995B (en) * 1962-01-18 1966-09-29 Lowell Molding Corp Apparatus for producing footwear with a device for pressing the upper leather in the heel area against the rear area of an inner mold
US3328815A (en) * 1964-11-04 1967-07-04 Lowell Molding Corp Back part molding and heel seat lasting machine

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2484876A (en) * 1946-05-21 1949-10-18 Milton L Dodge Machine for shaping shoe end portions
US2712663A (en) * 1952-01-19 1955-07-12 United Shoe Machinery Corp Prewelt upper shaping machines
US2719992A (en) * 1953-12-15 1955-10-11 United Shoe Machinery Corp Backpart molding machines
US2885699A (en) * 1957-03-28 1959-05-12 Anthony F Ronza Method for making shoes
DE1169337B (en) * 1958-08-05 1964-04-30 Eugene Alphonse Gabriel Bertra Press for loose shoe caps
US3007182A (en) * 1959-05-05 1961-11-07 Lauretti Piacentino Shoe upper shaping machine
DE1194736B (en) * 1959-08-12 1965-06-10 Edgar Eugene Howe Device for molding shoe uppers with an inner shape and an outer shape that can be moved against the inner shape by means of a mold clamping device
DE1225995B (en) * 1962-01-18 1966-09-29 Lowell Molding Corp Apparatus for producing footwear with a device for pressing the upper leather in the heel area against the rear area of an inner mold
US3328815A (en) * 1964-11-04 1967-07-04 Lowell Molding Corp Back part molding and heel seat lasting machine

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