US2320754A - Gas burner - Google Patents

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US2320754A
US2320754A US206233A US20623338A US2320754A US 2320754 A US2320754 A US 2320754A US 206233 A US206233 A US 206233A US 20623338 A US20623338 A US 20623338A US 2320754 A US2320754 A US 2320754A
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burner
gas
housing
burners
stove
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US206233A
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Alvin G Sherman
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SHERMAN JACKSON ROOSE Co
SHERMAN-JACKSON-ROOSE Co
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SHERMAN JACKSON ROOSE Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D14/00Burners for combustion of a gas, e.g. of a gas stored under pressure as a liquid
    • F23D14/02Premix gas burners, i.e. in which gaseous fuel is mixed with combustion air upstream of the combustion zone
    • F23D14/04Premix gas burners, i.e. in which gaseous fuel is mixed with combustion air upstream of the combustion zone induction type, e.g. Bunsen burner
    • F23D14/06Premix gas burners, i.e. in which gaseous fuel is mixed with combustion air upstream of the combustion zone induction type, e.g. Bunsen burner with radial outlets at the burner head
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D2900/00Special features of, or arrangements for burners using fluid fuels or solid fuels suspended in a carrier gas
    • F23D2900/14Special features of gas burners
    • F23D2900/14064Burner heads of non circular shape

Definitions

  • This invention relates to gas burners and has particularly to do with the novel arrangement of a gas burner in a stove.
  • the present type of gas burners used especially on domestic gas ranges usually consist of a star shaped grate having holes in each prong of the' star and positioned directly below a separate grate member which supports vessels being heated.
  • One of the main objections to this old type of gas burner has been the unsightly appearance after the range has been in operation for a comparatively short time. 'I'he ame either impinges on, or comes in close contact with, the top grate prongs and causes the nish to be burned oil so that the grates become unsightly in appearance.
  • the burner grates have been made, as a rule, from cast iron alone or cast iron with a porcelain surface, and have become heated to such an extent that any nish thereon soon deteriorated and caused the burners and grates to rust. Manufacturers have been unable to overcome these objections and consequently they have devised a coverall panel which is used to cover the burners when not ln use.
  • 'Ihe burner is so constructed that it may be composed of aluminum, or ceramics which have been provided'with glazed nishes.
  • the burners are so constructed that an individual drip pan of convenient size may be removably located under each burner such that it may be removed at any time and washed along with the regular household utensils.
  • Another object of the present invention is to provide a burner which may be placed inits position simply by lowering ilnto Aa burnerw socket. No special hangers are .-necessary. Additional objects oi.' the invention have to doqwith alburner design in which there is no flame .impingement on the grates and in which: the burners are..gas cooled so that metals and other materialswitli a low melting point may ⁇ be used for the burner.
  • Fig. 1 is a perspective of a gas'rangeshowing two of the burners constructed in accordance with the present invention.- up.
  • Lv Fig. 2 is a section taken ⁇ on the lines 2?-,2 of Fig. 1. -f
  • Fig. 3 is a section. taken on the lines"f3. 3 of Flg.1.
  • s Figs. 4 and 5 are'views taken on thelines-.4-4 and 55, respectively, of Fig. 3.
  • Fig. 6 is a section takenon the line Bfi of Fig. 5.
  • This"dra'fttubevl1 is ⁇ preferably (substantially se'mi-'c'ircularfiri' cross section as shown inv Figi 3l panel Vljrepre sents the top. of an oven' hichmaybeblcated in the ledge 3i to a lighted port and the flame the lower portion of the stove. By this arrangement oven drafts will not affect the burners located in the top ofthe stove.
  • the gas supply pipe is shown at and a pet-cock lever 2
  • the burner consists of three cast or cored members, made preferably of aluminum, these being a tcp casting
  • the vcastings i6 and 24 are joined together to form a completed housing which is substantially hollow at all parts.l
  • the housing is formed as shown in the drawings with the supporting flange 26 and in- Wardiy xprojecting burner members 21.
  • the burnerv housing is entirely supported in the top rpanel of the stove ina manner-which will be described with more detail later.
  • the burner housings extend downwardly into the draft tube
  • Thevarious hollow passageways between the two castings I6 and 24 are connected by an outside-annular passageway 28 which opens to the supply passageway 29 in the casting 25.
  • outlet port holes 30 where the combustible gases are supplied to the flame.
  • which overhangsA the outlets of the holes 30.
  • the port .holes 30 are preferably drilled with a slight downward inclination from the inside to the outside. Thispermits a positioning of the ports closer to the utensil without "floating and also prevents the flame from coming in close contact with the grate prongs.
  • the ledge 3l above the flame ports serves as .a gas duct when the burner is turned to a very low simmering flame. ⁇ With this arrangement the ports will relight and consume all the gas even though the gas supply is insufficient to support the flame at all ports aty once. ⁇ .tiny gas escaping from an unlighted port will flow along will then be carried to the unlighted port to consume the available gas.
  • also protects the burner ports 30 in case of spilling on the burner. The material spilled would ⁇ tend to pass over the ports 30 and thus preventplogging. y
  • the top burner casting IB is provided with upstandinglridges .32 and 33, asshown especially in- Fig.1. These ridges are provided to form supports for vessels being heated on the burner and to permit air to pass through the burner and under the vessel.
  • the gas supply casting 25 is formed in somewhat of an Sshape witha horizontal portion 25a, as shown in Fig. 3, so that it leads from the inlet pipe 23 at the center of the burnerto the opening in the annular passageway 28.
  • the lower end of the casting 25 is flared outwardly as' at 34 to provide a mixing chamber surrounding the inlet pipe 23.
  • a plate 35 Adjustably fixed at the entrance of the chamber 35 is a plate 35 which is similar to the adjustment plates now used on gas .stove burners.
  • a dish shaped drip pan and reflector plate 31 Resting on the horizontal portion 25a of the casting is a dish shaped drip pan and reflector plate 31 which is entirely supported by the casting as will be seen from Figs. 3 and 4.
  • the casting 25 kthe pilot light.
  • the drip pan 3l is notched as at 39, so that it fits around the top vertical portion of the casting 25.
  • a small recess is formed centrally in the lower surface of the drip pan and this recess is adapted to fit over a stud 40 ⁇ formed centrally of the burne-r on the casting 25.
  • a tool may be provided which will pass down through the burner, with pan 31 removed, and engage the plate 36 to permit adjustment while the burner is lighted.
  • having flared prongs 4
  • is preferably fastened to the bottom of the draft tube by a bayonet slot arrangement so that it may be readily removed if desired.
  • a flange or rim 34a on the mixing chamber serves to ⁇ contact the prongs 4
  • a lug 42 is formed on the burner casting I6 and adapted to engage a small hole beside the burner recess to position the burner as desired.
  • Three or four embossedportions 42a arc preferably provided around the burner opening in the top of the stove so that the top rim of the burner will be spaced slightly from the stove. This will permit air to pass through the spaces thus provided and will serve to cool the burner unit.
  • a pilot light may be provided at the end of a tube 43 leading from the inlet pipe 20 to a point between the burners; This tube extends up between the burners which are equipped with a pilot transfer opening 44. This transfer opening is shown in detail in Figs.
  • Figs. 8 to 14.1 have shown various modifications of burners which are adapted for use with my invention.
  • Figs. 8, 9 and 10 a unitary construction burner is shown which is so designed that no separate and removable drip pan is necessary.
  • This burner maybe formed of two castings, a top casting 46 and a base casting 41, the two being joined at 48.
  • a mixing chamber 49 is provided which leads to an entrance passageway 50 connected with an annular passageway 5I.
  • Burner prongs 52 are provided, extending inwardly from the annular passageway 5I and having passageways 53 which lead to gas ports 54.
  • the housing which lies below the annular passageway 5I and the burner units is a dish-shaped housing /having side slots 55 through which secondary air may be furnished to the gas ports.
  • Beneath each burner passageway 53 is a supporting wall structure which is provided with an opening 55 to facilitate the passage of air through the burners.
  • Each burner prong is provided with top ridges 51 adapted to furnish support for cooking utensils resting on the burner and similarly, auxiliary ridges 58 are spaced between'ridges 51.
  • a top burner grate 53 to be formed of ceramic material and glazed and adapted to be used with an ordinary type of burner bowl 60. It will be seen l that the burner'grate 59 isprovided with inwardly extending fins 6
  • a burner an outer fuel passage in a main housing, combined grid and burner members on i said housing projecting inwardly into the space enclosed by said housing, a supply housingconnected with said main housing having a passageway -ioining said outer fuel passage, a removable pan adapted to lie under the opening in said housing, and means on said supply housing forming a support upon which said pan may rest in serve as a reector burner.
  • a top panel having, apertures therein, a burner box housing below said top panel, a gas supply tube projecting vertically into plate and drip pan for said saidl housing to a point spaced below an aperture 1 in said top panel, a burner comprising'a main housing having a fuel passage, and combined grid and burner members projecting inwardly into the space enclosed bysaid main housing, a supply housing with one end connected with said main housing having a passageway joining said fuel passage and extending for a portion of its length ina horizontal direction under said burner, and
  • a removable drippan adapted ⁇ to lie under the spac'eenclosed by ⁇ said burner housing and supported byth'e horizontal portion of said supply housing, a mixing chamber formed at the other engi ⁇ qiisaid supply housing, and means on said "'burnibo'xlhousing"around said gas tube to guide d mixing'chamber into position around said ifwlaffrs- Y l ,3,3111 a; stove-aA top panel having apertures ,j therein, a'burnerqbox housing below said top apefagas supply tube projecting vertically into sa" fhousing to apoint spaced below an aperture toppanel, a burner comprising a main housing.
  • a burner comprising a main housing having a fuel passage and combined grid and burner members projecting inwardly into the space enclosed by said housing, a supply housing connected at one end with said main housing having a passageway Joining said fuel passage and extending for a portion of its length in a horizontal direction under said burner, and a removable drip pan adapted to lie under the space enclosed by said burner housing and supported by the horizontal portion of said supply housing, a mixing chamber formed at the other end ot said supply housing and adapted to receive said supply tube, and means comprising flared prongs upstanding from a wall of said burner box housing around said tube for guiding the projecting end of said supply housing into place around said supply tube.

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  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Chemical & Material Sciences (AREA)
  • Combustion & Propulsion (AREA)
  • Mechanical Engineering (AREA)
  • General Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Gas Burners (AREA)

Description

Junerl, 1943. A. SHERMAN GAS BURNER Filed May 5, 1938 4 sheets-sheet i A .l a /llf il!!! I,
INVETOR. ZV/f? Gf 57m/'mag Y Bg, l l'ulgm AL ATTORNEYS June 1, 1943. A. G. SHERMAN GAS BURNER 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 5. 1938` IN VENTOR.
J www June 1, 1943. A. G. SHERMAN GAS BURNER 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 5, 1938 ATTORNEYS Patented June' l, 1943 UNITED STATES GAS BURNER Alvin G. Sherman, Grosse Pointe, Mich., assignor Y 'y to Sherman-Jackson-Roose Company, Detroit, Mich.,'a. corporation ot Michigan Application May 5, 193s, serial1-1o."2ms,233
4 Claims. (Cl. 126-39) This invention relates to gas burners and has particularly to do with the novel arrangement of a gas burner in a stove.
The present type of gas burners used especially on domestic gas ranges usually consist of a star shaped grate having holes in each prong of the' star and positioned directly below a separate grate member which supports vessels being heated. One of the main objections to this old type of gas burner has been the unsightly appearance after the range has been in operation for a comparatively short time. 'I'he ame either impinges on, or comes in close contact with, the top grate prongs and causes the nish to be burned oil so that the grates become unsightly in appearance. Also, the burner grates have been made, as a rule, from cast iron alone or cast iron with a porcelain surface, and have become heated to such an extent that any nish thereon soon deteriorated and caused the burners and grates to rust. Manufacturers have been unable to overcome these objections and consequently they have devised a coverall panel which is used to cover the burners when not ln use.
With the previous stove designs, there has also been diiculty with what is called a oating flame which occurs when an oven is lighted which is below a burner on the top of the stove. This is caused by reason ofthe drafts from the oven which pass through the top burners causing the flame to actually'lift from the burner. Previous constructions have also includeda drip pan which extends below all of the two or f our burners on a stove and which is of an ungainly size and consequently diflicult to clean.
'Ihe burner is so constructed that it may be composed of aluminum, or ceramics which have been provided'with glazed nishes. The burners are so constructed that an individual drip pan of convenient size may be removably located under each burner such that it may be removed at any time and washed along with the regular household utensils.
An object of the present invention is to`pro- Avide a burner which is pleasing in appearance and which will remain so over a long period of use. Another object of the invention is to provide a burner which may be removed from the stove and washed simply by lifting it from its resting place. In present stove designs itis necessary to remove the top grate of the stove and go to considerable effort in removing the cast iron burners to clean them.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a burner which may be placed inits position simply by lowering ilnto Aa burnerw socket. No special hangers are .-necessary. Additional objects oi.' the invention have to doqwith alburner design in which there is no flame .impingement on the grates and in which: the burners are..gas cooled so that metals and other materialswitli a low melting point may `be used for the burner.
` Other features and objectspof.theinventlonhave to do with the construction .whichy eliminates lighter tubes, permits a very low simmering flame,
` and prevents a smothered flame and the yresultant 'escape of unburned gases. vThe 4invention .also
contemplates a stove ldesgnin ,whlch thereI will be no floating of the'top bur-ner `names regardless of the operation of the oven. v`Other features and objects ofl thev invention will be .made clearln-the following description. A '1 l 'In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a perspective of a gas'rangeshowing two of the burners constructed in accordance with the present invention.- up. Lv Fig. 2 isa section taken `on the lines 2?-,2 of Fig. 1. -f
Fig. 3 is a section. taken on the lines"f3. 3 of Flg.1. s Figs. 4 and 5 are'views taken on thelines-.4-4 and 55, respectively, of Fig. 3. f f
Fig. 6 is a section takenon the line Bfi of Fig. 5. l
Referring to' Figs. .land 2;"a'izstove ltopislshown at l5 as in a regularmo'dern typeofngasstove. and grates I6 are'shown located in spaced yrelation in the stove top.'v Supported beneath the stove top lis a drafttube or burner 'boxhousing I1 which extends from theback'tovthe front of the stove andwhlch'- is 'conx'ie'c'tedfl at the rear end to 'an air passagewayflll. f'The" front V'end of the draft tube I1 ris closed. i This"dra'fttubevl1 is` preferably (substantially se'mi-'c'ircularfiri' cross section as shown inv Figi 3l panel Vljrepre sents the top. of an oven' hichmaybeblcated in the ledge 3i to a lighted port and the flame the lower portion of the stove. By this arrangement oven drafts will not affect the burners located in the top ofthe stove.
The details of the grates IG and also of the entire burner arrangement are best shown in the vertical section of Fig. 3 and in the plan views of Figs. 4 and 5. Referring to Fig. 3, the gas supply pipe is shown at and a pet-cock lever 2| admits gas to a pipe 22 which enters the lower portion of the draft tube |1. Projecting upwardly from the pipe 2 and from the lower portion of the tube |1 is an adjustable orifice unit 23 which serves as an inlet pipe. In the modification shown in Fig. 2, the burner consists of three cast or cored members, made preferably of aluminum, these being a tcp casting |6, forming the grate, a bottom casting 24, and a supply 'casting 25. The vcastings i6 and 24 are joined together to form a completed housing which is substantially hollow at all parts.l The housing is formed as shown in the drawings with the supporting flange 26 and in- Wardiy xprojecting burner members 21. The burnerv housing is entirely supported in the top rpanel of the stove ina manner-which will be described with more detail later. The burner housings extend downwardly into the draft tube |-1 in such a way that the mixing chamber of the burner is suspended near the bottom of the tube |1.
Thevarious hollow passageways between the two castings I6 and 24 are connected by an outside-annular passageway 28 which opens to the supply passageway 29 in the casting 25. Along the lower edge of the burner members 21 are provided outlet port holes 30 where the combustible gases are supplied to the flame. Directly above the rows of port holes 30, which extend in spaced relation around the burners 21, is a ledge 3| which overhangsA the outlets of the holes 30. The port .holes 30 are preferably drilled with a slight downward inclination from the inside to the outside. Thispermits a positioning of the ports closer to the utensil without "floating and also prevents the flame from coming in close contact with the grate prongs. The ledge 3l above the flame ports serves as .a gas duct when the burner is turned to a very low simmering flame.` With this arrangement the ports will relight and consume all the gas even though the gas supply is insufficient to support the flame at all ports aty once. `.tiny gas escaping from an unlighted port will flow along will then be carried to the unlighted port to consume the available gas. The ledge 3| also protects the burner ports 30 in case of spilling on the burner. The material spilled would `tend to pass over the ports 30 and thus preventplogging. y
The top burner casting IB is provided with upstandinglridges .32 and 33, asshown especially in- Fig.1. These ridges are provided to form supports for vessels being heated on the burner and to permit air to pass through the burner and under the vessel.
The gas supply casting 25 is formed in somewhat of an Sshape witha horizontal portion 25a, as shown in Fig. 3, so that it leads from the inlet pipe 23 at the center of the burnerto the opening in the annular passageway 28. The lower end of the casting 25 is flared outwardly as' at 34 to provide a mixing chamber surrounding the inlet pipe 23. Adjustably fixed at the entrance of the chamber 35 is a plate 35 which is similar to the adjustment plates now used on gas .stove burners.
Resting on the horizontal portion 25a of the casting is a dish shaped drip pan and reflector plate 31 which is entirely supported by the casting as will be seen from Figs. 3 and 4. The casting 25 kthe pilot light.
is formed with outwardly extending horizontal prong members 38 which furnish adequate support for the drip pan 31 in conjunction with the horizontal portion 25a, of the actual casting. The drip pan 3l is notched as at 39, so that it fits around the top vertical portion of the casting 25. A small recess is formed centrally in the lower surface of the drip pan and this recess is adapted to fit over a stud 40 `formed centrally of the burne-r on the casting 25. A
In the adjustment of this plate 36, a tool may be provided which will pass down through the burner, with pan 31 removed, and engage the plate 36 to permit adjustment while the burner is lighted.
Fastened to the bottom of the draft tube I 1 and positioned around the inlet tube 23 is a metal stamping 4| having flared prongs 4|avwhich serve to guide the lower portion 34 of the burner into position as the burner is lowered into place through the opening in the top of the stove. yThe stamping 4| is preferably fastened to the bottom of the draft tube by a bayonet slot arrangement so that it may be readily removed if desired. A flange or rim 34a on the mixing chamber serves to `contact the prongs 4|a and thus prevents disturbing of the adjustment of plate 36 on the mixinx chamber. A lug 42 is formed on the burner casting I6 and adapted to engage a small hole beside the burner recess to position the burner as desired. Three or four embossedportions 42a arc preferablyprovided around the burner opening in the top of the stove so that the top rim of the burner will be spaced slightly from the stove. This will permit air to pass through the spaces thus provided and will serve to cool the burner unit.
Since most modern stoves are equipped with a pilot tube and light it is necessary to provide the burner with ameans for contacting said light. In most previous stoves it has been necessary to provide each burner with a tube which leads t0 With my typ of burner the necessity for a tube is practically eliminated. As shown in Fig. 2, in a bank of two burners, a pilot light may be provided at the end of a tube 43 leading from the inlet pipe 20 to a point between the burners; This tube extends up between the burners which are equipped with a pilot transfer opening 44. This transfer opening is shown in detail in Figs. 5 and 6, where it will be seen that the lower casting 24 of the burner is provided with a s1ot`45 at one portion thereof, this slot being open to the annular recess 23 in the burner. When the inammable gas is admitted to the lburner by the opening of the valve, it will'pass through the slot 45 and be exposed to the pilot light which willrignite the gas passing from the slot and readily pass the flame around to the regular burner openings 30. When a four burner cluster is used (not shown) only short tubes are necessary between the pilot light and the pilot transfer openings 45.
. It will be seen that, since I have located the mixingchambers of each burner centrally thereof, they may beplaced in any burner opening in the stove. By proper locating of the hole into which the lug 42 is projected, it is possible to klocate each burner so that .the pilot transfer opening will lbe properly positioned with respect to the pilot lights.
I have thus provided a unitary burner and grate which is pleasing in appearance and elllcient in opera-tion.v Due to the fact that the ports 30 are under the ledge 3|, they are practically out of sight and since the flame from these ports impinges not on the grates, but directly on the cooking utensil, the burner will be extremely enicient in operation. Since the burner does not become unsightly after use, it is unnecessary to provide stoves with the covers lately used on gas ranges.
In old types of burners, especially those with a burner bowl and a burner unit located centrally thereof, combustion has been imperfect by reason .of the fact that heat has been reflected down- `ward from the pan being heated and has prevented the proper upward flow of secondary air between the inner aperture of the burner bowl and the burner unit. In my burner, as above described, the drip pan 31 serves also as a refiector plate. The heat radiated downward from the'pan being heated is reflected by the pan 31 and, in addition, the secondary air flows undisturbed from the draft tube around the edges of the pan 31 .to the burners. It will be noticed also that in my burner the outlet burner ports are always a fixed distance from the grates. With previous designs the burner unit has been supported independently by crossv rods mounted below the grates and it has been difcult to keep num which has a fairly low melting point,.may
Y the burners are gas-cooled and there'is no direct flame impingement. In addition, such refractory,M
be' used without a disintegration from heat since ample. 2700 F. to provide the proper glazed finthese rods from sagging. Burner ports were often f located at an improper distance from the grates. With my construction the entire unit is supported from the top of the stove. No cross bars are necessary and no adjusting is necessary as far as the vertical position of the burners is concerned.
Users of the ordinary gas burners sometimes remove the top grates when heating, for example, a wash boiler or other large vessel. When these grates are removed the passageways intended for escape of the products of combustion are closed and thel result is a smothered burner with the possibility of escape of unburned gas. With my construction it is impossible to remove the supporting grate without removing the burner. Consequently the hazard of a smothered `burner is removed.
In Figs. 8 to 14.1 have shown various modifications of burners which are adapted for use with my invention. In Figs. 8, 9 and 10, a unitary construction burner is shown which is so designed that no separate and removable drip pan is necessary.
This burner maybe formed of two castings, a top casting 46 and a base casting 41, the two being joined at 48. Referring to the cross section in Fig. 9, it will be seen that a mixing chamber 49 is provided which leads to an entrance passageway 50 connected with an annular passageway 5I. Burner prongs 52 are provided, extending inwardly from the annular passageway 5I and having passageways 53 which lead to gas ports 54. The housing which lies below the annular passageway 5I and the burner units is a dish-shaped housing /having side slots 55 through which secondary air may be furnished to the gas ports. Beneath each burner passageway 53 is a supporting wall structure which is provided with an opening 55 to facilitate the passage of air through the burners. Each burner prong is provided with top ridges 51 adapted to furnish support for cooking utensils resting on the burner and similarly, auxiliary ridges 58 are spaced between'ridges 51.
It will be recognized that with the burner construction which I have shown it is possible to use materials which have, heretofore, been impractical for gas burners. For example, alumi- `a substantially horizontal position where it will Y ish, they will be able to resist any`he'at*tos which they are subjectedand remain with-'fan attractive glossy finish. Also, vthese ceramicfgburners do not conduct heat to valves and gascocks-and consequently the operation'of thesecocks'. is not influenced by expanding and contractingff''lihe ceramic burners may be 'made invarious'. colors to match the general stovecnstruction i'n'wwhich they are to be used. l
In previous constructions the-gas cocksmsed for regulating the. supply of gas `to vburners have ture. In my design the gas cocks are located outside the burner box or draft tube I1 but withinv the stove. Consequently, heat does not pass readily to the lgas cocks and they may be vmade with less expensive materials.
In Figs. 11, 12, 13, and. 14, I have shownother modifications of my invention. Fig. 11, for example, shows a type of burner which is particularly adapted to ceramic construction since the holes may be molded therein and the burner may be formed of two molds which are placed together before firing, thus obviating the necessity of a core. In 12 I have shown a top burner grate 53 to be formed of ceramic material and glazed and adapted to be used with an ordinary type of burner bowl 60. It will be seen l that the burner'grate 59 isprovided with inwardly extending fins 6|' and 62 which furnish a support for utensils being used over the gas fire.
What I claim is:
1. In a burner, an outer fuel passage in a main housing, combined grid and burner members on i said housing projecting inwardly into the space enclosed by said housing, a supply housingconnected with said main housing having a passageway -ioining said outer fuel passage, a removable pan adapted to lie under the opening in said housing, and means on said supply housing forming a support upon which said pan may rest in serve as a reector burner. e
2. In a stove, a top panel having, apertures therein, a burner box housing below said top panel, a gas supply tube projecting vertically into plate and drip pan for said saidl housing to a point spaced below an aperture 1 in said top panel, a burner comprising'a main housing having a fuel passage, and combined grid and burner members projecting inwardly into the space enclosed bysaid main housing, a supply housing with one end connected with said main housing having a passageway joining said fuel passage and extending for a portion of its length ina horizontal direction under said burner, and
a removable drippan adapted` to lie under the spac'eenclosed by` said burner housing and supported byth'e horizontal portion of said supply housing, a mixing chamber formed at the other engi `qiisaid supply housing, and means on said "'burnibo'xlhousing"around said gas tube to guide d mixing'chamber into position around said ifwlaffrs- Y l ,3,3111 a; stove-aA top panel having apertures ,j therein, a'burnerqbox housing below said top apefagas supply tube projecting vertically into sa" fhousing to apoint spaced below an aperture toppanel, a burner comprising a main housing. having av fuel passage, and combined idi--fandfjburner 'members projecting inwardly the s'pace enclosed by said main housing, a A p17' `housing connected with said main housing 'having 'a passageway joining said fuel passa e'andjextending for a portion of its length horizontal direction under said burner, and a Aremovable drip .pan adapted to lie under the nclosed by said burner' housing and supj y* j'bythe horizontal portion of said supply v' housing, a mixing chamber, an adjusting plate `fastened over said mixing chamber, means on said burner box housing for guiding said mixing chamber into place around saidk supply tube, and
means on s aid supply housing adjacent said adjusting plate to contact said guiding means and prevent contact with said adjusting plate.
4. In a stove, a top panel having apertures therein, a burner box housing below said top panel, a gas supply tube projecting vertically into said housing to a point spaced below an aperture in said top panel, a burner comprising a main housing having a fuel passage and combined grid and burner members projecting inwardly into the space enclosed by said housing, a supply housing connected at one end with said main housing having a passageway Joining said fuel passage and extending for a portion of its length in a horizontal direction under said burner, and a removable drip pan adapted to lie under the space enclosed by said burner housing and supported by the horizontal portion of said supply housing, a mixing chamber formed at the other end ot said supply housing and adapted to receive said supply tube, and means comprising flared prongs upstanding from a wall of said burner box housing around said tube for guiding the projecting end of said supply housing into place around said supply tube. ALVIN G. SHERMAN.
US206233A 1938-05-05 1938-05-05 Gas burner Expired - Lifetime US2320754A (en)

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Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2506483A (en) * 1944-06-05 1950-05-02 Forrest S Bechtold Stove-top burner and air shield
US2560959A (en) * 1946-12-30 1951-07-17 Caloric Stove Corp Cooking stove
US2624330A (en) * 1948-11-05 1953-01-06 Kennedy Walter Gas supply for auxiliary appliances
US2649850A (en) * 1950-02-11 1953-08-25 Perfection Stove Co Top burner assembly, including a flash tube lighter for cooking stoves or ranges
US2650586A (en) * 1944-11-13 1953-09-01 Murray Corp Cabinet range construction
US2759471A (en) * 1951-07-27 1956-08-21 Roper Corp Geo D Top burner assembly for gas stove
US3162237A (en) * 1961-10-02 1964-12-22 Whirlpool Co Pressurized gas burner
US4541407A (en) * 1980-10-23 1985-09-17 Ruhrgas Aktiengesellschaft Cooking station for gas ranges
FR2770620A1 (en) * 1997-11-04 1999-05-07 Sourdillon Sa Gas burner for use in kitchen
FR2814795A1 (en) 2000-10-03 2002-04-05 Sourdillon Sa GAS BURNER AND COOKING APPARATUS USING SUCH A BURNER
US20030024525A1 (en) * 1999-04-15 2003-02-06 Bsh Home Appliances Corporation Burner with piloting ports
US20030087214A1 (en) * 2001-11-08 2003-05-08 Bsh Home Appliances Corporation Controlled flame gas burner
US20050056268A1 (en) * 2003-09-17 2005-03-17 General Electric Company Gas burner for a cooking appliance
WO2005073630A1 (en) * 2004-02-02 2005-08-11 Aktiebolaget Electrolux Gas burner
US20060147861A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2006-07-06 Charles Czajka Gas circuit and pilot light system for cooking range
US20060144253A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2006-07-06 Charles Czajka Cooking range assembly and monolithic drip pan
US20060147865A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2006-07-06 Charles Czajka Cooking range burner head assembly
US20060154193A1 (en) * 2005-01-07 2006-07-13 Gas Technology Institute Advanced commercial range burner
US20060236997A1 (en) * 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 General Electric Company Pot supports and burner systems including same
US20080160468A1 (en) * 2006-12-29 2008-07-03 Electrolux Home Products Hub and spoke burner with flame stability
US20090101132A1 (en) * 2006-03-23 2009-04-23 Steel Time S.R.L. Modular Burner For A Cooking Plate
US20100035197A1 (en) * 2008-08-11 2010-02-11 Paul Bryan Cadima Cap for a gas burner
US20100154776A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2010-06-24 Charles Czajka Cooking range burner head assembly
US20140251305A1 (en) * 2011-11-04 2014-09-11 Electrolux Home Products Corporation N.V. Gas burner assembly, gas cooking hob and gas burner appliance
US9206985B2 (en) 2012-10-26 2015-12-08 Sears Brand, L.L.C. Integrated cooktop assembly
US20170276374A1 (en) * 2016-03-22 2017-09-28 General Electric Company Illuminated Cooktop Burner Appliance
US11047580B2 (en) * 2019-06-04 2021-06-29 Middleby Marshall Inc. Grate and range system
US11454393B2 (en) * 2019-01-04 2022-09-27 Haier Us Appliance Solutions, Inc. Gas burner with an offset flame port array

Cited By (54)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2506483A (en) * 1944-06-05 1950-05-02 Forrest S Bechtold Stove-top burner and air shield
US2650586A (en) * 1944-11-13 1953-09-01 Murray Corp Cabinet range construction
US2560959A (en) * 1946-12-30 1951-07-17 Caloric Stove Corp Cooking stove
US2624330A (en) * 1948-11-05 1953-01-06 Kennedy Walter Gas supply for auxiliary appliances
US2649850A (en) * 1950-02-11 1953-08-25 Perfection Stove Co Top burner assembly, including a flash tube lighter for cooking stoves or ranges
US2759471A (en) * 1951-07-27 1956-08-21 Roper Corp Geo D Top burner assembly for gas stove
US3162237A (en) * 1961-10-02 1964-12-22 Whirlpool Co Pressurized gas burner
US4541407A (en) * 1980-10-23 1985-09-17 Ruhrgas Aktiengesellschaft Cooking station for gas ranges
FR2770620A1 (en) * 1997-11-04 1999-05-07 Sourdillon Sa Gas burner for use in kitchen
US20030024525A1 (en) * 1999-04-15 2003-02-06 Bsh Home Appliances Corporation Burner with piloting ports
US6851420B2 (en) 1999-04-15 2005-02-08 Bsh Home Appliances Corporation Burner with piloting ports
FR2814795A1 (en) 2000-10-03 2002-04-05 Sourdillon Sa GAS BURNER AND COOKING APPARATUS USING SUCH A BURNER
EP1195556A1 (en) 2000-10-03 2002-04-10 Sourdillon Gas burner and cooking appliance using such burner
US6655954B2 (en) 2000-10-03 2003-12-02 Sourdillion Gas burner and cooking apparatus using such a burner
US20030087214A1 (en) * 2001-11-08 2003-05-08 Bsh Home Appliances Corporation Controlled flame gas burner
US7322820B2 (en) * 2001-11-08 2008-01-29 Bsh Home Appliances Corporation Controlled flame gas burner
US20050056268A1 (en) * 2003-09-17 2005-03-17 General Electric Company Gas burner for a cooking appliance
JP2011232027A (en) * 2004-02-02 2011-11-17 Electrolux Ab Distributor for gas burner
US20080241777A1 (en) * 2004-02-02 2008-10-02 Aktiebolaget Electrolux Gas Burner
WO2005073630A1 (en) * 2004-02-02 2005-08-11 Aktiebolaget Electrolux Gas burner
JP4842841B2 (en) * 2004-02-02 2011-12-21 アクティエボラゲット エレクトロラックス Gas burner
CN101487592B (en) * 2004-02-02 2012-07-25 电气联合股份有限公司 Gas burner
US8408897B2 (en) * 2004-02-02 2013-04-02 Aktiebolaget Electrolux Gas burner
JP2007519885A (en) * 2004-02-02 2007-07-19 アクティエボラゲット エレクトロラックス Gas burner
CN101956977B (en) * 2004-02-02 2013-07-10 电气联合股份有限公司 Gas burner
JP2011232026A (en) * 2004-02-02 2011-11-17 Electrolux Ab Manifold for gas burner
CN1930420B (en) * 2004-02-02 2013-08-28 电气联合股份有限公司 Gas burner
US20060144253A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2006-07-06 Charles Czajka Cooking range assembly and monolithic drip pan
US7363923B2 (en) 2005-01-05 2008-04-29 Illinois Tool Works Inc. cooking range assembly and monolithic drip pan
US20060147861A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2006-07-06 Charles Czajka Gas circuit and pilot light system for cooking range
US20100154776A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2010-06-24 Charles Czajka Cooking range burner head assembly
US7811082B2 (en) 2005-01-05 2010-10-12 Premark Feg, Llc Gas circuit and pilot light system for cooking range
US20060147865A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2006-07-06 Charles Czajka Cooking range burner head assembly
US7077644B1 (en) * 2005-01-07 2006-07-18 Gas Technology Institute Advanced commercial range burner
US20060154193A1 (en) * 2005-01-07 2006-07-13 Gas Technology Institute Advanced commercial range burner
US7650882B2 (en) * 2005-04-22 2010-01-26 General Electric Company Pot supports and burner systems including same
US20060236997A1 (en) * 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 General Electric Company Pot supports and burner systems including same
US20090101132A1 (en) * 2006-03-23 2009-04-23 Steel Time S.R.L. Modular Burner For A Cooking Plate
US7967004B2 (en) * 2006-03-23 2011-06-28 Steel Time S.P.A. Modular burner for a cooking plate
US20080160465A1 (en) * 2006-12-29 2008-07-03 Electrolux Home Products Hub and spoke burner port configuration
US20080160468A1 (en) * 2006-12-29 2008-07-03 Electrolux Home Products Hub and spoke burner with flame stability
US7871264B2 (en) 2006-12-29 2011-01-18 Electrolux Home Products, Inc. Hub and spoke burner port configuration
US20100051014A1 (en) * 2006-12-29 2010-03-04 Electrolux Home Products Hub And Spoke Burner With Flame Stability
US8057223B2 (en) * 2006-12-29 2011-11-15 Electrolux Home Produce Hub and spoke burner with flame stability
US7628609B2 (en) * 2006-12-29 2009-12-08 Electrolux Home Products, Inc. Hub and spoke burner with flame stability
US8535052B2 (en) * 2008-08-11 2013-09-17 General Electric Company Cap for a gas burner
US20100035197A1 (en) * 2008-08-11 2010-02-11 Paul Bryan Cadima Cap for a gas burner
US20140251305A1 (en) * 2011-11-04 2014-09-11 Electrolux Home Products Corporation N.V. Gas burner assembly, gas cooking hob and gas burner appliance
AU2012331416B2 (en) * 2011-11-04 2017-02-16 Electrolux Home Products Corporation N. V. Gas burner assembly, gas cooking hob and gas burner appliance
US9206985B2 (en) 2012-10-26 2015-12-08 Sears Brand, L.L.C. Integrated cooktop assembly
US20170276374A1 (en) * 2016-03-22 2017-09-28 General Electric Company Illuminated Cooktop Burner Appliance
US10401034B2 (en) * 2016-03-22 2019-09-03 Haier Us Appliance Solutions, Inc. Illuminated cooktop burner appliance
US11454393B2 (en) * 2019-01-04 2022-09-27 Haier Us Appliance Solutions, Inc. Gas burner with an offset flame port array
US11047580B2 (en) * 2019-06-04 2021-06-29 Middleby Marshall Inc. Grate and range system

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