US2241864A - Heating apparatus - Google Patents

Heating apparatus Download PDF

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US2241864A
US2241864A US321267A US32126740A US2241864A US 2241864 A US2241864 A US 2241864A US 321267 A US321267 A US 321267A US 32126740 A US32126740 A US 32126740A US 2241864 A US2241864 A US 2241864A
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pipe
heating
radiators
air
casing
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US321267A
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George M Maier
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American Radiator and Standard Sanitary Corp
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American Radiator and Standard Sanitary Corp
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D19/00Details
    • F24D19/02Arrangement of mountings or supports for radiators
    • F24D19/04Arrangement of mountings or supports for radiators in skirtings

Description

May y Q. Mo MAIER 2,244
HEATING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 28, 1940 I 3 ShetS-Shet 1 (g 0' 'H y Q f 3/ 50 big /vim 7 '1,' INVENTOR ATTORNEY May 13, 194i. G. M. MAIER HEATING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 28, 1940 I5 Sheets-Sheep 2 BY@ t ww ATTORNEY May 13, 1941. G. M. MAIER 2,241,864
HEATING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 28, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented May 13, 1941 HEATING APPARATUS George M. Maier, Mount Lebanon, Pa., assignor to American Radiator & poration, New York, N.
Delaware Standard Sanitary Cor- Y., a corporation of Application February 28, 1940, Serial No. 321,267
S Claims.
This invention relates to heating apparatus and more particularly to unitary heating devices adapted to be arranged within the room spaces of a building and operable totransmit the heat to the air of the room spaces by convection.
This invention has for an object to provide heating apparatus of the above type which is simple and inexpensive in its construction and which is dependable and efficient in operation.
The invention consists in the novel construction and combination of parts, to be more fully described hereinafter, and the novelty of which will be particularly pointed out `and distinctly claimed. n
In the accompanying drawings, tov be taken as a part of this specification, I have fully and clearly illustrated a preferred embodiment of my invention, in which drawings- Fig. 1 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating my invention as installed within a multiple story building, the heating apparatus being shown in front elevation;
Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1 and showing on an enlarged scale one of the unitary heatingdevices which is constructed in accordance with the present invention;
Fig. 3 is a front elevation of the unit shown in Fig. 2 with certain portions thereof being broken away and shown in section so as to illustrate more clearly the interior structure of the unit;
Fig. 4 is a plan view of the unit shown in Figs. 2 and 3 with certain of the parts being broken away and shown in section;
Fig. 5 is a perspective view showing the in-` side of the removable casing front;
Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view similar to Fig. 2 and showing a modified form of my invention, the view being takenl on the line 6--6 of Fig. 8;
Fig. 7 is a fragmentary plan view of the modified form of unitary heating device lshown in Fig. 6, a portion of the device being shown in horizontal section to disclose the interior structure thereof;
Fig. 8 is a fragmentary front elevation of the device shown in Figs. 6 and 7, with certain of the parts being broken away and others shown in section to disclose the interior structure;
Fig. 9 is an exploded View showing in perspective the details of the back portion and removable cover portion oi the modied form of my invention; and
Fig. is a perspective view illustrating a modified form of baille construction.
Referring now in detail to the construction illustrated and first to the modification shown f in Figs. 1 to 5 incl., it will be observed that I through an outside wall I4 thereof. As is common in buildings, the window openings of the several floors are arranged, respectively, one
above the other `and in vertical alignment.
The heating apparatus comprises improved unitary heating devices I5 and I5a which are shown as being located, respectively, in the floors I0 and Il Iand alongside the outside wall I4 and beneath the windows I2 and I3. Asuitable heating fluid, such as steam, may be supplied to the uppermost device I5a by a verticallyarranged flow pipe I6, which may be connected at its other or upper end to another device, like the devices I5 'and I5a located in an upper floor (not shown) v; or, the upper end of the pipe I6 may be connected directly to a source devices.
of steam supply such, for example, as a steam boiler (not shown). The device I5a. may be also connected to a vertically-arranged steam flow pipe I'l extending between the lower discharge end of the device I5a and the upper supply end of the device I5. Likewise, the lower discharge end of the device I5 may be connected to the upper end of a vertically-arranged flow pipe I3, and the latter may be connected at its lower end to either la device similar to the devices I5 and |50. or to the return side of the heating system.
From the above, it will be .apparent that I have elected to show my improvements as incorporated in a heating system of the type wherein the heating uid such as steam iiows in series through the several unitary heating devices located, respectively, one above the other in the several floors of the building, and that the steam flow pipes are of sufficient size to supply the steam to all of the unitary heating devices and to conduct away the condensate from such The building may comprise any number of oors, and the unitary devices I5 and I5a may form a part of a vertical bank or row of such devices in a larger building. Also, there may be a larger number of vertical banks or rows arranged in parallel and with the unitary devices of each bank connected in series, as shown. It will be appreciated however that my invention is not to be considered as being limited in all of its aspects to its incorporation in a heating system of this type; for, in so far as certain of its broader aspects are concerned, my improvements may form a part of other forms of steam heating systems and also hot water heating systems.
Each of the improved form of unitary heating devices I5 and I5a comprises an enclosure or casing 26 which is of suiiicient length to pro- Vide two end portions 2| which are shown as extending, respectively, beyond the two vertical sides of the window in front of which the` device is located. In each device, one of its end portions 2l is adapted to receive through a pipe opening 22 formed in the top thereof, the lower end of a steam ow pipe, and is adapted to receive through the bottom of its other end portion 2I, the upper end of a steam ow pipe.
From an examination of Figs. 2, 3, and 4, it will be notedthat each of the casings of the unitary heating devices comprises a rear wall 23, a front wall 24, end walls Aand 26 and a top wall 21. The rear wall 23 is arranged adjacent the room fall I4 and between the window sill 3Q and the floor 3| of the room in which the casing is located. The top wall is secured by suitable screws 32 to the lower part of the sill 3U, and is formed along its four edges with front, end and rear depending flanges 33, 34, and 35, respectively. The rear depending flange is suitab-ly secured to the upper edge of the rear wall 23 by spotwelding. The vertical end walls 25 and 25 of the casing are suitably secured to the top wall 21 by spotwelding to the depending end ilanges 34. Each of the end walls 25 and 26 is also provided with inwardly-extending flanges 31 and 33 at the front and rear thereof, respectively. The` end walls 25 and 26 are suitably secured to the rear wall 23 by spotweld-v ing each of the flanges 38 to the two outer vertical edge portions of the rear wall 23.
The front wall 24 of each casing extends between the flanges 31 and is so constructed that it may be readily removed and replaced in position on the casing. To this end, an angle member is suitably spotwelded to the inside surface of the front wall and at the lower part of the latter, and the angle member is provided at its lower edge with a downwardly and inwardly extending lip 4I which is spaced from the inside surface of the front wall and receives therebetween an upwardly extending ange 42 of a Z bar 43. The Z bar 43 is fixed by screws 44 at its ends to brackets 45 spotwelded to the casing end walls 25 and 26. Thus,v the front `wall is supported by the Z bar 43 and is secured thereby at its lower edge to the remaining portions of thecasing. The upper edge of the removable front wall 24 is detachably secured to the casing by a plurality of spring clips 41 fixed to the front wall 24 and enga/ging beneath a depending vertical flange 48 of a Z bar 49. The bar 49 is suitably spotwelded to the flange 33 depending from the forward edge of the top wall 21. The spring clips 41 may be readily detached by pulling the upper part of the Afront wall forwardly to disengage the clips 41, and the front wall may then be easily disengaged from the flange 42 by lifting the wall 24. To replace the front wall 24 the lower end is rst engaged with the flange 42 of Z bar 43 and the upper end then swung inwardly toward the casing and until the clips 41 engage beneath the ange 48.
Each casing 20 is open at its lower end to prosoi vide an air inlet opening 50 communicating with the room in which it is located and is provided in the top wall 21 with an air outlet grille or opening 5I, which also communicates with the room. The openings 50 and 5I are connected by a vertical flue space 52 which is dened by the inside surfaces of the rear wall 23, end walls 25 and 26, and front wall 24. y
Each of the unitary heating devices is provided with convector heat-emitting elements which are arranged in spaced relation across the flue space 52. In the drawings, I have shown these heat-emitting elements as convector radiators 54 and 55 formed of cast iron and having vertical heat dissipating iins 56 formed thereon. While in so far as the broader aspects of this invention are concerned, any number of radiators may be installed within a casing or enclosure, I have elected to show in each casing the two radiators 54 and 55 arranged at substantially the same level across the Iflue space 52 and adjacent the end walls 25 and 26, respectively, of the casing.
Each radiator 54 is provided in its top and adjacent one end thereof with a threaded pipe connection 58 and is provided in the lower part of the other end with a threaded pipe connection 59. The other radiator 55 is provided in its bottom and adjacent one end with a threaded pipe connection 69 and in the lower part of its other end with a pipe connection 6|. Each radiator' 54 may be termed the inlet radiator as it rst receives the steam, and each radiator 55 may be termed the outlet radiator. The radiators 54 and 55 are connected by a connecting iiow pipe 62 threadedly engaging at its opposite ends with the pipe connections 59 and 6I, respectively.
As stated, the uni-tary heating devices I5 and I5a are adapted to be connected for series flow therethrough of a heating fluid, such as steam. In order to accomplish this, the flow pipe I6, which is the steam supply pipe, is shown in Fig. 1 as being located alongside one of the vertical sides of the window I3.; the ilow pipe I1 connecting the devices I5 and I5a is shown as being located along the vertical side of vthe window I2 which is opposite to the pipe I6, and the ow pipe I8 is located directly beneath the pipe I6. On account of this the position of the radiators 54 and 55 in the device I5a is shown as being reversed or opposite to the position of the radiators 54 and 55 in the device I5. The inlet radiator 54 of the device I 5a is shown in Fig. l as being adjacent the end wall 26 with its connection 58 in vertical alignment and receiving the threaded lower end of the pipe I6, and the outlet radiator 55 of the device 15a is located adjacent the end wall 25 and in vertical alignment and receiving the threaded upper .end of the ow pipe I1. In the device I5 the inlet radiator 54 is adjacent the end wall 25 and .receives the lower end of the .pipe I1, and the outlet radiator 55 is adjacent the e'nd wall 26 and receives the upper end of pipe I 8.
As stated, the improved heating devices I5 and I5a are shown as being incorporated .in a system wherein the steam flows through such devices 4in series. The reason for such an arrangement is to reduce the cost of piping.. As the ldevices I5 and I5a are connected in series, the flow of steam to any particular device cannot be regulated with respect .to the now of steam to the other devices. Therefore, in order to control the heat output of the unitary heating ldevi-'ces Ain such a system, I provide a pivoted damper 65 in each of the casings 28 which extends across the iiue space 52 and may be adjusted .to regulate the gravity iiow of air upward over the radiators and into the room through the grille Advantageously, the damper 65 is provided with a pivot 66 journaled in spaced brackets 61 carried by the removable front wall 24. The pivot 65 of the damper |55 is so located that the damper tends at all times to remain fully open by its own weight and thereby permits the free flow of air through the ue space. In order to regulate the position of the damper, a bead chain 68 is connected at one end -to the damper and extends outwardly oi the casing through the key hole slot 69 in the front wall 24, By means of the bead chain 68 and slot 69, the damper may be closed entirely or may be adjusted to any desired mid-position, in a manner Well understood by those skilled in the art. When the damper 65 is closed, air circulation through the ue space 52 is stopped. As the room is heated primarily by the transmission of heat by convection to the air iiowing upwardly over the external surfaces of the radiators 54 and 55, the supply of heat to each unitary device and its room is eiectively controlled by the damper.
The unitary devices I5 and |5a are preferably of such a length that the flow pipes I6, |1, and I8 can be arranged at the sides of the windows and be directly connected at their ends to the radiators 54 and 55 without requiring the usual pipe fittings, such as Ts, elbows and the like, and the resulting increased labor cost in installing such a system. In order to make this possible, the radiators 54 and 55 have to be arranged adjacent the end walls of their respective casings or enclosures 20, which results in the adjacent ends of the radiators being spaced apart a substantial distance and being connected b-y the connecting flow pipes 62.
In accordance with the present invention, I also provide a baffling means for each of the unitary heating devices which cooperates with each connecting flow pipe 62 to restrict the upward flow of air through the regions of the iiue space between radiators, so as vto prevent the main body of air from by-passing the heat-emitting surfaces of the radiators 54 and 55 and at the same time to provide for the flow of a small body of air over the outer surfaces of the connecting flow pipe 62 and thereby make use of the pipe as a heat-emitting surface. To this end, a baiile 1I) extends along the rear wall 23 of the casing opposite the connecting flow pipe 62 and between the radiators 54 and 55 and is provided with a flange 1| suitably spotwelded to the rear wall 23. The baille 10 extends inwardly from the rear wall 23 toward the iiow pipe 62 and terminates a slight distance from the flow pipe to provide a small opening 12, through which a small amount of air will flow over the pipe, Also, I provide a baffle 14 which is carried by the lower inside of the front wall 24 and extends between the radiators 54 and 55 opposite the connecting flow pipe 62. The baille 14 is formed with a ange 15 which is suitably spotwelded to the front wall 24 and the balile 14 extends inwardly from the front wall toward the connecting flow pipe 82 and terminates a short distance therefrom to provide a relatively small opening 16, through which air may iiow over the y radiators 54 and 55, and at the same time provide the small openings 12 and 'I6 which permit a small flow over the connecting flow pipe 62 which, as stated above, results in the utilization of the iiow pipe as a heat-emitting surface.
In Figs, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, I have illustrated a modified form of unitary heating device which is indicated, in general, by the reference numeral I|5 and comprises a metal radiator enclosure or casing |28; a pair of radiators |54 and |55, arranged across the interior of the casing and connected by a flow pipe |52; and a baffling means which cooperates with the connecting flow pipe |62 to restrict the upward flo-w of air through the interior regions of the casing |28 which lie between the radiators |54 and |55. As in the previously described modification, the purpose of such a baiiiing means is to prevent the main body of upwardly flowing air from by-passing the heat-emitting surfaces of the radiators; and, at the same time, to provide for the flow of a small body of air over the connectingfiow pipe |62 and thereby make use of the latter as a heatemitting surface.
The casing |20 is composed of two unitary, fabricated metal parts, one part 88 forming the back wall |23 and being supported in xed relation to the room wall I4 by brackets 8|, and the other part 82 being removably attached to the part 88 by screws 83 and including the front wall |24, end walls |25 and |26, and a top wall |21, The casing |20 is open at its bottom to provide the air inlet opening |58 and is provided in its top wall |21 with an air outlet opening or grille |5I. The hollow interior of the casing provides the vertical flue space |52, across which the radiators |54 and |55 and connecting flowpipe |62 are arranged. A bracket 84 is fixed to a lower corner of the xed part 88 and serves to support the outlet radiator |55. In installing my improvements, the room wall I4 is first plastered, the part 8|] permanently attached to the wall ||4 by the bracket 8|, the radiators |54 and |55 and connecting How pipes ||1, ||8 and |62 connected and installed, and then the removable part 82 of the casing is secured in place by the screws 83.
As in the previously described modification, the casing |28 is made extra long to provide the extensions |2| at each end thereof, and one of the latter is provided with an opening |22 for receiving the vertical ow pipe ||1. In order to provide for attaching and removing the part 82 after the installation of the radiators and iiow pipes, the opening |22 is provided by forming, in the top wall |21, an open ended slot having its closed or inner end curved, as indicated at 86,
to provide one half of the opening, and by pro-v viding a plate 81 removably attached by a screw 88 within the outer end of the slot 85 and having a curved inner end 89 forming the other half of the opening.
A damper |65 is arranged across the flue space |52 and may be adjusted between full open and full closed positions to regulate the quantity of heated air flowing out through the grille |5I. The damper is provided in its opposite ends with pivot pins |66 and the latter are `iournaled within brackets |51 suitably spotwelded to the top wall |21. A shaft 81 is formed as an extension of one of the pivot pins |86 and extends outwardly through the end wall |26. A knob 88 is xed to the outer end of the shaft 81 and serves as a means of manually regulating the position of the damper |65.
In the modined form of unitary heating device H5, the baiiling means Which vrestricts the up.- ward now of air in th-e regions adjacent the pipe |62, is advantageously formed as a one piece removable baiile device 96 (see Fig. 10). The device 96 is in the Yforni of a saddle-like element,
,comprising end members 6| and 92 formed, re-
spectively, with arcuate cut-away portions 93 and 94, spaced from one another and connected by bafile plates 55 and 96. As can be seen from an examination of Figs, 6, 7, and 8, when the device 90 is placed in position on the pipe |62, the cut-away portions 93 and 911| receive the upper surfaces of the pipe, and the plates 95 and 98 extend lengthwise of the pipe |562 and at each side thereof. The device 90 is so formed that the outer edges of the plates 65 and 56 engage or lie `directly adjacent the Walls |23 and |24, respectively, and the inner edges of the plates 95 and "66 are spaced, respectively, from the opposite sides of the pipe |62 to form the small opening |72 and |16 through which a restricted upward oW of air about the pipe |62 is had.
From the above, it Will be apparent that I have provided a heating apparatus Which is unusually simple in construction and which is Well adapted to be installed in a system with a minimum requirement of labor and materials. This is an important feature, for in large bulidings, such as the present low-cost housing projects, the number of steam 110W pipes, elbows, and T connections for the heating systems and the labor vcost of connecting the elements of the system, are most important items. From the above, -it Will be apparent that by reason of the arrangement of the enclosure and the radiators in my improved unitary heating devices so as to permit their connection With steam ow pipes Without the use oi ttings, and by reason of the fact that I provide bales to restrict the flow of air through the portion of the flue spaces not occupied by the radiators, I am able to reduce materially the cost of the heating system Without sacrificing its eniciency of operation. Furthermore, as the transmission of heat from each unitary device to the room is effected almost entirely by convection air currents, the simple damper regulating the flow of air through the flue space controls the heat output of the heating device Without requiring the usual control valves for the radiators. The cross-sectional areas of the radiators and of the steam now pipes are such that the several heating units of any one vertical bank in a building may be connected in series Without dang-er of condensate interfering with the required flow of steam to any particular unit.
It is to be noted that in so far as certain of the broader aspects of my invention are concerned, certain of the Walls of the casings'20 or |20, or their equivalent, may be formed by yportions of the room wall I4. For example, the rear Walls 23 or |23 may be omitted and th-e remaining Walls so arranged With respect to the room Wall that the face of the latter Will function as the rear Wall of the casing and define in part the ue passages 52 or 152. As a further eX- ample, the room Wall may be provided with a recess of sufficient depth to function as both the rear Wall and as the two end Walls of the casing. In the latter instance the rear Walls 23, |23 and end Walls 25, |25 and 26, |26 could be omitted entirely and the front and top Walls of the casing so installed vWith respect to the recess' as to denne the ue passages 52 or |52. Various other modications of thev structure disclosed may be devised Without departing from the invention, as defined in the appended claims.
What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:4
l; Heating apparatus comprising casing means providing a radiator enclosure adapted to be arranged alongside a room Wall and having spaced air inlet and air outlet openings therein and including Walls defining a flue space Within the interior thereof connecting said inlet and outlet openings; a convector heat-emitting device occupying a portion of vsaid flue space; a flow pipe for heating uid connected to said devicev and extending laterally across said flue space from said device and Within the portion of the latter not occupied by said device; and baflle means cooperating With said now pipe to restrict air now through the portion of the flue space not occupied by said device so as to prevent the main body of air from by-passing the heating surfaces of said device and, at the same time, to provide a restricted flow of air over said pipe for utilizing the heating surfaces of said pipe.
2. Heating apparatus comprising casing means providing a radiator enclosure adapted to be arranged alongside a room Wall and having spaced air inlet and air outlet openings therein and including Walls defining a flue space Within the interior thereof connecting said inlet and outlet openings; a pair of convector radiators arranged across said nue space and occupying, respectively, laterally-spaced portions of said flue space; a flow pipe for heating fluid connecting said radiators and extending across said flue space and Within the portion of the latter not occupied by said radiators; and b'aiiie means cooperating With said connecting now pipe to restrict air flow through the portion of the flue space not occupied by said radiators so as to prevent the main body of air from by-passing the heating surfaces of said radiators and, at the same time, to provide a restricted now of air over said pipe for utilizing the heating surfaces of said pipe.
3. Heating apparatus comprising casing means providing a radiator enclosure adapted to be arranged alongside a room Wall and having spaced air inlet and lair outlet openings therein and a flue space connecting said inlet and outlet openings; said casing means including a pair stantial distance from each other across the flue space; a ovr pipe for heating fluid extending across the ue space between radiators and connecting the adjacent ends of said radiators; and baflie means cooperating with said connecting ov/ pipe to restrict `air flow through the portions of the Hue space between said radiators so as 'to prevent the main body of air' from bypassing the heating surfaces of said radiators and, at the same time, to provide a restricted flow of air over said connecting pipe for utilizing the heating surfaces of said pipe.
4. Heating apparatus comprising casing means providing a radiator enclosure adapted to be arranged alongside a room Wall and having spaced air inlet and air outlet openings therein and including Walls defining a flue space Within the interior thereof connecting said inlet and outlet openings; a convector heat-emitting device occupying a portion of said flue space; a now pipe for heating uid connected to said device 5. Heating apparatus comprising casing means providing a radiator enclosure adapted to be arranged alongside a room wall and having spaced air inlet and air outlet openings therein and including walls dening a ilue space within the interior thereof and connecting said inlet and outlet openings; a convector heat-emitting device occupying -a portion of said flue space; a flow pipe for heating fluid connected to said device and extending laterally across said ue space and within the portion of the latter not occupied by said device; and baille means extending inwardly from the .defining walls of said casing means toward said flow pipe and terminating a slight distance from said flow pipe to provide for a restricted flow of air about said pipe land to prevent the by-passing of the main body of air past the heating surfaces of said device.
6. Heating apparatus comprising casing means providing a radiator enclosure adapted to be arranged alongside a room wall and having spaced air inlet and air outlet openings therein and including Walls defining a ilue space Within the interior thereof connecting said inlet and outthe two end walls, respectively, and being spaced a substantial distance from each other laterally across the flue space; a flow pipe for heating fluid connecting the adjacent ends of the radiators and extending across the portion of the ue space not occupied by the radiators; and baille means extending inwardly from the casing Walls toward the connecting flow pipe to provide restricted flow of air through the portion of the flue space not occupied by the radiators.
7. Heating apparatus comprising casing means providing a radiator enclosure adapted to be arranged alongside a room wall and having spaced air inlet and air outlet openings therein and including walls dening a flue space within the interior thereof connecting said inlet and outlet openings; a convector heat-emitting device occupying a portion of said ue space; a liow pipe for heating fluid connected to said device and extending laterally across said ilue space from said device and within the portion of the latter not occupied by said device; and baille means for restricting the flow of air through the laterallyspaced portions of the llue space not occupied by said device, and said baffle means comprising a saddle-like element including end members engaging the upper surfaces of the pipe and a pair of baille plates connecting the end elements and arranged, respectively, lengthwise of the pipe and between the opposite sides thereof and Ithe adjacent defining walls of said casing means.
8. A saddle-like baille element for use with laterally extending flow pipes for convector radiators, comprising a pair of spaced end members having arcuate cut-away portions in their under sides, respectively, adapted to receive the upper surfaces of a flow pipe, and a pair of baille plates connecting, respectively, the outer ends of said end members and adapted to be arranged lengthwise of and at opposite sides of a ilow pipe.
GEORGE M. MAIER.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2639900A (en) * 1948-12-11 1953-05-26 Henry G Schaefer Simplified space heating radiator mounted on pipe
US2656156A (en) * 1950-05-01 1953-10-20 Chester M Wilcox Baseboard radiator
US2731242A (en) * 1951-05-01 1956-01-17 Turbo Ray Inc Radiant heating systems and apparatus therefor
US5361981A (en) * 1993-04-21 1994-11-08 Heat Exchangers, Inc. Air conditioning unit

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2639900A (en) * 1948-12-11 1953-05-26 Henry G Schaefer Simplified space heating radiator mounted on pipe
US2656156A (en) * 1950-05-01 1953-10-20 Chester M Wilcox Baseboard radiator
US2731242A (en) * 1951-05-01 1956-01-17 Turbo Ray Inc Radiant heating systems and apparatus therefor
US5361981A (en) * 1993-04-21 1994-11-08 Heat Exchangers, Inc. Air conditioning unit

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