US1503089A - Ventilating unit - Google Patents

Ventilating unit Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1503089A
US1503089A US301190A US30119019A US1503089A US 1503089 A US1503089 A US 1503089A US 301190 A US301190 A US 301190A US 30119019 A US30119019 A US 30119019A US 1503089 A US1503089 A US 1503089A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
chamber
air
damper
casing
blower
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US301190A
Inventor
Michael J Callahan
Original Assignee
Michael J Callahan
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Michael J Callahan filed Critical Michael J Callahan
Priority to US301190A priority Critical patent/US1503089A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1503089A publication Critical patent/US1503089A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D1/00Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators
    • F28D1/02Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid
    • F28D1/0233Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with air flow channels
    • F28D1/024Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with air flow channels with an air driving element

Description

1 FD.' v III' I HH||I||HHI|||IH|I|HH|II|I| .l u e h s 4. N n 9 A w m H w 1 A L m 2 L I 9 A n m H J -...HH. J m w M. w .u v F QQ -----1---|- n.hwll www5 mmm QN .QN 4 A 2 ,9 :1- l 9W' l HIIIIIIIIL 2 .w ww N .MNH
ATTURNEY.
July 29, i924, i 1,503,089
M. J. cALLAHAN VENTILATING UNIT Filed Jun 2,' 1919 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTI? Arron/vir M. J. CALLAHAN VENTILATI NG UNIT Filed June 2, -1919 v 4sheefsheet v:i
wen/ron:
l@mon/ vivl July 29, 1924.- 1,503,089
- M. J. CALLAHAN y VENTILATING UNIT Filed' June 2 1919 4 Sheets-Sheetl 4 1 12A-es maar .any as, ieri-243i.:
mont J'. CALLAHAN', or' NEW Yoan-N. Y.
vENTILA'rING UNIT.
s Applicationi'led June 2,
To all whom z't may concern:`
Be it known that I, MIOHAEL J. CALLA- HAN, a citizen of the United States, residing in the borough of Manhattan, city, county, and State of New York, have invented4 a new and useful improvement in Ventilating Units, of which thefollowing is a description. i
This' invention has reference to 'ventilating apparatus, and', particularly, to ventilating units adapted for individual installation in schools, houses, lofts, basements, and buildings generally, as well as where the installation of the usual type of Ventilating systems would be impracticable or too eX-f pensive.
Among the objects of my invention mayv be noted the following: to provide a ventilator, or Ventilating unit, adapted to be installed at a window and around a. radiator, or. around the latter in places where an-opening may be made in the, building wallfor the ingress of air; to provide a unit ventilating apparatus which is `highly elicient, is simple, compact, economical to build, and which, can be regulated so as to heat all portions of the room where installation is made to any degree desired, regardless of the outside temperatures; to provide a heating unit adapted to supply heated air to the room where installed to any desired temperature, with a steam pressure of comparatively small amount, and to deliver any de-V sired quantity of fresh air per minute to each occupant of the room; to provide a unit Ventilating apparatus with means whereby the airpassing therethrough may be heated to any desired degree and properly humidified before entering the room; to provide a Ventilating unit with means. whereby the entire volume of air enterinothe same may be brought into contact wit the radiator or heating apparatus, humidified, and assed in entire volume into the room, or, y means of which only a portion iof the. air entering the unit maybe heated, humidified, and delivered into the room, or the entire volume of air entering the unit may be humidified and delivered into the room cold or without any preliminary heating; to (provide a Ventilating unit with heating an liumidiing means and with a means by which t e air may be directed to the heating means, or by which the latter may be by-passed, so that the air may en- 1919. seriai No. 301,190.y
ter the room without preliminary heating; to provide a Ventilating unit by 'means of which fresh air can be brought from out of doors, heated, humiditied, and circulated in the roo-in, and by which the air in the room may be reciiculated and reheated, if desired, and by which, iii either instance, regulation can be so effected as to insure constant delivery of the required amount of air and of practically any desired temperature; to provide a system of dampers and bales in a Ventilating unit by which the maximum air requirement can be delivered into a room at a temperature rise not to exceed 5 F. between inlet and outlet when the outside temperature is below F. fo'r'example; to provide a Ventilating unit with means by which certain of the dampers can be regulated by hand, or automatically, as by electric or thermostatic devices; to provide a Ventilating unit with a combination of danipers and closures so connected as to en able the same to be opened and closed or shifted simultaneously, according to the effects desired oi" the I Ventilating requirements; and to provide a Ventilating apparatus which may be quickly, effectively and economically installed, and which is cheaply maintained, easily operated for anyrequirement and which/ is effective for all the purposes set forth in the foregoing.
-In order that my invention may be clearly understood, l have provided drawings wherein: Y
Figure l is a front'elevation of a ventilating unit installed, for example, at a window having a radiator thereunder;
Figure 2 is a sectional elevation looking at the apparatus from one end;
Figure 3 is across-sectional view of the apparatus.v
Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view oi the apparatus on a Aline corresponding to the line 4 4 of Figure 5; and v Figure 5 is a sectional view substantially on the line 5-5 of Figure 4.
Referring to the drawings, the numeral l indicates the Wall 'of-a building having a Window opening' and surrounding framing for the window-sashes, as usual, and gen-l erally indicated by 2. I desire it understood, however, that the passage 3, for the inlet of air to my Ventilating unit, may be throu h' the wall of the building, or
`through ues from any point or place where Aair can be obtained and which maybe found A the amount of cold air supply to the unit.
5 is the framing surrounding the inlet duct or casing 6 at the entrance to which a screen 7 is placed, in order to keep out insects, large particles, and, as eectively as possible, screen the indrawn air. The casing of the Ventilating unit may be made in practically any form desired; but, in the form of my invention shown in the drawings, it has been made to conform to the parts and disposition generally of the apparatus contained therein. As shown, the casing eX- tends down to the floor ofthe room, and the rear `wall of the same is indicated by 8, the bottom thereof by 9, the front wall by 10, and the end walls by 11. The top of the casing is indicated by 12. Within the casing is a partition 13 adapted to encase a radiator 14 through the medium of which the airis heated. The radiator may be of any usual type of steam or hot watercoils, or, it may be I of the special form and construction shown in design patent grantedNov. 4, 1919, No. 54,059. The radiator is preferablysupported atits bottom upon the opposite end A'walls 11 of the casing byangle-1rons or brackets l5, bolted or otherwise rigidly secured in place, as at 16. The chamber in which the radiatoris set is open at its bottom and the radiator is sup orted above the bottom of the casing su ciently high to: provide a chamber to freely admit a water pan or basin 17 of suitable form and size which is preferably removable to enable it to be cleaned and renovated when `found necessary. Above' the radiator 14 a shelf 18`is provided, for thesurport of a motor 19 of any approved type, a C. motor being preferable. The leads to the motor from a source of supply, including a' junction box, are-indicated at 20.
The drive-shaft o f the motor is extended in opposite directions, as at 21, and the outer ends thereof have removably'applied thereto centrifugal blowers or fans 22 adapted -to draw the air through the inlet opening 3. and screen 7 and to rotate in the casingsj-23 which are open -at their bottoms, thus. enabling the air, drawn in by the blowers, to be driven through the shelf or support 18 into the" where the radi. ator and dampers and other` devices arelocated. Thus, blowers into contact with chambers below the latter,
the air mayT bedriven by the and through the radiator, where it is heated in its passage to" the pan 17,* and thence 'upwardly o'r through the front wall of the casing into the room.` As shown in Figures 2 and 3, a damper 24`is hinged at 25 to the partition 13, said damper being adapted to swing, as shown by the dotted line 26, in a space or chamber above the radiator and below the support 18, from the full line position into engagement with the support 27 depending into the chamber 'above the top of the radiator, which latter ,is so constructed as to have its top surface inclined, as at 28, to enable the damper 24 to cover the same and rest yupon the support 27. The support 27 is connected in any' suitable manner with the shelf 18, and the blower casing is extended around the blower, as at 23, so as to shunt or deflect the air into the chambers below the support or shelf 18, through the 'openings in the latter` Pendent within the casing of the ventilator is a bafiie 29, dividing vertically the space between the radiator and the front wall 10 of the casing and helping to define the damper chamber between the blower chamber and heater chamber. The damper 24 is adapted to engage or lie 'against the baie 29 at its upper end adjacent` the shelf 18, thus cuttingI 0E the passage for the air between the partition 13 and baiiie 29, and compelling the air to travel in full volume through the radiator and to the outside of the baiiie, or through the discharge chamber between the latter and the front wall 10 of the casing. The front wall 10 of the casing, at its top, is provided with .a damper 30 ivoted at 31 and adapted to swing upwar l as' shown by adjacent odotted line. At its bottom, the easing is provided with a damper 32 pivoted-at 33, and adapted to swing upwardly, as shown by adjacent dotted line. The dampers 30 and 32 are connected together for simultaneous and\conjoint operation by the rod 34 l lpivotally connectedy at its lower end, as at 35, to an angle-bar or piece 36 rigidly fixed, at its opposite end, tothe damper 32, as at 37. The upper end ofthe rod 34 is pivotally connected at 38 to a lug 39 secured to the inside of thedamper 30. Thus, when the dam er 30 is lifted, the damper 32 will' be close and held tightly, since the lifting action of the rod 34 will draw the angle-` piece inwardly, thus depressing the damper 32. Reverse action will occur when the damper-30 is closed.' The damper 30 may. be maintained open by a plair of togglelinks 40-41, pivoted toget er at 42, and
the one 40 pivoted to the casing member 10j and the one 41 pivoted to the damper 30.
Thus, `links 40-41 may be pressed to the Aposition shown in Flgure 2, and, when the. damper is closed, gvill assume the position shown in re 4 rilgre'ss of theair through the opening 3 may be barred, either lowering the sash when the damper 30 is lifted, -the` '4, if the installation be at a window, or by cooperation of a pair of dampers, if the installation be at an opening not otherwise provided with a cut-off means; and the dampers may be so set' or regulated as to control the intake of air by the blowers. As shown in Figure 3, a damper 43 is pivoted at 44 to the inlet'duct 6, or adjacent part of the frame, and cooperates, at its upper end, with a damper 45, pivoted at 46 tothe top 12 of the casing. A lever 47 is pivoted at-one end at 48 to the damper 43, and, at its other end, has a pivotal and sliding connection at 49 to an angle-bar 50 rigidly connected at 51 to the closure 52 hinged at 53 to the top 12 of the casing. Between its ends, the lever 47 is pivoted at 54 to the end of a link 55, the other end of which is pivot/ed at 56 to the damper 45. Thus, when the closure 52 is raised, as shown in Figure 3, the two dampers 43 and 45 will be brought vtogether v so as to close the inlet and bar the ingress of air to the blowers. When, however, the
closure 52 is lowered to close the opening in the top of the caslng, as shown m F lgure 2,
the dampers 43 and 45 will be thrown wide open to admit full volumeof air to the blowers through the inlet 3. The top of the casing, at its i`ro`nt,lis also provided with av closure 57 pivoted at 58 and adapted -to be opened for access to the blowers, the motor,
, and other'apparatus contained in the upper part of the trame.
The steam or heating medium is preferably admitted to the radiator 14 at the top thereof, as at 59, Figure 1, and is controlled by usual valvular means 60, the supply being Jfurnished through pipe 61. The heating fluid, after passing through the radiator, leaves the latter preferably at. the bottom thereof, as at 62, where liturther control is obtained by usualvalvular means 63.
The damper 24 may be controlled either manually, thermostatically or electrically, as may be desired; but, for simplicity and as an example `of control means,- I have shown manually operated means consisting I of a plate 64, shown in 'dotted outline in Figure 2, in which is an arcuate slot. 65, which extends also through the end wall 11 of thel casing. Extending through the slot 65 is a bifurcated stud 66, which embraces the valve 24 and to `which the valve is connected,
whereby the latter may be shifted in the arc of a circle represented by the slot 65jabout its pivot at 25. The bifurcated stud is provided with a pointer 67 which may cooperate with calibrations, or other indicia, on -the face of the plate 64, or on the casing of the machine, in the event a plate is not employed or set into the casing. This simple means of manipulation and for controlling the damper 24 is merely an example of my invention, and it is to be understood, as previously suggested, that the dampervma'y be der thermostatic control.
TOOIII.
manipulated by thermostatic means connected with the heating fluid regulator, so that the damper 24 may be shifted in accordance with the operation, automatically or otherwise, of .the thermostatic regulator. The 70 damper may also beoperated yelectrically un- Having thus described the details of In invention, the 'following mode of operation will be readily understood:
As shown in Figure 2 the, window-sash 4 is raised suliciently to enable full volume of air to enter at the inlet 3, through the screen f 7, to -the fan or blower chamber, and, the motor having been set in operation, the centrifugal fans will draw in the air and drive the same with great force into the chambers below through the shelf or support 18. With the damper set as shown in Figures 2 .and 3, the full volume of air, driven down by the fans,V will pass through the radiator, as shown by the arrows a in the two figures, beiner deflected in great measure by damper 24. laving passed through the radiators, the heated air will be cleansed and humidifiedi?o by contactvwith the water in the pan 17 in`- the chamber at the base of the apparatus, and, with the position of dampers 30, 32 A shown in Figure 2, will thence pass upwardly, through the discharge chamber, as shown 52 atthe top ofthe apparatus will also b 105 shut. Thus, the'full volume of air will pa s through the apparatus, will be heated by the radiator, cleansed and humidiied by thewater, and driven into the room. Regulation of the inlet at 3 may be controlledV by 11G lowering the sash 4. The inlet of air may be entirely cut off by `raising the closure 52 at the top of the apparatus, which will', through the leverv mechanismdescribed, close the dampers 43, 45 and thus entirely 115 shut ofi' the inlet^of cold or fresh air to the? blowers.` When /this 'is accomplished, 'the' air in the room may be re-circulated without the admission of fresh cold air, and be passed through the radiator and into contact with the humidifying and cleansing means in the same way as just described. This will cause a quick rise of temperature in the Or, the air, after passing through), the radiator and in contactwith-the water in the pan. 17, may be driven /out through the bottom of the apparatus by shutting the damper 30 which will simultaneousl open the damper 32. This position of va ves or dampers is shown in Figure 3 and the direc- 130 tion of passage of by the arrows c. On the other hand, the air in the room may be re-circulated without being reheated, in which case the damper 24 will be set over to coverI the top of the radiator and thus shunt all the air around the radiator and downwardly to the water pan, as indicated by arrows d, Figure 3, in which event it may be either driven out through the bottom of the apparatus,arV rows or through the opening at damper 30, taking the course of arrows` b, Figure 2. This is an impor-tant feature of my invention, since the entire volume of air from the room, or cold air from outdoors, can be shunted past the radiator and delivered into the room, either through the `bottom of the ventilator or through its damper opening at 30. If itis desired to admit fresh cold air tothe room, the closure 52 will be shut, whereupon the dampers 43--45 will be opened, thus admitting the full or regulated volume of air from t e outside, whereupon the blowers will drive the air downwardly, and, with the valve or damper 24 set to cover 'the radiator, the air will pass by the lattenarrows d, Figure 3,--and in contact with the water in the pan and into the room either through the bottom of the apparatus,-arrows c,-or through the o ening covered bythe valve 80,--arrows I),l igure 2,-f accordingl to the way in whichthe dampers 30, 32 are set. Regulation of the damper 24, as by shifting the same to any intermediate 35 position between the two extremes. indicated by the support 27 and the baffle 29, may be brought about by manipulating the device 66-67, so as .to 'regulate vor control Ithe amount of air passing through the heating chamber and the by-pass chamber 69, from the damper chamber, and this may be with reference to the cold air admitted at 3 or the air of the room admitted at 68. In either .eventthe regulation of the damper controls or modifies the temperature of the air de- .livered from the'unit. v
From the foregoing description, it will be seen ythat ho-t or cold air can be driven into theroom, and the air so driven in maybe.
heated to any desired degree, and also a mixture'y of hot and cold air can be driven into the room, according to the wayinwhich the damper 24 is set, vi z, either partly over the radiator, or partly over the chamber in front thereof, or midway between, as when said damper is set vertically Vin its. chamber. These various modes of operationv and the f' means by which the same are vbrought about in my apparatus, are important features of my invention and upon them I- desire'to lay great lstress since I am enabled to raise `the temperature inthe room very rapidly by reheatin the air as described, and am also enable to bring into the rooin fresh cold' air'ancl oom'pletelyvby-pass the radiator,
the re-heated air is shown the entire apparatus can whether the saine be in operation or not. In the foregoing description, however, it has been assumed that the radiator is in full,
or controlled, operation and that the many important effects but, it is important to note that my ventilathave been thus obtained;.
ing unit may be used in warm weather with i no heat turned on, with heat turned on. Itiis also important to note that, in my unit or apparatus, the heating element or chamber can be completely bypassed, the air passing downwardly through the damper chamber into the chamber 69 at no point entering the heating chamber or commin ling with the air in the heating-chamber. n the other hand,.the
and also in mild weather body of air passing downwardly through i passage 18, from the blower chamber into the damper chamber, is divided in the latter chamber according to the position the damper 24 is seti therein and the two columns, equal or unequal, are'driven through the heating and by-pass chambers, respectively, and commingled or mixed in the chamber or space 70 above the pan 17, said space becoming a mixing chamber for the unit, the air therein bein delivered from the unit at any predetermined temperature.
In addition to the advantages of control, as set forth in the foregoing, my apparatus does away with the necessity for building in,
or installing inthe structure of the building, supply ducts, passages, flues and other similaimeans and auxiliary apparatus usually required in mechanical and other ventilating systems. It is ve economical in matter of tory, transported to the and Very quickly instal ed. Each room in which the apparatus is installed can have the temperature' therein regulated, by a supply of fresh heated air, to any degree or extent desired. When the Ventilating unit is' installed in rooms which are not'in use, it can be put out of operation, thus savingthe expense of runn'ing the same and economizing operation. Fresh air is brought diioo` -construction and installation,since be made at the faclace of installation,`
rectly from the outside, either exactly atv the i temperature of the outside air, or controlled 'to any'degree desired. There are no drafts created-byv my apparatus, since the air is l taken in at va given point and driven to the top of the room, the ceiling. 'T/h'e' temperature 'in the room can be raised 'very .where it is diffused againstA .120 rapidly and much more effectively than fis possible with ordinary duct systems.
,j Another vimportant feature of my inven tion is that the hot and cold air'can be mixed in the apparatus, humidified and driven into' the, room; that is to say, cold air entering. ati3, and with'the damper set verticall or tilted to the degreedesired in either tion, will, m part, be drivenY through ias' `radiator and, in part, through the by-pass.
chamber 69 to the chamber 70, between the pan 17 and the bottom of the radiator, Where mixing and humidifying will take place before the air is driven into the room either through the bottom, Figure 3, or the top, Figure 2, of the apparatus. Thus my apparat-us has, in effect, a mixing and tempering chamber. lVhen ventilation is not required, as at night, for example, during cold weather, but heat is required in the room, the motor and fans may be stopped. In such circumstance, the closure 52 will be raised, as in Figure 3, thus shutting out cold air, by simultaneously closing dampers 43, 45, the dampers 30 will be closed and damper 32 opened; the damper 24 will be set as in Figure 3. This is the position of parts, practically, for re-circulation as previously described. Now, the air in the room, as it cools will descend to the fioor, enter the opening at lower damper 32, pass upwardly through ythe radiator, through the fan housings, and thence through `grille 68, which protects the opening at the closure 52. This provides for a certain degree of gravity circulation or recirculation through the ventilator. To increase such circulation orrecirculation, and thereby increase the volume of heated air passing through the radiator in a given time, l provide the shelf 18, see Figures4 and 5, with a plurality of openings 71, one at each end of said shelf,ieach opening being located between the end wall 11 of the main casing and the adjacent blower casing 23. ln Figures 4 and 5,0nly one of the openings 71 is shown, since this is deemed sufficient for purposes of illustration. These openings 7l are controlled or covered by dampers-72 mechanically connected to the closure 52 by'links 73, pivoted Iat one end at 74, to the closure 52 and, at
the other end at 75, to the-damper 72, so that, as said closure 521is opened and the dampers 43, 45 are closed, the dampers 72 in the shelf 18 will be raised to permit free circulation through the apparatus. The dampers are hinged at 76 to the shelf 18 and only one is shown in the drawings, as previously stated. This is quite an important mode of operation andgives a big-feature of advantage to the apparatus, since it vmay frequently happen that, in extremely cold` weather, this mode of recirculation or gravity circulation may be necessary becauseof lack of sufficientheat in the radiator, or because of very cold weather, or both, ln Figures 4 and 5, the damper 72 is shown elevated, the closure 52 is likewise elevated, and the dampers 43 and 45 are closed, while the by-pass damper 24'is shown in Figure 4 in full lines as closing the by-pass chamber,
thus allowing4 recirculation through the damper 'and heating chamber. Also, in' Figure 4, the damper 30 is closed while thedamper 32 is open. In this position`v of the parts, the cold air falling to the'floor will .enter the main casing at the open damper chamber, and from thence through the damper chamber and the opening 7l in the` shelf 18 and upwardly through the opening in the top of the casing, it being understood, as previously described, that the air will also pass up through the shelf 18 into the blower chamber and outwardly at the sides thereof and upwardly through the top of the main casing. The added openings 71 in the opposite ends of the shelves increase the capacity of the apparatus for gravity circulation or recirculation without the admission of fresh air into the apparatus through the dampers 43, 45, and it will also be understood that, as just described, the air passing upwardly through the apparatus following the` course of the arrows e is heated in the heating chamber. However, the by-pass damper 24 may be thrown over to the dotted line position, Figure 4, thus closing the passage through the heating chamber and opening the passage through the by-pass chamber into the damper chamber. Under these conditions, the cold air will enter the apparatus at the bottom, as indicated by the 'arrow e and will follow the course of arrows'f damper 24 to any extent desired between the two extremes of full line and dotted line positions, Figure 4, thus enablingthe air entering the apparatus at the bottom thereof to follow both` the courses indicated .bye
the arrows e andi;c and thus be only partially reheated. p.
The damper 32, in theposition shown in Figurev 3, acts to defiect the air passing from the casing downwardly toward the floor, vand this effect will be increased accordi ing-to the position of the damper. This is also ,true .of the damper or closure 30, the angle of deflection depending upon the position of the closures. Similar effects would also be derived from the closure 52, ifit were desired to adjust the same between extremes,`
andthe position of the closure 52 will control the position of the dainpers 43 and 45 withmodication of functions or edects.
The grille 68 will prevent articlesfof any kind being accidentally dropped into the chamber containing'the motor and fans. lt
will also lprevent tampering with the motor and fans, and accidents by inserting the hand in said open-ing. The closure 57 may be provided with a lock 69. My ventilating unit may be set in alcoves or niches or other spaces in the walls of rooms, thus, in great measure, overcoming its projection into the room. In fact, the formation of the system lends itself readily to disposition in practically any place in a room where a radiator can be set.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. A Ventilating unit consisting of an enclosing casing; a heating chamber and a discharge chamber formed therein by a. Vertically extending partition; a radiator set in one chamber; humidifying means in the bottom of the casing; a chamber in the top of the casing and a blower in said chamber; means for admitting air tothe top chamber; a damper movablymounted at the top of the partition and adapted to be shifted to regulate the admission of air into the radiator chamber; and a passage between the top chamber and` the radiator vchamber whereby the blower may drive the air down through the radiator chamber when\the damper is properlyset, and to the humidifying means and out of the casingthrough the discharge' chamber.
2. A Ventilating unit comprising an i closing casing divided into a plurality of chambers,` two being arranged in parallelism and one-of the latter having two discharge openings arranged one above the other; a third chamber above the other two and a blower therein; a heating element in one of the parallel chambers; a passage between the blower and heater chambers; dampers arranged in cooperative relation to the discharge openings; andy means for actuating the`dampers whereby the heated air may be driven from the casing through either one of the discharge openings.
3. A Ventilating unit comprising an inclosing casing; a heating element and a blower in the casing; two independent discharge openings in the casing arranged one above the other; a damper at each opening for controlling the discharge of air therefrom, and means for actuating the dampers whereby the heated air may be driven from the casing through either one of the discharge openings.
4. A Ventilating unit comprising an inclosing casing divided into a plurality of chambers; a blower in one chamber; a heatin element in another chamber; the casing being provided with, a passage between the two chambers; and also with a plurality of discharge openings arranged remotely to each other and one above the other; dampers arranged in cooperative relation to the discharge openings; and means for setting the dampers so that air driven by thev blower through the heating chamber can be discharged from the casing in either one of a plurality of directions) 5. A Ventilating unit comprising a-n inclosing casing divided into a plurality chambers; a'blower in one'chamber; a heating element in a second chamber; and humidifying means in a third chamber; the casing being provided with a passage between the blower and heater chambers and between the latter and the third chamber, and also with a plurality of discharge openings arranged remotely to each other and one above the other; dampers arranged in cooperative relation to the discharge openings; and means for settin Jr said dampers so that air driven by the blower through the heating and humidifying chambers can be discharged from the casing in either one of a plurality of directions. 6. A Ventilating unit comprising an inclosing casing having a chamber .at its top and a, 'blower therein; a chamber, below the blower chamber, -and a heater therein; a chamber, below the heaterl chamber, and humidifying means therein; a by-pass chamber arranged beside the heating chamber; adischarge chamber arranged beside .the bypass chamber; and a damper located at the entrance'to the heating and by-pass chambers for operation between the two and relatively to the blower chamber, whereby air from' the blower chamber may emanating either or'l both the heating and pass through by-pass chambers and through the discharge chamber.
7. A Ventilating unit comprising la casmg having a plurality of chambers therein; a
fan or blower contained in the topmost chamber; a heating' element contained in a lower chamber; humidifying means contained in a third chamber below-the heating chamber; and a damper controlling the entrance into-a, fourth chamber; means whereby the damper may be set so as to entirely close the heating chamber or entirely close the fourth chamber, or to permit the fan to drive lair through both said chambers into -I v the humidifyingchamber; a discharge chamber having independent openings one above the other; and means whereby the air thus humidified may be driven through the casing and out through either of said open- 8.v A Ventilating unit comprising a casing having a plurality of chambers extending lengthwise thereof and certain of them in parallelism between thefront and back walls of the casing; a blower in one chamber; a heating element in another of the chambers adg'acent the back of the casing; one of the parallel chambers being for discharge of airgand located at the front of the casing; and means located-at the entrance to theheating chamber, whereby the air driven by the' fanmay be caused to completely bypass the heating 'chambers so as to" deliver cold air from the apparatus.
9. A Ventilating unit comprising a casing divided into a plurality of chambers, one of which is at the top of the casing and is provided with a f an or, blower, and another of which is at the bottom of the casing, and two others of which are parallel and between the top and bottom chambers and between the front and rear walls of the casing; va discharge chamber at the front of the casing; heating means in the between chambers adjacent the rear wall of the casing; and a damper located at the entrance tothe heating chamber to cooperate with the heating means and to swing across and close the other between chamber, whereby air driven by the fanmay be caused to pass through the between chambers and bottom chamber and out through the discharge chamber.
10. A Ventilating unit comprising a casing having an air inlet and two separated outlets; means for forcing air lthrough the casing; dampers controlling said outlets;i
and means connecting said. dampers whereby as one is opened 1the other will be closed.
l1.' A lVentilating unit comprising a casing having an air inlet and two separated outlets; a heater located between the inlet and outlets; means for forcingair through the heater and casing; dampers controlling the outlets; and means connecting the dampers whereby when one is opened the other will be closed. t
' 12, A Ventilating unit comprising a casing having an air` inlet at its top and, two separated outlets, one of which is at the bottom of the. casing; means for forcing air through the casing; dampers controlling said outlets; and means connecting said dam ers whereby as one is opened the other will e closed.
13. A Ventilating unit comprising a casing divided into a plurality of chambers; means for admitting air to one of the chambers; means for blowing air from Nsaid chamber ,finto another of the chambers; heating means in `the latter chamber; and means whereby air driven from the rst named chamber maybe caused to pass invpart throughthe heating chamber and in part through a third chamber, and mixed, and humidiiied in a fourth chamber in the caschamber and a by-pass chamber, and also n a chamber above the two said chambers, a
Y fan or blower in the latter chamber, and` a.
passa e therefrom whichcommunicates with the ot er two chambers; a damper controlling the admission of air to both of said two chambers from the fan'chamber; andclosing casing provided with a fan chamber;
a heatingechamber adjacent the back of the casing; a by-pass chamber; a discharge opening at the front of the casing; a fan 1n the fan chamber; heating means in the heati ing chamber; and means at the entrance to the heating chamber whereby ,the heating.
chamber may be by-passed entirely so as to deliver cold air through the casing.
16. A Ventilating unit comprising a cas? ing having a chamber at its top; a fan or blower located in said chamber; an air inlet to said chamber in rear of the fan; an air inlet at the top of said chamber; means for controlling the air inlet at the top of said chamber and connected for simultaneously controlling the air inlet at the rear of said chamber.
17. A Ventilating unit having a chamber in thetop thereof; a `fan in said chamber; an air inlet at the rear of the chamber; an air inlet at the top of the chamber; means for covering the air inlet at the top of the chamber; means for covering the air inlet at 'the rear of the chamber;'and means, necting the two lsaid covering means vv ereby, when one is opened, the other is closed, and Vice versa.
` 18. A heating unit comprising a casing divided into a top'chamber. a bottomchamber, a heating chamber, a by-pass chamber,
and a delivery chamber; a fanv in the top` chamber; humidifying means in the bottom chamber; heating means in the heating chamber; a damper mounted so as to close either the heating chamber at its top or the by-pass chamber at its top, and means for manipulating said damper; and means for y ing divided into a plurality of chambers; a
fan or blower in one of the chambers; heating means in another of the chambers; an inlet to the fan chamber through which cold air Vmay be admitted to said chamber and driven through the heating chamber; `means whereby the heating chamber may/ be more or less cut of, s o that Tair driven by the fan may by-pass the heating y chamber; and means whereby the cold air inlet may be cut oli"l and the air in the rcom may be recirculated through the Ventilating unit.
20; A. ventilatingnnit comprising heating means and air driving means; means whereby fresh air may be admitted to the .air driving means and driven to the heating means; a closure for controlling the admission of fresh air; a closure at the top of the unit; and connections between the closures for opening one when the other is closed so as to re-circulate the air in the room at will through the unit.
21. A Ventilating unit having a casing lo-provided with a direct opening into the room to be ventilated and divided into a plurality of chambers, and interacting means located in said chambers whereby air may be driven from one through another of said chambers, o r air may be caused to travel either downwardly or upwardly through said unit.
22. A Ventilating uni-t comprising a housing having a blower chamber; and a heating chamber below the blower chamber; the blower chamber being provided withinside and outside air admission means; closures ,w 1 for said air admission means; and said heating chamber being provided with an outlet opening; and means connecting said closures to eii'ect the operation of one by the other.
23. A Ventilating unit comprising a housing having a blower chamber and a heating chamber communicating with each other, the latter having an outlet; outside and inside air'inlet openings to said blower chamber; dampers 1n said openings; means connecting said dampers acting to close the outside air damper when the inside air damper is opened; and a damper mounted in the outletl of the heating chamber to control discharge therefrom. v y
24. A Ventilating unit comprising a housing having an outside air inlet and an inside 40 air inlet, and an outlet below said inlets; a blower withiny said housing; a damper in .said outside air inlet; a damper for said inl side air inlet, comprising a hinged structure; l and means connecting said dampers to effect the opening and closing of the outside air damper when the inside air damper islosed and opened, respectively. "r`
25. A Ventilating unit comprising a blower, heater and a damper; an inclosing casing provided with chambers for each of said elements to operate in; the` blower being arranged above' the heater and damper so as to drive air downwardly against the two;
a discharge chamber defined by a wall ofl the casing and a baiiie; the damperbeing pivotally mountedA adj acent; the heater and adapted to swing toward and fromv the latter ,and the baille; and means cooperating with the damper by which it may be adjusted to.
ward and froml the heater and baille so vas to modly the temperature'of the air delivered from the unit through the discharge chamber. i
v 2li. A Ventilating unit/comprising an ines. closingr casing partitioned to provide a blower chamber, a heatin chamber, a cleaning chamber, a by-pass c amber, and a discharge chamber; the l'irst ythree chambers being arranged one above the other and containing a blower, a heater and a ,water'pan, 70 respectively, and the. discharge chamber being above the cleaningchamber; a damper pivotally mounted to swing relatively to the heater and to close the by-pass when in one extreme position; and means cooperating with the damper by which it may be shifted, whereby the damper may shunt the'air from the blower into the Lheater, or allow the air. l to go through the by-pass, or allow part of the air to go through the heater and part through the by-pass, and in all instances to pass through the cleaning chamber and out of the unit through the discharge chamber.
27. A `Ventilating unit comprising an inclosing casing partitioned to provide a blower chamber, a heating chamber, a mixing chamber, a by-pass chamber, and a discharge chamber; the first three chambers being arranged one above the other and two containing a blower and a heater, respectively; a damper pivotally mounted to swing relatively to the heater and to close the bypass when in one extreme position; and means cooperating -with the damper by which it may be shifted, whereby the damper may shunt the air from the blower into the heater, or allow the air to go through the by-pass, or allow part of the air to go through the heater and part through the by-pass, and in all instances to pass throu h the mixing chamber -and out of the unit t rough the discharge chamber.
28. A Ventilating unit comprising an inclosing casing partitioned to provide a chamber at its top, a chamber at its bottom, and three parallel between chambers; a blower in the top chamber; a heater in one of the between chambers; vand a damper adapted .to close another of the between chambers; the third between chamber being l for air discharge, and the 'three between chambers opening at their bottom in the bot- 1 tom chamber; and means cooperating with the damper by .which it may be shifted,
whereby air passing into the bottom chamber may be driven from the unit through the discharge chamber.
l29. A Ventilating unit comprising a casing divided into a plurality of chambers,- oneA of which latter is at the top of the casing and is provided with a fan or blower, and another of which chambers is at the bottom of the casing and is provided with humidifying means, and another of which 5 chambers is between the fan and humidity-z ing chambers and contai ns a heating element suspended above the humidifying chamber;
` and another of which chambers is parallel with the heating chamber; and means wherebythe Aair driven by the fan may be caused to passl through either the heating chamber or the arallel chamber to' the humidiying chamber, and out through the casing near the top thereof. i 30. A Ventilating unit com rising a housing having an air inlet; an an air outlet near its u per end a blower chamber at the upper en of said housing and a blower therein; a radiator within the housing between the blower outlet and air outlet; a water pan within the housing between the radiator and the air outlet; a damper adjustable to cause all the air from the blower to be heated by the radiator before delivery thereof through said outlet and adjustable to cause part or all of the air from the blower to dow directly throu h said air outlet; and said water pan being ocated in position to cleanse the air passlng through said air outlet.
31. A unit ventilator comprising. a main housing, an air intake, an upper chamber connected to said air intake, a motor and blower mounted in said upper chamber, a lower chamber, an air assage connecting said blower and Vsaid ower chambers, a dam r in the lower chamber controlling the ow of air therethrough, a heating device mounted in said lower chamber, a water tank in the base of said lower chamber underneath said heating device, and an air outlet extending upward from the lower part of said lower or heating chamber.
32. ln a device of the class described, the combination of a housing havingan air inlet and an air outlet near its upper end, a blower chamber at the upper end of said housing and a blower therein, a radiator within the housin between the blower outlet and the air out et, a damper adjustable to cause all the air from the blower to be heated b said radiator before delivery thereof throng 'said outlet and adjustable to cause all of the' air from the blower to ow directly throu t s air outlet.
Lacan,
artor
US301190A 1919-06-02 1919-06-02 Ventilating unit Expired - Lifetime US1503089A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US301190A US1503089A (en) 1919-06-02 1919-06-02 Ventilating unit

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US301190A US1503089A (en) 1919-06-02 1919-06-02 Ventilating unit

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1503089A true US1503089A (en) 1924-07-29

Family

ID=23162332

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US301190A Expired - Lifetime US1503089A (en) 1919-06-02 1919-06-02 Ventilating unit

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1503089A (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2503764A (en) * 1945-02-17 1950-04-11 Trade Wind Motorfans Inc Fan accelerated radiator cabinet
US2649242A (en) * 1951-06-30 1953-08-18 Payne Beverly Mfg Co Variable capacity blower
US2724579A (en) * 1949-02-17 1955-11-22 Svenska Flaektfabriken Ab Heating, cooling, and ventilating apparatus for ship cabins
US2834279A (en) * 1955-11-10 1958-05-13 Ohio Foundry & Mfg Company Blower unit for wall heaters
US4475530A (en) * 1980-12-15 1984-10-09 Albertson Robert V Heating apparatus
US20040253917A1 (en) * 2003-06-12 2004-12-16 Lidartech Co., Ltd. Window having a ventilation equipment

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2503764A (en) * 1945-02-17 1950-04-11 Trade Wind Motorfans Inc Fan accelerated radiator cabinet
US2724579A (en) * 1949-02-17 1955-11-22 Svenska Flaektfabriken Ab Heating, cooling, and ventilating apparatus for ship cabins
US2649242A (en) * 1951-06-30 1953-08-18 Payne Beverly Mfg Co Variable capacity blower
US2834279A (en) * 1955-11-10 1958-05-13 Ohio Foundry & Mfg Company Blower unit for wall heaters
US4475530A (en) * 1980-12-15 1984-10-09 Albertson Robert V Heating apparatus
US20040253917A1 (en) * 2003-06-12 2004-12-16 Lidartech Co., Ltd. Window having a ventilation equipment
US7083110B2 (en) * 2003-06-12 2006-08-01 Lidartech Co., Ltd. Window having a ventilation equipment
US20060270334A1 (en) * 2003-06-12 2006-11-30 Lidartech Co., Ltd. Window having a ventilation equipment
US7270600B2 (en) 2003-06-12 2007-09-18 Lidartech Co., Ltd Window having a ventilation equipment

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2471351A (en) Dual hot-air heater unit for fireplaces
US3324782A (en) Air treating apparatus
US2135461A (en) Portable ventilating attachment for radiators
US1503089A (en) Ventilating unit
US2022332A (en) Air conditioning heating cabinet
US2327663A (en) Heating and ventilating apparatus
US2261852A (en) Mechanical ventilation
US2188566A (en) Air conditioning system for buildings
US2212222A (en) Combination water and air conditioning apparatus
US3958628A (en) Vertical blower coil unit for heating and cooling
US3372870A (en) Air treating unit
US1753156A (en) Heating and ventilating apparatus
US2229304A (en) Air conditioning apparatus
US1845243A (en) Heating and ventilating unit
US1903143A (en) Unit ventilator
US2013136A (en) Hot air furnace
US1782711A (en) Concealed unit for heating and ventilating
US2029368A (en) Method and apparatus for conditioning air
US1838505A (en) Heating and ventilating unit
US1815306A (en) Air system
GB460755A (en) Improvement in air circulating apparatus
US2338356A (en) Air heating apparatus and system
US1388330A (en) Car-stove
US1343330A (en) Heating and ventilating apparatus
US2220355A (en) Air conditioning apparatus