US2192695A - Tabulating machine - Google Patents

Tabulating machine Download PDF

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US2192695A
US2192695A US18483A US1848335A US2192695A US 2192695 A US2192695 A US 2192695A US 18483 A US18483 A US 18483A US 1848335 A US1848335 A US 1848335A US 2192695 A US2192695 A US 2192695A
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matrix
lever
card
carriage
bar
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US18483A
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Paul M Rainey
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COMBINATION SELECTOR Co
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COMBINATION SELECTOR Co
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KGRAPHICAL DATA READING; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K1/00Methods or arrangements for marking the record carrier in digital fashion
    • G06K1/12Methods or arrangements for marking the record carrier in digital fashion otherwise than by punching

Description

March 5, 1940. P. M. RAINEY TABULATING MACHINE Filed April 26, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet l ATTO R N EY 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 5, 1940. P. M. RAINEY TABULATING MACHINE Filed April 26, 1935 INVENTOR I W l l MI 0 Q 0 l 0 N f 0 ya hm .om ifi., 1mi v C@ NM QN 0N Yv KWN \\N @n Il..- www March 5,1940. P. M. RAINEY TABULATING MACHINE Filed April 26, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 [Nfl/[111111,
INVENTOR PAUL M. RAINEY BY ATTORNEY March Ei,v 1940. P. M. RAINEY TABULATING MACHINE Filed April 2e, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 MQ c wm QQ ATTORNEY March 5,` 1940. P. M. RAlNl-:Y
TABULATING MACHINE Filed Aprilrzes,4 1935 '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTORNEY P. M. RAINEY TABULATING MACHINE- Filed Aprii 26. 1935 y 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 IIIIP IIL .llll.' IIIIIL INVENTOR PAUL M. RAINEY BY ATTORNEY March 5, 1940.
III Sm March 5, 1940, P. M. RAINEY 2,192,695
y TABULATING MACHINE Fil'ed Apri-1 26, 1935 7 Sheets-sheet '7 ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 5, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Combination Selector Company,
Montclair,
N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application April 26, 1935, Serial No. 18,483
6 Claims.
This invention relates to new and useful improvements in tabulating machines.
The object of the invention is to -provide a machine in which a plurality of compilations of data can be simultaneously obtained from a set of record members while the record members are fed through the machine.
A tabulating machine embodying the various features of the present invention is designed to use tabulating record members, such as cards of conventional form in which the desired information, numerical or otherwise, is recorded by means of punched holes. These holes may be located in any one of a plurality of locations in any or'each of a plurality of positions or columns. Each position or column has at least 10 locations, at any one of which holes may be punched indieating the numeral digits 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9. The machine herein described uses a card having 45 columns with locations for 12 holes in each column.
Ihe machine is of about the size of two standard typewriters. It is motor driven, and is provided with a magazinento which the cards are placed in a horizontal position, one on top of the other, forming a stack. The machine feeds the cards from the bottom of the stack to a receiving pocket, depositing them in the same sequence in which they were placed in the magazine. The
machine is provided with two adding heads each adjustable to accumulate numerical data from any group of adjacent columns of the cards placed in the magazine. Each adding head is under the control of an associated reading mechanism.
including a matrix which makes it possible to accumulate numerical data from any classification of cards without the necessity for sorting or otherwise disturbing the original sequence of the cards. l
The reading mechanism comprises feeling members or fingers which read the holes punched in the card while the latter is in the testing position. Whether or not numerical data is to be accumulated from a given card iscontrolled by means. of standard record members or matrix cards. In the present embodiment of the invention two matrix cards are provided. In form these are similar to the tabulating cards placed in the magazine. A given matrix card 50. is punched to indicate the specification of the classification for which accumulation is desired. Matrices thus prepared are compared by the machine with a pattern of pins (one set of pins being provided for each matrix) setup by the v5 machine as the 'cards are fed from the magazine (Cl. 235-6L7) to the receiving pocket. The position of each pin in each pattern is determined by the position of a hole in the corresponding column of each tabulating card as it is fed from the magazine.
If all the pins in one of these patterns nd holes 5 in the matrix with which it is compared, then this indicates that the tabulating card last fed from the magazine is of the classification specied on a matrix and that accumulation of certain data is desired, If one or more of the pins fail to find holes in the associated matrix, then accumulation from that particular card is not desired on the accumulating mechanism associated with the matrix. The necessity of sorting the tabulating cards is entirely eliminated and the cards may be maintained in any convenient order. 'I'his makes it possible for the individual card to have a utility of place and for the iile of cards to have a utility of arrangement.
In addition to controlling the selection of cards for the purpose of accumulating desired data, one or both of the matrices control also the performance of other functions.
1. 'Ihe location and width of a notch in one 25 edge of the matrix determines the particular columns on record cards from which data should be accumulated.
2. A notch in another position on the matrix vcauses the cards of a given classification, as de- 30 termined by the matrix, to be thrown into a separate pocket.
3. A notch in another position causes the machine to print a translation of all tabulating cards of the classification determined by the 35 matrix.
4. A notch in still another position permits a mechanical memory mechanism to control the adding head with which the particular matrix is associated to accumulate and print sub-totals 40 'of cards numerically arranged with respect to numerical indications in any desired columns.
By comparing the cards simultaneously with two or more matrices, a large variety of statistical data can be accumulated from a set of cards 45 with great dispatch.
' The matrices 'afford a leable record of the functions performed by the machine. 1f once right, they are always right, wear and tear exfcepted, and therefore can be re-used whenever it is desired to secure similar information in similar form from similar cards. A file of these matrices may therefore constitute a record of clerical routine, relieving the operation ofthe necessity of setting the machine to do a particular job and thus insure against human errors by substituting mechanical surety.
In the preferred embodimentherein disclosed, the matrix and the record members are of paper, and perforations represent the data or indicia which the machine tests or reads 01T' the record members and compares with the matrix or matrices. Obviously. other types of cards or slugs may be used without departing from the spirit of the invention.
A more complete understanding of the machine and the details of its operation will be obtained by referring to the following detailed description of its operation and the appended claims.
In the drawings, Fig. l is a side elevation of the tabulating machine;
Fig. 2 is a detail of the translating mechanism;
Fig. 3 is a longitudinal cross-section of the machine;
Fig. 4 is a detail of the mechanism controlling the dropping of the matrix mechanism;
Fig. 5 is a detail showing the mechanism for arresting the movement of the individual select ing bars;
Fig. 6 shows certain detaiis in connection with the operation of the sorting mechanism;
Fig. 7 shows certain details for controlling the sorting operation;
Fig. 8 shows certain details in connection with sorting and the latches for maintaining the totalizer in the desired position;
Fig. 9 is a horizontal section through the gear reduction unit of the drive;
Fig. 10 shows certain details of the mechanical memory and the control oi adding sectors, totalizer and sorting mechanism;
Fig. 11 shows part ofthe mechanism illustrated in Fig. 10 in a different position;
Fig. 12 is a front view of the tabulating machine with the adding mechanismeliminated;
Figs. 13, 14 and 15 show how different functions of the'machine are controlled by notches in the matrix member. Fig. 13 being a sectional View along line .I3-43 of Fig. 15; I
Fig. 16 is a side elevation of a detail of the adding mechanism; and
Fig. 1'7 is a diagram illustrating the timing of the machine.
In reading the following detailed description of the machine, Fig. 17 should be consulted. The curve represents the movement of carriage 2li (in inches) in response to the rotation of driving gear I3 (in degrees). rl`.'he shaded oblongs below the graphrepresent the occurrence of functions noted n the appropriate legends with respect to the position of the carriage.
The usual record cards I perforated in accordance with the statistical or other data to be tabulated are stacked within a supply magazine 2 fastened on a casting 3 projecting from the base 4 of the machine. top card.
Power for operating the machine is supplied from a suitable motor (not shown) through a belt 6 (see Figs. 1 and 9) which rotates a pulley I1 freely mounted on' shaft 8. As the pulley 'I rotates a gear 9 fastened thereto and also freely rotatable on shaft 8 rotates with it and rotates in turn a gear I0 mounted on a stub shaft I I within the frame I2'vin which shaft 8 is also mounted. The other end of stub shaft II carries a small gear I2 which is in mesh with a gear` I3 fastened to one end of shaft 8. Gear I3 will, therefore, rotate shaft 8. Fastened tothe other end of shaft is a cam i 4 carrying a pin I5. During the rota A weight 5 is placed on the tion of gear i3 a lever I3 pivoted to the gear at II (see Fig. 3) is moved around with it and rocks a link coupling consisting of two arms I8 and I9. i8 is pivoted at one end in a casting 20 attached to the base i, to the end of which is pivoted at 2i the link I9. Intermediate the ends of link I8 is pivoted at 22 the free end of lever I3. The other end of link i3 is fastened to rod 23 mounted in two brackets like 24 projecting from bottom 25 of carriage 2E extending substantially the full length and Width of the machine. The rocking of the linkage I6, i3, i9 during the rotation of gear I3 will, therefore, cause the carriage 26 to reciprocate with respect to the frame of the machine, the linkage being introduced between the motive power and the carriage in order to insure the quick return movement (from right to left, as shown in the drawings). j
The carriage rides on rollers like 21 (Fig. 12) suitably supported in casting 3 by means of stub shaft 23 (Figs. 1 and 10). Fastened to the front edge of the carriage 23 is a solid plate 29 (Fig. 5) of the same width as the carriage and in the front edge of plate 29 is fastened a plate 30 of the same width as plate 23, but having a lip overhanging the edge of plate 29. Forty-six equally spaced strips 3i are anchored in the front edge of plate 42S at 32 below the overhanging lip of plate 30,
the other ends of said strips 3I being anchored in a bar or strip 33 which again is of the same length as the width of the carriage. Strip 33 constitutes the front edge of carriage 26. The spaces between adjacent strips 3i come directly under the perforations in the different columns of the cards I, the lowermost card resting on the strips 3| when the carriage is in its back position. Through each space between adjacent strips projects a feeling member constituted by a spring 34, the lower end of each of which is fastened to the free end of a corresponding lever 35, pivotally mounted at 36 on a frame 3'I which rests on casting 3. The wire 34 is bent into a gooseneck and its free end 3B is bent at right angles and is, in the normall position of the carriage 26, held down with respect to the cards by means of a retaining strip 33 fastened to the bottom of strip 33. As the carriage is moved to the right (Figs. 3 and 5), the projecting lip of plate 30, which is in alignment with the lowermost card IctY pushes said card to the right through a gate 4U on magazine 2, which aiiords a clearance above the tops of the strips 3i just suflicient for the passage of a single card.
As the carriage is moved to the right, the retaining strip 39 frees the springs 34 and permits them to project upward against the bottom of the card which has been fed out of the magazine, in the present case card Ia. If the card is perforated in alignment with the upper end 38 of a spring 34, then the latter will project through such perforation. During the further movement tothe right of the card, the springs 34 having ends 38 which had found perforations, will rotate the associated lever 35 in a clockwise direction around the pivot 36 and the left-hand ends of such levers 35 will be caused to move upward Within jaws 4I mounted on plate 31 and each Will lift a roller 42 into engagement with a notched rack 43 in the lower face of a selecting bar 44 extending substantially the full length of the carriage. One selecting bar 44 is provided for each space between strips 3I, in .he present case a total of forty-five and, therefore, one for each column on the cards in which perforations may occur. 'I'hese feeling members 3i will, therefore. test each card thev card inthe various columns. The result of this card testing or reading operation will be communicated to the machine in the manner to be presently described.
The forty-five selecting bars 44 are frictionally held in the carriage 26 and are taken along with the ycarriage during its reciprocating movement until a bar 44 is arrested by a roller 42 and held in the position to which vit has been advanced at the time the spring 34, associated with the particular lever 35, happened to project throughs. perforation in the card. The unavoidable friction due to the weight of the selecting bars is suicient for operation at moderate speeds. To work at higher speeds suil'lcient friction is insured by springs attached to the carriage and pressing against the selecting bars. It will be seen, therefore, that when the carriage 26 has been moved to its extreme right-hand position, some of the bars 44 will have moved with the carriage to their extreme right-hand positions, and others arrested in intermediate positions, the positions of the selecting bars indicating the pattern of the perforations in the card la that had been removed from the magazine.
Each of the tabulating bars 44 carries a matrix testing pin 45. These pins 45 are normally yin alignment and will, therefore, upon the completion of the left-to-right stroke display a male pattern of the perforated pattern of the card selected. The nearer to the right-hand edge of card la the perforations occur, the nearer to the left-hand edge of Fig. will the corresponding pin 45 be arrested. These pins 45 are below a matrix holder 46 between which a standard record or matrix card 41 is held. 'I'he matrix Lholder 46 is carried by a bracket 48 pivoted at 49 to the frame of the machine and is openon the operating side of the machine. Its top and bottom plates are flared out to facilitate the inserting of the matrix. The matrix card 41 may be of the same size and shape as the cards and isdivided into columns like the cards It is perforated in accordance with the tabulation or statistical data that one may wish to read off the cards. In other words, one punches into the matrix a female pattern of all the information that it is required to obtain from the cards. Where, for instance, the cards have to do with a census and each card contains a large number of characteristic indicia of individuals, the matrix card 41 may be punched to select all the male individuals more than thirty years old who were born in the United States,are at present employed, have dependents and were educated beyond the primary school grade, etc. A second matrix card 28| is punched in accordance with another group of statistical data and the card fed is compared with it through the agency of a second set of pins like 283, one on each selector bar 44 which are also set-into a male pattern representing the'indicia on"the card fed. I am enabled, therefore, to tabulate, list or otherwise compile a plurality of different classes of statistical information while the cards are fed through the machine. The cards need not be specially classified and need not be run through the machine more than once. The matrix cards are punched in accordance with the desiderata and the machine is operated without any special adjustment to perform the required operations.
As the carriage continues its movement in the right-hand direction the springs 34, the ends 38 of which have projectedthrough perforations in the card la, will snap out of the perforations.
`frame of the machine.
The lever 36 associated with each spring 34 which had been snapped out of its hole, may return to its normal position shown in Fig. 3, but roller 42 which had been lifted by the associated lever 35, will be wedged between a tooth of rack 43 on the selecting bar 44 and the inclined surface 50 of the jaws 4|, holding the tabulating bar 44 in its arrested position and preventing its further advance with the carriage.
As the carriage continues its movement in a right-hand direction the card la passes under two rollers 5| (only one shown) hinged on a bar 52 by means of bracket 53 to the side of magazine 2 at 54. The bracket 53 is pulled towards the magazine by means of a coiled spring 55, the motion of the bracket 53 with respect to the magazine being limited by a leg 56 projecting from the bracket. A simple clutch consisting of awire spring indicated at 56a is provided on each roller 5|, permitting it to rotate in a counter-clockwise direction but preventing clockwise rotation. Therefore, in the final stages of the right-hand movement of card la, rollers 5| will roll over the surface of card la.
Before the carriage reaches its end position to the right and after the last perforation on card la has passed the gate 40, or the position on the card where there might be a perforation has passed the gate 40, the pin I5 (Figs. 1 and 4) on cam |4 engages lever 51 pivoted in a bracket 58 attached to the base 4. The lever 51 is pulled up against an adjustable stop 59 in a bracket 60 by a spring 6| attached to casting 3. The pin I5 will press down lever 51 against the tension of spring 6| and pulls down a link 62, fastened at one end 63 to the lever, and at the other end 64 to a lever 65. The lever 65 is rotatably mounted on the shaft 49 (Figs. l and 4). The bracket 48 holding the matrix 46 may move with respect to the lever 65 to an extent limited by a screw 66 projecting through bracket 48. As the lever 62 is pulled down it will pull down the lever 65 and thus permit bracket 48 to fall by gravity.
If the perforations in the matrix 41 are in alignment with all the pins 45 positioned under the matrix holder 46 in accordance with the perforated pattern of card la, then the matrix holder will drop far enough for the pins 45 to project through the lower and upper halves of the matrix holder and, of course, the perforations in the cards. If the setting of pins 45 does not in every respect correspond to the perforations yin the matrix, then at least one of the pins will find an obstruction preventing the dropping of the matrix holder 46 to its lowest position.
A stop 61 projecting through the free en-d of the matrix holder 46 cooperates with a bell-crank lever 68 (Figs. l, 10, 1l). These elements are shown in the normal position in Fig. 1. Fig illustrates the condition when perforations in the matrix 41 permitted the matrix holder 48 to drop into its lowermost position, wherein the stop 61 engages the upper end of bell-crank 68 and causes it to rock around its pivot point 69 in the frame, in Which position it will be latched by latch 10 pivoted at 1| in the frame and engaging an ear 12 projecting from the bell-crank 68. The right-hand leg`13 of the crank 68 will be tipped up as shown in Fig. 10. As shown in Figs. 1 and 11, in the normal position an ear 14 projecting from the free end 13 of the crank engages a match in a long bar 16 which controls the sorting of the cards. The bar 16 is mounted to perform a limited longitudinal movement in the Bar 16 is urged to move a. arenoso from left to right against stop pin lil rigidly mounted in side projecting ear oi lever by means of a spring it, one end of which is iastened tobar ld, and the other end of which is fastened to a lever do (Figs. l, 6, l and 11). .As the carriage 2t nears the end of its stroke, then, as shown in Fig. 6, a pin di projecting from the carriage 255, engages the lowerend of a lever d2 and rocks it in a counter-clockwise direction around its pivot il@ on the frame. The upper end 32a of the lever d2 is hooked around a lever 34 pivoted at 85 in the frame and rotates the lever.
it in a counter-clockwise direction. The righthand end of bar 'it is pivoted at 8d to one leg of a bell-crank tl which in turn is pivoted at all to the lower end of lever td. Ii bar i6 is free to move forward, the bell-crank @l is moved to the right, pivoting around 85 with lever Bil, but if bar 'i6 is .not free to move to the right, bellcrank 3l is then turned counter-clockwise around pivot to with respect to lever Bil and in its extreme position misses the ear t@ on latch ell. The latch @il is pivoted at dii and is rotated in a clockwise direction by means of a spring Si attached to the ear 89. Therefore, if bar l@ is held in its left-hand position, latch u@ will not be operated and will hold double-armed lever d2 in the position shown in Fig. l.
If, however, as is assumed in. the present case, the matrix comes all the way down and tilts arm 'U3 so as to release bar iii, the latch 9@ will be lifted into position shown in Fig. l0, and releases the double-armed lever Q2 to he rotated by spring around the pivot dfi. The pivot shaft @l carries a plate Slt shown in lriig. 5 in the latched-up position. lin the latched-up position of the plate 95 the card ila when released, as ll shall presently describe, will iall in' the pocket et (Figs. i and 3). In the unlatched position as shown in Fig. lu the card would tall in the pocket Sil.
During the forward movement oi the carriage 2t, link il@ (Figs l, lil and ll) pivoted at tt and a second link also pivoted at 2&3, moved from left to right with the carriage, i. e., from the position shown in Fig. l into the position shown in Fig. 10, going through the intermediate position shown in Fig. ll. The left-hand end oi link ad is provided with a pin lil@ which passes through a slot lill in the lower end of alink lili?, which in turn is pivoted at lil@ to the free end of a crank iill pivote-d to a shatt illi, the operation of which will be described later. one of its ends, attached to pin ld@ and is pivoted at its other end in bracket lill on the base d. lntermediate the ends oi link mit a pin lil@ is guided within a slot lili? oi a crank il@ pivoted at l il to the frame of the machine. Similar links are associated with link @il at the forward end of the machine. A pin l l2 projecting from the end of link et passes through a slot il@ in the lower end oi a linkilrl. pivoted at iid tothe end of a crank il@ which is fastened to a shaft ill similar to shaft it. The link lll (see, for instance, Figs. i@ and ll), is
provided with an ear il@ to which one end ci? a" coiled spring il@ is attached. The other end oi spring lill is attached to ear lil of a lever tdi pivoted at iii to link lll. As best shown in Fig. l0, the lower end of lever lill is cut out at i223. In the normal position shown in Fig. i this cutaway portion rests against pin M2 and .prevents the pin from riding up in slot M3, thus imparting motion durlng'the lett-torlght movement of the carriage to crank it@ and thus rotates short till.
i link lil@ is, at-
The upper end of link lili is llink im is similarly coupled through a springJZd with a lever 25 which corresponds to lever l2@ and which prevents pin i0@ from riding up in slot lill and causes, through the agency of crank llllii, shaft W5 to rotate.
A link 126, the lower end of which is pivoted in bracket |21 of base 4, is pivoted at its upper end at H2. Intermediate its end it carries a pin t28 riding in a slot |29 of bracket l30 of the machine. The left-hand end of a restoring lever |130 is pivoted at |28. The restoring lever has a cam surface |31 which engages a bracket iti attached to casting 3 and rides up on the bracket during the left-to-right movement of lever l3ll. During this movement head |33 of lever I3@ will engage pin |34 of double-armed lever Q2, assuming that the lever is unlatched, and will rotate it into position shown in Fig. 11, in which it will be latched by the latch 9U. When lever i430 and its head |33 are in the position shown in Fig. l0, lifting of latch 90 will permit spring 93 to .flip the double-arm lever 92 into the position shown in this ligure.
The so-called memory device through which thesetting of the selecting bars 44 during the feeding of one card is communicated to the tabulating and listing mechanism during the feeding of the succeeding card will now be described with v reference to Fig. 3, which illustrates the apparatus with the carriage and selecting bars in the extreme left position. It will be noted that each .selecting bar irl carries near its left-hand end a pin itl which is straddled by the forked end of a bar i3d which in turn is pivoted on a rod i3@ supported in a casting |40 attached to base 4. The lower end of bar |38 has a key-slot cut-out lill, whereby it may be readily snapped on the bearing rod i3d. Each plate M2 (one for each selecting 'bar 34) is frictionally held between the bar i3d associated therewith and a spring riveted to the bar at 8d3. As the selecting bars M vare moved to the right into the positions determined hy the periorations in the card fed, they will rock the associated bars 38 into various angular positions and the members M2, being frictionally held, will also be rocked into corresponding positions.
' When the carriage reaches the extreme right position (Fig. rods |45 and M6 mounted in brackets Eril (only one shown) rigidly at tached to the leit-hand end of carriage 25 will have aligned all members |42 in a vertical position, although the position of arms |38 may be in different positions, depending on the positions in which their associated selecting bars M were stopped by holes in the card last fed from magazine Therefore, when the carriage is in the left-hand position andall of the arms its are aligned (because the selecting bars are aligned hy bar 252 as elsewhere explained), the angular position of the members |42 with respect to their associated arms i3d is determined by the previous forward position of their associated selecting hars, which in turn is determined by the location of the holes punched in the various columns of the card just fed. On the next stroke of the carriage from left to right members M2 of selecting bars Jill, which stop in the same position as on the previous stroke, will come to rest ina vertical position when their selecting bars are stopped, whereas the members M2 of selecting hars {lf-l which stop in a different position from that ci the previous stroke, will be inclined to right or left of the vertical position and the continued movement of the carriage will read-1 just them to a vertical position by rods and |46 as already described. In other words, any adjustment of the angular position of members |42 with respect to their associated arms |38 is evidence of a change in the position of the selecting bars 44 and in the position of holes in the card last fed as compared with the holes in the preceding card. Member is a broad U-shaped piece extending across the machine, the upturned ends of which are pivoted at |5| to brackets |41 (only one shown) mounted one on each side of the left-hand end of the carriage, and held in position shown in Figs. 1 and 10 by spring |52, one end of which is attached to lug |54 of member |50 and the other end attached to unnumbered lug of bracket |41. Member |50 shown in section in Fig. 3 carries a member |49, the right-hand edge of which normally projects beyond the transverse section of member |50 and the right-hand edges of rods |45 and |46, so as to enter the slots |48 of members |42 as the carriage nears the end of its left-to-right movement, providing the slots are aligned with the members |42 all in a vertical position. However, if any member |42 is not in a vertical position (indicating that the card last fed differs from the preceding card as previously explained), the righthand edge of member |49 will engage the lefthand edge of such members |42 (unless |49 is cut away as explained later) before rods |45 and |46 have restored it to the vertical position and cause member |50 to rotate in a clockwise direction against the tension or spring. |52 on its pivot |5|, causing member |53 also pivoted at |5| and supported against gravity by lug |54 of member |50, to drop so that notch |55 in its lower edge engages ear |56 of lever |51. The cutting away of that portion of |49 which extends to the right of bars |45 and |46 opposite member |42 associated with any given selecting bar makes that bar and its corresponding column of the card ineffective to cause the release of any crank |68 or |68 by dog |64 or |64.
'Ihe continued movement to the right will, through lever |53, communicate motion to the upright lever |51 and cause it to rock from left to right around its pivot |58. The upper end of lever |51 engages the left-hand edge of a horizontal bar |59 and pushes it from left to right against the tensionof a spring |60 fixed to the frame of the machine. During the travel of bar |59 from left to right it carries with it two levers |6| and |62, both of which are shown in Fig. 1, and only one, |62, of which is shown in Figs. 10 and 11. The levers |6| and |62 are centrally pivoted to the bar |59 and the lower ends of levers |6| and |62 will engage the lower ends |63' and |63 of dogs |64 and if the upper ends oflevers |'6'| and-|62 are stopped in their travel from left to right by matrix control lever 3| |A, as shown in Fig. 11, the functioning of which will be explained later. The dog |64 will be rocked in a counter-clockwise direction on its pivot |66 against the tension of a spring' |61 and will release crank |68 connectedto a gear pinion |69, in the form of pinion Wire with ends turned down, extending across the machine, The identical arrangement is provided to cooperate with the pivoted lever |6|. The crank corresponding to |68, which is controlled by a dog corresponding to |64, is mounted on a gear pinion |10 running clear across the machine.
The horizontal bar |59 initiates a total taking operation whenever blade |49 engages the edge of one or more numbers |42 providing matrix control lever 3| |A is so positioned as to engage the upper end of lever |62 pivoted on bar |59. The blade |49 is removable and its front edge is cut away except in those elds where a total should be taken in the event of any change in this eld. This performs the automatic control feature to be described in greater detail. This cutting away removes that part of |49 (see Fig. 3) which extends to the right oi rods |45 and |46 which would otherwise engage members |42 in those positions in which control is not desired.
Just before the carriage reaches the extreme right-hand position, the pin I5 (Fig. 4) moves away from lever 51, permitting it to rise under the tension of spring 6|. This forces up link 62,
v turning lever clockwise and lifting bracket 48 and matrix holder 46 above the level of the selector pins 45 on each of the selecting bars 44. This action clears the selecting bars so that they are free to move to the left with the carriage on the return stroke.
When the carriage is in its extreme right-hand position, the machine is ready to print on a sheet of paper |1| (see Figs. 2 and 3) running the full width of the machine, indicia corresponding to the perforations in the card last fed. At its lefthand end the upper face of each bar 44 carries types |12 formed therein corresponding to the indiciaborne by the cards. Depending on the extent to which a bar 44 has been moved, one or One arm |14 is provided on each side of the machine to carry the roller |13 vwhich also extends f the full width of the carriage. The arm |14 is pivoted in the frame of the machine at |15. The arm |14 is formed into a bell-crank |16 to which is pivoted at |11 a link |18, the free end of which carries a link |19 held in the position shown in Fig. 2 by means of a spring |80 fixed to the frame of the machine. The lower end of the link |19 is pivoted at |8| to a horizontal bar |82. A pin |83 provided on the carriage engages, during the last fraction of its movement from left to right, the link |19, and moves it'against the tension of spring |80. Through link |18 and crank H6 the roller |13 will be rocked into the position shown in Fig. 2 in which the printing is accomplished. This happens provided that a lever |84 pivoted at |65 o n bar |82 is obstructed by a matrix control lever |86 (to be explained later) at the lower end, and by an ear |81 provided on the dog 68. If the lever |84 is free to move at one of its ends or at both ends, then the pin |83 will move through the lever |19 the bar |82 from left to right, without causing crank |16 to rock, whereby the printing roller will remain in the position shown in Figs. 1 and 3, and the positioning of selecting bars` 44 will not be recorded at this point.
zine and is held against members 3| by the roller 5| (see Fig. 5). The driving gear I3 (Fig. 3) has rotated approximately at an angle of 240. As driving gear I3 continues to rotate, it will move the carriage through linkage I6, |8, |9 from right to left, Owing to the fact that'the rollers 5| are prevented from rotating in a' clockwise direction, they will hold the card la in its advanced position and, as the members 3| are pulled out from under the card upon the return of the carriage to the left, the card will be dropped into one of the pockets 96 or 91, de-
pending on the position of the guide 95. As the '(6 position they may have been moved during the' left-to-right movement of the carriage, will travel back with the carriage, since the rollers 42 are free to fall back from the position shown in Fig.
into the position shown in Fig. 3 over the nclined surface 50. The selecting bars will continue to travel back with the carriage until a shoulder 2|| (Fig. 3) formed in each bar engages a stop 2|2 which is mounted on the frame and runs clear across the carriage.' Owing to this, when the carriage has travelled. all the way back to the left, all the bars 44 will be aligned and, ofcourse, the pins 45 will also be aligned. The position of the stop 2|2 is determined so that on the forward stroke the pin 45 will be stopped under the matrix h ole corresponding to the perforation in the card being fed over the stop wires 34. When once set, the'position of the stop 212 is permanent.
During the back stroke of the carriage from right to left the link H6 (Figs. 10 andll) is not rotated on its pivot ||1, since the lever |2| is in lthe position shown in Fig. 10 and permits the pin H2 to ride up in the slot 3 as the lever |26 is rocked from right to left by link 98 which is carried at 23 by the carriage. The lever |2| was pushed into this open position by an ear 2| 3 comingvin contact with a stop 2|4 (Fig- 1) during the forward stroke of the machine. Lever |21 is held open by stop 2|4 until pin ||2 rises in slot 3. Lever |2| cannot return until pin H2 again reaches bottom of slot which is at the end of the return stroke. Similarly, the lever 25 (Fig. 1) permits the pin |88 to ride up in the slot |0I, the lever having been swung into the open position by an ear 2|5 engaging a stop 2|6 near the end of the left-to-right movement of 'the carriage.
During the back stroke the right-hand end of arm 13 (Figs. 7, 8, 10 and 11) on lever 68 will be engaged bythe lower end of a dog 2|1 held in the position shown in Fig. 10 by coiled spring 2|8. The dog will revolve about its pivot 2|9 on link |30 pivoted at |69, into the position shown in Fig. 1. Lever |68 is-then moved by said dog in a clockwise direction about its pivot |69 past a latch 229 pivoted at |66 against the tension of spring |61 which is common to latches |64 and 220 and normally tends'to hold them against a common stop 22|. Lever |68 will be moved to the position just described, whether it is in the position shown in Fig. 10 or in the unlatched positionkshown in Fig. 11. If -lever 68 is not latched up by dog 10 but is in the position shown in Fig. 11, dog 2|1 will not be rotated on its axis 2|9, but its forward movement by link |30' will restore lever |68 .from the position shown in Fig.
1l to the position shown in Fig. 10. During the backward movement of the carriage, bracket |41 carried members |59 and |53 from the position shown in Fig. 11 into the position shown in Fig.
l, thus 'permitting vertical bar |51 to be restored' by spring E69 acting on bar |59, until the vertical lever 51 hits against a stop 222.
The various elements are now back in the position shown in Fig. 3.
The machine as disclosed is equipped with two adding heads or unitsI 259 and 25| (Fig. 3) adj ustable across the width of the machine so as to accumulate data from different groups of selecting bars 44. Head 258 is slidably mounted on square shaft H1 and head 25| on square shaft |95, one of the end plates of each head being indicated at 252 and 253, respectively. Only so much of the mechanism forming part of each head is shown as is necessary for a clear understanding of the invention.
In each head, between side plates indicated as 252, is a square shaft 254, 255 rigidly carrying a pinion (not shown) meshing with a toothed arc 256 in head 25|), and a similar are in head 25|. Since the details of the two heads are alike, the following description will be restricted to head 258.
The arc 256 is rigidly connected with a bushing having a square hole and sliding on square shaft |11. 'I'he forward movement of the car riage oscillates, square shaft H1, through crank 6, first in a counter-clockwise direction and then in a' clockwise direction. The counterclockwise movement of square shaft ||1 gives through toothed arc 256 a clockwise motion to square shaft 254 which, through frictional means (details not shown), moves eight toothed segments, one of which is shown at 258 and another at 259, in a clockwise direction. Each toothed segment 258, 259, etc., is mounted between spring washers with square holes rltting shafts 254 and 255. The spring washers are mounted on shafts 254 and 255.
Above the toothed segments 258 and 259 are a set of totalizer wheels 268 mounted between two brackets 26| pivoted at 262 in end plates of head 250. The position of these brackets 26| is determined by a lever 263 connected at one end to one of the brackets 26| and at the other end to crank 264 provided with gear teeth in mesh with pinion |69. Crank 264 is Yfree to rotate around square shaft ||1.l As previously shown, pinion |69 is connected with lever |68 and the position of the totalizer wheels 268 with respect tothe toothed segments 258, 259, etc., is therefore determined by the position of lever |68 which may be latched by latch 228 or latch |64, or unlatched as shown in Fig.11. A spring489through bracket 26| lever 263, geared bell crank 264 and pinion |69 tends to move the lever |68 into the position shown in Fig. 11. If lever |68 is retained by latch 228 the totalizer wheels 269 will be in mesh with segments 258, 259, etc. If the lever 68 is held by latch |64, the totalizer wheels will be in a neutral position just clearing the teeth of thesegments 258. When released by latch |64, the totallzer wheels will be thrown up against a print roll 265, causing a record to be made on a strip of paper 266 suitably fed from a supply through a copying ribbon (not shown) by properly embossed char# ers on the periphery of the totalizer wheels During the latter part of the forward stroke of the carriage, when link ||6 is drawn down by linkage of which |4 is a part, the segments 258, 259, etc., are rotated in a counter-clockwise direction. by friction means previously referred to, until arms 261, one pivoted to each segment, are moved downward to engage steps 268 on the individual selecting bars 44. The particular step that a bar 261 engages depends on the position to which the selecting bar 44 has been moved during the left-to-right movement of the carriage which in turn is determined by the perforation occurring in the card that is being fed. VThe bars 261 communicate .the setting of the selecting bar 44 through their associated segments like 258 to the totalizing mechanism.
The tens carry or tens transfer mechanism of the totalizer is shown in Fig. 16. Each number wheel 260 of the totalizer carries a pinion as shown for engaging its corresponding segment 258. It also carries a pin 405 which when the number wheel passed from 9 to 0 depresses the lower end of a bell crank 403, causing it to rotate in a counter-clockwise direction against the tension of spring 402. This movement unlatches lever 404 which'in turn unlatchesstop lever 400 pivoted at 40|. The extent ofthe clockwise movement of the segments is determined by the ears in stop levers 400. When these levers are unlatched as above explained, their corresponding segments push them over to a stop which permits segments 258 to turn their corresponding number wheels one tooth farther than if levers 40 were latched in position shown in Fig. 16. The latches 403 and 404 associated with one number wheel unlatch the lever 400 associated with the segment 258 of the number wheel -of the next higher order. In other words, if in Fig. 16 the number Wheel 260 represents units, then the stop lever 400 determines the stopping position of segment 258 associated with the tens number wheel, and each time pin 405 on the unit number wheel depresses latch 403 as above described, the tens number wheel will be rotated one tooth farther, thus effecting the tens transfer or tens carry. Shaft 4|0 is mounted between brackets 26| and during its downward movement, when totalizer wheels next engage segments 258, 259, etc., will reset any released latches 404 to engage their respective latches 403. Shaft 4|0 also acts as a counter-clockwise stop for levers 400. Shaft 4| acts as a clockwise stop for levers 400. The angular displacement of levers 400 from position shown in Fig. 16 to engagement with stop shaft 4|| enables segments 258, 259, etc., to rotate their respective totalizer wheels one tooth, thus effecting the tens carry.
It will be seen, therefore, that when the carriage with the selecting bars 44 is moved from left to right, the positions of the various selecting bars 44 will be registered by the setting of the various bars 261 in a pattern corresponding to the steps 268 in the selecting bars. This pattern represents the perforated pattern in the card that is being fed during this stroke from left to right. Since the bracket 26| is up when the segments 258, 259, etc., are thus rotated, their rotation cannot be communicated to the totalizing mechanism 260. Near the end of the return stroke (from right to left) of the carriage the bracket 26| is brought down as above described, assuming that the selecting pins 45 have all found holes in the matrix 41, whereby the totalizer 260 will be brought in mesh with the segments 258, 259, etc., ready to receive the data stored in these segmentswhen they are next rotated in a clockwise direction during the early part of the next left-to-right movement of the carriage. In other words, the record or data from one card are entered or stored in the totalizer during the feeding of the next or following card.
'I'his takes place in the following manner: When the carriage with the selecting bars 44 is again moved from left to right the linkage, consisting of links 98, ||4, |26, will cause the rotation of square 'shaft ||1 in a counter-clockwise direction which, through gear sector 266, will cause the segments 258, 259, etc., to rotate in a clockwise direction. This rotation will give each of the totalizer wheels 260 an angular movement in a counter-clockwise direction corresponding to the number of teeth on the associated segment 258, 259, etc., which a particular counting wheel 260 engages during this restoring movement This in turn depends on the particular step 268 with which the associated bar 261 may have come into contact. The setting of the totalizing wheel will, therefore, numerically correspond to the step 268 with which the associated bar 261 came into contact during the previous forward movement.
When link I6 has concluded its counter-clockwise rotation, there will be no further turning of the square shaft 254 in a clockwise direction and in this position a finger 210 mounted on the carriage (Figs. 1 and 8) will first unlatch the dog 10, permitting lever 68 to turn by gravity into the position shown in Figs. 8 and 11. This finger 210 will then engage the tip 21| of latch 220 permitting lever |68 to fall back against latch |64 (Figs. 8 and 10). This movement, as previously described, disengages the totalizer wheels from the segments 258, 259, etc.,.by causing brackets 26| to be elevated. The continued forward movement (left to right) of the carriage through the linkage just mentioned gives link ||6 a clockwise rotation and square shaft 254 a counter-clockwise rotation until the respective arms 261 engage steps 268 to register the pattern of the new card that is being fed.
If, toward the end of the forward travel of the carriage, the pins 45 cannot penetrate through holes in the matrix, that is to say, if the perforations in the card that is being fed do not correspond to the perforations in the matrix, then the matrix holder 46 will not descend sufliciently to cause members 68 and 13 to be rocked into the position shown in Fig. 10. The dog 10 will not latch double-armed lever 68, 13 as shown in Fig.
10 and they will remain in the position shown in` Fig..l1. Therefore, upon the return stroke the dog 2|1 will not engage the end of lever 13 as in the previous case,.and lever |68 will not be carried back into engagement with latch 220. 'I'he totalizer 260 will not be thrown into engagement with 258, 259, etc., and, therefore, no accumulation will take place.
As long as it is desired to accumulate on the totalizer, the lever |68 remains latched by 220 during the time that the segments are turned in a clockwise direction by square shaft 254 (Fig. 3), as shown in Fig. 10. The lever |68 goes into the position shown in Fig. 11 only when it is desired to print the number accumulated on the totalizer and to reset the totalizer to zero. This is accomplished in the following manner: After the setting on the totalizer wheels has been printed on the paper ribbon 266, the lever |68 is moved from the position shown on Fig. 11 into engagement with' latch |64 or 220 through the agency of the dog 2| 1, as previously described. During this movement a link 213 (see head 25| in Fig. Ii) pivoted at one `end to one of the brackets 26| and to one end of a lever 214, pivoted to one of the side plates 25| at 215, gives lever 214 a counter-clockwise movement. Through link 216 pivoted to the other end of 214 and to crank 211, crank 211 is rotated about its pivot218. A dog 219 on crank 211-engages a ratchet 280 giving it a counter-clockwise rotation which, through gears 406 and 401, resets the totalizer wheels to zero.
Suppose cards are sorted numerically by order number which is punched in columns l() to le, inclusive, member |49 will be cut away as explained opposite all members |42 except those associated with selecting bars which are controlled by holes in columns 10 to 14, inclusive. Now, whenever a card is fed whose order number differs from the order number of the preceding card, one or more members |42 in positions 10-14 will be positioned out of the vertical, causing the totalizer wheels to be thrown up by spring di!!! against the paper 266 through the cooperation of members |439, |50, |53, |57, |59, |62, |63, lever |68, pinion |69, bellcrank 264, link 233, and bracket 23|.
Gear pinion 40'! is attached to end of square shaft 408 which carries the totalizer wheels like 260 for head 250. 'I'hese totalizer wheels are mounted on bushings between spring washers having squareA holes which t square shaft diill. The friction produced by these spring washers enables the clockwise rotation of shaft ille to rotate the totalizer wheels in a clockwise direction until pins like 405, Fig. 16, engage the stop on lower end of bell-crank 403. In this position the totalizer is reset to zero with all the zeros in a line opposite the paper 266.
Obviously, the functioning of the counting head 25| will be controlled in the same .manner as the functioning of counting head 250, but the control is by matrix 28| placed in a matrix holder 232 and cooperating with the second set of pins 283 provided on the selecting bars 44. The pattern of p'ins 283 isl always the same as the pattern of pins @5, since the corresponding pins of each pattern are attached to the same selecting bar 44. The bars 26N of counting head 25| take off the readings from steps 204 in the selecting bars which correspond to the steps 2te. In this manner, during a single operation, two different classications or tabulations of the cards can loc obtained, or as many more as there are counting heads like 250 and 25| Matrix 232 controls a bar 'it' similar to l, to the right-hand. end of which is attached a-bell-crank 8l similar to bellcrank 8l (Fig. 10). This bar 16 is mounted directly behind l@ and its right-hand end is at tached to a bell-crank 8l (Fig. 10). The bar can also be seen through notches in llt under head 25| and it is notched so as to cooperate with matrix 28| as 'i6 cooperates with matrix 4l to control sorting. This makes it possible to sort into pocket Sl, (l) all cards which meet requirements of matrix di; (2) all cards which meet requirements of matrix 23|; (3) al1 cards which meet requirements of matrix 4l and/or matrix 28|.
This bar, lt', is controlled by a matrix control mechanism associated with matrix 22| oi which 3| im, Fig. l., is one of the matrix control levers.
The matrix holder 282 is raised and lowered in the same manner as the matrix holder |36. vThe manner in which this is accomplished is best shown in Fig. 4, in which the bell crank lever 655e has been indicated, which is connected with the matrix holder 282 in the same manner as the bell crank lever 65 is connected with the matrix holderv 46. The motion is transmitted to the second matrix holder 232 through a link @5b one end of which is pivoted to the lower end of the bell crank lever 65 and the other end being pivoted to the lower end of bell crank lever 55a.
Referring now to Figs. 3, 13, 14, 15, the matrix (il, in addition to the holes for determining selection and tabulation, may have also notches cut eficaces out in .its side for exercising tabulating control. As shown in Fig. 13 the notch 30@ in the edge of matrix Ill determines the position on the cards l from which a head such as 250 may accumulate numerical data registered on card l. When the matrix @il is inserted in the matrix holder 46, links 3M, 30M, etc. (Fig. 3), which pivot on a rod 302 between the side frame 252 of counting head 250 are rotated in a counter-clockwise direction by turning a handle (not shown) which rotates shaft 303 in a clockwise direction. The ends 30d of levers 30| will be moved above the level of the matrix 4l. The matrix 4l is now inserted in the holder 46 and the shaft is now turned in a counter-clockwise direction to permit members 30|, 30|A, etc., to drop until the ends 304 rest on the top surface of the matrix. The position of head 250 is now adjusted along shaft ||`l until the levers 30| corresponding to the lowest digits ofv totalizer wheels 260 ll the notch 300 in the matrix 4l. The remaining levers 30| will still have their ends 304 resting on top of the matrix adjacent to the notch 300. A further counter-clockwise rotation of shaft 303 will lock the members 30| which did not fall through the notch, and these members will be held in the position shown for 3|||A. Members Bill and 30|A are shown near the right-hand end of Fig. 3, the curved member 303A passes under the pointed ends of members 30| and 30|A Whose ends 304 do not fall in a notch of the matrix. Thus the only columns on the cards from which data may be added are those which correspond to the notch 300, Fig. 13. A ratchet on the upper side of each member 30| engages a notch in the corresponding segment 253, 259, etc., indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 3 at 306. The engagement of a notch ttt in a segment like 258 by the associated lever 30| will lock such segment and will prevent it from accumulating data from the selecting bars 44 which have been displaced. The other segments, not thus locked, and which numerically correspond to the notch 300 out in the matrix il will be free to operate in the manner previously described.
The matrix @il may also be provided with notches like 3|@ along another one of, lts edges to control other functions of the machine.
Referring to Figs. 13, 14 and 15, each one of a plurality of matrix control bars 3| 3| lA, 3| lB, pivoted on. shaft 3|2 in bracket SH3 (shown also in Fig. 1) carries pins 3|4, 3|5. The upper end of each bar is retained in one of two positions by jockey spring 3|@ mounted on the bracket 3| 3. The edge of the matrix 4l in which notches 3|0 are cut is engaged by the free ends of bars 3H as the matrix is inserted in the matrix holder, i. e., from left to right as shown in Fig. 13. These bars, as best shown in Fig. l5, are slotted and are slidable on a member 3|3 mounted in the frame dit. The end 322 of bar @lla engages pin 3|5 o-n lever si l. The end corresponding to 322 of the adjacent bar 387| is cut on as indicated at 32|. Similarly, the lower end of bar Sil?, shown in Fig. 15, is cut offas indicated at 320.
` Assuming, for instance, that a matrix control lever had been in a position withits upper end to the left of jocky spring 3|6. Then the insertion of matrix 4l into the matrix holder with an unnotched portion coming in contact with SHA moves the bar to the right and the end 322 of Silla. engages pin 3|5 of the matrix control bar,
causing it to rotate in a clockwise direction to thev position shown in Fig. 15. During this rotation pin Sie engages ell, causing it to move to the end directly under the jockey spring 3|6.
left and to enter the notch in the matrix. Had there been no notch, the matrix could not have been completely inserted in the matrix holder and this would inform the operator that something is wrong. In such a case the matrix control bar will assume a position with its pointed In other words, it is necessary to have a notch in front of one bar like 3|1 and 3|1A of each matrix control bar 3| I, 3||A and 3| IB. Before using a matrix it is therefore necessary for the operator to indicate by notches the functions which he wishes the machine to perform. In a similar manner the other bars alternately engage the pins corresponding to 3|5 and 3|4 of the matrix control bars 3| IA, 3| IB, etc.
As shown in Fig. 1, the lower ends of bars like 3|I, 3||A and 3I|X affect the operation of the tabulating machine during the travel of the carriage. The lower end of bar 3|I, for instance, engages in one position 'a notch 323 in bar 16, and in another position it is out of engagement with said notch. Therefore, depending on the position of bar 3| I, the bar 16 will or will not be permitted to move from left to right when the lever 13 releases it at notch 15. As above described, when bar 16 is free to move, it controls `the sorting of the cards, whereas when it is held back it Will not sort the cards and all the cards will fall in the same pocket.- The notches 3|8 cut in the edge of the matrix will, therefore, permit sorting, provided the matrix indicates that sorting is desired, by causing the lifting of bar 13 to release bar 16.
'I'he lower end of bar 3||A prevents in one position the movement to the right of bar |62 pivoted to |59, and in the other position permits bar |62 to move to the right. When obstructed, the lower end of |62 engages end |63 of latch |64 and releases arm |68, which causes the totalizer to print and clear out, as previously described.
There are, of course, matrix control bars similarly positioned to control functions. 3IIX, for instance, has its lower end |86 in the path of the lower end of pivoted member |84 (Fig. 2) provided that it is rocked into one position by the associated bars like 3|1. If it is in the path of |84 it will, during the left-to-right travel of the carriage, cause bar |84 to rock on its pivot |85 in a clockwise direction provided the upper end of |84 is not obstructed by ear |81 on double armed lever 68, 13. If it is obstructed, then |83 will rock |19 on its pivot |8I and move bar |18 to rock bell-crank lever |14 counter-clockwise. Roller |13 will come down to print.
`The following is a summary of the foregoing detailed description intended to give a better understanding of the operation and utility of this type of tabulating machine, with particular reference to the time sequence shown in Fig. 17.
Assume a group of cards I, Figs. 1, 5 and 12, in which each card carries indicia representing a separate business transaction. This information may include (1) date of transaction, (2) merchandise classification, (3) cost of merchandise, (4) selling price, (5) salesmans number, (6) cash or charge transaction, etc. Assume also that the cards are arranged in numerical sequence by merchandise classification number. Assume also that the following information is desired regarding the transactions represented `by' the group of cards without changing the arrange- (b) Totals of sales for each merchandise classiy fication.
The `matrices to determine (a) and (b) will have all holes punched 0-9, inclusive, in each column, since no selection is involved. In other words, the selling price must be accumulated in each case. .Therefore notch 300, Fig. 13, will be cut under the columns in which selling price is indicated. Since the arrangement of the cards is not to be altered, all cards must go into pocket 86 in the same order as they are arranged in magazine 2. This means that the sorting pper must be maintained in the position shown in Figs. 1 and 3. This is accomplished by locating notch 3|0 in edge of the matrices to determine the information (a) and (b) so that 3||B will engage notches 323 and prevent members 81 from engaging end 89 of latch 90 and releasing sorting flipper 95.
Likewise, since no printing is required on |1I, the matrix in holder 282 will have a notch in its edge to position |86 so that it will not be engaged by member |84. The matrix to determine (a) will have a notch in its edge to position 3| IA so that it will not be lengaged by the upper end of lever |62, whereas the matrix to determine (b) will be so notched as to posision 3| IA in the path of |62. These two matrices which We will call A and B, prepared as above, are now inserted in matrix holders 41 and 282, respectively. A member |49 with its front edge cut away except in the positions opposite members |42 associated with selecting bars 44 corresponding to the columns on the tabulating cards in which the merchandise classication is indicated, is prepared and mounted in the position shown.
The machine is now ready to start with the carriage 25 and selecting bars 44 in the position shown in Fig. 3 and indicated in time chart, Fig. 17, at 0. As the carriage moves from left to right, the bottom card of group I is fed to the right. By the time the card has reached position 36 (Fig. 1'1), selecting feelers 34 have been released by plate 39 attached to the carriage and theirends 38 are pressing upward against the bottonr'of the card that is being fed. As the carriage and bottom card continue to the right, hole positions 8, 8, 1, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, I, 0, and |2pass successively over the ends 38 of selecting feelers 34. When a hole in one of the columns of the card reaches the position of ends 38 of feelers 34, the end of that feeler projects through the card and the continued movement of the card rotates member 35 clockwise on its bearing 36, causing roller 50 to engage a notch in selecting bar 44 and arrest its motion. In this position pins 45 and 283 of that particular selecting bar 44 are under holes in matrix holders 41 and 282 which correspond to the position of the hole ln the card being fed. The pins 45 and 282 will thus set up male patterns of the holes in the card fed.
During the movement of the carriage from position |60 to I 80 (Fig. 1'1) matrix holders 41 and 282 are lowered by pin I5 engaging lever 51 attached to link 62, Fig. l. Allof pins 45 and 283 find holes and, therefore, the levers 68 (one shown in Fig. 1 for matrix holder 46) are depressed and latched by latches 10 (Fig. 8) As previously described, this causes the transfer of numerical data from the selecting bars 44 through stop bars 261 and segments -258 to totalizer wheels 266 during the time indicated in Fig. 17 by the legend Segments 258, 259, etc.,` up"`during the Inext'. movement of the carriage from left to right. In other words, numerical data is transferred first from the card being ied to the selecting bars it, then from the bars tl to the segments itt, and `ilnally, from the segments to the totalizer wheels (il). This last transfer taires place during the next movement of the carriage from left to right.
As each succeeding card is fed from the magaeine 2 to pocket at, member Mill will enter slots ist in members M2 during the time indicated in Fig. 17 by the legend, Memory device test time, providing the numerical indication of the inerchandise classification is the same as the previous card. When a change occurs in the inerchandise classification, at least one member M2 will have its notch it@ out oi' line with the sp proaching member its 'which will engage the edge of one or more members 42, causing im to rotate clockwise about pivot ist and cause notch in the lower edge of member 953 to engage ear It of lever 57, causing it in turn to move member |59 to the right. Since matrix E in matrix holder 2M is notched so as to position member 3| |a (Fig. 11) in the pathV of the upper end of member |62 pivoted to member |58, whereby the left-to-right movement of l5@ will cause the lower end of H52 to engage projection' Het of latch |64, this releases lever |368 and actuates the totalizer bracket 2M to rotate clockwise (Fig. 3) about pivot 262 (by tension of spring not shown), until the raised type numerals on the totallzer Wheels print on paper strip 365 through an ink ribbon (not shown). arranged on totalizer wheels 26@ that the nurnbergprinted is the sum oi numerical data transierred from cards fed to the totalizer as above described This printing of the accumulated data occurs during the time indicated by Print time in Fig. 17.
During the next return stroke of the carriage from right to left, lever |53 is returned to latch 22u and during this return the totalizer is reset to zero. The above described operation has oo= curred only on adding head 25E because matrix B was so notched. Adding head Nl! thereiore accumulates a grand total of the selling prices for all merchandise classications, while adding head Zbl accumulates subtotals. Now if :matrix B had been notched so as to position 86 in the path of member i8!! attached to ld, Aa transla-l tion of each card would` be printed on paper HI.
After the last card has been ted from the magazine and the machine has made at least one more complete cycle, the machine may be stopped. The totalizer of adding head 2N will have printed the last subtotal and cleared out, since the stroke after feeding the last card oonstitutes a change from the last merchandise classification indication. The totalizer oi.' adding head 250 contains the grand total of all sales which should equal the sum of the subtotals printed in head 25|, but printing this total has not yet occurred. This is done manually by the unlatching of arm |68 of head 250 after the last card has been fed. We now have the grand total of sales'printed on paper slip 266 of head 25|) and a list of subtotals for the various merchandise classifications printed onpaper 2,65 of head 25|. If the matrix B were notched to prepare a printed translation ci? all cards We would have a lisj; of all transactions printed on paper The printed `recorm may now be torn oir and constitute, with vthe matrices A and B and the specially prepared memory member Maa complete record of the tabulation. Matrices A and The numerals are sol oneness B and memory member |49 may now be tiled lor similar use at later dates.
By way of illustrating the ilexibility and utility of this machine let us assume that it is desired to determine the following information from the above mentioned group of cards without disturbwith respect to tabulating cards punched in the 7 position, ln the column designating salesmen. if it is desired to remove from the file all cards of salesman 7, this maybe done by notching one or both of the matrices on the end so that lever 3l iB will be disengaged from notch 323 in bar it, thus causing all cards punched 7 in the salesman column to iall in pocket 91.
Many other oombmations are @possible but the above illustrates some 'of the possibilities. For example, on one adding head-250 it is possible to accumulate 'the total sales of one salesman lor one or several merchandise classifications, while during the same run, on the other adding head, itil, one may accumulate the cash transactions ci a given salesman or all salesmen in a given merchandise classification.
This application of the matrix principle to tabulating machines illustrates the fact that the individual tabulatingv cards may have a utility ci place and the ille of cards a utility of arrangement, since it is possible to 'tabulate information from any classiilcatlon determined by the holes punched in the cards without disturbing the arrangement. While it ls admitted that sorting is .frequently the economical method, the necessity ior sorting must be considered a limitation ln a system which frequently robs the individual card and the card ille oi a part of its usefulness.
What I claim ls:
l. In a machine of the character described, means ior sequentially feeding record members, a plurality of selecting bars variably set under the control of each record member that is fed,
means responsive to the setting of said selecting bars for establishingl two male patterns each registering data borne by said record members, two holders for matrices, means for simultaneously applying each matrix in its holder to its corresponding male pattern to ascertain if agreement exists, a totallzer associated with each matrix, means dependent on the setting of said selecting bars ier controlling the operation oi.' said totalizers, and means responsive to the accordance of a matrix With the associated male pattern for causing the operation of the associated totalizer.
2. In a tabulating listing machine, means for listing information from record members bearing data, means for -sequentially feeding said record. members, a plurality of selecting bars variably set under the control of each record member that is i'ed, means responsive to the setting of said selecting bars-for establishing two male patterns each registering data borne by said record members, two holders for matrices, means for simultaneously applying each matrix in its holder to its corresponding male pattern to ascertain if agreement exists, a. totalizer associated with each matrix, means dependent on the setting of said selecting bars for controlling the operation of said totalizers, means responsive to the accordance of a matrix with the associated male pattern for causing the operation of the associated totalizer, and means jointly controlled by the setting 'of said bars'and by said matrices for actuating said listing means;
3. In a machine of the character described, a magazine for record members bearing indicia, means for sequentially feeding said record members, a plurality of selecting bars each provided with a plurality of pins, means controlled by each record member fed for displacing certain bars in one direction thereby setting said selector bars for said pins to form as many identical patterns representing the indicia borne by the record member that is fed as there are pins on a bar, means for displacing said bars in the opposite direction thereby destroying the patterns, a plurality of steps cut into each selector bar adjacent each pin thereon, a totalizer associated with each group of pins of a male pattern, means cooperating with the steps cut into the bars adjacent the associated male pattern for controlling the extent of operation of the associated totalizer, a matrix holder cooperating with each group of pins forming a pattern, and means dependent on the correspondence of a matrix with the associated male pattern to actuate the associated totalizer.
4. In a machine of the character described, a magazine for record members bearing indicia, means for sequentially feeding said record members, means controlled by the indicia and operable as each record member is fed for simultaneously setting up a plurality of duplicate male patterns, each pattern representing the indicia of the record member that is being fed, a plurality of holders for matrices, one for each male pattern, means for simultaneously applying each matrix in its holder to its corresponding male pattern to ascertain if agreement exists, a plurality of totalizers one for each matrix holder,
and means for actuating the totalizer associated with a matrix which agrees with the male pattern.
5. In a machine of the character described, a magazine for record members bearing indicia, means for sequentially. feeding said record members, a selector comprising a plurality of bars each having a normal position and a plurality of actuated positions into which it may be set by said record members, means controlled by each record member fed for setting said selector bars into positions representing the indicia on the record member fed, means operative thereupon for resetting said selector bars into the normal position, said setting and resetting constituting one cycle of the machine, a totalizer, means controlled by said selector for operating said totalizer for each card as the succeeding card is fed during the succeeding cycle, means for thereafter printing from and zeroizing the totalizer, and means for operating said printing and Zeroizing means during said succeeding cycle of the machine whenever the indicia. on a record member fed during said succeeding cycle is different from the indicia on the record member fed during the preceding cycle.
6. In a machine of the character described, a magazine for record members bearing indicia, means for sequentially feeding said record members, a selector, means controlled by each record member fed for setting said selector, means operative thereupon for resetting said selector, said setting and resetting constituting one cycle of the machine; a totalizer, means controlled by said selector for operating said totalizer for each card as the succeeding card is fed during the succeeding cycle, means for thereafter printing from and zeroizing the totalizer, and means for operating said printing and zeroizing means during said succeeding cycle of the machine whenever the indicia on a record member fed during said succeeding cycle is diierent from the indicia on the record member fed during the preceding cycle.
PAUL M. RAINEY.
US18483A 1935-04-26 1935-04-26 Tabulating machine Expired - Lifetime US2192695A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2994475A (en) * 1955-04-08 1961-08-01 Ibm Card feeding, sensing, and translating mechanism
US3045905A (en) * 1959-05-21 1962-07-24 George J Tarasuk Punch card
US3171529A (en) * 1961-12-05 1965-03-02 Greene Datatape Inc Code controlled master control apparatus
US3286084A (en) * 1960-11-04 1966-11-15 T L Smith Co Punch card for control system for material handling
US3371193A (en) * 1959-12-31 1968-02-27 Control Data Corp Automatic card reading system

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2994475A (en) * 1955-04-08 1961-08-01 Ibm Card feeding, sensing, and translating mechanism
US3045905A (en) * 1959-05-21 1962-07-24 George J Tarasuk Punch card
US3371193A (en) * 1959-12-31 1968-02-27 Control Data Corp Automatic card reading system
US3286084A (en) * 1960-11-04 1966-11-15 T L Smith Co Punch card for control system for material handling
US3171529A (en) * 1961-12-05 1965-03-02 Greene Datatape Inc Code controlled master control apparatus

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