US1657712A - A corpora - Google Patents

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US1657712A
US1657712A US1657712DA US1657712A US 1657712 A US1657712 A US 1657712A US 1657712D A US1657712D A US 1657712DA US 1657712 A US1657712 A US 1657712A
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10 She-et-Sheet 1 M. M. GOLDBERG Original Filed June 21. 1920 PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECI-IANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS Jan. 31, 1928.
Jan. 31, 1928.
M. M. GOLDBERG PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECHANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS original Filed June 21. 1920 1o sheets-sheet 2 @m50 @wooo m @NSD emma@ M. M. GOLDBERG PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECHANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS Jan. 31, 1928.
Original Filed June 21. 1920 10 Sheets sheet 5 mfG-h- Rn NNN www Maxilian M. Goldberg Jan. 3l, 1928. 1,657,712
M. M. GoLDBERG PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECHANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS original Filed June 21, 1920 l0 Sheets-Sheet 4 D E! El El El sans www EIUDDU DUUU Goldberg Hi. am
Jan. 31, 1928.
M. M. GOLDBERG PRINTING AND PERFORATING MEGHANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS Original Filed June 2l. 1920 10 Sheets 5heet 5 {-Pulm. .MPM n.552 u.
Jan. 31, 1928.
M. M. GOLDBERG PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECHANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS Original Filed June 2l, 1920 10 Sheets-Sheet 6 3 Maximilian M. Goldberg IIIIEIIIII H IIIIHIIIITIINIIIIIIHIIIIIIII uml.' h
-nlulumumm Jan. 31, 1928.
M. M. GOLDBERG PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECHANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS original Filed June 21. 1920 1o Sheets-sheet 7 Maximilian Goldberg By M mi mi me .GE
@C I t .GE 9 v i Jan. 3l, 1928.
M. M. GOLDBERG PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECHANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS Original Filed June 21. 1920 10 Sheets-Sheet 8 Jan. 31, 1928. V 1,657,712
M. M. GoLDBl-:RG
PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECHANISM FOR CASH REGISTERS Original Filed June 21. 1920 10 Sheets-Sheet 9 295 23 z 375 FIG. 24* 7% 394 lu/ouden 3l] 366 3l, B Maxmilian M. Goldberg y QA// Hi; G ttouwgs Jan. 31, 1928. 1,657,712 M. M. GOLDBERG PRINTING AND PERFORATING MECHANISM FOR CASH vREGISIERS Original Filed June 21, 1920 l0 Sheets-Sheet 10 434 450 47 484 "3' w F|G.2e 4 68 485 405 410 Patented Jan. 31, 1928.
UNITEDv STATES PATENT OFFICE. y,
MAXIMILIAN M. GOLDBERG, OF DAYTON, OHIO, ASSIGNOR, `BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS,
y TO THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER COMPANY, lOIE' DAYTON, OHIO, A CORPORA- TION OF MARYLAND.
PRINTING AND PERFORATIN G MECHANISM FOR CASH REGISTEBS.
Original application led June 21, 1920, Serial No. 390,378. Divided and this-application tiled April 5,
This invention relates to improvements in cash registers and more particularly the type of registers illustrated and described in the Letters Patent of the United States,
5 No. 580,378, granted to Cleal and Reinhard on April 13, 1897, and No. 765,767,.granted to Thomas Carroll on July 26, 1904. A
The above mentioned machines are provided with a totalizer and are adapted to l0 produce a printed detail record strip of the various transactions.
f The subject matter claimed in this application constitutes a division of applicants copending application Serial No. 390,378, l5 tiled June 21, 1920, which matured as U. S. PatentNo. 1,506,056, issued August 26, 1924. The main object of this invention is to produce a machine of the above mentioned type which is capable of producing not only a printed record strip but a perforated record strip to be used in connection with an auditing machine and particularly that class of auditing machine shown andv described sin applicants pending ap lication 25 for Letters Patent of the Unite States,
Serial No. 316,528, filed Aug. 11, 1919.
Considering, for instance, that the ma.- chine heren described is one of a grou of machines used in a chain of stores an at the endfof any given period, for example, at the close of each day, the perforated record strip from the machine in each store is sent to a central office wherein is installed an auditing machine of the type shown and described in the above :mentioned application, Serial No. 316,528. The records from the various stores` would then be run through the auditing machine and entered therein and then a single summary record vfor all stores, and representing the total days business, would be perforated by the auditing machine. y Therefore, it is not Qnly an object of the present invention to prepare a perforated record stri butto have the items recorded on said strip classified to'such an extent that they may be readily analyzed and entered in the auditing machine in their proper places.
Serial No. 630,064.
Still another object of the presentinvenregular record strip, opposite` the amounts c ofthe various items thereon, under the cons y trol of the classification mechanism which; controls the perforated record strip, so thatl theproprietor or manager of each'ofthev 55 various stores may have, for his own benefit, the amounts on his personal detailfstrip classified to such an extent that the merchandise sold may be easily'checked. With these and incidental objectsk the invention consists in certain novel f'atures of construction andl combinations'o'f parts, the essential elements of which are set forth in appended claims anda preferred" form of embodiment of which is hereinafter B5 described with reference to the drawin s which accompany and form part of yt e specification. y I! Of said drawings: v Figs. 1A and 1B together'constitu'te a front 70 elevation of the machine, the differential mechanism, actuators, and the cabinet'therefor being removed, except a small portion of the cabinet bearing the classificationv in. scriptions. f1 ,i
Fig. 2 is a detail viewof the camfand arm for actuating the operating arms for the perforating punches. v iy Fig. 3 is a vertical section on`linev33-of1- Fig. 1A, looking inthe direction rows. y n f' n; I Fig. 4 is a. detail view of themechanis'm` f for operating the 'impression' hammerfand alining the type wheelswhichvprinton the' 'i .i perforated -record stripand alsofkshows one 86 of the punch operating arms.,
-Fig. 5 is a top view of the mechanism-- e f shown in Fig. 4, the punch operating arm: being omitted. j c
Fig. 6 is a detail'view of the mechanism 90 for inkng the type wheels which printon the perforated record strip. n i v. Fig.. 7 is a diagrammatic` view-showing how the` perorations are employedleither inv combination or alone to represent the digits. 95
Fig. 8 is a left hand elevation of kthe ma'- 1n view, 60 y chine and illustrates the position of the perforated record strip carriage.
Fig. 9 is a fragmentary view of the perforated record strip as prepared bv the machine.
Fig. 10 is a vertical section on line 10--10 of Fig. 1B, looking in the direction of the arrows.
Fig. 11 illustrates a sample slip as printed by the machine.
Fig. 12 is a vertical section on line 12-12 of Fig. 1^, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows, and illustrates particularly the motor releasing mechanism.
Fig. 13 is a detail view of the interlocking mechanism between the motor release key and the perforated record strip carriage.
Fig. 14 is a fragmentaryview looking from the back of the machine and shows the mechanism for operating the paper feed mechanism, the type alining and inking mechanism and the punch operating arms.
Fig. 15 is a detail view of the type line which prints on the record strip shown in Fig. 1B.
Fig. 16 is a vertical section on the line l616 of Fig. 1B, looking in the direction of the arrows.
Fig. 17 is a detail view of one of the consecutive numbering wheels and operating mechanism therefor.
Fig. 18 is a sectional view ou line 18-18 of Fig. 15, looking in the direction of the arrows, and also shows a portion of one of the operating segments.
Fig. 19 is a detail view of one of the classification type wheels shown in Fig. 15.
Fig. 20 is a vertical Section on the line 20--20 of Fig. 1^, looking in the direction of the arrows.
Fig. 21 is a detail view showing the means for manually operating the record strip tension rolls.
Fi 22 is a detail view of the type line whic prints on the prepared record strip.
Fig. 22A is a bottom edge view of one of the' amount type carriers.
Fig. 23 is a section on the line 23-23 of Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows, and also shows the setting segments for the classification perforating slides.
Fig. 24 is a top view of the classification levers and illustrates the interlocking mechanism between certain of said levers.
Fig. 25 is a section on the line 25--25 of Fig. 20, looking in the direction of the arrows.
Fig. 26 is a detail view showing three elevations of one of the amountslides.
Fig. 27 is a top plan view of the perfo.
I n. general.
Described in general terms the machineV shown in the drawings is provided with a keyboard comprising five amount banks of keys and one bank of keys for registering the quantity of articles sold for each'transaction. Differential mechanism under the control of the depressed keys is provided,
said differential mechanism co-operating with the totalizer for registering therein the amounts of the various transactions. Under the control of the differential mechanism are the regular printing devices for prlnt-ing the corresponding data of each transaction upon a record strip.
The general mechanism so far described is substantially the same as that illustrated in the above mentioned Cleal and Reinhard Patent No. 580,378, and also the above mentioned Carroll Patent No. 765,767.
As before stated, the machine herein disclosed is designed to produce a perforated record strip having records thereon classified to such an extent that they may be readily analyzed by and entered in an auditing machine described in the above mentioned application, Serial No. 316,528. i
To produce the above mentioned record strip the machine herein disclosed is provided with a series of punches under the control of the above mentioned differential mechanism. which in turn is controlled by the depression of the keys in the Amount" banks and the Quantity bank.
There is also provided another series of punches controlled by a special set of levers projecting through long slots in the cabinet. Opposite these slots are classification inscriptions which tell the operator in what position to set the levers in order to classify the amount of any certain transaction.
Co-operating withthese levers is mechanism for setting a special series of type wheels, mounted on the regular ty e line at the right hand end of the machine Fig. 1B), whereby the printed detail strip may receive impressions of characters which classify the amount printed in the same line. This loo Perforated detail record.
The detail record as it appears after being taken from the machine, is shown in Fig. 9, except that the lines appearing thereon may be omitted. since they serve no function except to aid in visually locating the control points. It will be noted that the sheet is provided with ten columns of perforations on the right hand side, and ten on-the left hand si e. Between these is an additional space equal in width to the width of two columns. An additional column of perforations appears inthe left side of this space, the other side being blank.
Each of the columns of perforations constituting the right hand set controls on-e group of totalizers in the auditing machine and the combinations of pertorations appearing in the columns determine the particular totalizer to be selected. The number of these .columns therefore must be equal to the number of groups of totalizers in the auditing machine. In the machine shown in theabove mentioned application, Serial No. 316,528, there are ten groups of totalizers, and therefore, there lare ten columns in the control sheet. If a less number of groups of'totalizers were used, a number of columns would be made by the machine herein described to agree therewith; if a greater number were used the nulnber ot' columns would have to be increased in accordance therewith. In an case the number of columns in the recor sheet produced by the machine herein described must be equal to the number ot totalizers in the above mentioned auditing machine. i
The perfor-ations in the ten columns on the left hand side of the sheet control the mechanism which actuates the denominational elements ofthe totalizers; that is, they control the amounts to be entered `upon the. denominational elements of the totalizers which have been selected by the perforations in the right hand column. There must, therefore, be upon this side of the sheet as many columns of perforations as there are denominational elements in tire totalizers. In the above mentioned auditing machine each totalizer is provided with ten elements. There are therefore ten columns of perforations on a sheet. Should the totalizers be provided with a smaller number of totalizer elements ay correspondingly smaller number of e columns of perforations would be made in the record strip. If, on the other hand, the totalizers in the auditing machine Should have a. greater number of totalizer elements a correspondingly greater number of col umns would be employed. It is thus seen that the columns on the right hand side of the sheet select the totalizers in the auditing machine upon which the entries are to be made, While the perforations in the columns v on the left hand side of the sheet determine the numerical quantities 4which are to be entered on the totalizers which'have been selected.
Since ten groups of totalizers are provided in the above mentioned auditing machine, it is possible in any given'case to select asmany as ten totalizers for the simultaneous entry of the same data, but not more than ten totalizers. i
The additional column of perforations lying adjacent the left hand Set of columns is used solely for control purposes and does not in any way enter into. the computations ot' the machine. The blank space lying between the two sets of columns is likewise used for certain control purposes in connection with preparing summary strips by the auditing machine as described in the above mentioned application, Serial No. 316,528.
In Fig. 9 the various columns are provided with legends which illustrate how the data is classified on the record strip prepared b v the machine herein described. These legends however, are illustrative only, various other arrangements and classifications' may be used, depending upon the needs of the situation.
The numerical quantities, and the classiiieation tl'ereof may both vary. As supplied to commercial enterprises, such as those referred to above, the numerical amounts will most frequently be dollars and cents 4and the classification will be as to goods,
clerks, kinds of transactions, etc. However, the numerical amounts may be other matter. Some of the columns may be set aside for dollars and cents and other columns for other information. In the illustration (Fig. 9) the three columns on the left hand side have been used to indicate. the quantity of articles entering into the transactions; columns 4 to 8 inclusive have been used to re resent dollars, while columns 9 to 10 in icate cents. It will be noted that the perforations in the first two columns on the left hand side are identical al1 the way down the strip and by referring to Fig. 7 it will be seen that these perfor-ations represent zero. The perforations in the third column vary and according to the system of perforations used represent the -digitsvas printed in this column. The reason for the first two being zero is so that nothing shall be added upon the corresponding totalizer elements of the auditing machine, which elements are for the purpose of taking care of the overfiow from the un its totalizer elementl of the quantity totalizer in the auditing machine. The fourth and`fifth rows, which, as stated above, are the highest denominational elements of the amounts, also receive perforations regresenting zero for the same reason that the rst two columns of the quantity columns are perforated with zero perfor-ations.
As to the classifications in the illustration shown. those totalizers from OO to 59 inelusive, in the audit-ing machine have been set aside for the classes of goods, and therefore, the first six rows, counting from the right, have been set aside to classify the goods. The totalizers 60 to 69 of the auditing machine have been set aside for cashiers, and therefore, column 7 from the right is for the purpose of classifying the cashiers. The totalizers between 7() and 79 in the auditing machine have been set aside for the transactions such as Cash, Charge,
0. 0. 1)., 0. O. A., ete. Therefore the eighth column from the right is set aside for these classifications. to 99 of the auditing machine are set aside for the clerks who conduct the various transactions, and therefore, the ninth and tenth columns, counting from the right, are set aside to register the clerk who conducted the transactions. In these two columns, 9 and 10, certain letters will be found. These letters are clerks initials. The lettering is arbitrary and any method of lettering may be used. In this art, however, it has become customary to designate the clerks .by letters, and therefore, the printing wheels which print in these two columns are provided with letters in the usual -wa In the eighth column rom the right, which is the transaction column, will be found special letters. The star or asterisk is used to indicate cash sales, the legend S. 0. A. sold on approval, and 0. O. D. collect on delivery.
The numbers appearing at various points on the six right hand columns indicate the number of the totalizer in the above mentioned auditing machine which is to receive the accumulation of the amount of the transaction.
The sheet will perhaps be better understood by describing in detail all of the perfoi-ations and all of the data pertaining to somearticular transaction. For this purposeK 1e transaction at the top of the sheet will be taken. Since four perforations are required to completely control the selection of the ten digits, each transaction is to be considered as represented by four horizontal rows of perforations taken together and considered as a unit. The details of the several transactions are printed in Arabic numerals, so that it is ossible for one not familiar with the com inations of perforations to at once readily interpret any given transaction. However, for mechanical reasons the printed interpretation of any particular transact-ion does not lie immediately adjacent the perforations of that transaction,
The totalizers but as herein shown is displayed two spaces ahead of the transaction which it interprets so that the data printed below the third transaction on the sheet (Fig. 9) is the interpretation of the first transaction re )resented by the first four horizontal rows o perforations; and the second line of printed data is the interpretation of the second transac tion, as represented by the second group of i'our horizontal rows of perforations, etc., down the sheet.
In the example shown in the drawings and beginning at the leftl hand side of the sheet, it will be noticed that the perforations in the first colulnn lie one in the first space and one in the fourth; these, according to the diagram (Fig. 7) indicate 0, but the 0 is not printed in the interpretation. In the second column the holes arel arranged in the same position as in the first. They also indicate O; but here again the 0 is not printed in the interpretation. In the third column a single perl'oration lies in the third space; this according to the diagram, (Fig. 7), and the notation on the sheet, indicates 8, and 8 is shown printed in this position in the interpretation. In the fourth and iii'th columns perforations are again found in the first space and in the fourth, which in both cases indicate 0 but here O is not printed in the interpretation. The perforations in the sixth, seventh and eighth col umns also represent 0 but these are shown printed in the interpretation. In the ninth column perforations appear in the first and third spaces which, according to the diagram (Fig. 7) represent 2, and 2 is shown printed in this column in the interpretation. In the tenth column, perforations appear in the third and fourth spaces, which, according to the diagram (Fig. 7) represent 5 and 5 is shown printed in this column in the interpretation of this transaction.
The reason for not printing the 0 in columns 1, 2, 4 and 5 is that provision must be made for supplemental or carry over elcments in the totalizer of the auditing machine, as previously stated; and if all positions were used in the detail record there. would be no extra totalizer elements for this purpose. Therefore, in the detail record all of the positions set aside for quantities and all set aside for dollars have not been used. Those positions that are not used have 0 perforations merely to control the elements of the auditing machine so that nothing should be added to these elements.
Further, following this transaction and considering now the perforatiens on the right hand side of the sheet, that the perforations controlling the selecting ol` the totalizers and beginning with the column at the left, it will be seen that no perforations appear in this column. Since all totalizers in the auditing machine controlled by this o 'csln thais, deken 81;; ,this jart it hasz-been.-rcustomary .to refer to .clerks vby lettersin'stead of numbers. This' falling wlthiny lt i Lewin column are foundbetween90fand 99, the absence of perforationsfmeansv that the clerk conductin'gjthetra tionrf ad a number not 4group @In the` second occur 1n the second and rfrations stand for e`rk"f1 yin group 9, defthefsale. But in column perforatio fourth spaces. ,u
whichm'eansL th y :custom fis` followed. `All'fclerksv between 80 and" 89 are'known' astAiclerks, while those lbetween 90 and'99 areknownfas .B clerks.
" The ".Afclerks and "Bclerks are distinguished from each other by means of numerand 130, B .1,etc., to,B"9. In the third column, still ycounting from theleft, perforations are found" in L thefv first and fourth spaces, which 'accordingtogthe diagram (Fig.
7) mean 0. This group of totalizers y70 to 79 in the auditing machine has been set aside V v for the transactions..V This means, therefore, that the transaction was ofthe kind to be entered on the .0 totalizer lof `group 7 or the totalizer 70 of the auditing machine.l In the interpretation of the transaction the designationis a star. This in vthe "artfhaslcome to mean".casl1 sof thatin; this instance the oods transaction v,was for ,cashilButo the might have been-sold on] approval S.
- or collect on delivery C,` yO. D'., or some ytotalizer in the auditing machine is No. 64.
But cashiers like clerks aresometimes designated by letters instead lof numbers and are here designated by the letter C together with the number. vInthis'v case thecashier wasNo. 4, and thedesignation is therefore C 4.` The fifth column, counting from the left, is blank, as"are alsogco'lumns 6, 7, 8 and 9.l This meansk that the lcla'ssof goods to -whichthe article sold belonged did not fall within any of the groups: of'totalizers of the auditing machine controlled` by 'these columns. But perforations appear in the lastl column in the second and fourth positions,
o which indicate 1. The goods therefore belonged to class l. The interpretation of the Whole first transaction, is that eight articles were sold for $0.25j and that the sale was madeby clerk A 1 (81) that the transaction was for cash, and that. it was supervised by cashier C 4 (64), and that the goods belonged to class No.1.
A In the third transactionas interpreted by the printed information, four articles were sold for $601.75; the ysale was made by clerk f B0 (90); the goods ,were sent (1. O. D.;
the transat-:tion was 'suprvised by cashier C 4 (64) and the goods longed to class 13. Operating mechonimn.
The means for imparting movement to the main cam shaft (Figs. 3, 10, 12, 16 and 20) may be either by hand operated crank or electric motor.
'In Fig. 1la is shown an operating handle 51 having secured thereto a sleeve 52 loose on a stud 53 (Fig. 16). Fast on the sleeve 52 1s a pinion 54 meshing with a gear 55 whlch in turn meshes with a gear 56 on a shaft at the rear of sleeve 52 that meshes with another gear (not shown) fast on the shaft 50. This driving mechanism is old, and is shown vand described in the Letters Patent of the United States, No. 703,639, granted to Thos. Carroll, on July 1, 1902.
When the machine is to be operated by an electric motor, a motor and mechanism for operating the same' is used, such as that fully illustrated and described in the Letters Patent of the United States, No. 1,144,418,
ranted to Chas. F. Kettering and W. A.
hryst on June 29, 1915. A portion of a motor and mechanism of this type is shown. 1n Fig. 12, but will be described only briefly herein, as it is very fully villust-rated and described in the above mentioned Kettering and Chryst patent. A motor` of the above mentioned type is mounted on the rear frame4 58. The motor armature shaft 59 supports a worm 60 meshing with a large worm gear 61 carrying the usual clutch 62. A clutch arm 63 carrying a roller 64 is mounted on the back frame 58.
When the arm 63 is rocked and released from the clutch 62 by means to be hereinafter described, the clutch 62 rotates and rocks a member 65 which engages a roller 66 on a lever 67 and rocks said lever so that contact points 68 engage contact points 69 mounted on the motor frame 70 and cause the circuit to be closed whereby the worm 60 is revolved to rotate the worm gear 61. Secured to the shaft which carries the worm gear 61 is a beveled gear (not shown) meshing with another bevel gear 71 fast on the shaft 50. Thus movement is imparted to the shaft 50 by the motor when the arm 63 is rocked to release the clutch 62.
The means for causingthe arm 63 to be rocked comprises an arm 72 bifurcated to surround the roller l64. Said arm is fast on a shaft 73 mounted in side frames 76 of the machine. Integal with the arm 72 is an arm 74 having connected thereto one en`d of a coil spring 75 the other end being connected to a small rod carried by the frames 76. Fast on the shaft 73 is an arm 77 pivoted to one end of a link 78 which has an upwardly extending arm 79 pivoted to an arm 80 fast on a shaft 81 mounted in the frames 76. The lower end of. the link 78 is pivoted to an arm 83 ivoted at 84 to an arm 85 loose on a stu 86 carried by one of the frames 76. The arms 83 and 85 form a toggleand are held in the position shown by means of a spring 87 stretched between the arm 85 and an upwardly extending arm 88 integral with the link 78. The operation of the above described mechanism is as follows: ,The shaft 81 when released, by means to be later described, is rocked counter-clockwise (Figi. 12) under the influence of the spring 75. The spring also rocks the arm 74, shaft 73, and the arm 77 clockwise, and consequently the arm 72 is rocked likewise to raise the roller 64 andv thereby rock the arm 63 to release the clutch 62. The clockwise movement of the arm 77 moves the link 78 to the left (Fig. 12) and rocks the arm 80 and shaft 81 counter-clockwise. This movement of the link 78, with the help of the spring 87, causes the arm 83 to be rocked clockwise about the pivot 82 and the arm 85 to be rocked counter-clockwise about the pivot 86. The arm 85 carries an anti-friction roller 89 which co-operates with a cam arm 90 secured to the cam shaft 50. Near the end of the operation of the machine it is desired to restore the arm 63 to normal position. This is accom lished by the cam arm 90 enga ing the ro ler 89 and rocking the arm 85 c ockwise which moves the arm 83 counter-clockwise and causes the link 78 at the same time to be moved towards the right to normal position thereby rocking the arm 77, the arm 74 and the arm 72 counterclockwise to normal position whereby the arm 63 is restored to its normal position. The cam arm 90 is so designed that 1t moves the arms 83 and 85 in the directions as `described, so that the point 84 passes below the center line between the points 82 and 86. This is what causes the link 78 to be moved towards the right. After the cam 90 has passed out of engagement with the roller 89 the spring 87 returns the members to the osition shown in Fig. 12, in which positlon the toggle is broken.
The means for releasin the shaft 81 compris a motor key 1gs. 1B and 10) secured to the upper end of a link 96, the lower end .of which is bifurcated to surround a stud` 97 carried by one of the frames 7 6. The link 96 is provided with a guide slot 98 into which projects a stud 99 carried by one of the frames 76. The link 96 also carries a stud 100 which co-operates with a slot 101 ina detent 102 slidably mounted on the stud 99 and a similar stud 103. The detent 102 is provided with a flattened stud 104 whichis normally engaged by the upper end of a pawl 105 mounted at 106 on an arm 107- fast on the shaft 81. Also mounted on the arm 107 at 108 is a pawl 109, the upper end of which co-operates with the stud 104. When the keyv 95 is depressed the pin 100 engages the slot 101 and moves thedetent 102 upward whereby the pin 1504 engages the up er end of the awl 109 and rocks said aw clockwise w ereby the lower yend o said' lawl rides above the portion 110 of the paw 105 thus preventing the pawl 105 from moving counter-clockwise a sufficient distance to permit the vstud 104 to become engaged between the upper end of the pawl 109 and the upper en of the pawl 105 before the release key is fully de ressed. As soon .as the studA 104 has pass ofi' from the upper end of the pawl105 the shaft 81 is released and is moved by the spring 75 as previously described.Y When the cam arm 90 returns these members to their normal osition the shaft 81 is rocked counter-cloc wise (Fig. 10) to normal position thereby causing the arm 107 to be rocked counter-clockwise whereby the stud 104 becomes disengaged from the pawls 105 and 109 thereby allowing the detent 102 to return to normal position whereby the motor key 95 under the influence of a spring 111 is restored to its normal position.
K egt/board and differential mechanism.
The machine is provided with five banks of amount keys 115 and one bank of quantity keys 116. The shanks 117 and 118 of the keys 115 and 116, respectively, are slidably mounted in curved portions 119 of the frames 76 and are held in their normal pol sitions by springs 120 around the Shanks 117 and 118.
The differential mechanism will be but briefly described herein as it is fullly shown and described in the above mentioned Cleal and Reinhard patent and in both of the above mentioned `Carroll patents. It comprises a plurality of differentially positioned toothed segments (Fig. 10) each controlled by a bank of keys 115 and 116. When a key is depressed it lifts a corresponding detent 126 (Figs. 10 and 12) thereby permitting a retaininggbar 127 for such detent, to be moved rearwardly under the action of its spring 128. This rearward movement of the retaining bar not only causes it to hold the detent and depressed key in the moved position but also serves to release and permit movement of the corresponding segment gear 125. Each of the segments 125 carries a latch 129. These latches are constructed normally to hold the segments 125 in whatever position they may be left at the end of an operation of the machine. When the cam shaft 50 is given a rotation it causes an oscillatory movement of a shaft 130 by means of an arm 131, link 132 and arm 133. The arm 131 is fast on the shaft 50. The arm 133 is fast on the shaft 130. The arm 131 beine' shorter than the arm 133, a rotation of the shaft 50 merely causes an oscillation of the arm 133 through the link 132. Fast on the shaft 130 is a' driving segment 134, one for each of the segments 125, and provided` with shoulders 135 for engaging shoulders 138 on the latches 129 and through them lifting the differential segments 125 until the latches 129 are disengaged from the drivin segments 134 by engagement of latch tripping members with the shanks 117 of the depressed keys. The driving segments 134 have downwardly extending arms 136 provided with flanges 137 for engaging shoulders 139 on the differential segments 125 when the arms 136 are'ino'ved upward. By this means such of the segments 125 that are not in zero position are returned to zero p0- isition and then such of the segments as are released by depressed keys will be rocked clockwise because of the engagement of the shoulders 135 with the shoulders 138 on the latches 129. The extent of upward moveyment of the segments`125 is determined by depressed keys which serve to unlatch the same from the driving segments 134 at the desired points, the segments 134 continuing their complete movement independently of the differential, toothed segments 125. The
segments 125 mesh with intermediate Gears' 140 which in turn mesh with gears 141 oose on a shaft 142 mounted in the frames 76.
. Fast on each gear 141 is a pinion 143. Ad-
jacent the pinion 143 is a pinion 144 connected to a totalizer Wheel 145. A frame i 146 fast on a rod 147 carries a broad pinion 148 which meshes with both pinions 143 and 144.
' Suitable means are provided for rocking the frame 146 so that the broad pinion 148 will be out of mesh with the pinions 143 and 144 on the return movement of the segments 125 but in mesh with these pinions on the forward movement of the segments 125. By this means the differential movements of ythe segments 125 are additively accumulated on the wheels 145 as such amountl is communicated in one direction only through the gears 140 and 141, the pinions 143, the broad pinions 148 and the pinions 144, to the totallzer wheels 145.
Printing mechanism.
The printing mechanism shown in Figs. lB and 16 is substantially the same as that shown and described in Letters Patent of the United States, No. 1,156,258, granted to E. J. Von Pein on October 12, 1915. Therefore, this mechanism will be but briefly described herein.
Fed from a supply roll 150 (Fig. 16) is a detail strip 151. Said strip is passed downward and underneath rollers 152, mounted on studs 153 carried by a printer frame 154 and wound upon receiving roll 155. Between the rollers 153 isA an impression platen 156 mounted ka 'block 157 j'ilxl'- oted on an arm 158fast on shaft 159.
shaft 159 is cagsed to ro'ckby a suitable lThis Atype line, in part, comprises five amount tity t nested 163.v l
`Adjacent the type,whee1s`165 is a row of consecutive numbering type wheels 168 (Figs. 15 and 17) 'loose upon va. turn to zero sleeve 169 mounted upon the shaft 163. Se'- curedto the lside of each ofthe wheels 168 is the usual feedin ratchet 170. Loose on the sleeve 169, and straddling wheels 168 is a yoke 171, carrying a` differentially tined pawl 172 which engages `the ratchets 170. The yoke frame 171 may be rocked in any suitable manner whereby through said rocklng, the pawl 172, by its engagement with the ratchets 170, causes theconsecutive numtype wheelsy 165 and'one uan- 5e wheel 166 securedtojithe en of eeves 167 mount'edfupon the shaft bering type whee1s'168 to be advanced in thev usual step b step fashion.' A consecutive numbering evice of this type is shown in the above mentioned Carroll Patent No. 703,639. To prevent retrograde movement of the type wheels 168, each of the ratchets ner, is a set of date type wheels 175. These date wheels are adapted to be set in the' usual manner through knurled knobs 176.
The means for inking the type.. wheels, just described,`whereby a record may be printed upon the detail strip 151 comprises an inking ribbon 180 fed from a supply roll 181, around three rolls .182 mounted on studs 183 supported by the frames 154 and 164, and underneathV stud 184 and wound upon a roll 185.
By referring to Fig. 1B an illustration of the printin from the t pe Wheels 165, 166 and 168 wi l be seen. 'Yaking for instance. the lowest line of printing, 4 designates the quantity of articles sold and is printed by type Wheel 166; 601.75 represents the amount of the four articles sold and is printed upon the type Wheels 165; 00130 designates the consecutive number and is printed by the type wheels 168. As is usual in they are provided with two sets of type on their` peripheries, one set of type cooperating with lio platen 156 whereby records are made u on the detail strip, as just described, the ot v1er set cooperating with platen 186 (Fig. 16), mounted in a block 187, which is operated in the usual manner and causes said platen to make contact with the lower set of type on the type wheels 165, 166 and 168 and also to cooperate with the date type wheels 175. The lower set of type and the date type wheels 175 are adapted to print on an inserted slip or other paper, such as illustrated in Fig. 1l. In this ligure is illustrated exactly the same record at the top of the slip as that illustrated at the bottom of record strip in Fig. 1B, except that the date is printed on the slip.
The amount type wheels 165 and the quantity type wheel 166 (Fig. 15) are differentially positioned under control of the keys 115 and 116 (Figs. 1^ and 1B) by the following means. Each of the segments 125 carries a stud 190, which projects into a slot 191, formed in an arm 192. The arms 192 are secured to one end of nested sleeves 193 loose on a shaft 194 supported in the frames 76. Secured to the other end of the nested sleeves 193 are segments 195 (Figs. 113 and 16) meshingwith gears 196, fast on the sleeves 167, which carry on their other ends the tvpe wheels 165 and 166.
From the above description, it will be clear when the segments 125 are differentiallypositioned under the control of the keys, as previously described, that through the pins 190 and slots 191 the arms 192 are rocked differentially according to the different positioning of the segments 125. The rocking of the arms 192 through the sleeves 193, segments 195 and gears 196, differentially position the type wheels 165 and 166, commensurate with the value of the keys depressed.
Record prodawiag mechanism.
The mechanism for producing the perforated record strip previously described and illustrated in Fig. 9, will now be described.
First, that part of the mechanism which perforates the holes which interpret the quantity of articles sold and the amount of said articles will be described.
Practically all of the record producing mechanism is supported by two side frames 200, secured to the back frame 58 and the base of the machine.
The gears 140 (Fig. 10), which mesh with the differential segments 125, are secured to one end of nested sleeves 201 loose on a shaft 202, carried by the frames 76 and 200. Secured to the other ends of the sleeves 201 are segments 203 and 204 (Figs. 1^, 3 and 20). There are five segments 203 and one segment 204. The segment 204 is on the largest sleeve 201. The segment 204 meshes mamie with teeth 205 (Fig. 3) formed on a slide 206 provided with slots 207 and 208 which surround a rod 209 and a shaft 210 respectively. The segments 203 mesh with teeth 214 (Figs. 20 and 26) on slides 215, like the slides 206, provided with slots 216 and 217, which surround the rod 209 and the shaft 210 respectively. The shaft 210 is rotatably mounted in the frames 200. The rod 209 is carried by an arm 218 (Figs. 1^ and 8), fast on the shaft 210 and an arm 219 (Fi 1^, 2 and 4) also fast on said shaft. T e slides 215 are provided with projections 220 which cooperate with one-half round portions 221 of punches 222 (Figs. 1^, 3 and 27) Secured to each of'the slides 215 is a thin plate 223 (Fig. 26) and another plate 224 provided with projections 225, said projections cooperating with one-half round portion 226 of the punches 227. The plate 223 is adapted to slide between the portions 221 and 226 as the slide 215 is being positioned.
The reason for cutting punches 222 and 227 so that their upper portions are only onehalf round is because the projections 220 (Fig. 26) could not be positioned to make the combinations accordlng to the diagram in Fig. 7. The slide 206 (Fi 3) is provided with the double projections 220 and 225 in identically the same manner as the slides 215.
The upper ends of the punches 222 and 227 project through a plate 230 (Figs. 3, 20 and 27 mounted on a channel bar 231, su ported by the frames 200. The lower ends of the punches project through holes in said channel bar. 'lhe punches are kept from droppin down by means of shoulders 232, interme iate their ends which rest on a U shaped plate 233, through which the punches project. Said plate 233 has secured to its ends parallel arms 234 (Figs. 1^, 3, 4, 8, 20 and 29). One of the arms 234 is pivoted upon the arm 219 and the other arm 234 is pivoted upon the arm 218 so that said arms 234 and the plate 233 form a basket which carries the punches 222 and 227. The shoulders 232 on the punches are long enough so that they will allow only a small clearance between the plate 230 and the plate 233, thereby preventing the punches from jumping up.
From the above description it will be clear that the gears 140 (Fig. 10) are differentially positioned by the segments 125 under the control of the keys 115 and 116, and that through the sleeves 201 and segments 203 and 204, the slides 206 and 215 are differentially positioned commensurate with the value of the keys depressedg The amount keys 115 control the positioning of the slides 215 and the quantit keys 116 control the positioning of the sli e 206. After the slides have been differentially positioned, as just described, and during the rotation of the shaft 50 a disk 237 (Figs. 2, 4 and 5), having in one side thereof, a cam slot 238, into which pro'ects an anti-friction roller 239, acts on sai roller and causes an arm 240 fast on shaft 210, and consequentl said shaft and the arms 219 and 218 to e rocked in a clockwise direction (Figs. 4, 8 and 20) whereby the rod 209 carried by the arms 219 and 218 is moved downward and causes the slides 206 and 215 to be rocked clockwise (Fig. 3) with shaft 210 as a pivot for said slides whereby the projections 220 and 225, which happen to be above the portions 221 and 226 of the punches 222 and 227 engage said portions and cause the punches to be moved downward thereby causing perforations to be made in the previously described record strip.
The blank record pif-per, provided'with square holes in the edges which will be hereafter described, is fed from a supply roll 241 (Fig. 8) up over a roller 242 and to the left underneath the channel bar 231 and over a roller 243, underneath said roller and plate 228 (Figs. 3, 8 and 20) provided withv holes 229 which register with the punches 222, 227, 319, and 320, and punches 372 (Fig. 27 later referred to. The plate 228 is lnounted upon a casting 235 mounted between `rthe frames 200. This casting is provided with a large opening 236. The plate 228 forms asupport for the paper when the above mentioned punches are moved downward to perforate said paper. The small paper punchings drop through the hole 236 in the castingr 235 into a container 245 supported by pins 246 carried by the frames 200.
As previously stated, Ithe perforations in the record strip are interpreted on said strip by means of legends printed from a set of type' wheels. This set of type wheels interprets the amount and quantity perforations and comprises five amount type wheels 247 (Fig. 22) and one quantity type wheel 248 (Figs.` 3 and 22) loose on a sleeve 249 mounted on a shaft 250 supported by the frames 200.-
The type wheels 247 carry numerals 1 to 9 and zero, the zeros being of smaller point type than the numerals 1 to 9 for the purpose of emphasizing the numeral at the left hand end of numbers printed. In this conuecton attention is called to Fig. 9. The etl'eet produced is substantially the same kas that obtained by eliminating the zeros to the left of numbers, and it is accom lished without the use of any added mechanlsm.
Secured to the side of each of the type wheels 247 is a gear 251, which meshes with teeth 4252 formed on the slide 215 (Fig. 26).
Secured to the side of the type wheel 248 is a gear 253 (Fi s. 3 and 22) which mesheswith teeth 254 ormed onslide 206.
From the above description, it can be seen that when slides 206 and 215 are differentially positioned under the control of 'the keys 115 and 116, the type wheels 247 and 248 will be set commensurate with the value of the keys depressed. yCo-operating with the type wheels 247 and 248 is a resilient platen 255 (Figs. 3 and 27) adjustably mounted in a channel bar 256 carried by parallel arms 257 fast on a. shaft 258 supported by the frames 200. Also fast on shaft 258 is an arm 259 (Figs. 3","'4 and 5) which haspivoted to its lower end a pitma-n 260 the upper end of which is bifurcated to surround shaft 50. Pitman 260 carries an anti-friction roller 264 which projects into a. cam race 265, formed in the side of the disk 237. The configuration of the cam race 265 is such that the pitman 260 is first moved upward in the direction of its length, thereby rocking the arm 259, shaft 258 and arms 257 ina clockwise direction, whereby the platen 255 engages a plate 278l carrying an ink pad 277, to be hereinafter described, and presses said pad 277 against the type wheels 247 and 248 to ink them after which the platen 255 and the ink` pad 277 are returned to normal position. The platen 255 is again raised and engages the underside of the recordstrip (Fig. 8) and presses said strip against type Wheels 247 and 248, thereby causing an interpretation of the perforations for that particular operation of the machine, to be printed on the record strip, after which the platen 255 is .lowered to its normal position, away from the record strip and type wheels.
Means for alining the type wheels 247 and 248 while taking an impression therefrom comprises a cam slot'266 formed in the vpitman 260 into which projects a pin 267 carried by an arm 268 loose on a shaft 269 supported bv the frames 200. Secured to the arm 268 by means, of a hub is an arm 270 engaged by apin 271 carried by an arm 272 fast on shaft 269. The pin 271 is held in engagement' with the arm 270 (Figs. 5 and 14) by a torsion spring 273 one end of which presses againstI the pin 271 and the other end lies in a groove of the arm 270. Integral with the arm 27 2 is a yoke' 274, the other end of which is integral with the arm 275 (Fig. 20) fast on the shaft 269. The yoke 274 is provided with projections 276, adapted to engage the gears 251 and 253. This engagement is caused by the action of the cam slot 266 upon the arm 268, causing said arm 269 and the arm 270 tobe rocked clockwise (Fig. 4), whereby the arms 272 and 27 5 under the influence ofthe spring 271 follow up the movement of the arms 268 and `272 thereby causing projections t0 engage the gears 251 and 253, whereby said gears and consequently the type wheels 'are held to prevent movement during the time the impression is taken therefrom by the platen 255.
Means for inking the type wheels comprises an inking pad 277 mounted on plate 278 pivoted at 279 (Fig. ti) and on an arm 290 and at 281 (Fig. 20) on an arm 282, said arms being made rigid by a yoke 283. These arms are loose on the. shaft 250.
'l`he plate 278 is held in nol'mal position liv a spring plunger 28-'1 supported by toi-mcd portions :285 of the arm 280. Piv- 1 otcd to said arm 2S() is the lower end of a pitman 286, the upper end ot which is b iturcated to surround the shaft 50. Said pitman carries an anti-friction roller 287 projecting into a cam race 288 tormed 1n the side of a disk 289 (Figs. 3, 6 and 14) tast on shaft 50.
The configuration of the race 288 is such that the pitman 286 is moved upward and then downward to normal position. The upward movement rocks the arms 280 and 282 clockwise to position the ink pad 277 in proper relation with the type wheels 247 and 248 after which the platen 255 engages the plate 278, as described above, and presses the pad 277 against the type wheels thus causing them to be inked so that an impression may be made therefrom upon the record strip. The downward movement ot the pitman 286 to normal position rocks the arms 280 and 282 clockwise to normal position thereby restoring the inking pail to normal position. As before stated, the machine herein described is designed not only to produce a perforated record of the quantity of articles sold and the amount of said articles but also to cause a classication of said amounts, or, in other words, to classify them such as Clerk making the sale. hind of transaction, Cashier who supervised the sale and Particular class of goods sold. These classifications are printed upon the detail strip indicated in Fig. l, and upon the. inserted slip (Fig. 11). In addition to making perforated classitii `itions ot the transactions involved, legends interpreting said perforations are also printed upon the perforated lecord strip illustrated in Fig. 9.
The means for controlling the classification of any particular' transaction comprises a set of manually operated levers arranged in tour groups comprising six levers 295 (Figs. 1, 23 and 24), one lever 290, one lever 297 and two levers 298. These levers project through slots 299 in a portion 300 of the cabinet. Inscribed on the cabinet 300 adjacent the first six slots 299 counting from the left (Fig. 1^) are the numerals 00 to 59. These characters 00 to 59" represent 60 different classes of goods. Adjacent the seventh slot are inscribed C O to C 9,
which represent the ditlereut cashiers. Adjacent the eighth slot are the inscriptions CaSh 077 HR-13 COD`277 SOA 379 ORD-4. EXch-, ALL-G, RET-7, Trans-8 and Part pay-9. These inscriptions represent various transactions, such :1s-cash, credit, collect on delivery, .sent
on approval, etc. Inscribed adjacent to the ninth slot are A 0 to A 9 and adjacent the tenth slot are inscribed-B 0 to l5 9. These inscriptions adjacent the ninth and tenth slots represent the various clerks.
Each of the levers 295, 296, 297 and 298 is integral with a crescent shaped plate 301 (Figs. 3, 8, 23, 24 and 25). The plates 301 are secured to levers 302 loose on a rod 303, supported by trunnion screws 304 in the frames 200. The levers 302, with exception of one, are bent to get the desired -lateral spacing on the rod 303. Sleeves 305 and 306 prevent lateral movement of the levers.
Each of the levers 302 has secured to a side thereof a plate 310 having teeth meshing with teeth 312 formed on slides 313 having slots 314 and 315 which surround the rod 209 and shaft 210 in identically the same manner as the previously described slides 206 and 215. The slides 313 are provided with projections 316 and 317 separated by a thin plate 318 and located substantially the same as the projections on the slide 215 illustrated in Fig. 26. These projections cooperate with the punches 319 and 320, which punches are identically the same as punches 222 and 227, previously described.
From the above description it will be clear that when one of the levers 295, 296, 297 and 298 is moved down in a slot 299 (Fig. 1), the plate 310 associated therewith is rocked clockwise (Fig. 20) thereby moving the slide 313 to position the projections 316 and 317 thereon to control the operation of the punches 319 and 320. After the slide has een positioned, as just described, it will, when the shaft 210 is rocked, as previously described, be moved downward whereby the projections 316 and 317 which register with the punches will force said punches down and perfor-ate the record strip commensurate with the value of the position to which the levers 295, 290, 297 or 298 has been Set.
The first lever 295 on the left hand .sido (Fig. 1^) controls the Slide. which operates the punches which perforate holes in the first column on the right hand side (Fig. 9) of the record strip. The second lever controls the perforations in the second column from the right and the third lever on the lett (Fig. 1^) controls the perforations in the third column from the right (Fig. 9) and so on through the rest of the levers. The right hand lever 298 (Fig.1^) controls the perforations in the tenth column from the right (Fig. 9).
Means is provided for retaining the levers
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2950758A (en) * 1955-03-16 1960-08-30 Englund Gosta Roland Cash registers, accounting and like machines
US3064560A (en) * 1959-09-08 1962-11-20 Sperry Rand Corp Printing recorder and punching converter

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2950758A (en) * 1955-03-16 1960-08-30 Englund Gosta Roland Cash registers, accounting and like machines
US3064560A (en) * 1959-09-08 1962-11-20 Sperry Rand Corp Printing recorder and punching converter

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