US2171010A - Random thatch roof construction - Google Patents

Random thatch roof construction Download PDF

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US2171010A
US2171010A US202170A US20217038A US2171010A US 2171010 A US2171010 A US 2171010A US 202170 A US202170 A US 202170A US 20217038 A US20217038 A US 20217038A US 2171010 A US2171010 A US 2171010A
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strip
strips
tabs
slots
shingles
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US202170A
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Clyde C Schuetz
Frank B Burns
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United States Gypsum Co
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United States Gypsum Co
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D1/00Roof covering by making use of tiles, slates, shingles, or other small roofing elements
    • E04D1/26Strip-shaped roofing elements simulating a repetitive pattern, e.g. appearing as a row of shingles

Description

Aug. 29, 1939. c C.'SCHUETZ ET AL RANDOM THATCH ROO F CONSTRUCTION Filed April 15, 1938 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 02 C 4/2 lfw w Aug. 29, 1939. c. c. scHuEfz ET AL 2,171,010

RANDOM THATCH ROOF CONSTRUCTION Filed April 15, 1938 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 @FFNR 73 v 4 F10 I! adiw' Aug.29,193 CCISCHUETZ ETAL I 2,171,010

v RANDOM THATCH ROOF CONSTRUCTION Filed April 15, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Aug. 29, 1939 UNITE RANDOM THATCH ROOF CONSTRUCTION Clyde 0. Schuetz and Frank B. Burns, Chicago,

Ill., assignors to United States Gypsum Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application April 15, 1938, Serial No. 202,170

7 Claims.

' This invention relates to roof construction, more particularly to a roof construction of that type in which multiple tab strip shingles, when applied, simulate an efiect of a plurality of individual shingles, and the invention has for an object the provision of an improved strip shingle and an improved roof construction of this character.

Theinvention, while particularly applicable to roof construction, is not limited thereto but is likewise applicable to siding elements and siding construction, and accordingly the words roof and roofing strips as used throughout the specification and claims are intended broadly to include siding and siding elements.

Roofing strips or siding elements known. as strip shingles, which when applied give an appearance of individual shingles, have long been used and are, of course, well known. One type commonlyknown'as a square tab shingle consists simply of a strip of roofing material having a plurality of slots along one edge extending perpendicularly to the long dimension of the strip at regular intervals. In application these strips are so laid that the upper continuous portion of each strip is covered by a strip in the course next above. The effect obtained is identishingles have likewise been provided with mul-' tiple tabs differing both in length and in width. With strip shingles of this latter character, however, considerable difllculty has arisen in the application of the shingles to a roof;

It will of course be understood that one of the principal desiderata of a satisfactory shingle roof is that the slots of the strip shingles in one course must not coincide with the slots of the shingles in adjacent courses, and it is due to this desideratum that difliculty has arisen. Unless the stripshingles having different width tabs are laid in a particular order and carefully selected during application, the coincidental location of slots in adjacent courses will inevitably occur.

Accordingly, it is a further object of this in vention to provide a random thatch roof covering from strip shingles having tabs of different widths and different lengths so as to give the effect of both random width and random length individual shingles, in which the strip shingles may be applied in random order, without any more difficulty than is encountered in the application of the usual square tab shingles and without any of the slots coinciding with the slots in adjacent courses.

i In carrying out the invention in one form a roofing set is provided comprising a plurality of different strips adapted to be laid in random order in overlapping courses, each of the strips having slots therein defining shingle simulating tabs of different width, the different Width'tabs being arranged in different order on certain of the different strips and each strip being provided with means for indicating a predetermined strip-offset distance so related to the tab widths and the tab order that when the strips are laid in overlapping courses in random order with this predetermined offset, a random type roof covering is provided in which none of the slots coincide with the slots in the strips of adjacent courses.

More particularly, the strip-offset distance is so determined with respect to the random widths and random order of the tabs that this distance is unequal to the distances between the center lilies of any two slots occurring in a single strip or in horizontally adjacent strips as applied, and is also unequal to the difference between such slot distances and the length of the individual strips.

In order to increase or vary the random thatch effect, the different width tabs are formed of different lengths, and if desired slots between adjacent tabs may be formed of different widths and the outer edges of the tabs cut at an angle to the longitudinal center line of the strips.

For a more complete understanding of this invention reference should now be had to the drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a somewhat diagrammatic fragmentary viewof a strip of roofing material indicating the -manner in which a set of strips having tabs of different widths and lengths may be formed from each predetermined length of a long strip of roofing material;

Fig.2 is a diagrammatic view of one pair ofthe complementary shingles formed as shown in Fig. 1;-

Fig. 3 is a similar viewof the other pair of complementary shingles formed as shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view of a section of a roof covering formed by applying in random order the strip shingles shown in Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive; v

Figs. 5 and 6 illustrate non-complementary strip shingles formed in accordance with the present invention; Fig. 7 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 4 showing a section of a roof covering formed by applying in random order the shingles illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6; i

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 1 illustrating the manner in which a still further set of roofing strips having complementary different width tabs may be cut from a single wide strip of roofing material; and.

Figs. 9 and 10 are illustrative diagrams useful in explaining our improved method of determining the proper offset distances in relation to the width and arrangement of the tabs on the strip shingles of our improved roofing set.

Referring now tothe drawings, the roofing set shown in Figs. 1 to 3, inclusive, which is used in forming the roof covering illustrated in Fig. 4, consists of four strip shingles i, 2, 3, and 41, which are respectively provided with different width and different length tabs H to l5 inclusive, 2! to 25 inclusive, M to 35 inclusive, and M to 35 inclusive. These tabs are formed, as shown, by suitable slots 5 and the width of each tab is indicated on Fig. l, the widths being measured from the center lines of the slots 5. While the strip shingles l and 2 and the strip shingles 3 and 41 are respectively complementary, and accordingly include tabs of the same widths, it will be apparent upon inspection of Figs. 2 and 3 that the different width tabs are arranged in different width order on the complementary shingles.

Each of the strip shingles i to i, inclusive,is provided on. the left-hand edge thereof with an aligning tab 6, the purpose of which will be more fully explained hereinafter, which aligning tabs, when the shingles are applied, nest within aligning slots l formed in the right-hand edge of each of the strip shingles. Likewise, the rear edge of each strip shingle is provided with a notch ii which constitutes means for indicating a stripoffset distance so related to the different tab widths and the arrangement of the tabs that the shingles may be applied to a roof in courses in random fashion without any of the slots coinciding with the slots in the strips of adjacent courses. It is obvious that any other suitable marking means can be used to indicate the best offset distance and to assist in properly aligning the strips.

We have found that this relation between the strip-ofi-set distance, the tab widths, and the tab arrangement is obtained by selecting or determining the strip-offset distance as indicated above, so that the strip-offset distance does not equal either the distance between the center lines of any two slots occurring in a single strip or in horizontally adjacent strips when applied in courses, and so that this offset distance does not equal the difierence between such slot distances and the total length of each individual strip.

Bearing in mind this above relation, it is apparent that if a strip of length L is provided the five tabs having widths respectively represented by the letters A, B, C, D, E and a complementary form has tabs of the same width but in reverse order, as E, D, C, B. A, all possible sequences of tab widths when the strip shingles are applied in courses, are shown in the arrangement below:

If the predetermined strip-ofiset is to conform to the above stated rule, it follows that this offset must not equal A nor B, nor L minus A, nor L minus B. Similarly, selecting at random a portion of the sequence shown above, the onset distance must not equal plus D plus E plus E,

arm it nor must it equal L minus (C plus D plus E plus E).

If the above stated rule is thus applied to all.

of the slot distencesindicated in the above sequence, a large number of expressions will be ob tained which indicate strip-ofisget distances that must not be used. By carrying out this procedure and substituting in the expressions thus obtained the numerical values of tab widths and total strip length for the strip shingles shovm in Figs. 1 to 3, it will be found that the horizontal strip oiiset must not equal any of the following values:

1!! 4!! 5!! 6!!I 17!! 8!! 9!! 10!! 31!! 12!! 14!! 15!! 16!! 20!! 21", 22!], 2II, 255'! 26!! 21x!), 28!! 29!! 30!! 31!! 32)! 35!! While any strip-ofiset distance other than the above eliminated values will prevent alignment of the slots in adjacent courses, a maximum oilset between slots may be obtained by selecting as a proper strip-onset value the mid-point between the two adjacent numbers in the above sequence of eliminated values iraving the greatest difference. In the above sequence of eliminated values the greatest difference occurs between it" and 20" and therefore, as indicated in Fig. l, 18 is chosen as the strip-onset which in this particular instance gives the best possible arrangement of the slots. It will be found that the minimum oifset between slots when 18" is chosen as the proper strip-offset distance will be 2", which s the difference between 16" and 18" and the difference between 18" and 20".

While in the example above given the tab widths were selected as integers, it will be obvious that fractional dimensions may be used without departing from the present invention. In the above discussion the tab widths used are taken as the distance across each tab between the center lines of the adjoining slots. The width so used thus includes the actual width plus half the sum of the width of the adjoining slots.

Referring to Fig. i, it will be seen that in applying the strip shingles of Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive, each succeeding course is so laid that the upper edges of the alignment tabs t coincide with the upper rear edge of the strip shingles in the underlying course, and the strip shingles in each course are so disposed laterally that the edges thereof coincide with the offset slots 8 in the strip shingles of the underlying course. Thus the strip shingles may be laid in random order without any fear of the slots coinciding with the slots in adjacent courses and an extremely pleasing random efiect is produced.

In Fig. 4 the lowermost course of shingles consists of a shingle strip I and a shingle strip 3 laid in that order from left to right, the broken lines IN, Hill, and IE2 outlining the strip shingle l, and the broken lines we, we, and IM outlining the strip shingle 3.

Similarly, the second course consists of the strip shingles #3, I, and 2 laid in that order from left to right, the strip shingle 6 being partially outlined by the broken lines I05 and I06, the strip shingle i being outlined by the broken lines I06, NH, and M38, and the strip shingle 2 being partially outlined by the broken lines I08 and H19. The third course of shingles consists of the strip shingles 2 and 6 arranged in that order, as shown from left to right.

It. will of course be apparent that our invention is not limited to strip shingles having tabs of difierent length, and it is likewise not limited to roofing sets in which the strip shin gles are complementary. In Figs. and 6 we have shown a roofing set which consists of two shingles 50 and 60 respectively provided with tabs 5| to 55 inclusive, and 6| to 65 inclusive, which are not only of different width but are arranged in noncomplementary order along the strip shingles.

If the above stated rule is applied to the shingle set shown in Figs. 5 and 6, it will be found that the following distances indicate unsatisfactory strip-offset distances:

A consideration of these unsatisfactory offset distances shows that the greatest gap occurs between and 13" and between 23" and 26". While either of the intermediate strip-offset distances 11 /2" and 24 respectively may be used so as to provide a minimum offset between slots of 1 we have found that the random effect produced may be increased by providing each of the strip shingles 50 and 60 with two offset notches 9 respectively arranged at 11 and 24 from the left-hand edge of each shingle and by utilizing these strip-offset distances in a random fashion when the shingles are applied to a roof. It will of course be understood that whichever of these two strip-offset distances is.

selected, that offset distance must be maintained throughout the entire course of strip shingles, but either the same or the other offset distance may be used for the succeeding course. Thus in the roof construction shown in Fig. 7 the 11 strip-offset is used between'the first and second,

- second and third, and third and fourth courses,

while the 24 strip-offset distance is utilized between the fourth and fifth, and fifth and sixth courses. I

The shingles 50 and 60, as shown, are provided with alignment tabs 6 which are similar to the alignment tabs 6 on the strip shingles shown in Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive, except that-the alignment tabs 6 are so arranged that the lower edge thereof rather than the upper edge is adapted to coincide with the upper edge of the underlying course of strip shingles in forming the roof covering as shown in Fig. ,7.

While in the constructions described above the strip shingles shown are provided with five tabs on each strip, it will of course be apparent that our invention is not limited to any particular number of tabs, and by means of the above stated rule predetermined strip-offset distances may be found for shingle strips having any desirednumber of tabs of any width, the total width being equal to the total strip length and the number of tabs being limited only by the requirements that all of the strip length cannot be removed as slots. As indicated above, our invention likewise is not limited to strip shingles in which the tabs are out only along straight lines. Obviously, waved or curved lines may be used along the tab edges.

In Fig. 8 we have shown a set of strip'shingles constructed in accordance with our invention in which the tab edges are cut at an angle to the horizontal center line of the strip shingles. This we consider at present to be a preferred embodiment of our invention, since the random thatch efiect obtained in the final roof construction is thus greatly accentuated, and it will be understood that the tabs in Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive may be out along similar angles if desired. In the form" shown in Fig. 8 the strip shingles are 40" long and, with the individual tab widths selected as shown, the most favorable Strip-offset distances are found to be 10 and 20", or, as indicated, 10" from either end of the strip shingles. Thus the shingles 10, ll, 12, and 13, shown in Fig. 8, are provided with offset notches 80 positioned 10" from either end of the strips.

As will be apparent from the above discussion, the provision of a satisfactory random type roof covering, in accordance with our invention, depends upon the proper selection of the strip-01T- set distance between courses, this ofiset distance being determined in relation to the different widths and different arrangement of the tabs in accordance with the rule set forth, and in Figs. 9 and 10 We have shown suitable diagrams by means of which this rule may be demonstrated In order fully to demonstrate the relation of the offset distance to the tab widths and tab arrangement, it will be assumed that the roofing set consists of two types of strip shingles, each having a length Land each having tabs of varying widths, arranged in neither the same nor in inverse order. Type I will be assumed to have tabs of widths A, B, C, D, and E in that order from left to right,.and Type II to have tabs of widths F, G, H, I, and J in the same order. The offset distance K to be determined is the lateral offset of a strip in the second course measured between the corresponding ends of the strips in the first and second courses. It will be obvious of course that with any offset each strip in the second course must span portions of two strips in the first course.

In Figs. 9 and 10 We have indicated as Case I to Case VIII inclusive, all of the possible permutations that may occur in the application of strip shingles of Type I and Type II in laying a roof. Thus Case I indicates Type I as the second course strip spanning portions of two Type I strips arranged in consecutive order in the first course. Case II indicates the same Type I'strip in the second course spanning portions of a Type I and a Type II strip arranged in that order in the first course, Case III being Type I over Type II and Type II in that order, and

Case IV being Type I over Type II and Type I in that order in the first course. Similarly, Case V to Case VIII indicate a Type II shingle in the second course spanning the following arrangements:

Case V Type II and Type II Case VI Type II and Type I Case VII Type I and Type I Case VIII Type I andType II Considering first Case I, it will be obvious that K must not equal zero, A, A'plus B, A plus B plus C, etc., and must not equal L. Also K plus A must not equal A plus B, but this is equivalent to saying that K must not equal B. Similarly, K plus A must not equal A plus B plus C, which is equivalent to saying that K must notequal B plus C. By like inequalities it may be shown that the ofiset K must not equal the width of any tab in the Type I strip or to the sum of the widths of any of the tabs insequence in this strip. I

Furthermore, it will be apparent that K plus (A plus B plus C) must not equal (A plus B plus C) plus (D plus E plus A plus B), which is equivalent to saying that K must not equal D plus E plus A plus B, and by like inequalities it can be shown that the offset K must not equal the sum of the widths of any of the tabs which can be brought into sequence in horizontally adjacent strips of the same type.

A similar application of the inequalities used above when applied to Case H establishes that the odset K must not equal the sum of the widths of any of the tabs which can be brought into sequence in two horizontally adjacent strips of difierent types, and accordingly it may be stated that the width of any tab or the sum of the widths of those tabs which can be brought into sequence in two horizontally adjacent strips whether of the same or of different types will always define inoperable ofiset distances.

Considering now Case'HI, it will be seen that the ofiset distance K must not equal F, F plus G, etc, or L, and that K plus A must not equal F. This last inequality, however, may also be expressed as K must not equal F minus A, and since F is equal to L minus the sum of the remaining tabs in the Type II strip, it will be found upon substitution of this value for F that K must not equal L the sum' of G plus H plus i plus J plus As shown in Case IV, this latter sum represents five tabs that can be brought into sequence, and by similar inequalities it can be shown that the difference between the total length of a strip and the sum or" widths of any tabs which can be brought into sequence in any two horizontally adjacent strips will define inoperable ofisets K.

A similar study of Case V to Case VIII confirms the rule that all strip ofisets which can in sequence. This is the rule promulgated above, and by means of which the ofiset distances shown in Figs. 1 to 8 inclusive were deter mined.

Although in Figs. 1 and '"i the strip shingles comprising the roofing sets embodying our invention are indicated as being formed in the conventional manner from conventional asphaltimpregnated rooting material, it will of course be obvious that our invention is equally applicable to roofing strips or siding elements of any desired. character, such for example as asbestos cement shingles.

in accordance with our invention the random thatch effect obtained may be accentuated by arranging the tabs in non-symmetrical relation with respect to the transverse center line of each strip shingle so as to preclude the regular interval arrangement of tabs of the same width.

Likewise, we have found it advisable to space the extremely narrow or extremely wide tabs in roofing sets embodying our invention away from the center line of the strip in order to preclude the regular interval arrangement of these prominent tabs. The random thatch effect may further be accentuated by providing slots of varying widths between the tabs having their butt'edges cut at an angle to the horizontal center line of the strip, the wider slot preferably being on'the long side of the tab to enhance the angular effect-and the variable width slots giving the effect of irregular spacing of individual shingles.

It should be understood, of course, that the reference throughout the specification and claims to strips having shingle simulating tabs of different widths does not mean that each tab is of anemic a difierent width than each other tab on the same strip, but means simply that all of the tabs on each strip are not of the same width.

While we have shown particular embodiments of our invention, it will be understood, of course, that we do not wish to be limited thereto since many modifications may be made, and we, therefore, contemplate by. the appended claims to cover any such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of our invention.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A roof covering comprising a plurality of rooting strips laid in successive overlapping courses, each of said strips having slots therein defining shingle-simulating tabs of different widths along one edge, and means on each strip for indicating predetermined oiiset distances, said distances being so chosen as to be unequal to the distance between the center lines of any two slots occurring in a single strip or in horizontally adjacent strips as applied and also unequal to the difference between such slot distances and the length of the individual strips, whereby a construction results when said strips are laid in random order in said successive courses with said predetermined offsets that none of said slots can possibly coincide with the slots in the strips of an adjacent course.

2. A roof covering comprising a plurality of dissimilar roofing strips laid in successive overlapping courses, each of said strips being of a length L and having slots therein defining shingle-simulating tabs of different widths along one edge, said widths being respectively :6, an, x2 the sum of said widths being equal to L; and means on each strip for indicating a predetermined ofiset-distance K; the value of K being less than L, unequal to 0:, 3:1, 1:2 and always unequal to any combination of consecutive rs in the same strip or adjacent strips or the difierences between L and an :1: or any combination of consecutive xs.

3. A roof covering comprising a plurality of dissimilar roofing strips laid in successive overlapping-courseswith the strips in each course laterally offset from the strips in adjacent courses, each of said strips having slots therein defining shingle simulating tabs along one edge, the adjacent tabs on each strip being of different widths and said different width tabs being arranged in dilierent order on certain of said different strips, the lateral oifsets between adjacent courses being unequal to the distances between. the center lines of any two slots in each strip and any two slots in laterally adjacent strips, and being unequalto the difierence between said slot distances and the length of each strip, whereby a mathematical relationship between the tab widths and offsets is established so that said strips may be laid in said courses in random order without the possibility of any slot coinciding with a slot in the adjacent courses 4. A roof covering comprising a plurality of dissimilar roofing strips laid in successive overlapping courses with the strips in each course laterally offset from the strips in adjacent courses, each of said strips having slots therein defining shingle simulating tabs of different widths along one edge, said different width tabs being arranged in difierent order on certain, of said difierent strips, the lateral offsets between adjacent courses diifering by more than the width of the narrowest slot from the distances between the center lines of any two slots in each iii strip and any two slots in laterally adjacent strips, and differing by more than the width of the narrowest slot from the difference between said slot distances and the length of each strip, whereby such a mathematical relationship between said tab widths and offsets is established that said strips may be laid in said courses in random order without the possibility of any slot coinciding with a slot in the adjacent courses.

5. A roofing set comprising a plurality of different strips adapted to be laid in random order in overlapping lateral courses, each of said strips. having slots therein defining shingle simulating tabs of different widths along one edge, said different width tabs being arranged in different order on certain of said different strips, and means on each strip for indicating predetermined offset distances unequal to the distances between the center lines of any two slots in each strip and between any two slots in laterally adjacent strips when laid in random order, said offset distances being also unequal to the difference between said slot distances and the length of each strip, whereby when said strips are laid in, random order in said lateral courses with said offset distances none of said slots coincide with the slots in adjacent courses.

6. A roofing set comprising a plurality of different strips adapted to be laid in random order in overlapping lateral courses, each of 'said strips having slots therein defining shingle simulating tabs of different widths along one edge, said different width tabsv being arranged in different order on certain of said different strips, and means on each strip for indicating a predetermined offset distance differing by more than the width of the narrowest slot from the distances between any two slots in each strip and between any two slots in laterally adjacent strips, and differing by more than the width of the narrowest slot from the difference between said slot distances and the length of each strip, whereby when said strips are laid in random order in said lateral courses with said offset distance between the strips of adjacent courses none of the slots coincide'with the slots of adjacent courses.

7. A roof covering comprising a plurality of dissimilar roofing strips laid in successive overlapping courses with the strips in each course laterally offset from the strips in adjacent courses, each of said strips having slots therein defining shingle simulating tabs of different widths along one edge, said different width tabs geing arranged in different order on certain of said different strips, the lateral offsets between adjacent courses differing by more than the width of the widest slot from the distances between the center lines of any two slots in each strip and any two slots in laterally adjacent strips, and differing by more than the width of the widest slot from the difference between said slot distances and the length of each strip, whereby said strips may be laid in said courses in random order without any slot coinciding with a slot in the adjacent courses.

' CLYDE C. SCHUETZ.

FRANK B. BURNS.

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USD805221S1 (en) * 2016-08-25 2017-12-12 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
US9878514B2 (en) 2010-04-08 2018-01-30 David SAIIA Apparatus and method for producing a thatch roofing material for building construction
USD825081S1 (en) * 2016-04-06 2018-08-07 Building Materials Investment Corporation Trilaminate roofing shingle

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US9878514B2 (en) 2010-04-08 2018-01-30 David SAIIA Apparatus and method for producing a thatch roofing material for building construction
USD774664S1 (en) * 2011-02-09 2016-12-20 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shake shingle
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US9808947B2 (en) * 2014-12-30 2017-11-07 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, Llc Roofing shingle system
US20160186436A1 (en) * 2014-12-30 2016-06-30 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, Llc Roofing shingle system
USD825081S1 (en) * 2016-04-06 2018-08-07 Building Materials Investment Corporation Trilaminate roofing shingle
USD805221S1 (en) * 2016-08-25 2017-12-12 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle

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