US2142693A - Knitting machine - Google Patents

Knitting machine Download PDF

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US2142693A
US2142693A US34580A US3458035A US2142693A US 2142693 A US2142693 A US 2142693A US 34580 A US34580 A US 34580A US 3458035 A US3458035 A US 3458035A US 2142693 A US2142693 A US 2142693A
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cam
knitting
sinkers
sinker
cams
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US34580A
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Robert H Lawson
Arthur N Cloutier
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Hemphill Co
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Hemphill Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/20Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles with provision for narrowing or widening; with reciprocatory action, e.g. for knitting of flat portions
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/42Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration
    • D04B9/46Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof
    • D04B9/56Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof heel or toe portions

Description

Jan. 3, 1939-j w 4 R. H` LAwsoN ET AL 2,142693 KNI'I'TNG MACHTNE Filed Aug. 3, 1935 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Jan. 3, 1939. R, H. LAwsoN ETAL 2142693 KNITTING MACHINE w Filed Aug. 3, 1935 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 rf'y Jan. 3, 1 939. RH. LAwsoN ET Al.
KNITTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Aug. 3, 1935 FIC. 20.
' to show how our'mechanism has been applied mam Jm. a, 1939 PATENT' OFFICE mma wiem Robert n. Lammrzymret, zna mam' Cloutien Innsdale, R. I., assign'ors tovlemphill I mm, J Massachusetts Application Allllllt In Canada ITCIIImI.
This invention deals with a new method and new mechanism for reciprocatory knitting and especially reciprocatory knitting as employed in the manufacture of split-foot stockings. The
invention is illustrated as applied to a circular knitting machine of the Banner type wherein the leg and instep of a stocking are to be knitted at the. auxiliary side of the machine, but this is not to be considered a limitation since the method and mechanism may be applied to any machine` wherein the usual split-foot fabric formed by reciprocatory knitting is to be producedf- In the drawings:
Fig. 1 represents a sectionof fabric knitted during rotary work;l
Fig. 2 shows a section of the fabric as it actually appears when knitted in a reciprocatory manner without the use of .the present invention;
Fig. 3 shows a section of fabric knit in a manner similar to that of Fig. 2,. except that the mechanism of this invention has been employed; Fig. 4 is a plan view of enough of the machine thereto;
Fig. 5 is a view in elevation taken from the left hand side of the machine, the mechanism comprising the invention being illustrated in the same position shown in Pig. 4;
Fig. 6 is a sectional view of a portion of the sinker cap showing the cams therein at the auxiliary side;
Fig. 7 is a view showing in section a fragment I of the sinker c'ap, the side sinker cam and flopper cam being shown in detail;
Fig. 8 is a plan view similar to Fig. 4 but showing the position of parts during the reverse stroke of reciprocation;
Fig. 9 is a plan viegi1 partially in section showing the auxiliary camblock assembly;
Fig. 10 is a view similar to. Fig. 4 but showing the mechanism comprising the invention in an inoperative position;
Fig. 1 1 is a view of the mechanism .as seen from the back of the machine;
Fig. 12 is a section showing the action of needles and sinkers according to the method employed in practicing the invention;
Fig. 13 is a sectional view showing a modified form of the. invention wherein sinkers are raised during stitch drawing;
Pig. 14 is a sectlonai view' similar to mg. 13,.
but showing the needle in a position wherein it is drawing a stitch;
Fig. 15 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 13
Central Falls, lt. I., a corporation of a. 1935, serial No; 84,580
awm so, 1884 v but showing the sinker in lower position, the
. stitch being cast ofl at this time;
Fig. 16 is a sectional view showing the means of mounting the auxiliary cylinder;
Fig. 17 is a'sectional view showing a detail 'of the auxiliary cylinderholding screws;
- Pig. 18 is a detail view showing the adjusting screws for the same;
Fig. 19 is a sectional view showing a detail of "the anten ring;
Fig. 20 is a plan view of the auxiliary cylinder mounting ring as seenfrom below;
Fig. 21 is a fragmentary view of sinkers and auxiliary sinker cams as seen from above; and
Fig. 22 is a sectional view of the auxiliary cylin- 15 der showing sinker raising cams thereon.
Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, we have shown practically what happens when knitting a stocking vwherein the leg portion is knitted in a circular manner and the ankle and foot portions in a reciprocatory manner to produce the usual splitfoot stocking. The` actual fabric made by knitting in a circular fashion appearsto the eye to be formed of loops which are substantially true in form, that is, the sides of each loop are of a about the same length and do not lean to either side of a line drawn vertically through any particular wale. With regard to the plain fabric. Fig. 1, it can be seen that the sides of loops are not of exactly the same length and that the tendency of these loops is to lean slightly in one direction, however, in the actual fabric this is.
. not apparent to the naked eye.
When split-foot knitting is started either at the top of the high-splice or at the termination of the heel. as the case may be, the fabric produced will appear very much likethat lndicated in, Pig. 2. In alternate courses, loops will be formed having unequal length sides and which also siant in opposite directions.
Taking a particular needle wale indicated by letter A, loops in alternate courses are composed 'of short sides land long sides 2 which cause the pronounced when stockings are knitted 'in old machines 'which are badly worn, and is known in the trade as wa/shboard eflect. Whereas, u
i. rier ring 5 havi g an extension 6 pivoted to saidv in the plam fabric of Fig. 1, the eye was deceived into seeing what appeared to be straight wales of perfect loops since these loops all slant in one direction the opposite is true of the split fabric of Fig. 2 wherein an illusion is created which multiplies the actual defect of each loop. This is apparently; due to the fact that loops of adjacent courses slant in opposite directions. The applicants have discovered that if sinkers are so controlled immediately after stitches have been drawn at the knitting point as to 'extend or push sinker loops inwardly, these same loops and their adjacent needle loops will be straightened up so that their sides will become substantially of the same length. While this method of controlling sinkers may be employed in each course, that is, during reciprocations in both directions, it has been found that perfectly satisfactory results may be obtained when dealing with reciprocations in one direction only,l i. e., in every other course. In case the action of sinkers occurs in every other course onLv, a harsher action must be resorted to, andin actual practice, loops will be straightened and pushed around until they may lie in a direction slightly reverse to that in which they first inclined. At the same time a sinker is trueing a loop in the course which has just been knitted, that particular loop apparently tends to work in the loop of the course previously knitted and to straighten that loop also. By employingthis invention during lkniting of the split pprtions of the fabric, results such as indicated in Fig. 3 are obtained and the fabric as itl is removed from the machine, will not show any apparent difference between portions knit in the circular manner and those knitted byreciprocation.
Referring to Figs. 4-11. a needle cylinder is shown at 3, a carrier ring post at 4 and a caral manner.
post in the u An auxiliary cam block is adapted to be moved in and out of.
active position in the usual manner and carries a center cam 8, Figs. 9 and 11, as well as stitch cams and a needle raise cam such as are commonly employed at the auxiliary side of a splitfoot'knitting machine. The cam block is supported upon cam plate 9 and slides radially be- `ing guided by angular clamps |01and 4The usual sinker cap |2 has fixed therein a sinker side cam |3 of theusual construction and opposed to this, a similar side cam |4 which is of a thickness approximately l/z that of the first mentioned cam. For measuring stitches, casting off, etc., these side cams function in the usual way. Center sinker cam |5 is attached to a stem IG which is. guided radially within a groove formed in the (top of sinker cap |2 and plate which is attached to said cap. This center cam is normally in a position such as shown in Figs. 4 and 6 when knitting at the auxiliary side but is pushed radially inward against the tension of a spring |5' so that it does not act to withdraw sinkers during knitting of the h'eel and toe of a stocking or at any other time when knitting is to be discontinued at this side of the machine.
23 which is controlled along with the-auxiliary center cam 0, by means of a link 25, connected Referring' to Fig.V 11, a post 2| has pivoted thereon at 22 a leverI ai-faeos at extension 26 to lever 21. A stem |9 of cam has attached thereto a hooked finger 28. The hooked end 29 engages lever 23 so that when that lever is swung into position shown in Fig.
11, which position is assumed whenever the yarn guide at the auxiliary feed is withdrawn from active position, cam |8 will be pushed inwardly and the center sinker cam will at the same time be projected inwardly to a position wherein it will not retract sinkers. This control of the center sinker cam |5, cam |8 and also cam 8 is well known in the Banner split-foot machine and is described to this extent, merely for purposes of setting forth enough of the operation to lay a basis for the description of Operating the controlling mechanism for the fiopper cam which is to be described later.
In Figs. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 11, flopper cam 30 is shown in active and also inactive positions. This fiopper cam rests within a slot in sinker cap |2 directly beneath side cam |4. The flopper cam pivots about a pin 3| projecting up from cap |2 and is free to be swung inwardly against sinker butts as shown'in Fig. 6 or to be swung outwardly into the position of Fig. 7, the extending end 32 of said cam acting as a stop when it strikes against the beveled portion of the sinker cap. Flopper cam 30 has an extension 33 projecting from a point near its forward end and a pin 34 extends upwardly from this projection to contact with a` cam to be described later. Flopper cam 30 also has its butt engaging surfaces of practically the same curvature as those on fixed cam |4.' Pivot 3| is arranged in such a position that the point 35 of cam 30 is spaced a slight amount from point 30 of cam |4 so that when in active position the working surface 31 of cam 30 practically forms a continuation of the working surface 38 of cam |4, see Fig. 6.
A bracket 39 is attached as shown in Fig. 5 to carrier ring post 4 and has a movable cam 40 resting thereon, said movable cam being pivoted about a pin 4| 'and also being slotted at 42 so that it may slide lengthwise of bracket 39. A spring 43 attached at one end to' the bracket and at its other end to cam 40 normally tends to i draw that cam into the position shown in Fig. 10. .A lever 44 is pivoted at 45 on post 2| and has a link 40 pivoted to its opposite end at 41, said link being connected at 40 to one end of movable cam 40.
Lever 44 passes behind'the upper projecting end of lever 23 so that when that lever is in the position shown in Figs. 4 and 8, a position assumed when the auxiliary feed becomes active such as in knitting the leg and instep of a stock-l ing, cam 40 will be drawn against the tension of spring 43 into a position wherein it may engage the projecting pin 34 on the fiopper cam. In operation the sinker cap reciprocates back and forth through a small angle so that on the clockwise reciprocation during split'foot knitting, the pin 34 strikes cam 40`and said flopper cam is projected inwardly as is very evident from inspection' of Flg. 4. This is the reciprocation corresponding to the course of loops which are straightened or trued up. During the counterclockwise reciprocation, Fig. 8, pin 34 is not in connection with cam 40 and cam 30 would merely ,be pushed out to the position shown in that flgure as sinker butts pass by it. During circular knitting as in the leg of the stocking; the condition shown in Fig. 8 prevails.
It is quite evident that the mechanism provided for straightening loops during reciprocation in corresponding to 40 from operation while knitting in a cir ular fashion. r
Bracket 3 is formed with an upwardly extending lug 49 through which an adjusting screw 50 is threaded. This adjusting screw bears against cam 40 and is used to control that cam for varying the extent to which flopper cam. 30 will be projected' inwardly. A lock-nut 5| may be tightened v against lug 49 for maintaining this adjustment permanently. This adjustment merely has to be made at the start of knitting a particular length of stitch and yarn, and by inspection of the fabric,
vthe machine operator can tell when he has flopper cam 30 acting upon sinkers in`just the proper manner to neutralize the washboard effect ,which has been illustrated in Fig. 2.
Figs. 10 and 11 show cam 40 and its Operating mechanism in the positions which they assume when knitting the heel and toe of the stocking or at any time when the auxiliary feed is inactive.
In such position cam 40 is drawn by spring 43 beyond a point where it might be contacted by pin 34 as the sinker cap oscillates back and forth during reciprocatory knitting. It may thus be seen that fiopper cam 30 is controlled automatically during the various phases of knitting a split foot stocking.
In Fig. 12 we have shown how sinkers are projected inwardly by the poiiit of flopper cam 30 to straighten up stitches which have already been drawn a few needles in advance of that point. The arrow indicates direction of rotation. The sinker 52 is considered to be at the point, of cam 30 and is projected inwardly extending its corresponding si reeving that p about adjacent needles 53. That particular sinker loop being' straightened as shown, also' has a tendency to straighten up the adjacent course which was previously formed.
Referring to Figs. 13-20, we will now describe a modified form of the apparatus for accomplishing substantially the same-result which' was accomplished by the first form. It has been -found that if stitches are drawn .by lthe conjoint action of needles and sinkers during reciprocatory knitting, the resulting fabric will fairly closely approximate that ,which was formed during circulardmitting, see Flg. 1, no matter whether that fabric was produced of stitches drawn by needles alone or by sinkers and needles. It has further been'discovered that if sinkers are used to assist in stitch drawing in one direction of reciprocation'a d in the other direction stitches are drawn by eedles alone very satisfactory results will be obtained... In this case the stitch vcams must be adjusted so that the stitch .drawn Fig. 14, which are adapted to be rocked about,
their outer ends when actuated by certain sinker cams to be desc'rlbed hereinafter, A sinker cap 59 of the usual type having sinker cams therein r loop and at the same time,`
A sinker head 51 is clamped to said cylinder completes this assembly and serves -to operate said sinkers during rotary or reciprocatory knitting. Needles 60 preferably of the latch type recip cate in tricks cut in said cylinder.'. A stitch ng 6| of special design is fixed to the upper end of-said cylinder and this stitch ring will be described'in greater 'detali later.
Within this rotary needle cylinder a relatively fixed auxiliary sleeve or cylinder 62 is mounted so that it may be adjusted 'in a Vertical direction. This sleeve is better shown'in Figs. 16, 21, 22and the mounting therefor in Fig. 20.
Referring to Flgs. 16 and 20 a ring 63 having projections 64 and 65 is attached to the under side of the circular base 56 by means of said extension. Extension 64 is permanentlybolted'to a machined surface at one side of this element 56 and extension 65 projects through a slot in widening pick bracket 66 which bracket isin tum fixed to the circular base. Three screws 61 pass through ring 63 and are threaded within a flange at the lower end of said auxiliary cylinder. These screws serve to maintain said cylinder downwardly in a boss wherein its fianged lower end bears against adjusting studs 68. These studs are herein shown as three in number and are threaded within said ring being locked in their adjusted position by means of lock-nuts 69. I
Cylinder 62 carries at its' upper end equally spaced on either side of the auxiliary yarn feed point (not shown) two cams 10, 1|, which serve to raise the inner ends of sinkers during knitting at said feed point. Each cam is provided with a fianged extension 12 which has slots 13 through which pass screws for clamping thesame to 'the auxiliary cylinder. .These cams may be adjusted to their proper positions Vby loosening these mounting screwsand sllding the camsv about the upper surface of said cylinder.. l
By the adjustment for said sleeve, previously described, it is possible to regulate the upward movement of sinkers and thus to vary stitch length by sinkers as well as by the usual stitch cam. The sinker will be positively elevated by its cam 10 or 1| as the case may be, but excessive movement is limited by a spring 14 which is re- Atained within an annular groove in the special stitch ring 6| shown in detali in Fig. 19. In operation a sinker will be raised by one of the cams in drawing a stitch and that same sinker will cast oif its loop prior to being again raised by the second cam, at which time a needle will have been raised to the position shown'in Fig. 1'3 so that this second upward motion of the sinker has. no effect on stitches previously drawn as they are merely held idly about vthe shank of a needle.` As. before results have been obtained when only one of the cams 10, 1| is used. In such case alternate courses o f reciprocating knitting will be formed by needles alone, while the intervening courses will be formed of loops drawn' by conjoint action of needles and sinkers. The eifect of such a method of knitting is to greatly improve the quality of fabric knitted thereby, and-in cases, such split fabrics very closely approximate that which has been knitted by circular knitting. I
The' invention has been described relative to split foot knitting at the auxiliary side of a machine which knits both leg and instep of the same yam but is not'in any way limited to 'such a use, w since it may be employed in any knitting machine wherein reciprocatory knitting takes place and results in distorted loops such as have been shown in Fig. 2. Many changes may occur to one skilled stated, lt has been found that more satisfactory in the art and we are not to 'be limited except by the scope of the appended claims.
We claim:
. 1. An independent needle knitting machine having knitting instrumentalities including needles and sinkers, and cams for controlling the movements of the said knitting instrumentalities, the knitting instrumentalities and cams being relatively reciprocable, one of the said cams being.
operable during such reciprocatory knitting to advance the sinkers abnormally immediately following the drawing of the stitches to effect the knitting of uniform stitches in adjacent courses.
2. In av .circular knitting machine having needles and sinkers independently mounted therein, cams for acting upon the needles and sinkers to effect the knitting of fabric, the needles and sinkers being reciprocable with respect to the cams, one of the said cams acting upon the sinkers to advance them, a supplemental cam acting upon the sinkers during reciprocatory knitting to impart an abnormal' advancing movement to the sinkers immediately following the drawing ofstitches to eifect the knitting of uniform stitches in adjacent courses, said cam being movable to an active position to advance the sinkers as aforesaid and'being movable from the said position to a relatively inactive position where the movements of the sinkers are not affected, and means 'for moving the said cam last mentioned to its active position.
3. A circular knitting machine having independent needles and sinkers, cams Afor acting upon the said needles and sinkers 'to move them to effect the knitting of fabric, there being relative reciprocatory movements between the cam means on the one hand and the needles and sinkers on the other hand, two of the cams actlng upon the sinkers during successive reciprocations, a supplemental and movable cam acting in conjunction with one of the two aforesaid cams for imparting an abnormal advancing movement to the sinkers during a relative reciprocation of the cam means and the needles and sinkers in one direction, the construction and operation being such that the abnormal advance of the sinkers effects the knitting of uniform fabric.- i
4. A knitting machine having in combination a sinker cap for a knitting' machine and a movable cam therein for acting upon sinkers during reciprocatory knitting, means for advancing the said cam at predetermined times, said means including a movable cam which in one position is effective to .advance the cam first mentioned and in another position is ineffective for that pur-' pose, means effective during reciprocatory knitting for moving said second mentioned cam to and from its effectifi cam engaging position.
5. An independent needle' knitting machine having knitting instrumentalities and cams for acting upon them, there being relatively circular'l an'd reciprocatory movements between the cams on the one hand and the knitting instrumentalities on the other, the instrumentalities including sinkers, and means for acting upon the sinkers to advance them abnormally and immediately after drawing stitches, during reciprocatory movements in one direction to effect the knitting of uniform fabric, the said sinker advancing means being inetfective during circular movements.
6. A sinker head for use in a knitting machine and having a movable cam mounted therein, means for acting upon the cam to advance the same, said means at other times being inefiective 'ai-12,893 A for the purpose stated, auxiliary means, for mov- I ing the said means to one of said positions and spring'means for moving the said means to the other of said positions.
7. A sinker head for use in a knitting machine and having a movable cam mounted therein and a second cam effective thereupon to move the m'ovable cam to an active position, said second mentioned cam being movable to a position| wherev it is inefl'ective during heel and toe knitting to advance the cam first mentioned.
8. A sinkervhead for use in a knitting machine and having a movable cam mounted therein and a second cam effective thereupon to move the movable cam to an active position, said second mentioned cam being movable to a position where it is ineifective to advance the cam first mentioned, the means for moving the second cam as aforesaid consisting of levers 23, 4| and connections leading to the said second mentioned Cam..
9. An' Independent needle knitting machine having a needle bed and knitting instrumental- 'ities including needles and sinkers mounted therein, a member mounted in the needle bed for acting upon the sinkers to move them in combination with the needles to advance them labnormally during reciprocatory movements in vadapted to engage the slnkers'to limit their upward movement.
11. A sinker cap for a knitting machine having a cam therein for at times advancing sinkers abnormally, a second cam for acting upon the first cam to advance the same, means for effecting movement of the second cam to a position where it does not.advance the sinker engaging cam during heel and toe knitting.
12. An independentneedle' knitting machine adapted to knit a stocking having circular courses and split-foot courses and havingv an auxiliary feeding station for eil'ecting the knitting of the continuous circular portions of the stocking and of the instep of the split-foot portion of the stocking, a sinker cam for abnormally advancing sinkers during reciprocatory courses and immediately after drawing stitches in which the knitting is eifected by relative reciprocatory movements of the instrumentalities and cams in adirection opposite to the direction of relative movement of said instrumentalities and cams in effecting the knitting of continuous circular courses.
13. An independent needle knitting machine adapted to knit courses' by relative reciprocatory' vmovements of the instrumentalities and cams, a
cam for abnormally advancing the sinkers immediately after drawing stitches and dur'mg relative movements in one direction of the cams on the one hand and the knitting instrumentalities on the other hand but not efiective to advance the sinkers in the opposite direction of 'reciprocation 14. An independent needle knitting 'machine adapted to knit courses by relative reciprocatory movements of the instrumentalities and cams, a cam for abnormally advancing the sinkers during relative movements in one direction of the cams on the one hand and the knitting instruamaeaa mentalities on the other hand but not effective to advance the sinkers in the opposite direction of reciprocation, the ineffectiveness of the said cam being the result of the shifting of the sinker cap incident to reversals in the directions of rotations of the needles.
15. A circular, independnt needie knitting machine having needles and cooperating sinkers therein, cams for controlling the needies and sinkers in rotary and reciprocatory knitting, and means functioning on sinkers in one direction of reciprocation, at least, to impart to said sinkers an additional movement inwardly, immediately .after drawing stitches, for causing loops which have been drawn to incline in one direction, to be straightened and aligned with the direction of their individual wales.
16 An independentneedle knitting machine having knitting instrumentalities including needles and sinkers, and cams for controlling the movements of thel said knitting instrumentalities, the knitting instrumentalities and cams being relatively reciprocable, one of the said cams being operable during such reciprocatory knitting abnormally to advance the sinkers radially immediately following the drawing of the stitches to effect the knitting of uniform. stitches in adjacent courses.
17. An independent needle knitting machine having knitting instrumentalities including needles and sinkers, cams for controlling the movements of said knitting instrumentalities during reciprocatory knitting to effect simultaneous knitting of two joined fabric Sections, said cams including a cam operable during such reciprocatory knitting abnormally to advance sinkers immediately following the drawing of the stitches to effect the knitting of uniform stitches in adjacent, reciprocatorily knitted courses.
ROBERT H. LAWsoN. ARTHUR N. CLOUTIER.
US34580A 1934-08-30 1935-08-03 Knitting machine Expired - Lifetime US2142693A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2529181A (en) * 1947-04-25 1950-11-07 Scott & Williams Inc Sinker cam mechanism for circular knitting machines and method of operating a circular knitting machine
US3013417A (en) * 1959-01-13 1961-12-19 Patent Hose Corp Knitting machine stitch length control
US3013414A (en) * 1958-09-11 1961-12-19 Morpul Inc Fabric control device
US3041860A (en) * 1959-04-30 1962-07-03 H E Crawford Company Inc Means for and method of operating the sinkers of knitting machines

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2529181A (en) * 1947-04-25 1950-11-07 Scott & Williams Inc Sinker cam mechanism for circular knitting machines and method of operating a circular knitting machine
US3013414A (en) * 1958-09-11 1961-12-19 Morpul Inc Fabric control device
US3013417A (en) * 1959-01-13 1961-12-19 Patent Hose Corp Knitting machine stitch length control
US3041860A (en) * 1959-04-30 1962-07-03 H E Crawford Company Inc Means for and method of operating the sinkers of knitting machines

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