US2124243A - Violin - Google Patents

Violin Download PDF

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Publication number
US2124243A
US2124243A US113064A US11306436A US2124243A US 2124243 A US2124243 A US 2124243A US 113064 A US113064 A US 113064A US 11306436 A US11306436 A US 11306436A US 2124243 A US2124243 A US 2124243A
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strings
auxiliary
bridge
neck
finger board
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US113064A
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Areyon C Carter
Carter Anderson
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Areyon C Carter
Carter Anderson
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/06Necks; Fingerboards, e.g. fret boards
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D1/00General design of stringed musical instruments
    • G10D1/02Bowed or rubbed string instruments, e.g. violins or hurdy-gurdies

Description

July 19, 1938. A. c. CARTER ET AL VIOLIN Filed Nov. 27, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet l Aiiorneys July 19, 1938.

A. g. CARTER ET AL VIOLIN Filed Nov. 27, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Inventor: J J. 6222 2 2 flza er'wz (rifli Attorneys Patented July 19, 1938 UNITED STATES VIOLIN Areyon 0. Carter, and Anderson Carter, Clinton, N. 0.

Application November 27, 1936, Serial No. 113,064

5 Claims.

This invention relates to novel improvements in fingered musical instruments and has reference in particular to instruments of the type played with a bow, and the principal object is to provide a novel and improved violin.

By way of introductory explanation, it might be stated that although the invention is susceptible of being incorporated in a viola, cello, double bass, or the like, it is expressly designed for incorporation in a conventional violin.

- Persons familiar with the art with which the invention relates, are aware that the regula- 'tion violin includes four distinguishable strings, namely, E, A, D, and G. The strings'are bowed and fingered individually and collectively depending on the discretion of the performer since he may play single tones, double stops, or sweeping harmonious chords as the case may be.

In reducing the principles of the present invention to practice, we have found that it is possible toassociate with the four main strings, a plurality of auxiliary strings which we conveniently designate as harmony strings, the latter strings being vibrated through the instrumentality of the bow, being permanently or fixedly tuned and therefore not fingered as are the main melody playing strings.

The preferred embodiment of the invention therefore, comprises a violin characterized by four main strings and six auxiliary harmony strings, all having individual tuning keys and all being trained over the standard type bridge to produce the-desired melodic results.

More specifically, the improvement is predicated upon an especially constructed finger board,

wherein a hollow shield is embodied in such a way as to permit the auxiliary strings to be partially carried therebeneath, whereby to permit them to be connected with the tuning pegs or keys and to avoid fingering thereof.

Other features and advantages will become more readily apparent from the following description and drawings. In the drawings, wherein like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the views:-

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the improved violin constructed in accordance with the principles of our present invention.

Fig. 2 is an edge view of the structure depicted in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal sectional view detailing the auxiliary strings, secondary bridge, and shield arrangement.

' Fig. 4 is.a view showing the multiple tuning key or peg arrangement.

Figs. 5 and 6 are sections taken on the planes of the lines 5-4 and 8-6 respectively of Fig. 1.

The body of the instrument, denoted by the numeral 1 is of regulation construction. The neck, which is partly conventional, is denoted by I the numeral 8 and includes the usual peg box 8 to accommodate all ten of the individual keys. The regular four keys are denoted or distinguished by the numerals l0. These are arranged in pairs horizontally on opposite longitudinal sides of the peg box. The auxiliary keys are denoted by the numerals H, these being'suitably mounted for accessibility -to allow all ten strings to be individually tuned. Incidentally, so far as the particular construction of the key is concerned, this is of no moment. That is to say, we can use, if found practicable, the regular tuning pegs. It has been found more satisfactory, however, to use the pinion and gear type keys such as are used to advantage on some violins but 50 primarily on mandolins, banjos',"and the like.

A portion l2 of the finger board, forming a part of the neck overlies the body I as is customary. The main part of the finger board, however, is channelled or cut out as indicated at l3and a channel shaped metal shield I4 is fitted over this. The inner end of the shield terminates in the formation of what may be called a slot I5 and located in this slot is a diagonal auxiliary or secondary bridge H5. The primary bridge, which is of regular construction, is denoted by the numeral I1, and occupies the regular position on the belly of the-body between the extension I2 of the finger board and the tail piece I 8.

It will be remembered that in the introductory portion of the description we pointed out that the instrument includes the ordinary four main strings and these are shown to advantage in Fig.

1 and denoted by the numerals I9. These strings are the regular E, A, D, and G strings found on 40 all present-day violins. The'six auxiliary strings are collectively denoted by the numerals 20. Thus it is evident that the main strings l9 are attached'on the tail piece I8 at one end, stretched across the bridge 20, over the finger board and are then attached to the main tuning keys ID. The auxiliary strings are also attached at one end to the tail piece I8 and are trained over the bridge I]. These auxiliary strings, however, are then trained over the secondary or auxiliary bridge l6, go down through the slot l5, and into the space 13 formed by the groove in the neck and the overlying shield or metal panel member I4. Thus the part I4 is in effect, the finger board insofar as it relates to the main strings H. Th

till

auxiliary strings 28 go beneath the finger board and therefore are not affected by the fingers of the left hand of the performer. In other words, so far as the strings 20 are concerned, they are not fingered. Only the strings is are fingered, and these are played or utilized individually and/or collectively according to the requirements of the score or melody lieing played. Although the strings 20 are not fingered with the left hand, they ar nevertheless vibrated with the same bow which vibrates the main strings l9. Thus they are arranged in a predetermined relationship to the strings l9 and tuned accordingly. For instance, there may be auxiliary strings on opposite sides of the E string and these auxiliary strings may be tuned to definite pitches so as to harmonize with the E string when the performer is playing, for example, in the key of G. The nature of the instrument may be better understood if it is borne in mind that it is of limited utility so far as the auxiliary harmony strings arev concerned. That is to say the harmony strings can be fixedly tuned in relation to the main strings with which they are associated and, consequently, the performer is compelled more or less to play in a simple key to avoid complications.

When we perfected the instrument we had in mind the provision of a structure which would give chord effects such as are produced in two or three part harmony when violins are playing in duet or trio formation. Consequently it is possible by the use of this instrument to obtain the effects of two or three violins which result is calculated to enhance or otherwise amplify the performance of the player.

Visualized along other lines, it is fundamental that the auxiliary strings be tuned to harmonize with the differently tuned main strings, that is to say the auxiliary strings associated with the G string will be tuned in harmony therewith, those associated with the A string will be tuned in harmony therewith, and so on. It follows, therefore, that as the bow is manipulated in the usual way, it will simultaneously strike one main string and the associated auxiliary string so that the air played on the main string will, thru the agency of the auxiliary strings, give the desired chords or multiple part harmony effect.

It is important to understand that the vibratory length of the open main strings i9 is between the bridge l7 and the nut which is adjacent to the peg box. The vibratory length of the auxiliary strings 20 is between the bridge ii and the auxiliary bridge it. Moreover since the auxiliary strings go beneath the finger board, they are not affected by the fingering of the regular or main strings l9.

In playing an instrument of this kind, it is obvious that the main strings need not necessarily be tuned in fifths, for they may be tuned in an entirely different progressive order and the strings 20 tuned in accord therewith, depending on the order chosen, enabling the performer to have at his disposal ten playable strings instead of.

four as is ordinarily the case.

It is thought that persons skilled in the art to which the invention relates will be able to obtain a clear understanding of the invention after considering the description in connection with the drawings. Therefore, a more lengthy description is regarded as unnecessary.

Minor changes in shape, size, and rearrangement of details coming within the field of invention claimed may be resorted to in actual practice, if desired.

amazes What we claim as new is:-

1. A violin of the class described comprising a body, a tail piece connected to one end of the body, a neck connected to the opposite end thereof, a bridge on the body between the tail piece and neck, said neck being provided at its outer end with a peg box, a plurality of individually usable tuning pegs mounted in said box, said pegs including main and auxiliary species, said neck being provided with a hollow finger board of a predetermined longitudinal playing range, the hollow portion of said finger board being open at opposite ends, an auxiliary bridge built into the finger board adjacent the inner open end thereof, a plurality of main and auxiliary strings, said auxiliary strings being attached to the tail piece, trained over said main bridge and then over said auxiliary bridge, said auxiliary strings extending through the hollow portion of the finger board and through and beyond the outer open end thereof where they are connected with their respective tuning pegs, the effective vibratory length of said auxiliary strings being between .said bridges and therefore beyond the normal playing range of the main strings, said main strings being attached to the tail piece, trained over said main bridge and being disposed above the finger board with their tunable ends connected with their respective tuning pegs, all of said strings being affected by the bow at the discretion of the performer and said main strings being fingered in conjunction with the underlying finger board.

2. In a stringed musical instrument of the class described a conventional hollow violin body, a neck attached to one end of said body, said neck being provided at its outer end with a peg box having a plurality of individually usable string accommodation and tuning pegs, that portion of the neck constituting the finger board area being provided with a longitudinal groove, a shield of channel-shaped cross sectional design fixedly attached to the neck and covering said groove, said shield forming a finger board on its exterior and cooperating with the groove in defining a passageway for auxiliary strings, and an auxiliary string bridge being mounted in said neck at the inner end of said groove and disposed diagonally with respect to-the longitudinal dimension thereof and being located in a position spaced from an adjacent inner end of the shield, in the manner and for the purposes described.

3. A violin of the class described comprising a conventional hollow body, a tail-piece connected to the butt end of said body, a longitudinally elongated neck attached to the opposite end of said body in alignment with the tail-piece, said neck being provided at its outer end with a tuning peg box, that portion of the neck between the peg box and body being of hollow construction to form a tubular finger board open at its opposite inner and outer ends, a plurality of selectively usable tuning pegs mounted in said peg box, a primary bridge supported on the belly of the body between the tail-piece and finger board, a secondary bridge mounted in the hollow portion of said finger board at the inner open end thereof and disposed on a plane below said primary bridge, a plurality of main strings attached at one end to the tail-piece and trained over said primary bridge, overlying the finger board and attached to predetermined ones of said tuning pegs, and a plurality of auxiliary strings attached at their outer ends to the remaining ones of said tuning pegs, said auxiliary strings having their intermediate portions extending through the hollow portion of said finger board over said secondary bridge and then over the body and primary bridge where they are attached to said tail-piece.

4. A violin comprising a conventional hollow body, a neck attached at its inner end to said body and disposed in a plane with the top 01 the body, said neck having a tuning peg box at its outer end provided with a plurality of individually usable string anchoring and tuning pegs, a tallpiece attached to the butt end of said body in alignment with said neck, a primary string supporting bridge resting on and rising above the belly of the body, said neck including a finger board extending from the peg box inwardly and partially overlying the adjacent frontal end portion of the body, that portion or the finger board adjacent the body being provided with a secondary auxiliary string accommodation bridge, said last named bridge being disposed on a plane below the string supporting edge of the primary bridge, a plurality of main strings attached to the tail-piece and predetermined ones of said tuning pegs and trained over said first named bridge and passing above the finger board in conventional tached at corresponding ends to said tail-piece and passing over said primary bridge and having their intermediate portions passing over said auxiliary bridge with their outer ends attached to the remaining ones of the tuning pegs, the portion of the auxiliary strings between the secondary bridge and tuning pegs being disposed on a plane below said finger board.

5. As a component part of an assemblageof the class described, a combined finger board and neck adapted for attachment to one end of a violin, said neck being longitudinally elongated, provided at'its outer end with a peg box, provided intermediate its ends and on its under side with a stabilizing and attaching member, the normal top surface of said neck being provided with a groove extending from the central portion through that end adjacent the peg box, an auxiliary string accommodation bridge mounted in the inner end of said groove, and a channel shaped shield attached to said neck and overlying the groove, said shield constituting a finger board and having its inner end spaced from said bridge.

AREYON C. CARTER. ANDERSON CARTER.

US113064A 1936-11-27 1936-11-27 Violin Expired - Lifetime US2124243A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4122745A (en) * 1976-02-17 1978-10-31 Darias Paya Francisco J Stringed musical instrument with auxiliary strings
EP0038228A1 (en) * 1980-03-11 1981-10-21 Patrice Vigier Neck for a plucked instrument
FR2525794A1 (en) * 1982-04-22 1983-10-28 Guinot Michel Musical instrument with five bowed strings - resembles violin with curved base and has seven strings used only for resonating
US20060150797A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-13 Gaffga Christopher M Stringed musical instrument with multiple bridge-soundboard units
FR2913136A1 (en) * 2007-02-23 2008-08-29 Santos Luiz Alfredo Dos Scalable stringed bowed musical instrument for providing assistance to pedagogy, has bridge for modifying technical characteristic of instrument by presence of notches, nut, head balance rails, hitchpin rail, lug, pique and eight chords
US10325578B1 (en) * 2015-11-10 2019-06-18 Wheely Enterprises IP, LLC Musical instrument
US10733965B1 (en) * 2018-08-25 2020-08-04 David Cody Warner Stringed instrument enhanced with sympathetic strings

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4122745A (en) * 1976-02-17 1978-10-31 Darias Paya Francisco J Stringed musical instrument with auxiliary strings
EP0038228A1 (en) * 1980-03-11 1981-10-21 Patrice Vigier Neck for a plucked instrument
FR2525794A1 (en) * 1982-04-22 1983-10-28 Guinot Michel Musical instrument with five bowed strings - resembles violin with curved base and has seven strings used only for resonating
US20060150797A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-13 Gaffga Christopher M Stringed musical instrument with multiple bridge-soundboard units
US7288706B2 (en) * 2004-12-30 2007-10-30 Christopher Moore Gaffga Stringed musical instrument with multiple bridge-soundboard units
FR2913136A1 (en) * 2007-02-23 2008-08-29 Santos Luiz Alfredo Dos Scalable stringed bowed musical instrument for providing assistance to pedagogy, has bridge for modifying technical characteristic of instrument by presence of notches, nut, head balance rails, hitchpin rail, lug, pique and eight chords
US10325578B1 (en) * 2015-11-10 2019-06-18 Wheely Enterprises IP, LLC Musical instrument
US10733965B1 (en) * 2018-08-25 2020-08-04 David Cody Warner Stringed instrument enhanced with sympathetic strings

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