US20160353896A1 - Chair with activated back flex - Google Patents

Chair with activated back flex Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20160353896A1
US20160353896A1 US15/087,103 US201615087103A US2016353896A1 US 20160353896 A1 US20160353896 A1 US 20160353896A1 US 201615087103 A US201615087103 A US 201615087103A US 2016353896 A1 US2016353896 A1 US 2016353896A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
back
upright
flex
wing
embodiments
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
US15/087,103
Other versions
US10172465B2 (en
Inventor
Jay R. Machael
Travis J. CROWELL
Bruce Fifield
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
HNI Technologies Inc
Original Assignee
HNI Technologies Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201361793272P priority Critical
Priority to US14/212,772 priority patent/US9332851B2/en
Application filed by HNI Technologies Inc filed Critical HNI Technologies Inc
Priority to US15/087,103 priority patent/US10172465B2/en
Assigned to HNI TECHNOLOGIES INC. reassignment HNI TECHNOLOGIES INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CROWELL, TRAVIS J., MICHAEL, JAY R., FIFIELD, BRUCE
Publication of US20160353896A1 publication Critical patent/US20160353896A1/en
Publication of US10172465B2 publication Critical patent/US10172465B2/en
Application granted granted Critical
Active legal-status Critical Current
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C7/00Parts, details, or accessories of chairs or stools
    • A47C7/36Support for the head or the back
    • A47C7/40Support for the head or the back for the back
    • A47C7/44Support for the head or the back for the back with elastically-mounted back-rest or backrest-seat unit in the base frame
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C5/00Chairs of special materials
    • A47C5/12Chairs of special materials of plastics, with or without reinforcement
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C7/00Parts, details, or accessories of chairs or stools
    • A47C7/36Support for the head or the back
    • A47C7/40Support for the head or the back for the back
    • A47C7/44Support for the head or the back for the back with elastically-mounted back-rest or backrest-seat unit in the base frame
    • A47C7/445Support for the head or the back for the back with elastically-mounted back-rest or backrest-seat unit in the base frame with bar or leaf springs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C7/00Parts, details, or accessories of chairs or stools
    • A47C7/36Support for the head or the back
    • A47C7/40Support for the head or the back for the back
    • A47C7/46Support for the head or the back for the back with special, e.g. adjustable, lumbar region support profile; "Ackerblom" profile chairs
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining

Abstract

A chair back that includes a back support, an upright frame, and at least one flex wing. The back support is substantially flexible and has a first side portion and a second side portion. The upright frame is substantially rigid and has a first frame side and a second frame side. The flex wing is located between the first frame side and the first side portion, where the flex wing includes a front portion coupled to the first side portion, a back portion coupled to the first frame side, and a web portion interconnecting the front portion and the back portion. The flex wing flexes during engagement by a user.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 14/212,772, filed Mar. 14, 2014, which claims the benefit of priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/793,272, filed Mar. 15, 2013, which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Chair manufacturers continually strive to improve the comfort, benefits, aesthetics, and manufacturability of the chairs they produce. Often, chairs have features, such as a reclining back, to increase comfort. Sometimes, chairs have features, such as adjustable seats, backs, back supports, armrests, and heights, to reduce or prevent injuries, including repetitive stress injury and back pain associated with sitting for long periods. Chairs are designed and built to fill an individual's needs and provide support where the individual needs it. In some chairs, the seat and back are fixed or the seat is fixed and the back tilts for comfort. In other chairs, the seat and back move together to support the user.
  • SUMMARY
  • Some embodiments described in this disclosure relate to a chair back that includes a back support, an upright frame, and at least one flex wing. The back support is substantially flexible and has a first side portion and a second side portion. The upright frame is substantially rigid and has a first frame side and a second frame side. The flex wing is located between the first frame side and the first side portion, where the first flex wing includes a front portion coupled to the first side portion, a back portion coupled to the first frame side, and a web portion interconnecting the front portion and the back portion. The flex wing flexes during user engagement.
  • Some embodiments relate to a chair including a base, a seat, and a back. The base supports the chair on a surface such that the seat and the back are supported by the base. The back includes a first upright, a second upright, a first wing, a second wing, and a back support. The first wing is attached to the first upright and includes a first web portion. The second wing is attached to the second upright and includes a second web portion. The back support is attached to the first upright and the second upright via the first wing and the second wing such that the first web portion extends between the back support and the first upright and the second web portion extends between the back support and the second upright.
  • Some embodiments relate to a method of making a chair back. The method includes: forming a back support that is substantially flexible and has a first side portion and a second side portion; forming at least one flex wing that has a front portion positioned at the first side portion of the back support, a back portion, and a web portion interconnecting the front portion and the back portion; and securing the back portion to a first frame side of an upright frame that is substantially rigid, such that the first flex wing flexes in response to force applied to the back support by the user.
  • While multiple embodiments are disclosed, still other embodiments within the inventive scope of the disclosure will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following drawings and detailed description, which shows and describes illustrative embodiments. Accordingly, the drawings and detailed description are to be regarded as illustrative in nature and not restrictive.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view of a chair, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 2 is a diagram illustrating a side view of the chair of FIG. 1, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating a back view of the chair of FIG. 1, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating a rear perspective view of a back, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating a rear exploded view of the back of FIG. 4, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating a rear top perspective view of the back of FIG. 4, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating a top view of the back of FIG. 4, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 8 is a cross-section diagram illustrating the back of FIG. 4 taken along the line 8-8 in FIG. 3, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 9 is an enlarged diagram illustrating one side of the back of FIG. 8, according to some embodiments.
  • FIGS. 10A-10D are diagrams illustrating the flexing action of the first and second flex wings, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 11 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view from the back of a chair including a lumbar member, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 12 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view of the back of FIG. 4 including a lumbar member, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 13 is a diagram illustrating a cross-section view taken along the line 13-13 in FIG. 12, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 14 is a diagram illustrating an enlarged view of one side of the back of FIG. 13, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 15 is a diagram illustrating an enlarged cross-section view of one side of a back that includes a Y-shaped flex wing, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 16 is a diagram illustrating one side of a back that includes a lumbar member slidably engaged with a flex wing, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 17 is a diagram illustrating one side of a back that includes a lumbar member slidably engaged with an upright frame, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 18 is a diagram illustrating an exploded view of a back that includes a U-shaped upright frame and Z-shaped first and second flex wings, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 19 is an enlarged diagram illustrating a cross-section of one side of the assembled back of FIG. 18, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 20 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view of a back including a lumbar member, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 21 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view of a back including a pair of lumbar members, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 22 is a flow chart diagram illustrating a method of making a chair back, according to some embodiments.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIGS. 1-3 are diagrams illustrating a chair 40, according to some embodiments described in the disclosure. FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view of the chair 40, according to some embodiments. FIG. 2 is a diagram illustrating a side view of the chair 40, according to some embodiments. FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating a back view of the chair 40, according to some embodiments. The other side of the chair 40 is, optionally, a mirror image of the side shown in FIG. 2, but otherwise substantially similar, such that the other side can be described with reference to the side shown in FIG. 2.
  • The chair 40 includes a base 42, a hub 44, a seat 46, a back 48, and armrests 50 a and 50 b. The base 42 supports the chair 40, including the hub 44, the seat 46, and the back 48, on a surface, such as the floor of an office building. The hub 44 is connected to the base 42, and the seat 46 and the back 48 are connected to and supported by the hub 44. In some embodiments, the armrests 50 a and 50 b are attached to the back 48. In some embodiments, the armrests 50 a and 50 b are attached to the hub 44. In some embodiments, the chair 40 does not include the armrests 50 a and 50 b.
  • The base 42 includes leg supports 52 a-52 e that support the chair 40 on the surface. Each of the leg supports 52 a-52 e includes a corresponding wheel 54 a-54 e for rolling the chair 40 on the surface. In some embodiments, the base 42 includes fewer than five leg supports 52 a-52 e. In some embodiments, the base 42 includes more than five leg supports 52 a-52 e. In some embodiments, each of the leg supports 52 a-52 e includes a corresponding foot, such that the chair 40 does not roll.
  • In some embodiments, the hub 44 is rotatably connected to the base 42, such that the seat 46 and the back 48 swivel on the base 42 via the rotating hub 44. In some embodiments, the hub 44 includes a lever arm 56 for adjusting the seat height or other adjustable aspects of the chair 40. In some embodiments, the hub 44 includes a weight activated control mechanism for raising and lowering the seat 46 in response to the user leaning or applying weight, or force, to the back 48.
  • The seat 46 supports the body of the user and the armrests 50 a and 50 b support the arms of the user. In some embodiments, each of the armrests 50 a and 50 b swivels to move with an arm of the user. In some embodiments, the height of each of the armrests 50 a and 50 b is adjustable to accommodate users of different sizes.
  • The back 48 supports the back of the user and flexes or bends to accommodate movements of the user. The back 48 includes an upright frame 58, first and second flexible (flex) wings 60 and 62, and a back support 64.
  • The upright frame 58 is supported by the base 42. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is secured to the base 42. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is secured to the hub 44.
  • The upright frame 58 includes a first frame side 58 a and a second frame side 58 b. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is U-shaped, with one arm of the U-shaped frame at the first frame side 58 a and the other, opposite arm at the second frame side 58 b. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is Y-shaped, with one arm of the Y-shaped frame at the first frame side 58 a and the other, opposite arm at the second frame side 58 b. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is H-shaped, with one arm of the H-shaped frame at the first frame side 58 a and the other, opposite arm at the second frame side 58 b and an interconnecting member (not shown) extending between the first and second frame sides 58 a, 58 b. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is a closed loop frame, such as a rectangular, circular, or oval shaped frame. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is a shell, such as a solid shell or a rigid shell, which extends from the first frame side 58 a to the second frame side 58 b.
  • As shown, the back support 64 is attached to the upright frame 58 at the first frame side 58 a and the second frame side 58 b via the first and second flex wings 60 and 62. The first flex wing 60 is situated between the first frame side 58 a and the back support 64 and the second flex wing 62 is situated between the second frame side 58 b and the back support 64.
  • FIGS. 4-7 are diagrams illustrating the back 48 of the chair 40, according to some embodiments. FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating a rear perspective view of the back 48, according to some embodiments. FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating a rear exploded view of the back 48, according to some embodiments. FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating a rear top perspective view of the back 48, according to some embodiments. FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating a top view of the back 48, according to some embodiments. As shown, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 secure the back support 64 to the upright frame 58 and flex in response to application of a back force by the a user.
  • In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 that is illustrated in FIGS. 4-7 is substantially rigid and includes a first back upright 66, a second back upright 68, a bottom transverse member 70, and a top transverse member 72. A shown, the upright frame 58 is a closed loop frame that is substantially rectangular, where the first back upright 66 is substantially rigid and situated at the first frame side 58 a and the second back upright 68 is substantially rigid and situated at the second frame side 58 b. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is formed from cast aluminum. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 is formed from molded plastic.
  • In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 includes the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, and the bottom transverse member 70, but not the top transverse member 72, to form a U-shaped upright frame 58. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 includes the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68 to form an H-shaped upright frame 58. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 includes the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68 secured directly to the hub 44 or directly to the base 42. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 includes the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68 positioned at an angle from the center line 74 of the back 48 to provide a Y-shaped upright frame 58. In some embodiments, each of the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68 includes a lumbar support adjustment track for receiving an adjustable lumbar support.
  • In the upright frame 58 that is illustrated in FIGS. 4-7, the bottom transverse member 70 is substantially rigid and secured to the hub 44, which secures the upright frame 58 to the hub 44. The bottom transverse member 70 includes first and second corner portions 76 and 78 and a bottom portion 80 that includes back frame inserts 80 a-80 d (shown in FIG. 7). The bottom transverse member 70 is secured to the hub 44 by inserting and securing the back frame inserts 80 a-80 d in the hub 44. In some embodiments, each of the corner portions 76 and 78 includes an arm receiving opening, such as arm receiving opening 82, for engaging and securing the armrests 50 a and 50 b to the upright frame 58.
  • The first back upright 66 is attached to the second back upright 68 by the bottom transverse member 70, such that the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, and the bottom transverse member 70 form a U-shaped support. The first back upright 66 is secured to the first corner portion 76 and the second back upright 68 is secured to the second corner portion 78. In some embodiments, the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, and the bottom transverse member 70 are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, and the bottom transverse member 70 are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, and the bottom transverse member 70 are molded as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, and the bottom transverse member 70 are separate pieces that are secured together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with each other.
  • The top transverse member 72 is substantially rigid and secured to the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68. Where, the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, the bottom transverse member 70, and the top transverse member 72 form the closed loop upright frame 58. In some embodiments, the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, the bottom transverse member 70, and the top transverse member 72 are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, the bottom transverse member 70, and the top transverse member 72 are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, the bottom transverse member 70, and the top transverse member 72 are molded as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, two or more of the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, the bottom transverse member 70, and the top transverse member 72 are separate pieces that are secured together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with each other.
  • The back support 64 is substantially flexible and has an outer region 84 and a central region 86. The outer region 84 includes a first side portion 88 and a second side portion 90. In some embodiments, the back support 64 is integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the back support 64 includes separate pieces that are secured together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with each other. In some embodiments, the back support 64 is formed of a flexible material, such as a thermoplastic. In some embodiments, the back support 64 is formed of a flexible material, including a thermoplastic elastomer. In some embodiments, the back support 64 is formed of a molded plastic that flexes under the weight of the user. In some embodiments, the back support 64 is formed of a molded thermoplastic.
  • The outer region 84 defines a perimeter ring 92 and the central region 86 defines a plurality of apertures arranged in a grid pattern that, optionally, increases the flexibility of the back support 64 in the central region 86. The perimeter ring 92 includes the first side portion 88 and the second side portion 90. In some embodiments, the central region 86 includes a mesh material for supporting the user, where the mesh material is attached to the perimeter ring 92. In some embodiments, the back support 64 includes a knit upholstery for supporting the user, where the knit upholstery is attached to the perimeter ring 92. In some embodiments, the back support 64 includes a molded plastic ring carrier at the perimeter ring 92 and a mesh is secured to the molded plastic ring carrier.
  • The first and second flex wings 60 and 62 secure the back support 64 to the upright frame 58. The first flex wing 60 is attached to or part of the first side portion 88 of the back support 64, and the second flex wing 62 is attached to or part of the second side portion 90 of the back support 64. The first flex wing 60 includes first notches 94 defined along the length L1 of the first flex wing 60 and the second flex wing 62 includes second notches 96 defined along the length L2 of the second flex wing 62. The flexibility of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 can be adjusted based on the number of first and second notches 94 and 96 per unit length. Also, the flexibility of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 can be adjusted based on the thickness of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62. In some embodiments, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 and the back support 64 are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 and the back support 64 are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 and the back support 64 are molded as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 are separate pieces attached to the back support 64, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with the back support 64.
  • FIG. 8 is a cross-section diagram illustrating the back 48 taken along the line 8-8 in FIG. 3, according to some embodiments, and FIG. 9 is an enlarged diagram illustrating one side of the back 48 as indicated in FIG. 8, according to some embodiments. The back 48 includes the upright frame 58, including the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, and the bottom transverse member 70; the back support 64, including the outer region 84, the first side portion 88, the second side portion 90, and the central region 86; and the first and second flex wings 60 and 62.
  • The first and second flex wings 60 and 62 are each Y-shaped or, alternatively, lambda-shaped resilient pieces that flex during user engagement with the back support 64. The first flex wing 60 includes a first front portion 60 a, a first web portion 60 b, and a first back portion 60 c. The second flex wing 62 includes a second front portion 62 a, a second web portion 62 b, and a second back portion 62 c. In some embodiments, the first front portion 60 a, the first web portion 60 b, and the first back portion 60 c are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the second front portion 62 a, the second web portion 62 b, and the second back portion 62 c are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first front portion 60 a, the first web portion 60 b, and the first back portion 60 c are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the second front portion 62 a, the second web portion 62 b, and the second back portion 62 c are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the first front portion 60 a, the first web portion 60 b, and the first back portion 60 c are formed of a resilient flexible material, such as a molded plastic. In some embodiments, the second front portion 62 a, the second web portion 62 b, and the second back portion 62 c are formed of a resilient flexible material, such as a molded plastic. In some embodiments, two or more of the first front portion 60 a, the first web portion 60 b, and the first back portion 60 c are separate pieces attached together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement. In some embodiments, two or more of the second front portion 62 a, the second web portion 62 b, and the second back portion 62 c are separate pieces attached together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement.
  • The first and second flex wings 60 and 62 secure the back support 64 to the upright frame 58. The first front portion 60 a of the first flex wing 60 is attached to or part of the first side portion 88 of the back support 64, and the second front portion 62 a of the second flex wing 62 is attached to or part of the second side portion 90 of the back support 64. Also, the first back portion 60 c is inserted and secured in a first receiving channel 66 a of the first back upright 66 to secure the first flex wing 60 to the first back upright 66, and the second back portion 62 c is inserted and secured in a second receiving channel 68 a of the second back upright 68 to secure the second flex wing 62 to the second back upright 68.
  • The first and second flex wings 60 and 62 flex in response to the weight of a user. The first flex wing 60 includes a first flex region 98 defined by the first front portion 60 a and the first web portion 60 b and a second flex region 100 defined by the first web portion 60 b and the first back portion 60 c. The second flex wing 62 includes a third flex region 102 defined by the second front portion 62 a and the second web portion 62 b, and a fourth flex region 104 defined by the second web portion 62 b and the second back portion 62 c. In some embodiments, the first and second web portions 60 b and 62 b extend away from the first and second front portions 60 a and 62 a, respectively, at an acute angle. In some embodiments, the first and second web portions 60 b and 62 b extend away from the first and second front portions 60 a and 62 a, respectively, at an angle in the range of 20-80 degrees. In some embodiments, the first and second web portions 60 b and 62 b extend away from the first and second back portions 60 c and 62 c, respectively, at an obtuse angle. In other embodiments, the first and second web portions 60 b and 62 b extend away from the first and second back portions 60 c and 62 c, respectively, at an acute angle.
  • FIGS. 10A-10D are diagrams illustrating the flexing action of the first and second flex wings 60 and 02, according to some embodiments. The first and second flex wings 60 and 62 flex in response to a user leaning back in the chair 40 and applying weight to the back support 64. As shown in FIG. 10B, as the back support 64 bows under user weight, indicated by arrows at 106, the front portions 60 a and 62 a flex inwardly, indicated by arrows at 108 a and 108 b, toward the web portions 60 b and 62 b and about the first flex region 98 and the third flex region 102. Also, edges of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 move toward the center line 74 of the back 48, indicated by arrows 110 a and 110 b. In some embodiments, a concentrated center load flexes the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 such that the back support 64 embraces the user.
  • As shown in FIG. 10C, as the user further leans back in the chair 40 and applies more weight, the user's weight, indicated by the arrows at 106, is spread across the back support 64 and the back support 64 further bows under the user's weight. The web portions 60 b and 62 b flex inwardly, indicated by arrows at 112 a and 112 b, toward the center line 74 of the back support 64 and about the second flex region 100 and the fourth flex region 104. Also, the edges of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 move further toward the center line 74 of the back 48, indicated by the arrows 110 a and 110 b in FIG. 10C.
  • As shown in FIG. 10D, as more of the user's weight is spread over a wider area of the back support 64, indicated by the arrows at 106, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 flatten out, such that the front portions 60 a and 62 a flex or fold toward the web portions 60 b and 62 b and the web portions 60 b and 62 b flex or fold toward the first and second back uprights 66 and 68, indicated by arrows at 114 a and 114 b. Also, the edges of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 move away from the center line 74 of the back 48 to create more support in the middle of the back support 64. In some embodiments, the front portions 60 a and 60 b flex or fold against the web portions 60 b and 62 b to arrest further deformation of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62. In some embodiments, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 experience flexing at the flex regions 98, 100, 102, and 104 and deformation throughout the web portions 60 b and 62 b. In some embodiments, the flex regions 98, 100, 102, and 104 are reinforced against deformation such that the web portions 60 b and 62 b deform more than the flex regions 98, 100, 102, and 104 or substantially all of the deformation is in the web portions 60 b and 62 b.
  • FIG. 11 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view from the back of a chair 150 including a lumbar member 152, according to some embodiments. The chair 150 is similar to the chair 40, with the exception that the chair 150 includes the lumbar member 152.
  • The chair 150 includes the same or similar components as the chair 40 such that like numerals point to like components and the description above of the chair 40 applies to the components of the chair 150. For reference, the chair 150 includes the base 42, the hub 44, the seat 46, the back 48, and the armrests 50 a and 50 b, where the base 42 supports the chair 150, including the hub 44, the seat 46, and the back 48, on the surface. Also, the base 42 includes the leg supports 52 a-52 e, where each of the leg supports 52 a-52 e includes the corresponding wheel 54 a-54 e for rolling the chair 40 on the surface. The seat 46 supports the body of the user and the armrests 50 a and 50 b support the arms of the user.
  • The back 48 supports the back of the user and flexes or bends to accommodate movements of the user. The back 48 includes the upright frame 58, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62, and the back support 64. The upright frame 58 is supported by the base 42 and includes the first frame side 58 a and the second frame side 58 b. The back support 64 is attached to the upright frame 58 at the first frame side 58 a and the second frame side 58 b via the first and second flex wings 60 and 62. The first flex wing 60 is situated between the first frame side 58 a and the back support 64 and the second flex wing 62 is situated between the second frame side 58 b and the back support 64.
  • The lumbar member 152 provides localized support to the back support 64, such as in the lower back region of the user. The lumbar member 152 is slidably engaged between the first frame side 58 a and the second frame side 58 b to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 48. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 152 includes a pad to engage the back support 64 and provide forward pressure on the back support 64 to further support the back of the user.
  • FIG. 12 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view of the back 48 including the lumbar member 152, according to some embodiments. The back 48 includes the upright frame 58, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62, and the back support 64. In some embodiments, the upright frame 58 includes the first back upright 66, the second back upright 68, the bottom transverse member 70, and the top transverse member 72.
  • The lumbar member 152 is slidably engaged between the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68 to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 48. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 152 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 152 is slidably engaged with the first flex wing 60 and the second flex wing 62.
  • FIGS. 13 and 14 are diagrams illustrating the lumbar member 152 slidably engaged with the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68. FIG. 13 is a diagram illustrating a cross-section view taken along the line 13-13 in FIG. 12, according to some embodiments. FIG. 14 is a diagram illustrating an enlarged view of one side of the back 48, as indicated in FIG. 13, according to some embodiments. The lumbar member 152 includes a first end 154, a second end 156, and a central support region 158. In some embodiments, the central support region 158 includes a first cross-member 160 and a second cross-member 162 that is substantially perpendicular to the first cross-member 160, as shown in FIG. 12.
  • In some embodiments, the first end 154, the second end 156, and the central support region 158, including the first cross-member 160 and the second cross-member 162, are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first end 154, the second end 156, and the central support region 158, including the first cross-member 160 and the second cross-member 162, are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the first end 154, the second end 156, and the central support region 158, including the first cross-member 160 and the second cross-member 162, are formed of a resilient flexible material, such as a molded plastic. In some embodiments, two or more of the first end 154, the second end 156, the first cross-member 160, and the second cross-member 162 are separate pieces attached together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement.
  • The first back upright 66 includes a first lumbar track 66 b for receiving the first end 154 of the lumbar member 152 and the second back upright 68 includes a second lumbar track 68 b for receiving the second end 156 of the lumbar member 152. The first end 154 is inserted in and slidably engaged in the first lumbar track 66 b and the second end 156 is inserted in and slidably engaged in the second lumbar track 68 b. The lumbar member 152 extends between the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68 to provide local resistance to compression of the first flex wing 60 and the second flex wing 62, and the lumbar member 152 slides vertically upward and downward to locally adjust support along the back 48. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 152 further includes a pad to engage the back support 64 and provide forward pressure on the back support 64.
  • In some embodiments, the first flex wing 60 includes a first lumbar track for receiving the first end 154 of the lumbar member 152 and the second flex wing 62 includes a second lumbar track for receiving the second end 156 of the lumbar member 152. The first end 154 is inserted in and slidably engaged in the first lumbar track of the first flex wing 60 and the second end 156 is inserted in and slidably engaged in the second lumbar track of the second flex wing 62. The lumbar member 152 extends between the first flex wing 60 and the second flex wing 62 to provide local resistance to compression of the first flex wing 60 and the second flex wing 62, and the lumbar member 152 slides vertically upward and downward to locally adjust support along the back 48. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 152 further includes a pad to engage the back support 64 and provide forward pressure on the back support 64.
  • In some embodiments, the lumbar member 152 does not include the central support region 158, such that the lumbar member 152 includes the first end 154 and the second end 156 without the interconnecting central support region 158. In these embodiments, the first end 154 is inserted in and slidably engaged in a first lumbar track in one of the first back upright 66 and the first flex wing 60 to provide local resistance to compression of the first flex wing 60, and the second end 156 is inserted in and slidably engaged in a second lumbar track in one of the second back upright 68 and the second flex wing 62 to provide local resistance to compression of the second flex wing 62.
  • FIG. 15 is a diagram illustrating an enlarged cross-section view of one side of a back 170 that includes an upright frame 172, a back support 174, and a flex wing 176, according to some embodiments. The flex wing 176 is one flex wing of a pair of flex wings similar to the first and second flex wings 60 and 62, with the exception that the flex wing 176 and its pair have different shapes than the first and second flex wings 60 and 62. The flex wing 176 and its pair are mirror images of each other, but otherwise similar, such that they can both be described with reference to the flex wing 176.
  • The flex wing 176 is similar to each of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62, except for the shape, such that the description provided above for the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 applies to the flex wing 176. Also, the back 170 is similar to the back 48, the upright frame 172 is similar to the upright frame 58, and the back support 174 is similar to the back support 64, such that the description provided above for the back 48, the upright frame 58, and the back support 64 applies to the back 170, the upright frame 172, and the back support 174.
  • The flex wing 176 is a Y-shaped or, alternatively, lambda-shaped resilient piece that flexes as user weight is applied to the back support 174. The flex wing 176 includes a front portion 176 a, a web portion 176 b, and a back portion 176 c, where the web portion 176 b is straighter than each of the web portions 60 b and 62 b of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62.
  • The flex wing 176 and its pair secure the back support 174 to the upright frame 172. The front portion 176 a is attached to or part of the back support 174 and the back portion 176 c is inserted in and secured to a receiving channel 172 a of the upright frame 172.
  • The flex wing 176 flexes in response to the weight of a user. The flex wing 176 includes a first flex region 178 defined by the front portion 176 a and the web portion 176 b and a second flex region 180 defined by the web portion 176 b and the back portion 176 c. In some embodiments, the web portion 176 b extends away from the front portion 176 a at an acute angle. In some embodiments, the web portion 176 b extends away from the front portion 176 a at an angle in the range of 20-80 degrees. In some embodiments, the web portion 176 b extends away from the back portion 176 c at an obtuse angle. In other embodiments, the web portion 176 b extends away from the back portion 176 c at an acute angle.
  • The flex wing 176 flexes in response to a user leaning back and applying weight to the back support 174. The flex wing 176 flexes similar to the first and second flex wings 60 and 62 as described in reference to FIGS. 10A-10D. Initially, as the back support 174 bows under user weight, the front portion 176 a flexes inwardly, indicated by an arrow at 182, toward the web portion 176 b and about the first flex region 178. Also, the edge 184 of the flex wing 176 moves toward the center of the back 170.
  • Next, as the user further leans back and applies more weight, the user's weight is spread across the back support 174 and the back support 174 bows further under the user's weight. The web portion 176 b flexes inwardly, indicated by the arrow 186, toward the center of the back support 174 and about the second flex region 180. Also, the edge 184 of the flex wing 176 moves further toward the center of the back 170.
  • Next, as more of the user's weight is spread over a wider area of the back support 174, the flex wing 176 flattens out, such that the front portion 176 a flexes or folds toward the web portion 176 b and the web portion 176 b flexes or folds toward the back support 174 and the upright frame 58. Also, the edge 184 of the flex wing 176 moves away from the center of the back 170 to create more support in the middle of the back support 174.
  • FIG. 16 is a diagram illustrating one side of a back 200 that includes a lumbar member 202 slidably engaged with a flex wing 204 to slide vertically upward and downward on the back 200, according to some embodiments. Also, the lumbar member 202 locally limits further compression of the flex wing 204, after the flex wing 204 has been sufficiently flexed. The back 200 includes the lumbar member 202, the flex wing 204, an upright frame 206, and a back support 208.
  • The one side of the back 200 that is shown in FIG. 16 is a mirror image of the other side of the back 200, but otherwise similar, such that they can both be described with reference to the one side of the back 200 shown in FIG. 16. Also, the flex wing 204 is one of a pair of flex wings that are mirror images of each other, but otherwise similar, such that they can both be described with reference to the flex wing 204. In addition, an end 210 of the lumbar member 202 is one of a pair of ends of the lumbar member 202, which are mirror images of each other, but otherwise similar, such that they can both be described with reference to the one end 210.
  • In some embodiments, the back 200 is similar to the back 48, the flex wing 204 is similar to each of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62, the upright frame 206 is similar to the upright frame 58, and the back support 208 is similar to the back support 64, such that the description provided above for the back 48, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62, the upright frame 58, and the back support 64 applies to the back 200, the flex wing 204, the upright frame 206, and the back support 208. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 202 is similar to the lumbar member 152.
  • The lumbar member 202 includes the end 210 and a central support region 212. The flex wing 204 includes a front portion 204 a, a web portion 204 b, and a back portion 204 c. In addition, the flex wing 204 includes a lumbar track 214 for receiving the end 210 of the lumbar member 202. The end 210 is inserted in and slidably engaged in the lumbar track 214. The lumbar member 202 slides vertically upward and downward in the lumbar track 214 to locally adjust support along the back 200.
  • In some embodiments, the lumbar member 202 further includes a protrusion 216 that extends from the lumbar member 202 to between the front portion 204 a and the web portion 204 b of the flex wing 204. As the front portion 204 a flexes toward the web portion 204 b, the protrusion 216 interferes with the flexure of the front portion 204 a and the web portion 204 b to limit further compression of the flex wing 204.
  • FIG. 17 is a diagram illustrating one side of a back 240 that includes a lumbar member 242 slidably engaged with an upright frame 244 to slide vertically upward and downward on the back 240, according to some embodiments. The lumbar member 242 locally limits further compression of the flex wings including flex wing 246, after the flex wing 246 has been sufficiently flexed. The back 240 includes the lumbar member 242, the upright frame 244, the flex wing 246, and a back support 248.
  • The one side of the back 240 that is shown in FIG. 17 is a mirror image of the other side of the back 240, but otherwise similar, such that they can both be described with reference to the one side of the back 240 shown in FIG. 17. Also, the flex wing 246 is one of a pair of flex wings that are mirror images of each other, but otherwise similar, such that they can both be described with reference to the flex wing 246. In addition, an end 250 of the lumbar member 242 is one of a pair of ends of the lumbar member 242, which are mirror images of each other, but otherwise similar, such that they can both be described with reference to the end 250.
  • In some embodiments, the back 240 is similar to the back 48, the flex wing 246 is similar to each of the first and second flex wings 60 and 62, the upright frame 244 is similar to the upright frame 58, and the back support 248 is similar to the back support 64, such that the description provided above for the back 48, the first and second flex wings 60 and 62, the upright frame 58, and the back support 64 applies to the back 240, the flex wing 246, the upright frame 244, and the back support 248. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 242 is similar to the lumbar member 152.
  • The lumbar member 242 includes the end 250 and a central support region 252. The flex wing 246 includes a front portion 246 a, a web portion 246 b, and a back portion 246 c. In addition, the upright frame 244 includes a lumbar track 254 for receiving the end 250 of the lumbar member 242. The end 250 is inserted in and slidably engaged in the lumbar track 254 of the upright frame 244. The lumbar member 242 slides vertically upward and downward in the lumbar track 254 to locally adjust support along the back 240.
  • In some embodiments, the lumbar member 242 further includes a protrusion 256 that extends from the lumbar member 242 toward the back support 248. As the front portion 246 a flexes toward the web portion 246 b, the protrusion 256 presses against the back support 248 and limits flexure and further compression of the flex wing 246. In some embodiments, the lumbar track is built into the lumbar member, such as lumbar member 202 and lumbar member 242, and a complementary slide feature is built into one of the flex wings and the upright frame.
  • FIG. 18 is a diagram illustrating an exploded view of a back 300 of a chair that includes a U-shaped upright frame 302 and Z-shaped first and second flex wings 304 and 306, according to some embodiments. The back 300 includes the upright frame 302, the first and second flex wings 304 and 306, and a back support 308. The first and second flex wings 304 and 306 are secured to the upright frame 302 and to the back support 308. The first and second flex wings 304 and 306 secure the back support 308 to the upright frame 302 and flex in response to the weight of a user.
  • The upright frame 302 is substantially rigid and includes a first back upright 310, a second back upright 312, and a bottom transverse member 314. The upright frame 302 is a U-shaped frame, where the first back upright 310 is substantially rigid and situated at the first frame side 302 a and the second back upright 312 is substantially rigid and situated at the second frame side 302 b. In some embodiments, the upright frame 302 is formed from cast aluminum. In some embodiments, the upright frame 302 is formed from molded plastic. In some embodiments, each of the first back upright 310 and the second back upright 312 includes a lumbar member track for receiving an adjustable lumbar member.
  • The bottom transverse member 314 includes first and second corner portions 316 and 318 and a bottom portion 320 that includes frame connectors 320 a and 320 b. In some embodiments, the bottom transverse member 314 is substantially rigid and secured to a hub, such as the hub 44, with the frame connectors 320 a and 320 b, which secures the upright frame 302 to the hub. In some embodiments, each of the first and second corner portions 316 and 318 includes an arm receiving opening, such as arm receiving opening 322, for engaging and securing armrests, such as the armrests 50 a and 50 b, to the upright frame 302.
  • The first back upright 310 is attached to the second back upright 312 by the bottom transverse member 314, such that the first back upright 310, the second back upright 312, and the bottom transverse member 314 form a U-shaped support. The first back upright 310 is secured to the first corner portion 316 and the second back upright 312 is secured to the second corner portion 318. In some embodiments, the first back upright 310, the second back upright 312, and the bottom transverse member 314 are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first back upright 310, the second back upright 312, and the bottom transverse member 314 are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the first back upright 310, the second back upright 312, and the bottom transverse member 314 are molded as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, two or more of the first back upright 310, the second back upright 312, and the bottom transverse member 314 are separate pieces that are secured together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with each other.
  • The back support 308 is substantially flexible and has an outer region 324 and a central region 326. The outer region 324 includes a first side portion 328 and a second side portion 330. In some embodiments, the back support 308 is integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the back support 308 includes separate pieces that are secured together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with each other. In some embodiments, the back support 308 is formed of a flexible material, such as a thermoplastic. In some embodiments, the back support 308 is formed of a flexible material, including a thermoplastic elastomer. In some embodiments, the back support 308 is formed of a molded plastic that flexes under the weight of the user. In some embodiments, the back support 308 is formed of a molded thermoplastic.
  • The outer region 324 defines a perimeter ring 332 and the central region 326 defines a plurality of apertures arranged in a grid pattern that, optionally, increases the flexibility of the back support 308 in the central region 326. The perimeter ring 332 includes the first side portion 328 and the second side portion 330. In some embodiments, the central region 326 includes a mesh material for supporting the user, where the mesh material is attached to the perimeter ring 332. In some embodiments, the back support 308 includes a knit upholstery for supporting the user, where the knit upholstery is attached to the perimeter ring 332. In some embodiments, the back support 308 includes a molded plastic ring carrier at the perimeter ring 332 and a mesh is secured to the molded plastic ring carrier.
  • The first flex wing 304 is attached to or part of the first side portion 328 and the second flex wing 306 is attached to or part of the second side portion 330. The first flex wing 304 includes first notches 334 defined along the length L1 of the first flex wing 304 and the second flex wing 306 includes second notches 336 defined along the length L2 of the second flex wing 306. The flexibility of the first and second flex wings 304 and 306 can be adjusted based on the number of first and second notches 334 and 336 per unit length. Also, the flexibility of the first and second flex wings 304 and 306 can be adjusted based on the thickness T (see FIG. 19) of the first and second flex wings 304 and 306. In some embodiments, the first and second flex wings 304 and 306 and the back support 308 are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments the first and second flex wings 304 and 306 and the back support 308 are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the first and second flex wings 304 and 306 and the back support 308 are molded as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first and second flex wings 304 and 306 are separate pieces attached to the back support 308, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with the back support 308.
  • FIG. 19 is an enlarged diagram illustrating a cross-section of one side of the assembled back 300, according to some embodiments. The cross-section of FIG. 19 is taken along a line that intersects the first and second flex wings 304 and 306. The cross-section enlarged diagram of FIG. 19 is similar to the enlarged diagram illustrating one side of the back 48 of FIG. 9. The one side of the back 300 that is shown in FIG. 19 is a mirror image of the other side of the back 300, but otherwise similar, such that both sides can be described with reference to the side of the back 300 shown in FIG. 19. Also, the first and second flex wings 304 and 306 are mirror images of each other, but otherwise similar, such that they can both be described with reference to one of the flex wings 304.
  • With reference to FIGS. 18 and 19, the first and second flex wings 304 and 306 are each Z-shaped resilient pieces that flex as user weight is applied to the back support 308. The first flex wing 304 includes a first front portion 304 a, a first web portion 304 b, and a first back portion 304 c. The second flex wing 306 includes a second front portion 306 a, a second web portion 306 b, and a second back portion 306 c. In some embodiments, the first front portion 304 a, the first web portion 304 b, and the first back portion 304 c are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the second front portion 306 a, the second web portion 306 b, and the second back portion 306 c are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the first front portion 304 a, the first web portion 304 b, and the first back portion 304 c are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the second front portion 306 a, the second web portion 306 b, and the second back portion 306 c are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the first front portion 304 a, the first web portion 304 b, and the first back portion 304 c are formed of a resilient flexible material, such as a molded plastic. In some embodiments, the second front portion 306 a, the second web portion 306 b, and the second back portion 306 c are formed of a resilient flexible material, such as a molded plastic. In some embodiments, two or more of the first front portion 304 a, the first web portion 304 b, and the first back portion 304 c are separate pieces attached together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement. In some embodiments, two or more of the second front portion 306 a, the second web portion 306 b, and the second back portion 306 c are separate pieces attached together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement.
  • The first and second flex wings 304 and 306 secure the back support 308 to the upright frame 302. The first front portion 304 a of the first flex wing 304 is attached to or part of the first side portion 328 of the back support 308 and the second front portion 306 a of the second flex wing 306 is attached to or part of the second side portion 330 of the back support 308. Also, the first back portion 304 c is secured to the first back upright 310 to secure the first flex wing 304 to the first back upright 310 and the second back portion 306 c is secured to the second back upright 312 to secure the second flex wing 306 to the second back upright 312.
  • With reference to FIG. 19, the first flex wing 304 includes a first flex region 338 defined by the first front portion 304 a and the first web portion 304 b, and a second flex region 340 defined by the first web portion 304 b and the first back portion 304 c. In some embodiments, the first web portion 304 b extends away from the first front portion 304 a at an acute angle. In some embodiments, the first web portion 304 b extends away from the first front portion 304 a at an angle in the range of 20-80 degrees. In some embodiments, the first web portion 304 b extends away from the first back portion 304 c at an acute angle. In some embodiments, the first web portion 304 b extends away from the first back portion 304 c at an obtuse angle.
  • The Z-shaped first and second flex wings 304 and 306 flex in response to the weight of a user similar to the way the Y-shaped first and second flex wings 60 and 62 flex in response to the weight of a user, as described in reference to FIGS. 10A-10D.
  • FIG. 20 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view of a back 350 including a lumbar member 352, according to some embodiments. The back 350 is similar to the back 300, with the exception that the back 350 includes the lumbar member 352. The back 350 includes the same or similar components as the back 300 such that like numerals point to like components and the description above of the components of the back 300 applies to the components of the back 350.
  • For reference, the back 350 includes the U-shaped upright frame 302, the Z-shaped first and second flex wings 304 and 306 and the back support 308. The first and second flex wings 304 and 306 are secured to the upright frame 302 and to the back support 308, which secures the back support 308 to the upright frame 302.
  • The lumbar member 352 provides localized support to the back support 308, such as in the lower back region of the user. The lumbar member 352 is slidably engaged between the first frame side 302 a and the second frame side 302 b to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 350. The lumbar member 352 includes a pad 354 to engage the back support 308 and provide forward pressure on the back support 308 to further support the back of the user.
  • In some embodiments, the lumbar member 352 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 310 and the second back upright 312 to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 350. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 352 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 310 and the second back upright 312 similar to the way that the lumbar member 152 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68 as shown in FIGS. 13 and 14. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 352 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 310 and the second back upright 312 similar to the way that the lumbar member 242 is slidably engaged with the upright frame 244 shown in FIG. 17.
  • In some embodiments, the lumbar member 352 is slidably engaged with the first flex wing 304 and the second flex wing 306 to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 350. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 352 is slidably engaged with the first flex wing 304 and the second flex wing 306 similar to the way that the lumbar member 202 is slidably engaged with the flex wing 204 shown in FIG. 16.
  • FIG. 21 is a diagram illustrating a perspective view of a back 370 including a pair of lumbar members 372 and 374, according to some embodiments. The back 370 is similar to the back 300, with the exception that the back 370 includes the lumbar members 372 and 374. The back 370 includes the same or similar components as the back 300 such that like numerals point to like components and the description above of the components of the back 300 applies to the components of the back 370.
  • For reference, the back 370 includes the U-shaped upright frame 302, the Z-shaped first and second flex wings 304 and 306 and the back support 308. The first and second flex wings 304 and 306 are secured to the upright frame 302 and to the back support 308, which secures the back support 308 to the upright frame 302.
  • The lumbar members 372 and 374 provide localized support to the back support 308, such as in the lower back region of the user. The lumbar member 372 is slidably engaged on the first frame side 302 a to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 370. The lumbar member 374 is slidably engaged on the second frame side 302 b to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 370.
  • In some embodiments, the lumbar member 372 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 310 and the lumbar member 374 is slidably engaged with the second back upright 312, to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 370. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 372 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 310 and the lumbar member 374 is slidably engaged with the second back upright 312 similar to the way that the lumbar member 152 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 66 and the second back upright 68 shown in FIGS. 13 and 14. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 372 is slidably engaged with the first back upright 310 and the lumbar member 374 is slidably engaged with the second back upright 312 similar to the way that the lumbar member 242 is slidably engaged with the upright frame 244 as shown in FIG. 17.
  • In some embodiments, the lumbar member 372 is slidably engaged with the first flex wing 304 and the lumbar member 374 is slidably engaged with the second flex wing 306 to slide vertically upward and downward and locally adjust support along the back 370. In some embodiments, the lumbar member 372 is slidably engaged with the first flex wing 304 and the lumbar member 374 is slidably engaged with the second flex wing 306 similar to the way that the lumbar member 202 is slidably engaged with the flex wing 204 shown in FIG. 16.
  • FIG. 22 is a flow chart diagram illustrating a method of making a chair back, such as any one of the backs 48, 170, 200, 240, 300, 350, and 370, according to some embodiments.
  • At 400, a back support that is substantially flexible and has a first side portion and a second side portion is formed. In some embodiments, the back support is integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the back support is formed of a flexible material, such as a thermoplastic. In some embodiments, the back support is formed of a flexible material, including a thermoplastic elastomer. In some embodiments, the back support is formed of a molded thermoplastic. In some embodiments, the back support is formed of a molded plastic that flexes under the weight of the user. In some embodiments, the back support includes separate pieces that are secured together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with each other.
  • At 402, at least one flex wing is formed, where the flex wing has a front portion that is positioned at the first side portion of the back support. The flex wing also includes a back portion and a web portion interconnecting the front portion and the back portion. Also, in some embodiments, another flex wing has a front portion that is positioned at the second side portion of the back support.
  • In some embodiments, the front portion, the web portion, and the back portion are integrally formed, i.e., as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments, the front portion, the web portion, and the back portion are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the front portion, the web portion, and the back portion are formed of a resilient flexible material, such as a molded plastic. In some embodiments, two or more of the front portion, the web portion, and the back portion are separate pieces attached together, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with each other.
  • Also, in some embodiments, the flex wings and the back support are molded as a single, monolithic piece. In some embodiments the flex wings and the back support are integrally formed in the same manufacturing process step. In some embodiments, the flex wings and the back support are separate pieces attached to the back support, such as with one or more of adhesives, welding, fasteners, and mechanical engagement with the back support.
  • At 404, the back portion of the at least one flex wing is secured to a first frame side of an upright frame that is substantially rigid, such that the flex wing flexes in response to weight applied to the back support. Also, in some embodiments, another back portion of the other flex wing is secured to a second frame side of the upright frame, such that the flex wings flex in response to weight applied to the back support.
  • Various modifications and additions can be made to the exemplary embodiments discussed without departing from the scope of the present invention. For example, while the embodiments described above refer to particular features, the inventive scope also includes embodiments having different combinations of features and embodiments that do not include all of the above described features.

Claims (16)

1-35. (canceled)
36. A chair back comprising:
a back support that includes a perimeter ring and a central region, the central region defining a plurality of openings arranged in a grid pattern;
an upright frame that is substantially rigid and includes a first upright, a second upright, a top transverse member extending between the first and second uprights and a bottom transverse member extending between the first and second uprights, the upright frame defining a close loop that is substantially rectangular with an open central region;
a first flex wing attaching the back support to the first upright, the first flex wing including a plurality of flexible members positioned along a height of the first flex wing, the plurality of flexible members being separated from one another by a plurality of notches extending between the plurality of flexible members; and
a second flex wing attaching the back support to the second upright, the second flex wing including a plurality of flexible members positioned along a height of the second flex wing, the plurality of flexible members being separated from one another by a plurality of notches extending between the plurality of flexible members.
37. The chair back of claim 36, wherein each of the plurality of flexible members of the first and second flex wings defines a substantially lambda-shaped transverse cross-section.
38. The chair back of claim 36, wherein the central region of the back support is viewable through the open, central region of the upright frame.
39. The chair back of claim 36, wherein at least a portion of the back support is covered by upholstery.
40. The chair back of claim 36, wherein a portion of each of the plurality of flexible members of the first flex wing and the second flex wing defines an acute angle with the back support.
41. The chair back of claim 40, wherein the actuate angle is from 20 to 80 degrees.
42. The chair back of claim 36, wherein the first flex wing is configured such that the first flex wing flexes inwardly toward a center of the back support as the back support bows during user engagement.
43. A chair comprising:
a base to support the chair on a surface;
a seat supported by the base; and
a back supported by the base, wherein the back includes:
a frame including a first upright and a second upright;
a first wing attached to the first upright, the first wing including a plurality of notches formed along a height of the first wing;
a second wing attached to the second upright, the second wing including a plurality of notches formed along a height of the second wing; and
a back support attached to the first upright and the second upright via the first wing and the second wing such that the first wing extends between the back support and the first upright and the second wing extends between the back support and the second upright.
44. The chair of claim 43, wherein the back support includes a perimeter ring and a central region that defines a plurality of apertures arranged in a grid pattern.
45. The chair of claim 43, wherein the back support is formed of a molded plastic that flexes during user engagement.
46. The chair of claim 43, wherein the back support is formed of a molded thermoplastic.
47. The chair of claim 43, wherein the back support includes a molded plastic ring carrier and a mesh secured to the molded plastic ring carrier.
48. The chair of claim 43, wherein the back support is at least partially covered with a knit upholstery.
49. The chair back of claim 43, wherein a central region of the back support is viewable through an open, central region of the frame.
50. A method of making a chair back comprising:
forming a back support that is substantially flexible and has a first side portion and a second side portion;
forming a first flex wing that has a plurality of flex members separated by a plurality of notches extending between the flex members; and
securing the back portion to a first frame side of an upright frame that is substantially rigid, such that the first flex wing flexes in response to user force applied to the back support.
US15/087,103 2013-03-15 2016-03-31 Chair with activated back flex Active 2034-12-15 US10172465B2 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201361793272P true 2013-03-15 2013-03-15
US14/212,772 US9332851B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-03-14 Chair with activated back flex
US15/087,103 US10172465B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-03-31 Chair with activated back flex

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15/087,103 US10172465B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-03-31 Chair with activated back flex
US16/210,232 US20190216224A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-12-05 Chair with activated back flex

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/212,772 Continuation US9332851B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-03-14 Chair with activated back flex

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US16/210,232 Continuation US20190216224A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-12-05 Chair with activated back flex

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20160353896A1 true US20160353896A1 (en) 2016-12-08
US10172465B2 US10172465B2 (en) 2019-01-08

Family

ID=50678296

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/212,772 Active - Reinstated 2034-09-06 US9332851B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-03-14 Chair with activated back flex
US15/087,103 Active 2034-12-15 US10172465B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-03-31 Chair with activated back flex
US16/210,232 Pending US20190216224A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-12-05 Chair with activated back flex

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/212,772 Active - Reinstated 2034-09-06 US9332851B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-03-14 Chair with activated back flex

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US16/210,232 Pending US20190216224A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-12-05 Chair with activated back flex

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (3) US9332851B2 (en)
CN (1) CN105101845B (en)
CA (1) CA2906736A1 (en)
HK (1) HK1214743A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2014144143A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN101801241B (en) 2007-03-13 2013-06-05 Hni技术公司 Dynamic chair back lumbar support system
DE102011104972B4 (en) 2011-06-08 2015-03-05 Haworth, Inc. Seating furniture, in particular office chair
WO2014144143A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Hni Technologies Inc. Chair with activated back flex
WO2014196630A1 (en) * 2013-06-06 2014-12-11 株式会社イトーキ Chair
JP2016538173A (en) * 2013-10-07 2016-12-08 ジョンソン コントロールズ テクノロジー カンパニー Seat structure
USD731833S1 (en) 2014-04-17 2015-06-16 Allsteel Inc. Chair
US10064493B2 (en) 2014-04-17 2018-09-04 Hni Technologies Inc. Flex lumbar support
US9173492B1 (en) * 2014-06-06 2015-11-03 Jacques Fortin Self-reclining chair
USD743180S1 (en) 2014-10-15 2015-11-17 Hni Technologies Inc. Chair
US9801470B2 (en) 2014-10-15 2017-10-31 Hni Technologies Inc. Molded chair with integrated support and method of making same
US20160360892A1 (en) * 2015-06-12 2016-12-15 Gary Neil Adjustable lumbar support for a chair back
ITUB20154093A1 (en) * 2015-10-02 2017-04-02 Pro Cord Spa Chair with oscillating backrest
USD846928S1 (en) * 2016-01-12 2019-04-30 Interstuhl Bueromoebel Gmbh & Co. Kg Chair
USD815868S1 (en) * 2016-02-02 2018-04-24 Office Master Inc. Office chair
US10182657B2 (en) * 2016-02-12 2019-01-22 Haworth, Inc. Back support for a chair
USD779252S1 (en) * 2016-02-12 2017-02-21 Haworth, Inc. Back support for a chair
USD779253S1 (en) * 2016-02-12 2017-02-21 Haworth, Inc. Back support for a chair
DE102016102557A1 (en) 2016-02-15 2017-08-17 Interstuhl Büromöbel GmbH & Co. KG Seating furniture with a backrest stop
DE102016102556A1 (en) * 2016-02-15 2017-08-17 Interstuhl Büromöbel GmbH & Co. KG Backrest for an office chair
USD799876S1 (en) * 2016-03-01 2017-10-17 Oasyschair Co., Ltd. Backrest for a chair
US9713385B1 (en) * 2016-03-16 2017-07-25 Oasyschair Co., Ltd. Lower-back supporting device of chair
US10463153B2 (en) 2016-06-09 2019-11-05 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement
USD807658S1 (en) * 2016-08-31 2018-01-16 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Seat for a motor vehicle
US10219627B2 (en) * 2016-09-29 2019-03-05 Steelcase Inc. Compliant seating structure
USD846294S1 (en) 2017-05-25 2019-04-23 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement
USD851418S1 (en) 2017-05-25 2019-06-18 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement
USD829033S1 (en) 2017-05-25 2018-09-25 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement arm structure
USD851952S1 (en) 2017-05-25 2019-06-25 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement
USD852525S1 (en) 2017-05-25 2019-07-02 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement
USD852524S1 (en) 2017-05-25 2019-07-02 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement
USD852526S1 (en) 2017-05-25 2019-07-02 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement
USD851417S1 (en) 2017-05-25 2019-06-18 Steelcase Inc. Seating arrangement
USD823017S1 (en) * 2017-07-21 2018-07-17 Homy Casa Limited Chair
USD869889S1 (en) 2017-12-05 2019-12-17 Steelcase Inc. Chairback
USD869890S1 (en) 2017-12-05 2019-12-17 Steelcase Inc. Chairback
USD870479S1 (en) 2017-12-05 2019-12-24 Steelcase Inc. Chair
USD869872S1 (en) 2017-12-05 2019-12-17 Steelcase Inc. Chair
DE102018123731A1 (en) * 2018-09-26 2020-03-26 Figueroa Büro für Gestaltung GmbH Backrest and seating
USD879491S1 (en) * 2018-11-15 2020-03-31 Zhejiang Henglin Chair Industry Co., Ltd. Chair

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6305750B1 (en) * 1999-05-12 2001-10-23 Meco Corporation Clamshell backrest components
US7063384B2 (en) * 2004-01-09 2006-06-20 Huang Chang Liu Flexible chair back
US8567864B2 (en) * 2011-08-12 2013-10-29 Hni Corporation Flexible back support member with integrated recline stop notches
US20140077548A1 (en) * 2012-09-20 2014-03-20 Steelcase Inc. Chair assembly with upholstery covering

Family Cites Families (236)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US186462A (en) 1877-01-23 Improvement in revolving chairs
US909751A (en) 1908-09-11 1909-01-12 Robert W Butcher Revolving and sliding chair.
US1290532A (en) 1918-06-20 1919-01-07 Frank F Fischer Opera-chair.
US1376382A (en) * 1920-12-27 1921-04-26 Int Motor Co Cushioned seat
US2312030A (en) 1939-05-22 1943-02-23 Roy A Cramer Locking sliding seat
US2471024A (en) 1946-10-04 1949-05-24 Roy A Cramer Chair with tilting back and automatically shiftable seat
US2796920A (en) 1955-02-01 1957-06-25 Gen Tire & Rubber Co Chair back support
US3102753A (en) 1960-08-04 1963-09-03 Anton Lorenz Multiple position reclining chair with extendible head-rest
DE1429266B2 (en) 1964-07-14 1972-07-20 Backrest for chair, in particular for vehicle seats
US3453024A (en) 1967-11-06 1969-07-01 Stewart Warner Corp Single action chair control
US3565482A (en) * 1968-06-24 1971-02-23 Leif Blodee Adjustable contour chair
US4014507A (en) 1976-01-12 1977-03-29 Milsco Manufacturing Company Seat supporting assembly
US4155592A (en) 1977-08-07 1979-05-22 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Seat back with adjustable lumbar supporter
USD255184S (en) 1977-07-15 1980-06-03 Giroflex-Entwicklungs-Ag Chair or similar article
US4168050A (en) 1977-08-31 1979-09-18 Winnebago Industries, Inc. Tiltable swivel seat
US4166469A (en) 1977-12-13 1979-09-04 Littleford Philip O Apparatus and method for inserting an electrode
US4429917A (en) 1981-04-29 1984-02-07 Hauserman Inc. Int. Furniture & Textile Division Chair
DE3152945C1 (en) 1981-08-19 1987-06-19 Giroflex Entwicklungs Ag Chair with swivel seat and backrest that can be swiveled relative to it
DE3306994A1 (en) 1983-02-28 1984-08-30 Rentrop Hubbert & Wagner Seat, in particular motor vehicle seat
DE8401000U1 (en) 1984-01-14 1984-04-05 Mauser Waldeck Ag, 3544 Waldeck, De Swivel chair
IT1191383B (en) 1986-02-21 1988-03-23 Co Fe Mo Spa Chair with seat and backrest having synchronized variable inclination
DE3617624A1 (en) 1986-05-26 1987-12-03 Drabert Soehne Chair
DE3632131C2 (en) 1986-06-04 2001-12-13 Hartmut S Engel Functional seating
DE3622272C2 (en) 1986-07-03 1988-06-01 Dr.Ing.H.C. F. Porsche Ag, 7000 Stuttgart, De
DE3700447A1 (en) 1987-01-09 1988-07-21 Vogt Bueromoebel Seat furniture
US4744370A (en) 1987-04-27 1988-05-17 Cordis Leads, Inc. Lead assembly with selectable electrode connection
IT1210753B (en) 1987-05-20 1989-09-20 Pro Cord Srl A pivoting support for chairs seats and the like
DE3741472C2 (en) 1987-12-08 1991-07-04 Simon 4830 Guetersloh De Desanta
US5110182A (en) 1988-10-21 1992-05-05 Life Force Associates, L.P. Portable seat
DE3841532C2 (en) * 1988-12-09 1991-04-18 Bayer Ag, 5090 Leverkusen, De
DE3916474C2 (en) 1989-05-20 1992-02-13 Roeder Gmbh Sitzmoebelwerke, 6000 Frankfurt, De
DE3930983C2 (en) 1989-09-16 1993-09-30 Rolf Voelkle Seating with an adjustable seat
JP2978244B2 (en) 1989-12-29 1999-11-15 ヴィルカーン ヴィルケニング ウント ハーネゲーエムベーハー ウント コンパニー Synchronous position adjustment device for office chair
KR0182297B1 (en) 1990-04-10 1999-05-01 오웬 페리 찰즈 Flexible chair
JP2976059B2 (en) 1991-02-08 1999-11-10 住友化学工業株式会社 Manufacturing method of hollow molded products
AT142857T (en) 1991-05-24 1996-10-15 Equus Marketing Ag Work chair, especially office chair
US5507559A (en) 1991-09-24 1996-04-16 Hendersons Industries Pty. Ltd. Adjustable and releasably connectable lumbar support assembly
DE4135603A1 (en) 1991-10-29 1992-05-21 Harald Jaeger Triangular chair leg slide piece - incorporates pin fixed at angle on one side, with non-twist arm
AT398160B (en) 1992-06-10 1994-10-25 Froschauer Hedwig Work armchairs, in particular office armchairs
CA2319881C (en) 1992-06-15 2001-10-30 Herman Miller, Inc. Office chair
AU668427B2 (en) 1992-10-12 1996-05-02 Henderson's Industries Pty Ltd Adjustable lumbar support
JP2596820Y2 (en) 1993-07-27 1999-06-21 メーコー工業株式会社 Chair
DE4421597A1 (en) 1994-06-21 1996-01-04 Link Wilhelm Kg Chair, especially office chair
AUPM694194A0 (en) 1994-07-20 1994-08-11 Henderson's Industries Pty Ltd Lumbar support adjustment
US5486035A (en) 1994-08-01 1996-01-23 Koepke; Marcus C. Occupant weight operated chair
DE4437394C2 (en) 1994-10-19 1997-11-27 Mauser Office Gmbh Upholstered seating, in particular a chair with a padded backrest
US5538326A (en) 1994-11-14 1996-07-23 Milsco Manufacturing Company Flexible unitary seat shell
GB9500022D0 (en) 1995-01-04 1995-03-01 Unwalla Jamshed Integrated seat and back and mechanism for chairs
DE29507658U1 (en) 1995-05-12 1996-02-22 Froli Kunststoffe Heinrich Fro Device for adjusting a seat and / or back shell
US5826940A (en) 1995-11-27 1998-10-27 Hodgdon; Dewey Reactive multi-position chair
US5649740A (en) 1995-11-27 1997-07-22 Hodgdon; Dewey Chair tilt control mechanism
US5775774A (en) 1996-08-12 1998-07-07 Okano; Hiroshi Tilt mechanism for chairs
AUPO213496A0 (en) 1996-09-05 1996-09-26 Henderson's Industries Pty Ltd Adjustable lumbar support
US5755488A (en) 1997-03-06 1998-05-26 Steelcase Inc. Chair with adjustable seat
US5931861A (en) 1997-04-25 1999-08-03 Medtronic, Inc. Medical lead adaptor having rotatable locking clip mechanism
US5909924A (en) 1997-04-30 1999-06-08 Haworth, Inc. Tilt control for chair
US5934758A (en) 1997-04-30 1999-08-10 Haworth, Inc. Membrane chair
DE29711329U1 (en) 1997-06-19 1997-08-28 Opsvik Peter As Arrangement on a tilting chair
US5871258A (en) 1997-10-24 1999-02-16 Steelcase Inc. Chair with novel seat construction
US6250715B1 (en) 1998-01-21 2001-06-26 Herman Miller, Inc. Chair
US6030037A (en) 1998-05-15 2000-02-29 Steelcase Inc. Horizontally nestable chair
EP0970639A1 (en) 1998-07-07 2000-01-12 Provenda Marketing Ag Adjustable lumbar support
US6176548B1 (en) 1998-10-23 2001-01-23 Haworth, Inc. Tilt mechanism for chair having adjustable spring characteristics
US6709058B1 (en) 1999-04-09 2004-03-23 Humanscale Corp. Ergonomic chair
US6296309B1 (en) 1999-06-04 2001-10-02 Hon Technology Inc. Chair construction
EP1191863A4 (en) 1999-06-17 2004-06-09 Steelcase Inc Chair construction
DE19927691A1 (en) 1999-06-17 2000-12-28 Koenig & Neurath Ag Office chair comprises support, seat and back section which can be pivoted to inclined position, back being mounted on pivot near middle of chair and second pivot nearer rear, first pivot being on same level as, or higher than, second
FR2796896B1 (en) 1999-07-30 2001-10-05 Faure Bertrand Equipements Sa Variable configuration seat for motor vehicle
US7013182B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2006-03-14 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Conductive polymer sheath on defibrillator shocking coils
IT1320421B1 (en) 2000-06-09 2003-11-26 Pro Cord Srl Chair with seat and backrest oscillating in a synchronized manner.
AU783829B2 (en) 2000-09-28 2005-12-08 Formway Furniture Limited A reclinable chair
JP2002119366A (en) 2000-10-16 2002-04-23 Kokuyo Co Ltd Chair
CN100353889C (en) 2000-10-16 2007-12-12 科库友株式会社 Chair
JP4674952B2 (en) 2000-10-16 2011-04-20 コクヨ株式会社 Chair
JP4477766B2 (en) 2000-10-30 2010-06-09 株式会社岡村製作所 Chair backboard
US6854994B2 (en) 2001-04-19 2005-02-15 Medtronic, Inc. Medical electrical lead connector arrangement including anti-rotation means
DE10109624C1 (en) 2001-02-28 2002-09-12 Interstuhl Bueromoebel Gmbh Chair, especially office chair
DE10122945A1 (en) 2001-05-11 2002-12-12 Armin Sander Chair, especially office chair
DE10122948C1 (en) 2001-05-11 2003-03-13 Armin Sander Chair, especially office chair
US7674245B2 (en) 2001-06-07 2010-03-09 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Method and apparatus for an adjustable shape guide catheter
US6616231B2 (en) 2001-06-15 2003-09-09 Hon Technology Inc. Multi-position tilt-limiting mechanism
US6568760B2 (en) 2001-06-15 2003-05-27 Hon Technology Inc. Chair of modular construction
US6609755B2 (en) 2001-06-15 2003-08-26 Hon Technology Inc. Ergonomic chair
US6688692B2 (en) 2001-06-15 2004-02-10 Hon Technology Inc. Locking device for chair seat horizontal adjustment mechanism
US6572190B2 (en) 2001-06-15 2003-06-03 Hon Technology Inc. Lumbar support for a chair
US6565153B2 (en) 2001-07-31 2003-05-20 Johnson Controls Technology Corporation Upper back support for a seat
US6644741B2 (en) 2001-09-20 2003-11-11 Haworth, Inc. Chair
ITTO20010940A1 (en) 2001-10-04 2003-04-04 Pro Cord Spa ,,chair,,
US20030132653A1 (en) 2001-10-18 2003-07-17 Doug Thole Tension control mechanism for a chair
US20030127896A1 (en) 2001-12-14 2003-07-10 Deimen Michael L. Chair with lumbar support and conforming back
KR100434997B1 (en) 2002-01-02 2004-06-09 주식회사 일룸 the back of a chair
DE10200355A1 (en) 2002-01-08 2003-07-17 Dauphin Friedrich W Gmbh chair
US7717899B2 (en) 2002-01-28 2010-05-18 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Inner and outer telescoping catheter delivery system
WO2003063651A2 (en) 2002-01-28 2003-08-07 Walker Brock M Sacral support member for seating
US7134722B2 (en) 2002-02-08 2006-11-14 Kokuyo Co., Ltd. Chair
GB2414176B (en) 2002-02-13 2006-09-13 Miller Herman Inc Tilt chair having a flexible back, adjustable armrests and adjustable seat depth, and methods for the use thereof
USD476821S1 (en) 2002-02-15 2003-07-08 Hon Technology Inc. Ergonomic chair
NZ518944A (en) 2002-05-14 2004-09-24 Formway Furniture Ltd Height adjustable arm for chair with outer stem releasably lockable to inner stem by engagement of recesses
JP4137536B2 (en) 2002-07-03 2008-08-20 コクヨ株式会社 Chair
JP4149755B2 (en) 2002-07-22 2008-09-17 株式会社岡村製作所 Chair backrest device
US7097249B2 (en) 2002-07-23 2006-08-29 Okamura Corporation Tilting mechanism for a chair and chair having the same
JP4084113B2 (en) 2002-07-23 2008-04-30 株式会社岡村製作所 Chair armrest equipment
US7226130B2 (en) * 2002-09-12 2007-06-05 Steelcase Development Corporation Seating with comfort surface
USD493627S1 (en) 2002-09-27 2004-08-03 Chien-Shen Ma Arm chair
US7174211B2 (en) 2002-10-18 2007-02-06 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Header for implantable medical for use with both unipolar and bipolar leads
US7539542B1 (en) 2003-01-09 2009-05-26 Boston Scientific Neuromodulation Corporation Lead connector, lead adapter, and lead insertion apparatus
US6986549B2 (en) * 2003-03-19 2006-01-17 Leif Kniese Seating element
JP4194405B2 (en) 2003-03-31 2008-12-10 タカノ株式会社 Stacking chairs
WO2004089162A2 (en) 2003-04-02 2004-10-21 Wells Harold G Articulated seating mechanism
DE10318759B3 (en) 2003-04-25 2004-07-29 Armin Sander Office chair with pivoted backrest support and synchronous mechanism for adjustment of seat position simultaneous with adjustment of backrest
US7130699B2 (en) 2003-05-13 2006-10-31 Medtronic, Inc. Medical lead adaptor assembly
US20040230269A1 (en) 2003-05-13 2004-11-18 Medtronic, Inc. Medical lead adaptor assembly
CN2629546Y (en) 2003-05-24 2004-08-04 深圳市雅轩实业有限公司 Folding chair
US20050062323A1 (en) 2003-06-11 2005-03-24 Dicks Gerald G. Chair
US6709060B1 (en) 2003-07-03 2004-03-23 Tung-Hua Su Chair backrest
US8639340B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2014-01-28 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable medical lead connector sleeves
USD499260S1 (en) 2003-11-12 2004-12-07 Virco Mgmt. Corporation Chair
US6981743B2 (en) 2003-11-21 2006-01-03 Hni Technologies Inc. Chair with adjustable lumbar support
US6945602B2 (en) 2003-12-18 2005-09-20 Haworth, Inc. Tilt control mechanism for chair
US6843530B1 (en) 2003-12-23 2005-01-18 Yao-Chuan Wu Multi-stage backrest assembly
US7066538B2 (en) 2003-12-30 2006-06-27 Hni Technologies, Inc. Chair with tilt lock mechanism
US6994400B2 (en) 2003-12-30 2006-02-07 Hni Technologies Inc. Chair with adjustable seat depth
US20050177199A1 (en) 2004-02-09 2005-08-11 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. PSA cable and connector for quadripolar lead terminal
WO2005082451A1 (en) 2004-02-23 2005-09-09 Synovis Life Technologies, Inc. Test connector for implantable leads and associated methods
US7877150B2 (en) 2004-03-30 2011-01-25 Medtronic, Inc. Lead electrode for use in an MRI-safe implantable medical device
USD503559S1 (en) 2004-04-12 2005-04-05 Virco Mgmt. Corporation Chair
USD559571S1 (en) 2004-04-20 2008-01-15 Vitra Patente Ag Chair
US7147286B2 (en) 2004-05-28 2006-12-12 Hni Technologies Inc. Versatile chair
US7025424B2 (en) 2004-06-07 2006-04-11 Allseating Corporation Chair back for a chair
US7273253B2 (en) 2004-06-09 2007-09-25 Kimball International, Inc. Chair ride mechanism with tension assembly
USD513911S1 (en) 2004-06-10 2006-01-31 Virco Mgmt. Corporation Chair seating assembly
WO2005122833A2 (en) 2004-06-14 2005-12-29 Hni Technologies Inc. Backrest and adjustable arm for a chair
DE102004032765C9 (en) 2004-07-06 2009-02-26 Volker Wilhelm Eysing Office chair with flexible backrest
SG163586A1 (en) 2004-07-08 2010-08-30 Knoll Inc Office chair
US7726740B2 (en) 2004-09-22 2010-06-01 Okamura Corporation Backrest-tilting device
TWM269799U (en) 2005-01-12 2005-07-11 Comfordy Co Ltd Improvement of reticular chairback structure
DE502005002756D1 (en) * 2005-02-16 2008-03-20 Volker Wilhelm Eysing Support element
CN103494465B (en) 2005-03-01 2016-05-04 霍沃思公司 For the waist pad of seat
WO2006094259A2 (en) 2005-03-01 2006-09-08 Haworth, Inc. Tilt control mechanism for a chair
DE102005009419A1 (en) 2005-03-02 2006-09-07 Recaro Aircraft Seating Gmbh & Co. Kg Seat
US7422287B2 (en) 2005-03-08 2008-09-09 Steelcase Inc. Seating with shape-changing back support frame
US7753696B2 (en) 2005-05-12 2010-07-13 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Lead terminal multi-tool
USD522265S1 (en) 2005-06-07 2006-06-06 Virco Mgmt. Corporation Chair
US8061775B2 (en) 2005-06-20 2011-11-22 Humanscale Corporation Seating apparatus with reclining movement
USD572948S1 (en) 2005-10-14 2008-07-15 Uchida Yoko Co., Ltd. Chair
JP4719905B2 (en) 2005-10-27 2011-07-06 コクヨ株式会社 Chair
JP5002835B2 (en) 2005-10-27 2012-08-15 コクヨ株式会社 Member connection structure
EP1785069A1 (en) 2005-11-10 2007-05-16 Pro-Cord S.P.A. Nestable chair
JP4747311B2 (en) 2005-11-11 2011-08-17 コクヨ株式会社 Chair
JP4945781B2 (en) 2005-11-11 2012-06-06 コクヨ株式会社 Chair
JP4721183B2 (en) 2005-11-11 2011-07-13 コクヨ株式会社 Spring mounting structure
USD544230S1 (en) 2005-11-17 2007-06-12 Virco Mgmt. Corporation Chair
US7104604B1 (en) 2005-12-14 2006-09-12 Russell International Corporation Waist supporting structure of a dual-layer chair back
US7517024B2 (en) 2006-02-03 2009-04-14 Sava Cvek Post-assembly tension adjustment in elastomeric material applications
DE102006012618A1 (en) * 2006-03-20 2007-09-27 Sedus Stoll Ag Lumbar support device
US20070222266A1 (en) 2006-03-21 2007-09-27 Ditto Sales, Inc. Nestable and stackable chair
AT485078T (en) 2006-03-23 2010-11-15 Medtronic Inc Systems and method for connecting medical electrodes
US7837265B2 (en) 2006-03-24 2010-11-23 Hni Corporation Reclining chair with enhanced adjustability
DK2004020T3 (en) 2006-03-24 2014-12-08 Miller Herman Inc seating arrangement
USD541063S1 (en) 2006-04-14 2007-04-24 Shu O Su Office chair
US20070284920A1 (en) 2006-06-09 2007-12-13 Hni Technologies Inc. Tablet arm for nesting chair
US7831312B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2010-11-09 Medtronic, Inc. Floating adapter for use with auxiliary lead assembly
CA2911124C (en) 2006-10-04 2017-09-26 Formway Furniture Limited Chair recline mechanism composed of deformable members
DE102006047889B4 (en) 2006-10-10 2008-10-23 Interstuhl Büromöbel GmbH & Co. KG Seating furniture, in particular office chair
AU315004S (en) 2006-10-24 2007-07-06 Okamura Corp A chair
USD559572S1 (en) 2006-10-24 2008-01-15 Okamura Corporation Chair
USD566979S1 (en) 2006-11-22 2008-04-22 Artco-Bell Chair
DE102006056928B3 (en) 2006-12-04 2008-06-05 Sato Office Gmbh Seat for e.g. office chair, has rod elements fitted with front ends on seat panel, in pivotable and linearly movable manner and connected to angled extension of rear connecting levers in pivotable manner
US7711428B2 (en) 2007-01-18 2010-05-04 Medtronic, Inc. Hermetic lead connector assembly
BRPI0807127A2 (en) 2007-01-29 2011-09-13 Miller Herman Inc seat structure and methods for using it
US7758384B2 (en) 2007-02-26 2010-07-20 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable bifurcated neurostimulator adapters
US7594828B2 (en) 2007-02-26 2009-09-29 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable neurostimulator adapters
CN101801241B (en) 2007-03-13 2013-06-05 Hni技术公司 Dynamic chair back lumbar support system
CN201019315Y (en) * 2007-03-16 2008-02-13 上海震旦家具有限公司 Office chair back supporting structure
US20080315645A1 (en) 2007-06-21 2008-12-25 Koh-Tuang Hock Chair capable of being firmly stacked
CN201064296Y (en) 2007-06-28 2008-05-28 合富国际股份有限公司 Chair stack structure
JP2009011694A (en) * 2007-07-09 2009-01-22 Itoki Corp Backrest or seat of chair, and chair
CN201123561Y (en) 2007-09-06 2008-10-01 陈登慧 Chair structure
CA2700254C (en) 2007-09-20 2013-12-17 Herman Miller, Inc. Body support structure
US7717511B2 (en) 2007-09-21 2010-05-18 Tsung-Chieh Huang Structure of chair capable of being stacked vertically and horizontally
USD597758S1 (en) 2008-02-05 2009-08-11 Krueger International, Inc. Chair
US7600820B2 (en) 2008-02-05 2009-10-13 Krueger International, Inc. Chair shell with integral hollow contoured support
DE102008009509B4 (en) * 2008-02-15 2014-02-20 Volker Eysing Office chair
CA2720692C (en) 2008-04-08 2016-10-04 Formway Furniture Limited Injection moulding method
EP2110051A1 (en) * 2008-04-18 2009-10-21 Pro-Cord S.P.A. Chair
US20090273126A1 (en) 2008-05-01 2009-11-05 Krueger International, Inc. Method and Apparatus of Gas-Assisted Injection Molding of Thick Parts
USD582170S1 (en) 2008-05-16 2008-12-09 Ching-Hui Chi Chair
USD600462S1 (en) 2008-09-16 2009-09-22 Kokuyo Co., Ltd. Chair
US20100078975A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 Ming-Shiang Kang Structure of a single-part elastic waist support
JP4379538B1 (en) 2008-10-07 2009-12-09 沖電気工業株式会社 Link mechanism for chair, chair
USD652223S1 (en) 2008-10-09 2012-01-17 Okamura Corporation Chair
DE202008016260U1 (en) 2008-12-09 2009-02-26 Design Ballendat Gmbh Chair with swiveling backrest
NZ593679A (en) 2008-12-12 2013-08-30 Formway Furniture Ltd A chair, a support, and components
KR100940190B1 (en) 2008-12-19 2010-02-10 주식회사 체어로 A chair
US20100187891A1 (en) 2009-01-26 2010-07-29 Commercial Plastics Company Chair and Method of Manufacturing Same Using Gas Assist Injection Molding
US8544951B2 (en) 2009-02-02 2013-10-01 Hni Technologies Inc. Stacking and nesting chair
DE102009002335B3 (en) * 2009-04-09 2010-08-19 Jost-Werke Gmbh Method and control system for a distance measuring displacement device for detecting obstacles
US20100283308A1 (en) 2009-05-11 2010-11-11 Knoll, Inc. Co-injection molded chair
DE102009021193A1 (en) 2009-05-13 2010-11-25 Bock 1 Gmbh & Co. Kg synchronous mechanism
USD618469S1 (en) 2009-06-08 2010-06-29 Highmark Smart, Reliable Seating, Inc. Chair
CA132118S (en) 2009-09-10 2010-03-31 Nightingale Corp Chair
CA135022S (en) 2009-10-16 2010-11-24 Okamura Corp Chair
US9302092B2 (en) 2009-12-30 2016-04-05 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Multi-function lead implant tool
US8613482B2 (en) 2010-02-08 2013-12-24 Hangzhou Zhongtai Industrial Co., Ltd. Chair chassis
CA2788779A1 (en) 2010-02-12 2011-08-18 Georgetown University Polymer film bioelectrodes and methods of making and using the same
US20110198909A1 (en) 2010-02-16 2011-08-18 Jason Fickas Fifield Suspended pin chair
US8449037B2 (en) 2010-04-13 2013-05-28 Herman Miller, Inc. Seating structure with a contoured flexible backrest
US8663514B2 (en) 2010-05-11 2014-03-04 Knoll, Inc. Gas-assisted co-injection molded chair
US8616640B2 (en) 2010-05-20 2013-12-31 Knoll, Inc. Chair
US8408647B2 (en) 2010-05-21 2013-04-02 Yao-Chuan Wu Movable chair backrest
USD646092S1 (en) 2010-06-09 2011-10-04 Office Master Office chair
US9083129B2 (en) 2010-07-14 2015-07-14 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Multipolar lead evaluation device
USD643642S1 (en) 2010-10-25 2011-08-23 Dauphin Entwicklungs-U. Beteiligungs-Gmbh Chair
USD643641S1 (en) 2010-10-25 2011-08-23 Dauphin Entwicklungs-U. Beteiligungs-Gmbh Chair
US8666514B2 (en) 2010-11-19 2014-03-04 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Peel-away IS-4/DF-4 lead implant tool with electrical contacts
US20120242130A1 (en) 2011-03-21 2012-09-27 Yu-Ching Hung Chair with waist rest and armrests
USD648561S1 (en) 2011-03-30 2011-11-15 Johansson Paul J Chair
USD648564S1 (en) 2011-04-20 2011-11-15 Johansson Paul J Chair
DE102011104972B4 (en) 2011-06-08 2015-03-05 Haworth, Inc. Seating furniture, in particular office chair
USD676254S1 (en) 2011-07-27 2013-02-19 Jianhua Yang Office chair
US9498066B2 (en) 2011-08-04 2016-11-22 Cramer Llc Ergonomic seating assemblies and methods
CA144855S (en) 2011-09-15 2012-12-13 Okamura Corp Chair
USD683558S1 (en) 2011-11-08 2013-06-04 Hni Technologies Inc. Chair
USD691407S1 (en) 2011-11-17 2013-10-15 Itoki Corporation Chair
DE102012201318A1 (en) 2012-01-31 2013-08-01 Sedus Stoll Ag Lumbar support, backrest, chair and method for adjusting a lumbar support
CA149379S (en) 2012-03-21 2013-02-15 Itoki Corp Chair
USD688483S1 (en) 2012-05-09 2013-08-27 Okamura Corporation Chair
USD697726S1 (en) 2012-09-20 2014-01-21 Steelcase Inc. Chair
CA150684S (en) 2012-10-17 2014-09-12 Okamura Corp Chair
WO2014144143A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Hni Technologies Inc. Chair with activated back flex
USD704944S1 (en) 2013-04-08 2014-05-20 Hni Technologies Inc. Chair
USD715068S1 (en) 2013-06-07 2014-10-14 Itoki Corporation Chair
USD714070S1 (en) 2013-11-19 2014-09-30 Sava Cvek Mesh back task chair with pelvic positioning
USD718544S1 (en) 2014-03-17 2014-12-02 Chueng Shine Co., Ltd. Chair
US10064493B2 (en) 2014-04-17 2018-09-04 Hni Technologies Inc. Flex lumbar support
USD731833S1 (en) 2014-04-17 2015-06-16 Allsteel Inc. Chair

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6305750B1 (en) * 1999-05-12 2001-10-23 Meco Corporation Clamshell backrest components
US7063384B2 (en) * 2004-01-09 2006-06-20 Huang Chang Liu Flexible chair back
US8567864B2 (en) * 2011-08-12 2013-10-29 Hni Corporation Flexible back support member with integrated recline stop notches
US20140077548A1 (en) * 2012-09-20 2014-03-20 Steelcase Inc. Chair assembly with upholstery covering

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20190216224A1 (en) 2019-07-18
WO2014144143A1 (en) 2014-09-18
US9332851B2 (en) 2016-05-10
CA2906736A1 (en) 2014-09-18
CN105101845A (en) 2015-11-25
HK1214743A1 (en) 2016-08-05
US10172465B2 (en) 2019-01-08
US20140265493A1 (en) 2014-09-18
CN105101845B (en) 2018-11-09

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9826839B2 (en) Chair assembly with upholstery covering
US9538849B2 (en) Chair back with lumbar and pelvic supports
US9504331B2 (en) Dynamic chair back lumbar support system
US10543764B2 (en) Vehicle seat and stiffness setting method for vehicle seat
US9592757B2 (en) Armrest
US5979984A (en) Synchrotilt chair with forwardly movable seat
EP2068677B1 (en) A chair
CN102669972B (en) Control mechanism of seat device
CN102843931B (en) There is the armchair structure of wavy elastic backrest
US4529247A (en) One-piece shell chair
US7419222B2 (en) Support member for a seating structure
ES2328594T3 (en) Malla chair component.
US4418958A (en) Plastics chair shell
CA2750303C (en) Method and apparatus for dynamically correcting posture
KR100683984B1 (en) Improved ergonomic chair background of the invention
US7429080B2 (en) Seat with adjustable support system
US7568763B2 (en) Control for seating unit with back stop
AU784055B2 (en) A reclinable chair
US9326613B2 (en) Upholstered seat with flexible pelvic support
KR100641957B1 (en) Chair back construction with lumbar support
US7344194B2 (en) Device for lumbar support
CA2400586C (en) Device for supporting a seated person and method for adjusting, designing and/or manufacturing such a device
US6079785A (en) Chair having adjustable lumbar support
US6439665B1 (en) Ergonomic chair with mesh seat and back
CA2659248C (en) Seating apparatus with reclining movement

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: HNI TECHNOLOGIES INC., IOWA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MICHAEL, JAY R.;CROWELL, TRAVIS J.;FIFIELD, BRUCE;SIGNING DATES FROM 20150327 TO 20160314;REEL/FRAME:039611/0418

STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE