US20130036702A1 - Shelter - Google Patents

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Publication number
US20130036702A1
US20130036702A1 US13524109 US201213524109A US2013036702A1 US 20130036702 A1 US20130036702 A1 US 20130036702A1 US 13524109 US13524109 US 13524109 US 201213524109 A US201213524109 A US 201213524109A US 2013036702 A1 US2013036702 A1 US 2013036702A1
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Prior art keywords
shelter
respective
longitudinal
framework
frame
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Abandoned
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US13524109
Inventor
Stefano Pacetti
Marco De Fazio
Mario TEGLIA
Carlo D'Harmant
Stefano Baglioni
Marco Vitucci
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Selex Sistemi Integrati SpA
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Selex Sistemi Integrati SpA
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H1/00Buildings or groups of buildings for dwelling or office purposes; General layout, e.g. modular co-ordination, staggered storeys small buildings
    • E04H1/12Small buildings or other erections for limited occupation, erected in the open air or arranged in buildings, e.g. kiosks, waiting shelters for bus stops or for filling stations, roofs for railway platforms, watchmens' huts, dressing cubicles
    • E04H1/1205Small buildings erected in the open air
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H1/00Buildings or groups of buildings for dwelling or office purposes; General layout, e.g. modular co-ordination, staggered storeys small buildings
    • E04H1/12Small buildings or other erections for limited occupation, erected in the open air or arranged in buildings, e.g. kiosks, waiting shelters for bus stops or for filling stations, roofs for railway platforms, watchmens' huts, dressing cubicles
    • E04H2001/1283Small buildings of the ISO containers type

Abstract

A shelter having a longitudinal axis and equipped with a parallelepiped-shaped central element or module and two parallelepiped-shaped end elements or modules, which are aligned with the central module along the longitudinal axis and are rigidly connected to the central module at respective opposite axial ends of the central module; the central module has a first framework defined by a plurality of bars and closed by panels carried by the first framework, and each end module has a respective second framework, structurally independent from the first framework and formed by a plurality of tubes connected to one another by means of ISO-standard corner blocks defining the respective external vertices of the shelter.

Description

  • The present invention relates to a shelter. In the following text, the term “shelter” indicates a prefabricated unit normally used for habitation and/or operational use. Shelters are used, for example, as temporary accommodation when setting up field structures or as operations centres, such as satellite or telephone transmission and reception systems for example.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • From the structural standpoint, a shelter is usually similar to a container and comprises a parallelepiped framework formed by metal sections that are rigidly connected to each other by standard corner blocks suitable to allow the handling of the shelter, by means of lifting devices or similar, and its securing on the container-carrier trailers of transport vehicles. Panels welded to the framework, possibly fitted with doors and/or windows, laterally delimit the shelter and define a closed space therein, which is normally divided by inner walls into a living area and one or more utility compartments suitable for housing, for example, service equipment such as generating sets, air conditioning systems, work equipment, etc.
  • Up to now, shelters suffer from some drawbacks mainly due to the fact that their framework, extended to the entire length of the related shelter, is necessarily made with tubular sections that are heavy and expensive, as the standard corner blocks they are supplied with only connect to tubular sections.
  • Furthermore, because the dimensions of a shelter preferably comply with the ISO standards for containers, to meet demand, it is necessary to make a relatively large number of side panels, in general fitted-out panels, of different longitudinal lengths.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The object of the present invention is to provide a shelter in which it is possible to limit both the use of tubular sections and the number of side panels to be made to meet market demands.
  • In accordance with the present invention, a shelter is made according to that claimed in the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention will now be described with reference to the attached drawings, which illustrate some non-limitative embodiments, where:
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective view, with some parts removed for clarity, of a first preferred embodiment of the shelter of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the shelter in FIG. 1;
  • FIGS. 3 and 4 show, on an enlarged scale, respective details of FIG. 2;
  • FIGS. 5, 6, 7 and 8 show respective variants of the shelter in FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 9 shows perspective views of a series of fitted-out panels suitable for being mounted on a shelter made according to the present invention;
  • FIG. 10 shows a perspective view of an example of the fitting out and installation of two shelters from FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 11 show a side elevation of the shelters in FIG. 10; and
  • FIG. 12 show a side elevation of a variant of one of the shelters in FIG. 11.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • In FIG. 1, reference numeral 1 indicates, as a whole, a shelter, which is defined by a parallelepiped-shaped body having a substantially horizontal longitudinal axis 2.
  • Schematically, the shelter 1 is divisible into three main parts, integral with each other and aligned along axis 2:
  • a central parallelepiped-shaped box 3, preferable destined for use as a living and/or operations area, and
  • due end portions 4 a and 4 b, that extend from respective longitudinally opposite ends of the box 3 and are preferable destined for being used as utility compartments, for example, for housing electrical and/or power systems and work equipment.
  • According to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the shelter 1 has a reticular load-bearing structure composed of three frameworks, rigidly connected to each other and comprising a framework 5 for the box 3 and two frameworks 6 a and 6 b for the end portions 4 a and 4 b respectively.
  • Framework 5 comprises two right-parallelogram-shaped frames 7 a and 7 b, which are coaxial with axis 2 and are connected to each other, at the respective vertices, by four longitudinal bars 8 parallel to each other and to axis 2.
  • Frames 7 a and 7 b have no differences from the structural point of view and therefore, for simplicity, explicit reference will be made to just one of them hereinafter, in particular to frame 7 a, indicating the reference regarding the other frame in parentheses, frame 7 b in the case in point.
  • Frame 7 a (7 b) lies on a plane perpendicular to axis 2 and is formed by a pair of transversal bars 9 a (9 b) parallel to each other and transversal to axis 2 and by a pair of vertical bars 10 a (10 b) perpendicular to the transversal bars 9 a (9 b).
  • The longitudinal bars 8, transversal bars 9 a (9 b) and vertical bars 10 a (10 b) are all of the same type and are obtained from metal section, in aluminium for example, with an L-shaped section comprising two flat flanges 11 of substantially the same width, defining between them a right dihedral facing axis 2 and possibly stiffened in the inner joint area.
  • Each longitudinal bar 8 is rigidly connected at each of its free axial ends to a respective pair of bars 9 a (9 b) and 10 a (10 b) of the respective frame 7 a (7 b) by a respective corner joint 12, which defines, together with the other corner joints 12, the eight vertices of the box 3.
  • According to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, each corner joint 12 is defined by three, substantially square, flat plates 13, each of which is integral with and perpendicular to the other two and is rigidly connected to the flanges 11 of two of the three bars 8, 9 a (9 b) and 10 a (10 b) that converge at the corner joint 12 by means of screws or rivets or other similar connection elements.
  • Each corner joint 12 further comprises a respective parallelepipedal tubular appendage 14, which projects from the plate 13 that is coplanar with the frame 7 a (7 b), is arranged with its two edges substantially coincident with two top edges of the respective corner joint 12 and, as shall be clarified further on, has the function of forming a plug-and-socket coupling between the respective corner joint 12 and a respective longitudinal element of framework 6 a or 6 b.
  • The box 3 is externally delimited by a plurality of lateral panels comprising a floor 15, a ceiling 16, two transversal walls 17 closing frames 7 a and 7 b, and two longitudinal walls 18, each one extending between a pair of longitudinal bars 8 and two vertical bars 10 a and 10 b. All lateral panels 15, 16, 17 and 18 are arranged simply in contact with framework 5 from the inside and are fixed in a removable manner, by means of screws, rivets or the like, to the respective bars of framework 5.
  • As shall be seen in greater detail further on, the side panels, and in particular the transversal walls 17 and longitudinal walls 18, can be fitted out differently and include, for example, doors, windows, various types of openings and a multitude of accessories depending on the final usage of the shelter 1.
  • According to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, frameworks 6 a and 6 b are identical as regards the shape, number and arrangement of their respective components and can only differ regarding their longitudinal size, i.e. the length of the respective end portion 4 a or 4 b measured parallel to axis 2. For this reason, and for motives of simplicity, explicit reference will only be made to one of the frameworks 6 a and 6 b in the following description, in particular to framework 6 a, indicating the reference regarding the other framework in parentheses, framework 6 b in the case in point.
  • Framework 6 a (6 b) is arranged facing frame 7 a (7 b) and comprises, in turn, a frame 19 a (19 b) that is substantially identical in shape and size to frame 7 a (7 b), lies on a plane perpendicular to axis 2 and is formed by a pair of transversal tubes 20 a (20 b), each of which is parallel to and facing a corresponding transversal bar 9 a (9 b) of frame 7 a, and by a pair of vertical tubes 21 a (21 b), each of which is parallel to and facing a corresponding vertical bar 10 a (10 b) of frame 7 a.
  • Framework 6 a (6 b) further comprises four longitudinal tubes 22 a (22 b), each of which extends from a respective corner of frame 19 a (19 b) to a corresponding corner of frame 7 a (7 b) and is axially aligned with a respective longitudinal bar 8 of framework 5.
  • The longitudinal tubes 22 a (22 b), the transversal tubes 20 a (20 b) and the vertical tubes 21 a (21 b) are all of the same type and are obtained from a hollow metal section with a square cross-section.
  • Framework 6 a (6 b) and framework 5 are rigidly connected to each other by plug-and-socket couplings, each of which is made by the insertion of a tubular appendage 14 inside an axial end of the longitudinal tube 22 a (22 b) aligned with it. To ensure stability of the connection, the end of each longitudinal tube 22 a (22 b) is fastened to the respective tubular appendage 14 by means of screws or rivets or other similar connection elements.
  • At the opposite axial end, each longitudinal tube 22 a (22 b) is connected to frame 19 a (19 b) by a corner block 23, which defines, together with the other corner blocks 23, the vertices of the shelter 1.
  • In particular, according to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, each corner block 23 connects a longitudinal tube 22 a (22 b), a transversal tube 20 a (20 b) and a vertical tube 21 a (21 b) together and comprises a parallelepiped-shaped block 24 with square faces and three tubular appendages 25, which are identical to tubular appendages 14 and are arranged on three respective faces of the block 24, two-by-two contiguously.
  • In particular, each tubular appendage 25 of each corner block 23 projects from the centre of the respective face of the respective block 24 and is firmly planted inside one of the ends of the three longitudinal 22 a (22 b), transversal 20 a (20 b) and vertical 21 a (21 b) tubes that converge to the corner block 23. To ensure stability of the connection, each tube is fastened to the related tubular appendage 25 by means of screws or rivets or other similar connection elements.
  • Lastly, each corner block 23 has a hole 26 on each of its two faces opposite to the tubular appendages 25 connected to the transversal tube 20 a (20 b) and the longitudinal tube 22 a (22 b), and a substantially elliptical slot 27, arranged with its larger axis parallel to axis 2, on its face opposite to the tubular appendage 25 connected to the vertical tube 21 a (21 b).
  • Preferably, the size and shape of the corner blocks 23, the holes 26 and the slots 27 are made in compliance with the ISO 1161 standards for containers in order to allow the shelter 1 to be lifted and secured on any means of transport equipped with standard coupling systems.
  • For the same reason, although they can be of any size, the longitudinal, transversal and vertical dimensions of the shelter 1 are preferably set in compliance with the ISO 668 standard for containers to allow, together with the ISO 1161 corner blocks, the transportability of the shelter 1 on any trailer equipped with the mentioned standard coupling systems. In particular, according to the mentioned ISO 668 standard, the standard transversal width is 8 feet, the standard height is 8 feet 6 inches, and the standard longitudinal lengths are 10, 20, 30 and 40 feet.
  • From the foregoing description, it can be deduced that, unlike known shelters, which have a monolithic structure, this shelter 1 has a module-based structure (3, 4 a, 4 b), hereinafter indicated by the term “modular structure”, which enables:
  • moving the corner blocks 23 on the end portions 4 a and 4 b, with the consequent possibility of simplifying and considerably lightening the structure of framework 5 by the adoption of bars constituted by L-shaped sections and the corner joints 12; varying, within relatively broad limits and according to needs, the position of box 3 along the shelter 1 by simply varying the length of the longitudinal tubes 22 a and 22 b;
  • pre-assembling frames 19 a and 19 b, the dimensions of which can be varied by simply changing the lengths of the transversal tubes 20 a and 20 b and the vertical tubes 21 a and 21 b;
  • considerably reducing installation times and costs with respect to traditional shelters and, at the same time, offering an extremely flexible solution adaptable to all application requirements; and
  • satisfying market demands with a minimum number of boxes 3 being proposed, with a consequent reduction in the associated side panels (15-18) “in the catalogue”.
  • FIGS. 1, 6 and 7 show three shelters 1 having the same transversal width, the same height and different overall longitudinal lengths, in the cases in point, of 20, 10 and 30 feet.
  • In the shelter 1 shown in the attached figures, the overall longitudinal length is equal to the sum of the longitudinal length of the box 3, namely the length of the longitudinal bars 8, the length of end portion 4 a and the length of the end portion 4 b, namely the lengths of the longitudinal tubes 22 a and 22 b.
  • It follows that, once the overall length L that the shelter 1 must have is decided, the length of the box 3 and the lengths of the end portions 4 a and 4 b can be chosen, based on the needs, from a theoretically infinite multiplicity of solutions, by simply selecting the length of the longitudinal bars 8 and of the longitudinal tubes 22 a and 22 b.
  • In other words, by simply varying the length of the longitudinal components and adapting the size of the panels, the “modular structure” of the shelter 1 enables an overall size to be reached in compliance with the ISO 668 standard or, in any case, any overall size between the minimum and maximum limits set by standard rules, with evident advantages in terms of simplification and standardization of the structure's design.
  • In this regard, the modularity of the shelter 1 renders the design of the shelter's mechanical structure advantageously practicable with the aid of software tools able to propose a list of components in conformity with the technical specifications and to check the dimensional and/or functional compatibility of the selected components.
  • Another advantage consists in that, unlike traditional shelters, the assembly of the shelter 1 does not envisage welding operations on the components. In particular, the longitudinal bars 8, transversal bars 9 a, 9 b and vertical bars 10 a, 10 b of framework 5 allow the panels to be fastened by removable connection means, such as screws or similar, which, in addition to the simplicity and rapidity of mounting, also allow the removal of the panels for possible substitution on site.
  • In each of the shelter 1 shown in FIGS. 1, 6 and 7, the end portions 4 a and 4 b have respective lengths that are the same and less than the length of the box 3.
  • FIG. 5 shows a shelter 1, in which the overall length and the length of the box 3 are the same as those of the shelter in FIG. 1, except that unlike the latter, the end portions 4 a and 4 b have mutually different lengths, respectively greater than and less than the corresponding lengths of the shelter in FIG. 1.
  • The above-stated considerations also hold for the shelter 1 in FIG. 8 compared to the shelter in FIG. 7.
  • Four types of fitted-out panels are show in FIG. 9 by way of example. In particular, the following are shown:
  • a longitudinal wall 18 having an opening surrounded by a tubular accordion-like element 28, which is extended, in use, between the above-mentioned opening and an opening on the other shelter so as to define a passageway tunnel between the two shelters;
  • a longitudinal wall 18 fitted with a door 29 and lighting appliances 30;
  • a longitudinal wall 18 fitted with a multifunction connector 31; and
  • a longitudinal wall 18 fitted with openings closed by horizontally pivoted hatches 32.
  • A solution for the fitting out and installation of two shelters 1 is shown in FIGS. 10 and 11, these being arranged with the respective longitudinal walls 18 side by side and provided with respective openings connected to each other by a tubular accordion-like element 28. One of the two shelters 1 (shown in the foreground of FIG. 10) is also provided with a door 29, located on the longitudinal wall 18 opposite to the one facing the other shelter 1, and is equipped with solar panels 33 mounted on top of the ceiling 16.
  • The end portions 4 a and 4 b of both shelters 1 are partially closed by side panels 34, each of which extends between frame 19 a (or 19 b) and frame 7 a (or, respectively, 7 b) parallel to a respective longitudinal wall 18 and carries a support and levelling device 35 (of known type) for the respective shelter 1. The side panels 34 and the transversal walls 17 are preferably provided with standard holes and coupling points able to facilitate the housing and fastening of any type of equipment and fittings inside the end portions 4 a and 4 b.
  • In the example shown, one end portion 4 a is dedicated to housing the cable storage reels 36, while the other end portion 4 a is closed by a closing panel of the associated frame 19 a and houses a fire-fighting system 37.
  • The shelter in FIG. 12 is a variant of the shelter 1 shown in the foreground of FIG. 10 and differs from the latter in that, for the same overall length of the shelter 1, the ratio between the lengths of the end portions 4 a and 4 b and the length of the box 3 changes, and in that the door 29 is placed in the middle and not to one side of the respective longitudinal wall 18.

Claims (13)

  1. 1. A shelter having a predetermined standard length and a longitudinal axis (2), and comprising a parallelepiped-shaped central element or module (3) and two parallelepiped-shaped end elements or modules (4 a, 4 b), which are aligned with the central module (3) along the longitudinal axis (2) and are rigidly connected to the central module (3) at respective opposite axial ends of the central module (3); the shelter (1) being characterized in that the central module (3) has a first length shorter than said standard length; and the end modules (4 a, 4 b) have respective second and third lengths, which are equal or different, but are complementary lengths so that their sum is equal to the difference between the standard length and the first length; the shelter (1) comprising a plurality of ISO-standard corner blocks (23) defining respective external vertices of the shelter (1).
  2. 2. A shelter as claimed in claim 1, wherein the central module (3) comprises a first framework (5) comprising a plurality of bars (8, 9 a, 9 b, 10 a, 10 b) and is closed by panels (15, 16, 17, 18) carried by the first framework (5), and each end module (4 a; 4 b) comprises a respective second framework (6 a; 6 b), structurally independent from the first framework (5) and comprising a plurality of tubes (20 a, 20 b, 21 a, 21 b, 22 a, 22 b) connected to one another by means of said ISO-standard corner blocks (23).
  3. 3. A shelter as claimed in claim 2, wherein the panels (15, 16, 17, 18) are arranged simply in contact with the framework (5) from the inside and are fixed in a removable manner, by means of screws, rivets or the like, to the respective bars (8, 9 a, 9 b, 10 a, 10 b) of the framework (5).
  4. 4. A shelter as claimed in claim 2, wherein the first framework (5) comprises two first frames (7 a, 7 b), which are identical, are right-parallelogram-shaped, are aligned to and spaced apart from one another along said longitudinal axis (2) and lie on respective planes perpendicular to the longitudinal axis (2), each first frame (7 a, 7 b) comprising a pair of transversal bars (9 a, 9 b) and a pair of vertical bars (10 a, 10 b) arranged at right angles to the transversal bars (9 a, 9 b), and wherein the first framework (5) further comprises four longitudinal bars (8), each of which is parallel to said longitudinal axis (2) and extends from an edge of a first frame (7 a; 7 b) to a corresponding edge of the other first frame (7 b; 7 a).
  5. 5. A shelter as claimed in claim 4, wherein, at each axial end, each longitudinal bar (8) is rigidly connected to an end of a respective transversal bar (9 a; 9 b) and to an end of a respective vertical bar (10 a; 10 b) by means of a corner joint (12), which defines, with the other corner joints (12), the eight vertices of the central module (3).
  6. 6. A shelter as claimed in claim 5, wherein each of said bars (8, 9 a, 9 b, 10 a, 10 b) is a metal L-shaped bar comprising two flat flanges (11) having substantially the same width and defining therebetween a right dihedral facing the longitudinal axis (2).
  7. 7. A shelter as claimed in claim 6, wherein each corner joint (12) is defined by three flat plates (13), each of which is integral with and perpendicular to the other two plates (13) and is rigidly connected, by means of screws, rivets or other analogous fastening means, to the flanges (11) of two of the three bars (8, 9 a, 9 b, 10 a, 10 b) that converge to the corner joint (12) itself.
  8. 8. A shelter as claimed in claim 7, wherein the form, the number and the arrangement of the respective components of said second frameworks (6 a; 6 b) are the same and can only differ with regard to their longitudinal dimension, i.e. the length, measured parallel to said longitudinal axis (2), of the respective end module (4 a, 4 b).
  9. 9. A shelter as claimed in claim 8, wherein each second framework (6 a; 6 b) comprises a second frame (19 a; 19 b), which faces a respective first frame (7 a; 7 b), has a form and dimensions identical to those of the first frames (7 a, 7 b), lies on a plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis (2) and comprises a pair of transversal tubes (20 a, 20 b) and a pair of vertical tubes (21 a, 21 b) which are arranged at right angles to the transversal tubes (20 a, 20 b); each second framework (6 a; 6 b) further comprises four longitudinal tubes (22 a, 22 b), each of which is parallel to the longitudinal axis (2), extends from an edge of a second frame (19 a; 19 b) to an edge of a facing first frame (7 a; 7 b), and is aligned to a corresponding longitudinal bar (8).
  10. 10. A shelter as claimed in claim 9, wherein said transversal tubes (20 a, 20 b), vertical tubes (21 a, 21 b) and longitudinal tubes (22 a, 22 b) are hollow metal sections with a square cross section, each longitudinal tube (22 a; 22 b) being connected, at one axial end, to an end of a transversal tube (20 a; 20 b) and an end of a vertical tube (21 a; 21 b) by means of a said ISO-standard corner block (23).
  11. 11. A shelter as claimed in claim 10, wherein, at its axial end facing the first frame (7 a; 7 b), each longitudinal tube (22 a; 22 b) is rigidly connected to a respective said corner joint (12) by means of a plug-and-socket coupling.
  12. 12. A shelter as claimed in claim 11, wherein each corner joint (12) has a projecting element (14), which projects from the respective first frame (7 a; 7 b) toward the second frame (19 a; 19 b) facing the first frame (7 a; 7 b) and is fitted inside an axial end of a respective said longitudinal tube (22 a; 22 b) to define the respective said plug-and-socket coupling.
  13. 13. A shelter as claimed in claim 4, wherein said panels (15, 16, 17, 18) are releasably mounted on the first framework (5), are, at least in part, fitted-out panels, and comprise a floor (15), a ceiling (16), two transversal walls (17) each closing a respective first frame (7 a; 7 b) and two longitudinal walls (18), each of which extends between a respective pair of longitudinal bars (8) and two respective vertical bars (10 a, 10 b).
US13524109 2011-06-15 2012-06-15 Shelter Abandoned US20130036702A1 (en)

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US9121168B2 (en) * 2010-01-06 2015-09-01 Home Ec. Modular housing
US20130047521A1 (en) * 2011-08-22 2013-02-28 Steven M. Yoder Self-Contained Portable Container Habitat For Use In Radiological Environments
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US20140306118A1 (en) * 2011-11-17 2014-10-16 The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior University Dedicated cardiac pet
US9435898B2 (en) * 2011-11-17 2016-09-06 The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior University Dedicated cardiac PET
US9631359B2 (en) 2012-01-23 2017-04-25 Vastint Hospitality B.V. Prefabricated module for a building
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US20140352232A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2014-12-04 Inter Hospitality Holding B.V. Method and system for construction of a building
US9464436B2 (en) 2012-01-23 2016-10-11 Vastint Hospitality B.V. Prefabricated panel for a building
USD765266S1 (en) 2013-07-22 2016-08-30 Vastint Hospitablity B.V. Prefabricated module design
US9441359B1 (en) * 2015-01-13 2016-09-13 Tommy Hsieh Structurally independent frame for component based multi-unit buildings
USD761548S1 (en) * 2015-02-22 2016-07-19 Rand Elliott Tubing walker

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