US2012607A - Knitting machine - Google Patents

Knitting machine Download PDF

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US2012607A
US2012607A US562462A US56246231A US2012607A US 2012607 A US2012607 A US 2012607A US 562462 A US562462 A US 562462A US 56246231 A US56246231 A US 56246231A US 2012607 A US2012607 A US 2012607A
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needles
cam
cams
feed
yarns
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US562462A
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Wilbur L Houseman
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STANDARD TRUMP BROS MACHINE CO
STANDARD-TRUMP BROS MACHINE Co
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STANDARD TRUMP BROS MACHINE CO
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/42Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration
    • D04B9/46Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/26Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics
    • D04B9/28Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics with colour patterns
    • D04B9/34Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics with colour patterns by plating

Description

.1935- w. 1.. HOUSEMAN 2,012,607
KNITTING MACHINE I Original Filed Jan. 29, 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 M 4. 56mm Aug. 27, 1935. w HQUSEMAN 2,012,607
KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed Jan. 29, 1951 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 llllllllllllllllllllMllllllllillllHllHll "Huld :IHHHI:
Aug. 27, 1935. w. L. HOUSEMAN KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed Jan. 29, 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 Aug. 27, 1935. w. HOUSEMAN KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed Jan. 29, 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 JITO'Z/YEVJ hwy 4 Aug. 27, 1935. w. 1.. HOUSEMAN KNITTING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Original Filed Jan. 29, 1951 w i m 4 m w// w M m 1 m 2 W N/ 0 3 w 8 G W A E. 4 2 n z m .L. E a M 1m 2 um an n I w Q 2, I I Il 5 wa a Aug. 27, 1935.
w. L. HOUSEMAN KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed Jan. 29, 1931 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 Patented -Aug. 27, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Standard-Trump Bros.
Machine Company,
Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Original application January 29, 1931, Serial No.
511,949. Divided and this application September 12, 1931, Serial No. 562,462
17 Claims.
This invention relates broadly to a knitted fabric and a method and machine for producing the same. More specifically it relates to a stocking embodying the fabric and a method and machine for making the stocking.
This application is a division of my application Serial Number 511,949, filed January 29, 1931 in which the fabric is claimed, the present case relating to the method and machine.
Heretofore it has been found desirable for various reasons to produce stockings of a type said to have a split foot in which the instep, being visible when low shoes are worn, is composed of suitable yarn or yarns generally similar to those used for the leg portion of the stocking, while the sole is composed of different yarn, sometimes undyed to cater to certain hygienic ideas, but in general of heavier or stronger character to better withstand wear. Such stockings generally also involve a split fabric above the heel, in which the rear of the leg above the heel is composed of wear resisting yarn where a low shoe would tend to destroy the fabric, this arrangement involving the so-called high splice.
The machines heretofore used to produce such stockings involve two feeds, generally designated the sole and instep feeds in view of their particular functions, each of the feeds being associated w th the usual knitting cams, etc. In such machines the upper leg is knit from a yarn at the main feed, but the lower leg, at the high splice, and the instep are knit from a similar yarn at the instep feed. Desirably. of course, the same appearance should be maintained continuously from the leg into the instep but since two yarn supplies are neces arily used, and color, weight and texture are rarely duplicated to such degree that differences escape notice, there is almost always a noticeable line of demarcation at the place where change from one yarn to the other occurs. Besides this, the change is further made noticeable by any slight variations in sizes of loops occurring because of varying tensions, different adjustments of cams, etc. Obviously, this change of feeds also makes it diflicult if not impossible to continue a design fromthe leg into the instep.
One of-the primary objects of the present invsnticn relates to the provision of a fabric or vide a method and machine'for producing these results.
Another object relates to the provision of a fabric having designs formed therein during reciprocatory knitting, and, specifically, during both rotary and reciprocatory knitting.
The broad objects concerning the method and machine relate to the provision of these to pro duce the fabric of the type just outlined. Particularly it is the broad object to provide a method and machine whereby knitting continues at the same feed through the upper leg and the instep, specifically with the production of an uninterrupted design.
It is another object of the invention to provide a method and machine in which, in the formation of a split foot stocking, knitting is begun at one feed and finished at the other feed to avoid undesirable overlapping between yarns at the two feeds.
Further specific objects relating to the machine are the provision of means for controlling needles for the production of designs, of means for controlling the parts to properly adjust and balance the stitches for both varying yarns and reciprocation, etc.
The accomplishment of these and other objects will be apparent from the following description read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which: 3
- Fig. 1 is a plan view of that portion of a circular knitting machine of well known type which is particularly modified in accordance with the invention;
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the same;
Fig. 3 is an elevation ofa stocking embodying the features of the invention;
Fig. 4 is a plan view of the cams and other elements acting upon the butts of the needles;
Fig. 5 is a plan view of the active parts of the same elements showing their cooperation with needles during one of the reciprocatory periods;
Fig. 6 is a sectional plan view showing particularly the arrangements for controlling the needle cams;
Fig. '7 is an inside development of the knitting cams and associated elements;
Fig. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken approximately on the plane indicated by line 88 in Fig.
Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional view taken approxi-' mately on the plane indicated by line 9-9 in Fi 1;
Fig. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the assembly of a. trick wheel;
Fig. 11 is a plan view with parts broken away showing the needle cylinder adjusting means;
Fig. 12 is an elevation, partly in vertical section, of the same means;
Fig. 13 is a horizontal sectional view showing the adjusting means for the cams at the instep feed;
Fig. 14 is a side elevation, partly broken away, further showing the same;
Fig. 15 is a vertical section taken approximately on the plane indicated by line I-I5 in Fig. 13; and
Fig. 16 is a diagram illustrating the various events in a cycle of operation.
The illustrated machine is of the'rotary needlestationary cam type having independently movable latch needles. The needle cylinder 2 is carried by the ring gear 4 adapted to be rotated and oscillated through the usual clutch connections, one of the intermediate driving gears being illustrated at 6 in Fig. 1. The present machine differs from the ordinary type in that, instead of being axially fixed, the ring gear 4 and needle cylinder are adapted to be moved axially. This is effected by the mounting of the ring gear in an annular non-rotating member 8 mounted for sliding movement in the frame of the machine in the direction of the axis of rotation of the needle cylinder, movement thereof being effected through the medium of plungers Ill passing through holes in the frame and a supporting ring I 2 secured to the frame. The plungers rest upon a yoke lever I4 pivoted to ring I2 and having an extension I6 engageable by an adjusting screw I8 carried by a lever 20 pivoted to a bracket 22 forming part of ring I2. An adjustable screw 24 limits downward movement of lever I4.- Adjustable cam following screws 26 are acted upon by cams 28 carried by the main cam disc 30, whereby lever I6 may be raised and the needle cylinder lifted by the action of plungers I0.
A sinker dial 32 mounts the sinkers 34 for radial movements under the action of the usual sinker cams 36 so that they properly cooperate with the needles, generally designated as 38, in the formation of stitches. As is usual, the sinker cams are mounted so as to have slight reciprocatory movements during reciprocation of the needle cylinder so that the sinkers cooperate properly with the needles when moving in either direction. A slotted jack dial 40 rotates with the needle cylinder and slidably supports jacks 42 arranged to engage and actuate pressers 44 located in the needle slots and adapted to deflect the hook ends of the needles. This arrangement in which pressers and jacks may be supplied to cooperate with all or certain selected needles is similar to that shown in the patent to Harold E. Houseman, No. 1,779,237, dated October 21, 1930. The actuating means for the jacks in the present case differ from that illustrated in this patent and will be hereafter described.
The needles, heretofore generally designated as 38, are of three types as illustrated in Fig. 5, namely, long butt needles 46. intermediate butt needles 48. and short butt needles 5!]. There are two intermediate butt needles 48 located diametrically oppositeeach other and adapted to act as suture needles. On one side of the diameter defined by the suture needles are the long butt needles 46 adapted to form the instep of the hosiery, and on the other side are the short butt needles 53 adapted to form the sole.
In the present machine there are two feed and stitch forming points designated generally by the numerals 52 and 53 respectively in the developed interior view of the cams, Fig. 7. These points will be designated as the instep and sole feeds, respectively. As shown in Figs. 1, 4, and 6, these feeds are angularly spaced 112.5 apart, the di rection of rotation of the needle cylinder during rotary knitting being counterclockwise as viewed in plan.
' Referring particularly to Fig. 7, the cams at the instep feed comprise the upper center cam 54, the lower center cam 56, end cams 58 and 60. stitch cams 62 and 64, and deflector cams 66 and 68. Similarly the cams at the sole feed comprise the upper center cam I0, the lower center cam I2, end cams 14 and I6, stitch .cams I8 and 80, and a guard cam 8|. Raising pickers 82 and 84 of the usual type are associated with the sole feed only. A lowering picker 88 of the usual form is provided, being located diametrically opposite the sole feed. A switch cam 86 mounted on a pivoted shaft and urged by a spring 81 to the position illustrated in Fig. 7, is designed to engage only the long butt needles to elevate them when they move in one direction and yield upwardly against the action of spring 61 when they move in the opposite direction to allow them to pass. A main switch cam 90, the operation of which will be later pointed out, is also provided, being positioned as illustrated in Figs. 4 and 7.
Cams 62 and 66 are carried by a radially reciprocable slide 92 and cams 64 and 68 are carried by a similar slide 94. These slides are provided respectively with adjustable screws 96 and 98 adapted to be engaged under the tensions of springs IDI and I03 with upwardly projecting ears I00 and I62 formed on a yoke I04, (Fig. 8), pivoted to the frame and oscillatable, under the action of a plunger I06 when lifted by cams I08 on the main cam disc 30, to simultaneously retract the two slides. The two slides may be sepa rately washered up to balance the stitches formed during reciprocation.
The slides 92 and 94 are mounted in a segmental cam carrying member I I6 which also forms the support for the fixed cams 54, 56, 58 and 60 at the instep feed. As shown in Figs. 13, 14 and 15, member III] has journalled therein elements II 2 threaded at their lower ends and fixedly carrying pinions II4 which, acting together with the heads of the elements, prevents relative axial movements between the elements and member. The pinions I I4 mesh with teeth on an arcuate rack bar II6 which is constrained to arcuatc movement about the center line of the needle cylinder by pins II8 extending through slots therein and carried by brackets I34 fixed to the non-rotating member 8, which, as brought out previously moves vertically with the needle cylinder. A forked end I20 of rack bar II6 embraces the upper end of an upstanding arm of a lever I22 pivoted to the frame at I24. A spring I26 urges the lever to a limiting position defined by an adjustable screw I 28, the lever being rocked at proper times against the action of the spring by engagement of a follower screw I30 carried thereby with cams I32 on the main cam disc. The elements II 2 are threaded into tapped holes in brackets I34 and accordingly rocking movements imparted to lever I22 will cause simultaneous upward and downward movements of the cams at the instep feed relative to the cams at the sole feed, initial adjustment being readily effected by screw I26, and the amount of movement by a cam I32 being adjusted by screw I39. The arrangement is such that action of a cam I32 produces downward movement of the knitting cams. It
may be pointed out that H is carried by memher 8 so that, in the absence of action by cam I32, the cams associated with IIII move with the needle cylinder in its axial movements.
The main switch cam 90 is carried by a shaft I36 to which is aflixed a pin I38 projecting into an oblique slot I40 in the fixed supporting sleeve. An arm I42 carried'by the shaft I36 is urged downwardly by a spring I43 and is arranged to be engaged by a cam element I44 carried by a rocker I46 pivoted at I48 to the frame and having a downward extension I53 carrying a cam follower I52 engageable by cams I54 on the main cam disc, (Fig. 9). A spring I56 normally urges the follower in a direction to contact with the cams. The pin and slot connection causes the switch cam to ride away from the cylinder when lowered so that only long butt needles are engaged. On the other hand, when it is in raised position, it engages all of the butts regardless of length to lower the needles.
A second cam element I58 is adapted to rock the lever I60 which is operative when so acted upon to lower the picker 88 to an inoperative position between the levels occupied by the butts of active and inactive needles as they reach its location.
Cam 18 is carried by a radially movable slide I62 carrying an adjustable follower screw IE4 urged by a spring I66 into contact with a lever I68 arranged to be rocked to move the slide outwardly by a plunger I16 acted upon by a cam I on the main cam disc. Similarly cam 88 is carried by a slide I12 carrying an adjustable follower screw I14 urged by a spring I16 into contact with a lever I18 arranged to be rocked to move the slide outwardly by a plunger I80 acted upon by a cam I8I on the main cam disc. It is accordingly to be noted that the cams 18 and 88 are independently movable as contrasted with the corresponding cams at the instep feed. The cam cylinder at the sole feed is centrally split as shown in Figs. 4 and 7 so that the sections may be separately washered up to balance the stitches.
At the instep feed are several yarn feeding fingers I82, in the present instance five, one of which may carry the main or body yarn. another the yarn used to form the extended top, and the others the yarns for striping and plating. In the case of plating. one or more fingers may carry a plurality of yarns. Similarly, at the other feed there may be a plurality of fingers I 84; for example, one of them may carry the yarn forming the high splice above the heel, another the heel and toe yarn, and a third one the sole yarn. Any of thse fingers I84 may carry a plurality of yarns for the production of plating; a plated high splice being particularly frequently desirable. A fancy high splice may be formed by feeding both body and plating yarns through the first of the fingers. The means for changing yarns at the feeds is preferably of the type illustrated in the patent to Harold E. Houseman, No. 1,161,677, dated November 23, 1915. The means for producing striping at the instep feed may be similar to that shown in the patent to Harold E. Houseman, No. 1,769,580, dated July 1, 1930.
As is usual, one of the driving gears 6 is formed with a cam groove I88 adapted to produce oscillation of a lever I96 which carries a pivoted pawl whiclrengages a ratchet wheel I92 carried by a pattern chain drum I94 to produce intermittent movements of the latter. The drum in this case carries two chains I96 provided with lugs I98 at lugs thereof can drop into the depressions.
properly spaced intervals. The lugs on one chain are adapted to engage a lever 2 66 pivoted to the frame on a pin 262 and urged against a stop 204 by a spring 286. This lever has a lateral ex tension 201 on which is pivoted a pawl 2B8 engageable with teeth 2I8 of a ratchet wheel secured to a trick wheel 2 I2. As shown in Fig. 10, the trick wheel H2 is axially slotted to receive tricks 2I4 having butts broken out in the usual fashion to determine the production of patterns. These tricks are maintained in position by an interengagin arrangement at their lower ends and a spring band 2 I6.
A second lever 2I8, also pivoted on pin 202 is arranged for engagement by the lugs on the inner chain, its movement being limited by an adjustable stop 22!]. An adjustable screw 222 is carried by a lever 224, pivoted to the frame at 225, so as to be engaged and lifted by the lever 2I8 when it is raised by a lug on the chain. The lever 224 carries a roller 226 which, during oscillation of the lever, engages a cam member 228 carried by a lever 229 to thereby impart reciprocating movements to a link 230 pivoted at one end to the lever 229 and at its other end to a lever 232 carrying a pawl 234 engaging a ratchet wheel secured to a trick wheel 238 corresponding to trick wheel 2I2. A spring 236 serves to return the various connected elements.
The two trick wheels cooperate with identically corresponding elements so that only those associated with the trick wheel 2| 2 will be described. A number of levers 248, one corresponding to each height of butts of the tricks, are pivoted about a common upright pin and are adapted to be rocked by engagements of their outer ends by the trick butts. These levers engage corresponding cam levers 242 having elongated 248 has a lug engageable with an edge portion 241 of a corresponding lever 242 and capable of dropping into a depression 25I therein when the lever is rocked by the action of a butt. The edge portions 241 are parallel or concentric with the portions of the opposite edges of the levers which engage the adjustable stops so that movements of the levers 242 do not affect cams 248 until the The springs 246 not only serve to pull the levers rearwardly but also serve to swing them about pin 243 until they engage a pin 250 of semicircular cross-section, this position being assumed when there is no butt engaging a lever 240. Under these conditions the cams are forced inwardly to cause deflection of the needles. If, however, a butt engages a lever 246, the lever 242 corresponding thereto will be moved to a position such that the lug of the corresponding cam may drop into depression 251. The cam will then not be backed up'so as to cause deflection of the needle. The operation is somewhat similar to that occurring in the machine illustrated in the patent to Harold E. Houseman No. 1,779,237, dated October 21, 1930.
The semicircular pin 250 is arranged to be rocked about its axis by an extension 252 of a lever 254 pivoted to the frame and provided with an adjustable follower screw 25S engageable by cams 258 on the main disc. When the pin 250 is rocked by a cam 258, it moves all of levers 242 the same as they would be moved by butts on the tricks. Accordingly, the fingers 248 are rendered inoperative to deflect the needles irrespective of the movements of the trick wheel. The necessity of this action will be hereafter pointed out. Corresponding to lever 254 is a lever 260 which, when acted upon by either of two cams 262, serves to produce a corresponding action on the opposite side of the machine.
The outer chain I88 carries a pin 266 arranged to cooperate with a member 268 carried by lever 210 which has a cam following end 212 adapted to cooperate with a suitable cam on the disc 30. A pawl 274, pivoted to the lever 270, and having its 'motion under the action of a spring 218 limited by an adjustable screw 216, is adapted to impart movement to the ratchet wheel 92. The lever 270 carries a guard (not shown) which acts to raise the pawl carried by the lever I90 so that it will be inoperative at predetermined times to advance the pattern chains. This mechanism is of the type fully described in the patent of Harold E. Houseman, No. 1,805,697, dated May 19, 1931, and is operative to insure the proper beginning of the pattern producing cycle of operation at the initiation of the knitting of each stocking.
The various elements of the machine and their relative relationships having been described, there will now be taken up the operation of the machine in the production of a stocking.
A stocking typical of those which the machine is adapted to produce is illustrated in Fig. 3. This stocking comprises a ribbed top a, produced as usual on a rib machine and transferred to the needles of the plain fabric machine, an extended top b, which may be omitted, consisting of several circularly knit courses, the leg c circularly knitted and in the present instance composed of fancy fabric which extends continuously into the instep and the upper part of the foot as indicated at e and h, the high splice d, the heel f, the split sole 9, the advanced toe i, which may be omitted, if desired, consisting of several circularly knit courses, the toe k, and loopers rounds I. The composition of these parts of the stocking and their production will be clear after the description of the operation. The parts knitted at the sole feed, particularly the high splice, may be formed of a plurality of yarns in plated relationship.
In Fig. 16 there are graphically illustrated the events occurring in the formation of a complete stocking, the operative or inoperative conditions of various elements being plotted against'the sixteen periods (some of which are idle) defined by the sixteen steps of the main cam disc 30. The various periods are designated by the operations effected therein. The periods of rotation and reciprocation are designated at the bottom of the figure.
When the machine is in the stationary condition the needles are levelled to receive the rib top. At this time as indicated in the figure, fingers I82 and I84 are raised out of action, cams 62. 64, 66 and 68 and earns 18 and are fully retracted to disengage all of the needle butts, switch cam is raised and in inner position and there is no cam I54 acting on follower I52 and accordingly the switch cam occupies the position just noted and the lowering picker 88 occupies its inoperative position intermediate the levels assumed by the butts of raised'and lowered needles during operation. The pickers 82 and 84 ride the butts. The pattern chain is stationary, and controls254 and 260 are active to prevent any deflection of the needles.
Following the transfer of a rib top a to the needles, the machine is started to knit a few rounds of yarn similar to that in the rib top to form the portion b known as the extended top. Upon starting of the machine the cam disc 3|] is advanced one step. Cams 62, B4, 66 and 68 are allowed to move inwardly in the usual fashion, first dropping against the short butts and then subsequently moving on into the cylinder as the long butt needles pass through. The yarn finger I82 which carries the extended top yarn drops in advance of the first needle to knit which will be the advancing medium butt suture needle 48. The switch cam 90 is still raised so as not to affect the operation. The cam 86 swings up during each revolution to allow long butt needles to pass, motion of the needles during revolution being fro right to left as viewed in Fig. 7.
At each of the feed points the sinkers are retracted and then advanced in a wave in the conventional manner even though the needle cams may not be in operation. Accordingly, because of fabric tension, fabric loops will sometimes tend to climb up the needles at the sole feed, where at this time no knitting is taking place, in the space where the sinkers are retracted. If this were permitted, when the sinkers moved in these loops would be above the nebs of the sinkers and out of control and would not be moved below the latches at the instep feed, thereby failing to cast off.
In order to avoid this climbing of the loops at the idle sole feed, the stitch cam 80 is permitted to move in against the needle cylinder. This puts an upward wave in the needles before the sinkers are retracted. Accordingly, the loops occupy a lower position on the needles and when the needles are again lowered by the top center cam 18 the fabric loops are drawn down against the stitch drawing edges of the sinkers, and the nebs are well above the loops as they move in.
Except for the parts mentioned, the positions held before starting are maintained.
During this period, accordingly, several courses of plain fabric are knitted on all of the needles at the instep feed 52.
After the extended top is completed the cam disc is advanced another step and rotary knitting of the upper leg starts. As the movement of the cam disc takes place, the extended top yarn finger is withdrawn and another finger, or plurality of fingers, carrying yarns suitable for the leg, are dropped into action. Of course, if striping is to take place, the fingers originally dropped into action may be replaced by others during the formation of the leg in the usual manner, for example, by the mechanism illustrated in the patent to Harold E. Houseman, No. 1,769,580.
During this period the fingers I84 remain inactive, and the stitch cams at both feeds and switch cam 98 retain their previous positions.
Accordingly, stitches are formed solely at the instep feed.
In the present machine, in order to illustrate the mode of production of fancy fabric, there is illustrated specifically an arrangement for producing designs by reverse plating. However, from this it will be obvious that numerous other types of fancy eifects may be produced, utilizing the same general principles, for maintaining a design from the leg through the instep.
As pointed out above, two trick wheels, stepped around by means of pattern chains control the production of reverse plating by deflection of needles during the loop drawing periods. Referring to Figs. 1 and- 7, it will be clear that during rotary knitting, when the needle cylinder rotates in a counterclockwise direction, only the trickwheel 2I2, which serves to determine the deflection of needles when acted upon by cam 62, need be operative. Accordingly, during rotary knitting of the leg the control 254 must become inoperative to prevent defiec'lion of the needles but control 268 remains operative to prevent deflection f the needles at cam 64, the deflection of needles when not needed being objectionable.
While on the subject of the pattern mechanism,'it will be well to point out the preferred set up of the trick wheels. Since the trick wheel 2I2 is used for all of the courses during rotary knitting,.there must be a complete trick pattern set up thereon. However, in the case of the trick wheel 238, which is effective only during reciprocation, the pattern need only be set up on tricks in every other slot corresponding to the courses for which it is active, assuming, of course, that the trick wheels are stepped about at every revolution or reciprocation. Of course the stepping may be such that it would be necessary to supply the trick wheel 238 with a full set of tricks. In any case it would do no harm to so supply this trick Wheel. It is to be noted that during rotation or a counterclockwise reciprocation deflection of a needle at the time it rides over cam 84 would produce no effect, the same being true with respect to needles acted upon by cam 62 during a clockwise reciprocation.
A reverse plated split foot fabric could be made with only a single trick wheel associated with the rotary stitch cam 62 by setting up a pattern with tricks in alternate courses. Reverse plating would then take place only on alternate courses during rotary knitting and would continue on alternate courses during reciprocatory knitting. This produces a pattern effect similar in appearance, though not in construction, to that described in my Patent No. 1,805,624. There will be more fully discussed below a further possible mode of operation involving not only the utilization of a single trick wheel but also other modification of the mechanism.
Proceeding with the rotary knitting of the leg, the pattern chains, starting from an initial position determined by pin 266, etc., will accordingly control trick wheel 2I2 with the resultant production of a reverse plated pattern, deflection of needles at cam 64 being preferably avoided by the continued activity of control 268.
In a split foot stocking it is customary to begin split work well above the heel so that a stronger wear resisting fabric may be made at the back above the heel. Split work commences with another step of the main cam disc, the rotation being changed to reciprocation, the range of which is, in the present machine, 360. Inasmuch as the pattern is to be continued as indicated at e, the same fingers I82 remain active. The finger I84 which carries the high splice yarn or yarns islowered into action. Cams 62, 68, 56 and 58 are now withdrawn part way so as to clear the short butt needles but still engage the long and medium butt needles. Cam 78 moves into action, joining cam 80 which is already in active position. An intermediate length step of a cam I54 engages follower I52 so that switch cam 90 is lowered and simultaneously moved outwardly so that it will engage and raise -long butt needles butmiss short and intermediate butt needles. The lowering picker 88, however, retains its inactive position since the cam I58 is so designed as not rocatory knitting the usual take up sweepsthrough which the yarns at both feeds pass are rendered active.
The extreme position of the needle cylinder cates the needles in positions approximately 180,
removed from those illustrated in Fig. 5. That is, the suture needles 48 are adjacent the two switch cams, the long butt needles are located adjacent the sole feed 53, and the short butt needles adjacent the instep feed 52.
Assuming first a counterclockwise reciprocation of the needle cylinder the intermediate butt needle which leads the long butt needles rides up cam 64 and is depressed by center cam 54 and stitch cam 62 taking a yarn or yarns at the instep feed. It then rides up cam 58, passes switch cam 90, by which it is not engaged, and follows the short buttneedles up over cam 80 and. below cams III and 18 taking the high splice yarn at the sole feed and thereby forming a suture between the yarns at the two feeds. The long butt needles follow this suture needle through the camsat the instep feed and also take yarn there; However, the long butts do engage the switch cam 90 and are raised thereby so that they ride above the cams at the sole feed 53.
The intermediate butt needle 48 which follows the long butt needles and precedes the short butt needles starts from a position adjacent switch cam 90 and rides up the end of cam 80 until it engages the picker 84 by which it is raised whereupon it follows the long butt needles through the cams at 52 taking the main yarn or yarns there and finally reaching a. position adjacent switch cam 90 without being raised thereby. The short butt needles following this intermediate butt needle ride over cam 88, beneath the picker 84, are moved downwardly by cams I0 and I8 to take the high splice yarn, pa'ss switch cam 86 without engagement and likewise pass the partially retracted earns 64 and 62 without engagement. This partial retraction avoids the necessity of raising the short butt needles thereabove.
In a clockwise reciprocation a reverse series of events occur, the positions of the parts being illustrated in Fig. 5 for approximately 180 of such reciprocation. In this case the switch cam 86 takes the place of switch cam .90 and likewise picker 82 lifts the medium butt needle leading the short butt needles.
From the above it will be seen that the yarn or yarns at the instep feed are knitted by the long butt needles and both of the medium butt needles on each reciprocation. The high splice yarn at the sole feed is knitted by the short butt needles and that medium butt needle which leads the long butt needles in that stroke. It is to be observed that this alternate suture operation of the medium butt needles forms a substantial but non-bulky se'am by the avoidance of excessive yarns in the loops thereof.
During the above, the alternate selection action of the two trick wheels proceeds to produce the pattern. Since the patterning occurs at the instep feed there is no break at the change from rotation to reciprocation. While short butt nee- I Alternate trick wheel action produces the reverse plating. However, the left trick wheel will be pressing back needles while the cylinder travels clockwise but no reverse plating is eifected thereby since the needles are not then forming stitches at this point. This occurrence is illustrated in Fig. 5 in which needles are shown deflected at both sets of cams 248.
When the knitting of the heel is to begin, the main cam disc is again given an intermediate movement, and the parts operate to produce the heel in substantially the conventional manner. At this time, in order to prevent interruption of the pattern, the pattern chain is stopped in the usual manner by the action of a suitable cam upon the lever 212. Both controls 254 and 260 are rendered operative to prevent unnecessary deflection of needles. Cams 62, 64, 66 and 68 are fully withdrawn and the finger or fingers I82 previously active are raised, this raising being at a point which will cause the yarn or yarns to knit last on the medium butt needle which is trailing behind the long butt'needles when the cylinder is traveling in a clockwise direction. These yarns may be clamped and cut, but are preferably allowed to float from this needle to the raised yarn finger. Cams I8 and remain in action since the heel is to be knit at the sole feed. An intermediate portion of cam I54 still engages follower I52 so that the lowering picker remains inactive.
The change to the heel yarn having been made at the sole feed, the narrowing proceeds in the usual manner, the raising pickers 82 and 84 being operative upon the medium and short butt needles, while the long butt needles are raised out of action. When narrowing has been completed,- the cam disc is again stepped around. The only effect of this is to bring a high portion of the cam I54 into engagement with follower I52 to rock lever I 46 further outwardly and permit the lowering picker 88 to rise and become operative in the usual manner to lower the needles two at a time while the pickers 82 and 84 continue to raise them one at a time.
When the sole is completed the cam disc again advances restoring all of the elements to the po sitions occupied during the knitting of the high splice, the main yarn or yarns being reintroduced so that the suture needle which last knit again begins knitting while the cylinder travels in a counterclockwise direction. A suitable sole yarn replaces the heel yarn. The movements of the pattern chain continue from the stopping I8 and 80.
position. Since the operation is the same as that above described during the formation of the high splice it need not be again repeated.
When the, sole is completed the cam disc again advances either one step, or, as shown, two steps, one being idle. All fingers I82 are raised out of action, so that withdrawal takes place on the medium butt suture needle following the long butt needles while the cylinder is travelling in a clockwise direction, while the finger I84 which carries the heel yarn is lowered into action to replace the sole yarn finger. Cams '62, 64, G6 and 68 are withdrawn. Switch cam 90 is raised. The needle cylinder rotates. Accordingly, all of the needles knit at the sole feed to form the advanced toe 2'.
At this time both controls 254 and 260 become active to prevent needle deflection and remain so during the remainderof the formation of the stocking. The pattern chain continues to advance until it is arrested by the action of pin 266 as fully described in the application referred to above. Stopping of the chain will occur at sometime during the finishing of the stocking. The chain thus becomes ready to properly start the pattern in a subsequent stocking.
After the formation of the several courses forming the advanced toe, the disc 30 again moves bringing the parts into position to perform the narrowing and then the widening for the toe, the motion of the needle'cylinder again becoming reciprocatory. The operations in both narrow-.
ing and widening resemble those occurring in the formation of the heel and are not, therefore, repeated.
Following the completion of the widening operation, rotary knitting is resumed, the parts being the same as in the formation of the advanced toe. The several courses thus formed constitute the loopers rounds. It may be noted, in this connection, that the same yarn is generally used for the heel, advanced toe, toe, and loopers rounds.
After the loopers rounds are completed the yarn is withdrawn so that the loops are pressed off the needles, the cams are then withdrawn to effect levelling, and the machine stops. The cycle is thus completed, and a new rib top may be transferred to the machine.
During the above cycle of operations various different yarns have been inserted at both feeds. At the instep feed, for example, there is first inserted the extended top yarn which is of comparatively heavy weight and then the main yarns which are of comparatively light weight. Similar changes take place at the sole feed, the high splice and sole yarns being generally lighter than the yarn or yarns constituting the heel, toe, etc.
Accordingly, in order to produce proper results,
it is necessary that the various cam adjustments heretofore described be used. As pointed out above, the cams at the sole feed are not axially movable during the cycle of operation, adjustment being effected at this point by axial movement of the needle cylinder. As the needle cylinder moves it carries with it the cams at the instep feed supported by the member III]. This, in turn, is adjustable through the medium of the cam I32 as illustrated in Figs. 13, 14 and 15. Suitable cams on the main disc 30 are provided to effect these'independent adjustments, at the proper times. The action of cam I32 might take place, for example, when the extended top yarn is introduced.
Besides the adjustments mentioned above, it is necessary to provide means for balancing the "stitch when wear occurs upon the cams 62, 64,
Accordingly, as pointed out above, these cams are independently adjustable by means of washers. Of course, such adjustment need not be effected during a cycle of the machine but is made when the machine is stationary It will be clear that numerous changes may be made in details of construction and also by the replacement of certainmechanism my non-equivalent but analogous mechanism without departing from the spirit of the invention. For ex ample, as mentioned above, the arrangement for carrying the pattern from the leg into the instep continuously without interruption is not confined to a reverse plating mechanism, but it is obvious this same method can be applied to the control of other design forming means.
One modification of particular utility can be attained by the operation of the machine so that knitting occurs at both feeds during rotation. This may be accomplished by a rearrangement of the controlling cams so that cam 18 as well as cam 80 is active and one of fingers I84 is operative to present a yarn or yams to the needles at the sole feed. By now having the trick wheel split fabric operation of the type already described but with only one trick wheel, 2 I2, active, the one split portion formed at the instep feed 1 may be given an appearance identical with that of the circularly knit portion, assuming, of course, a suitable selection of yarns at the two feeds.
In the following claims, for simplicity of expression, the term instep has been used to apply to the entire front and top split portion of a stocking; that is, it refers broadly to such portions of a stocking as are designated at either e or h, or both, in Fig. 3. Also where reference is made to a common or same yarn it will be understood that portions of yarn from the same presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds,
cams associated with the feeds for actuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, 'first, rotary movements while only one feed is active to produceone portion of fabric, and, secondly, reciprocatory movements while both feeds are active to produce a split portion of fabric having two parts, and means for effecting manipulation 'of yarns at one-feed to produce patterns during reciprocatory knitting, said last named means including two pattern devices one of which. is effective during reciprocation in one direction and the other of which is effective during reciprocation in the other direction.
2. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds, cams associated with the feeds for actuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for eifecting, first, rotary movements while only one feed is active to produce one portion of fabric, and, secondly, reciprocatory movements while both; feeds are active to produce a split portion of fab'richaving two parts, and means. for effecting manipulation of yarns at that feed which is active during rotation to produce patterns during both rotary and reciprocatory knitting, said last named means including two pattern devices one of which is effective during reciprocation in one direction and also during rotation, and the other of which is effective during reciprocation in the other direction.
3. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds, cams associated with the feeds for actuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, first, rotary movements while only one feed is active to produce one portion of fabric, and, secondly, reciprocatory movements while both feeds are active to produce a split portion of fabric having two parts, and means for effecting manipulation of yarnsat that feed which is active during rotation to produce patterns during both rotary and reciprocatory knitting, said last named means including two pattern devices one of which is effective during reciprocation in one direction and also during rotation, and the other of which is effective during-reciprocation in the other direction, and means for maintaining the last named device inoperative during rotation.
4. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds, cams associated with the feeds for actuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, first,' rotary movements while only one feed is active to produce one portion of fabric, and secondly, reciprocatory movements while both feeds are active to produce a split portion of fabric having two parts. and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at that feed which is active during rotation to produce patterns during both rotary and reciprocatory knitting, said last named means including two pattern devices one of which is effective during reciprocation in one direction and also during rotation, and the other of which is eifective during reciprocation in the other direction, and means for rendering both devices inoperative at predetermined times.
5. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements. cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds, cams associated with the feeds for actuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, first, rotary movements while only one feed is active to produce one portion of fabric, and, secondly, reciprocatory movements while both feeds are active to produce a split portion of fabric having two parts, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at one feed to produce patterns during reciprocatory knitting, said last named means including two intermittently stepped trick wheels one of which is effective during reciprocation in one direction and the other of which is effective during reciprocation in the other direction.
6. A knitting machine including a needle cylinder, a circular series of needles carried thereby, and two sets of knitting cams, said cylinder being axially adjustable, one of said sets of cams being axially fixed, and the other set of cams being axially movable during axial adjustment of the cylinder.
7. A knitting machine including a needle cylinder, a circular series of needles carried thereby, and two sets of knitting cams, said cylinder being axially adjustable, one of said sets of cams being axially fixed, and the other set of cams being axially movable during axial adjustment of the cylinder, the last named 'set of cams being adjustable relatively to the cylinder.
8. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at a feed, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feed, and devices for effecting manipulation of yarns at said feed to produce patterns during reciprocatory knitting, said devices including two pattern means one of which is effective during reciprocation in one directionand the other of which is effective during reciprocation in the other direction.
9. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at a feed, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feed, and devices for effecting manipulation of yarns at said feed to produce patterns during reciprocatory knitting, said devices including one means effective to control the formation of designs during reciprocation in one direction, a separate means effective to control the formation of designs during reciprocation in the other direction, and means interrelating the operations of the two controlling means whereby a predetermined design may be formed extending through courses formed during reciprocation in both directions.
10. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at a feed, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feed, and devices for effecting manipulation of yarns at said feed to produce patterns during reciprocatory knitting, said devices including separate means arranged to selectivefeed, one acting to effect patterning during reciprocation in one direction and the other acting to effect patterning during reciprocation in the other direction, and means interrelating the operations of said needle manipulating means whereby a predetermined design may be formed extending through courses formed during reciprocation in both directions.
11. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for simultaneously feeding a plurality of yarnsto the needles, pattern controlled mechanism controlling the needles whereby, after they pass beyond the feeding means when moving relatively thereto in one direction, their engagement with said yarns vary, and pattern controlled mechanism controlling the needles whereby, after they pass beyond the feeding means when moving relatively thereto in the opposite direction, their engagement with said yarns vary, whereby the yarns are variously arranged in courses formed during reciprocatory knitting in both directions to form predetermined patterns.
12. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for simultaneously feeding a plurality of yarns to the needles, pattern controlled mechanism controlling the needles whereby, after they pass beyond the feeding means when moving relatively thereto in one direction, their engagement with said yarns vary to produce selective normal plating and reverse plating, and pattern controlled mechanism controlling the needles whereby, after they pass beyond the feeding means when moving relatively thereto in the opposite direction, their engagement with said yarns vary to produce selective normal plating and reverse plating, whereby the yarns are variously arranged in courses formed during reciprocatory knitting in both directions to form predetermined patterns.
13. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for simultaneously feeding a plurality of yarns to the needles, pattern controlled mechanism effecting varying manipulations of the yarns whereby, as needles pass beyond the feeding means when moving relatively thereto in one direction, their engagement with said yarns vary, and pattern controlled mechanism effecting varying manipulations of the yarns whereby, as needles pass beyond the feeding means when moving relatively thereto in the opposite direction, their engagement with said yarns vary, whereby the yarns are variously arranged in courses formed during reciprocatory knitting in both directions to form predetermined patterns.
14. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for simultaneously feeding a plurality of yarns to the needles, pattern controlled mechanism effecting varying manipulations of the yarns whereby, as needles pass beyond the feeding means when moving relatively thereto in one direction, their engagement with said yarns vary to produce selective normal plating and reverse plating, and pattern controlled mechanism effecting varying manipulations of the yarns whereby, as needles pass beyond the feeding means when 'moving relatively thereto in the opposite direction. their engagement with said yarns vary to produce selective normal plating and reverse plating, whereby the yarns are variously arranged 'in courses formed during reciprocatory knitting in both directions to form predetermined patterns.
15. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at a feed, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feed, and devices for effecting manipulation of yarns at said feed to produce patterns during reciprocatory knitting, said devices including elements located at different positions, one of which elements is effective during reciprocation in one direction and another of which is efiective during reciprocation in the opposite direction to produce patterning, and pattern means for controlling said elements.
'16. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, a feed, elements cooperating with the needles at the feed to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feed, and means individual to the needles effective during reciprocation in both directions to produce selective relative positioning 17. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds,
cams associated with the feeds'foractuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprccatcry movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, first, rotary movements while only one feed is active to produce one portion of fabric, and, secondly, reciprocatory movements while both feeds are activeto produce a split portion of fabric having two parts,
and means individual to the needles effective during reciprocation in both directions to produce selective relative positioning of the needles and. yarns where the needles may take yarns atone of said feeds to produce definite geometrical patterns by selective plating during reciprocatory knitting in both directions.
WILBUR L. HOUSEMAN.
US562462A 1931-01-29 1931-09-12 Knitting machine Expired - Lifetime US2012607A (en)

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2426010A (en) * 1945-01-03 1947-08-19 Hemphill Co Wrap spindle
US2473944A (en) * 1945-12-08 1949-06-21 Hemphill Co Selecting mechanism
US2677167A (en) * 1948-12-30 1954-05-04 Du Pont Apparatus for continuous treatment of yarn
US2800782A (en) * 1953-07-27 1957-07-30 Waldensian Hosiery Mills Inc Argyle stocking with cushion high splice and method
US2917912A (en) * 1956-05-15 1959-12-22 Textile Machine Works Method and apparatus for making patterned hosiery
US3046762A (en) * 1952-04-02 1962-07-31 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting method and machine
US3046763A (en) * 1952-04-02 1962-07-31 Scott & Williams Inc Multi-feed circular knitting machine
US3430463A (en) * 1961-02-18 1969-03-04 Hanes Corp Method and apparatus for making run-resistant knitted fabric
US5018370A (en) * 1989-06-09 1991-05-28 Precision Fukuhara Works, Ltd. Central stitch controlling apparatus for circular knitting machine
US5212967A (en) * 1991-06-10 1993-05-25 Precision Fukuhara Works, Ltd. Automatic stitch adjusting mechanism for circular knitting machine
US5511392A (en) * 1993-11-04 1996-04-30 Precision Fukuhara Works, Ltd. Method and apparatus for adjusting the stitch length on a circular knitting machine
WO2006075380A1 (en) * 2005-01-14 2006-07-20 Corporation Pearl Star Co., Ltd. Hosiery machine

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2426010A (en) * 1945-01-03 1947-08-19 Hemphill Co Wrap spindle
US2473944A (en) * 1945-12-08 1949-06-21 Hemphill Co Selecting mechanism
US2677167A (en) * 1948-12-30 1954-05-04 Du Pont Apparatus for continuous treatment of yarn
US3046762A (en) * 1952-04-02 1962-07-31 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting method and machine
US3046763A (en) * 1952-04-02 1962-07-31 Scott & Williams Inc Multi-feed circular knitting machine
US2800782A (en) * 1953-07-27 1957-07-30 Waldensian Hosiery Mills Inc Argyle stocking with cushion high splice and method
US2917912A (en) * 1956-05-15 1959-12-22 Textile Machine Works Method and apparatus for making patterned hosiery
US3430463A (en) * 1961-02-18 1969-03-04 Hanes Corp Method and apparatus for making run-resistant knitted fabric
US5018370A (en) * 1989-06-09 1991-05-28 Precision Fukuhara Works, Ltd. Central stitch controlling apparatus for circular knitting machine
US5212967A (en) * 1991-06-10 1993-05-25 Precision Fukuhara Works, Ltd. Automatic stitch adjusting mechanism for circular knitting machine
US5511392A (en) * 1993-11-04 1996-04-30 Precision Fukuhara Works, Ltd. Method and apparatus for adjusting the stitch length on a circular knitting machine
WO2006075380A1 (en) * 2005-01-14 2006-07-20 Corporation Pearl Star Co., Ltd. Hosiery machine

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