US2435771A - Circular knitting machine - Google Patents

Circular knitting machine Download PDF

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US2435771A
US2435771A US645862A US64586246A US2435771A US 2435771 A US2435771 A US 2435771A US 645862 A US645862 A US 645862A US 64586246 A US64586246 A US 64586246A US 2435771 A US2435771 A US 2435771A
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needles
cylinder
terry
links
needle
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US645862A
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Edgar W Clarke
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INTERWOVEN STOCKING CO
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INTERWOVEN STOCKING CO
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/10Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles with two needle cylinders for purl work or for Links-Links loop formation

Description

Feb. 10, 1948.
E. w. CLARKE CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed July 14, 1945 '7 Sheets-Sheet 1 l I 137 I 115 c L l j 132 151 IN VEN TOR. 5064,9114 Chloe/r6 Feb. 10, 1948, E. w. CLARKE YCIRCULAYR KNITTING momma:
Original Filed July 14, 1945 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. 64/? W. C4 ARKE I A TTOR NEX Feb. 10, 1948. E, w R E I r 2,435,771
CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed July 14, 1945 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 EN TOR. E0621? M4 CL ARKE fl TTOR/VEX CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINE I v Original. Filed July 14, 1945 I 7 Sheeflzs-Sheet 4 67- 7 192A w il 74 84 Q 7 83m 4 1 I g 62 W/ $74 I, I INVENTOR. 0 GAR NCLARKE Heb. 10, 1948. E w. CLARKE CIRCUL AR KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed July 14, 1945 7 Sheets-ShetS INVENTOR. 06
Arrow/5f Feb. 10, 1948. E. w. CLARKE CIRCULAR \KNITTIN G MACHINE Original Filed July 14, 1945 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 LAP/(E Feb. 10; 1948. E. w. CLARKE 2,435,771
cmcuux KNITTING mcnmn v Original Filed Juli, 1945 7 Sheets-Sheet m ijl'gig jllilyifi A: F! K! 2 I I J 1 L 6 JNVENTOR.
ATTORNEY Patented F eb. 10, 1948 CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINE Edgar W. Clarke, Hamilton,
Ontario, Canada, as-
signor to Interwoven Stocking Company, New Brunswick, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey July 14, 1945, Serial No.
Original application 605,020. Divided and ary 6, 1946, Serial No.
this application Febru- 645,862
16 Claims. (Cl. 66-14) The present invention relates to the knitting of articles composed at least in part of terry fabric on circular knitting machines having superposed coaxial needle cylinders and needles operative selectively in either cylinder. This application is a division of my application, Serial N 0. 605,020, filed July 14, 1945.
A characteristic feature of terry fabric is that it has long loops of thread, hereinafter referred to as terry loops, which protrude on at least one face of the fabric and provide a soft cushioning effect. It has heretofore been proposed to produce terry fabric on a circular knitting machine by feeding two threads to the needles and drawing longer loops of one thread than the other. For example, the two threads may be fed to the needles and knitted together but with the sinker loops of one thread longer than the corresponding sinker loops of the other thread so as to form the terry loops of the fabric. The terry loops may or may not be combed or brushed to provide a soft matted fabric surface.
My invention is particularly directed to producing knitted articles, for example, articles of hosiery, composed in part Of terry fabric and in part of Links-Links fabric. The term Links-Links fabric is herein used to designate a patterned fab ric formed of inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches occurring in predetermined sequences in each of a plurality of selected needle wales. In knitting on a coaxial cylinder knitting machine, an outwardly facing stitch-sometimes called a plain stitch-is produced by a needle operating in the lower cylinder and is drawn to the outer face of the fabric, while an inwardly facing stitch-sometimes called a rib 'stitch is produced by a needle operating in the upper cylinder and is drawn to the inner face of the fabric. By transferring selected needles back and forth from one cylinder to the other in predetermined sequence during the knitting operation, a fabric is produced in which the inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches are arrangedin predetermined 'order both coursewise and walewise to form a design or pattern in the fabric as desired. Such a pattern is herein referred to as Links-Links pattern and depends for its distinctive appearance on the predetermined arrangement of inwardl facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches.
Terry fabric has heretofore been produced on machines which apart from the complications introduced to form the terry loops were of relatively simple construction. Machines for producing Links-Links fabric, on the contrary, are relatively complex requiring superposed coaxial needle cylinders, needles operable in either cylinder and pattern controlled mechanism for selectively transferring needles from one cylinder to the other during the knitting operation. To enable a single Links-Links pattern drum to control the needle selection, all needles are transferred to one of the cylinders atone point of the needle circle in each revolution of the machine and selected needles are then transferred back to the other cylinder to provide the selection required by the pattern for the particular course of fabric being knitted. As selected needles are thus continually being transferred back and forth between the needle cylinders during the knitting of the Links- Links fabric, accurate alignment of the needle cylinders is essential to avoid needle breakage and the cylinders of a Links-Links machine are spaced close together to facilitate the needle transfer. The close spacing of the needle cylinders and the necessity of avoiding interference with the continual transfer of needles from one cylinder to the other during knitting has prevented performing on a Links-Linksmachine any operation requiring mechanism or instrumentalities interposed between the needle cylinders. Moreover, the needle selection for producing Links-Links fabric is customarily obtained by means of selectors or jacks having butts at a plurality of different levels making it necessary to extend the needle cylinder to such length that the operation of any mechanism inside the needle cylinder at the level where knitting occurs is rendered difficult. The provision of instrumentalities capable of operating to produce terry fabric concurrently with the operation of the Links-Links mechanism, for example to produce fabric which is Links-Links fabric throughout a portion of its coursewise extent and terry fabric throughout another portion of its coursewise extent, presents a still more difficult problem.
These difficulties and obstacles are overcome by the present invention which provides for the first time a machine for producing a knitted article, for example, an article of hosiery, having both the advantageous characteristics of terry fabric and the desirable appearance and extensibility provided by Links-Links patterning. Moreover, in accordance with my invention there is produced a new article of hosiery having leg and instep portions comprising thread knit to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches'occurring in predetermined sequences in each of a plurality of selected needle wales, and heel. sole and toe portions comprising a plurality of threads knit to form body stitches and terry loops of greater length than said body stitches. In such an article the leg portion is composed of Links- Links fabric throughout its coursewise extent, while the instep portion and sole portion together comprise'an integral section composed of Links- Links fabric throughout a portion of its coursewise extent and of terry fabric throughout another portion of its coursewise extent. A high splice portion of terry fabric extending-upwardly above the heel can be provided as desired. In a preferred embodiment of my inventionthe'sole and instep portion of the article is knit o'f a plurality of threads extending continuously around the fabric, the threads being knit to form longer loops of one thread than of another toforrn terry loops in the sole portion and the same thread being knit in plating relation with loops of substantially the same length in the Links-Links fabric of the instep portion.
In accordance with "my invention a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles-operable in either cylinder, means for-feeding a plurality of threads to the needles and means for operating'the-needles to receive and knit the threads is provided withpattern controlled mechanism for transferring selected needles "from one cylinder to the'other during the knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales'and coordinated mechanism-for forming terry fabric. The terry mechanism comprises instrumentalities cooperating with the needles to'draw longer loops of one thread, herein referred 'to as 'a terry threadjthan 'ofanother'threa'd which forms the body stitches of'the fabric. The operationof the instrumentalities for forming terry loops is coordinatedwith the operation of the mechanism for producing Links-Links fabric in such manner as to prevent interference between the two. Moreover, thecoordination of the Links-Links mechanism and the terry mechanism makes it possible to knit Links-Links fabric on certain needles of the needle circle while concurrently knitting terry fabricon'other needles.
In the embodiment of my invention herein particularly described the terry forming instrumentalities are associated withthe upper needle cylinder. The upper cylinder is also provided with elements which cooperate with the needles in the upper cylinder'to draw inwardly facing stitches of the-Links-Linksfabric, These elements are herein referredto generically as verge bits or a verge. 'To'prevent'interference between the terry'forming instrumentalities and the verge bits, the latter-aremovable vertically and their'upward movement is coordinated with the operation of'the terry instrumentalities so that the latter instrumentalities are operated only when the verge bits are. raised. In order toproduce'terry fabric for part'of a course and Links- Lin-ksfabric-for another'part of the same course, I provide a group-ofterry instrumentalities extending partway around the needle circle and a "series :of 'verge bits of corresponding circumferential extentthat can be raised or lowered independently of other verge'bitsin the needle circle. The actuation of this group of terry instrumentalities-is coordinated with the raising andlowering of the'verge bits located in the same 'portion of needle circle so that whenthe terry'instrumentalities are operated, the verge bits in the corresponding portion of the needle 'circleare raised out of the way while other verge which is moved into and out'o'f operative position bythe movementof corresponding verge bits.
Still other features, characteristics and advan- -tages of my invention will appear from the following description and the appended claims in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which show by wayof example a knitting machine selected to'illustrate my invention and a knittedarticleillustrating the operation of the machine.
In the-drawings,
Fig. 1 isapartial side elevation of a knitting machinefor carrying out my invention.
Fig, 2 is a partial plan view of the machine.
Fig. 3 is a conventional illustration of an article of hosiery produced in accordance with my invention, portions of the'heeL-sole and toe being broken away to show internal construction.
Fig.3ais a similar illustration of the foot portion 'of an article of hosieryhaving a modified toe band construction, thearticle being otherwise the same as that of Fig. 3.
Figs, 4 and 4a are together a composite vertical sectional-view through the needle cylinders of the machine, the upper portion'of the machine being shown in Fig. 4 and the lower portion in Fig. 4a. Certain parts have for convenience been shown in these views although they are not in the same plane.
Fig. 5 is a transverse section taken on the line 5-5 in Fig. 4.
Fig. 5a is a partial vertical section taken on the line 5a5a in Fig. 5.
Fig. 6 is'a transverse section taken onthe line 6-6 in Fig. 4.
Fig. 'I is a horizontal section through-the lower needle circle and the Links-Links pattern drum approximately on the line in Fig. 4a.
Fig. '8 isa developed view 'of the cam blocks of the-machine and includes attheleft-handend of the figure a diagrammatic'side viewof the needles, sliders and lacks.
Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic inside view showing the stitch structure of a representative section of'fabric of a knitted article'suchas that shown in Fig. 3 or 3a.
Articles of hosiery produced by the machine of the present invent-ion and forming the subject matter of my applicationSerial No. 605,020, filed July 14,1945, of which the present application a division, are illustratedby way vof example in Figs.'3, 3a and '9 to facilitate an understanding of'the machine and the problems involved in its structure and operation. The article illustrated in Fig. 3 is a mans halfhose or sock having a top portion 2|,.leg .portion '22,.instep portion 23, high splice .p0rti0n'24, heel 25, sole 26, toe-band 21 and toe 28. The top portion 2| is provided atits upper edge with a selvage, welt or other anti-ravel structure .29, andis formed of fabric having suitable extensibility and recoverability to pass over the heel when the sockis being put on and yet fit the leg snugly when being worn. For example, the top can be formed of 1 x 1 or other rib knitfabric orof. fabric having. elastic thread incorporated therein. In the particular embodiment illustrated in the drawings, .the top portion .of the sockisformed of thread knit to form selected groups of consecutive wales of'outwardly facing stitches and other wales of inwardly fac- '5 ing stitches to provide vertically extending ribs that are more than one wale in width.
The leg portion 22 and instep portion 23 of the article shown in Fig. 3 are formed of Links- Links fabric, i. e., fabric in which the thread or yarn is knit to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches occurring in predetermined sequences in each of a pluralityof selected needle wales. Referring for example to Fig. 9 which shows diagrammatically the stitch structure of a small portion of fabric at the junction of the leg portion, the instep portion and the high splice, it will be seen that in wale I there are inwardly facing stitches in courses l3 and I4, outwardly facing stitches in courses l5 and I6, inwardly facing stitches in courses I! and [8, an outwardly facing stitch in course l9 and an outwardly facing stitch in course 20. In wale 8 there is an outwardly facing stitch in course l3, inwardly facing stitches in courses [4 and I5, outwardly facing stitches in courses l6 and H, inwardly facing stitches in courses l8 and i9, and an outwardly facing stitch in course 20. The inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches likewise occur in predetermined sequences in selected courses of-the fabric. For example, in course i3 there are inwardly facing stitches at wales I and 2, outwardly facing stitches at wales 3 and 4, inwardly facing stitches at wales 5, 6' and l, outwardly'facing stitches at wales 8 and 9, an inwardly facing stitch at wale l8, and outwardly facing stitches at Wales II and I2. The sequence of stitches is different in succeeding courses. However, the Links-Links pattern will ordinarily repeat itself in a predetermined number of courses of the fabric. It will be noted that both walewise and coursewise, the inwardly facing stitches may occur in groups of two or more consecutive stitches drawn to the same face of the fabric as well as singly. The same is true of outwardly facing stitches. The number of different combinations of inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches that can be used to produce different Links-Links patterns is virtually unlimited.
The high splice portion 24, heel 25, sole 25, at least the lower part of toe-band'Z'I and toe 28 are formed of terry fabric composed of body thread B and terry thread T (Fig. 9) knit together in such manner as to form loops of terry thread that are longer than the corresponding loops of the body thread stitches so as to project on a face of the fabric in the form of terry loops. As illustrated in the lower left-hand portion of Fig. 9, all the stitches of the terry fabric are drawn to the same face of the fabric, being shown as outwardly facing stitches. The body thread B and terry thread T are knitted together, preferably in plated relation with the needle loops of the two threads substantially coextensive. However, the sinker loops of terry thread T are substantially longer than the sinker loops of the body thread B-preferably at least twice as long-and form terry loops on the inner face of the fabric. It will be seen that the terry loops occur at successive wales in successive courses to provide a soft cushion fabric. The terry thread T can, if desired, be an extra or splice thread extending across only the terry portions of the fabric. However, it is shown as a continuous thread extending all the way around the fabric. In the Links-Links portions of the fabric forming the instep 23, the two threads 13 and T are knit together preferably in plated relation with loops of substantiallythe same length, while in the terry fabric forming the sole the threads are knit with loops of different lengths to provide terry loops as described above. Thus the threads B and T both extend continuously throughout the coursewise extent of the fabric so that there are no loose ends. The leg portion 22 is also preferably knit of the same thread as the instep portion 23 and sole 2B.
As illustrated in Figs. 3 and 9, the leg portion 22 of the article is formed of Links-Links fabric throughout its circumferential or coursewise extent. It will be understood that the Links-Links pattern may be an all over pattern or may be confined to selected areas such as the sides of the sock so that the stitches in considerable areas are drawn to the same face of the fabric. However, regardless of the particular pattern used, the fabric of the leg portion of the sock is considered as being Links-Links fabric throughout its circumferential extent.
Following the leg portion there is an integral tubular seamless section composed of Links-Links fabric throughout a portion of its circumferential extent to form the instep portion 23 and composed of terry fabric throughout another portion of its circumferential extent of form the high splice portion 24 and sole portion 26. Each of the individual courses of this section is formed partly as terry fabric and partly as Links-Links fabric. Referring to Fig. 9, it will be seen, for example, that each of courses I 6 to 20 is knit to form terry loops in wales l to 5 and is knit to form Links-Links fabric in wales 6 to l2. It will be understood that Fig. 9 shows only a very small section of the fabric and that both the terry portions and Links-Links portions of the fabric are much more extensive than shown in this figure. The toe-band 21 is knit as a further integral section of tubular seamless fabric which may be formed of terry fabric through its circumferential or coursewise extent as illustrated in Fig. 3A. Alternatively, the fabric of the toe band may have terry loops on the lower side only as illustrated in Fig. 3, the upper portion being knit as nonterry, for example. plain knit, fabric. The heel pocket 25 and toe pocket 28 are formed of partial courses knit by reciprocation of the machine and are composed of terry fabric throughout.
It will be understood that the Links-Links pattern shown in Figs. 3, 3a and 9 is for the purpose of illustration only and that an infinite number of difierent patterns can be produced by varying the selection of needles transferred from one cylinder to another during the knitting of the fabric.
In Figs. 1, 2 and 4 to 8 there is shown so much of a knitting machine asis necessary to illustrate my invention. The invention is shown by way of example embodied in a coaxial knitting machine of the general type manufactured by Wildt & Co. Ltd., of Leicester, England, and certain standard parts which are not necessary to an understanding of the invention have been omitted for the sake of clearness.
The machine illustrated in the drawings has an upper needle cylinder 3| and a lower needle cylinder 32 (Figs. 4 and 4a). The lower cylinder is substantially longer than the upper cylinder, being provided with a downward extension 32a of greater outside diameter than the upper portion of the cylinder. The upper and lower cylinders are rotated in synchronism with one another, for example by suitable gears 33 and 34, and have aligned grooves or tricks in their peripheries. A circular series of needles 35 having a hook and latch at each end are operable in either cylinder and transferrable from one cylinder to the other. When in the upper cylinder the needles are operated by sliders 36 having knitting butts 31 and transfer butts 38. When in the lower cylinder the needles are operated by sliders 39 having knitting butts 4| and transfer butts 42.
Cams for operating the needles by engagement with the slider butts are shown by way of example in Fig. 8 where the direction of movement of the needles and sliders relative to the cams, when the machine is operated by continuous rotation, is from left to right as indicated by the arrow. The cams for operating needles in the upper cylinder comprise a stitch cam 43 and a clearing cam 44. There are also provided a welt cam 45 which is withdrawn to allow the knitting butts of the sliders to pass through an idle track 46 so that the upper cylinder needles will hold their stitches without knitting during the knitting of welt courses on the lower cylinder needles and a switch cam 41 operable in conjunction with the lower cylinder switch cams to render the needles on the instep side of the cylinder inactive during the knitting of the heel and toe.
Cams for operating needles in the lower cylinder include a center cam 48, stitch cam 49 and clearing cam 5|. When the cylinder is rotated in the opposite direction as when it is oscillated during the knitting of the heel and toe, the needles are actuated by a stitch cam 52 and clearing cam 53. The lower cam block is also provided with vertically movable switch cams 54 which cooperate with the switch cam 41 of the upper cylinder cam blocks to render needles in the instep side of the needle cylinder inactive during the knitting of the heel and toe.
The transfer of needles from one cylinder to the other is effected by an upper transfer cam 55 (Fig. 8) acting on the transfer butts of the upper cylinder sliders 36 to transfer needles from the upper to the lower cylinder, and by a lower transfer cam 56 acting on the transfer butts of the lower cylinder sliders to transfer needles from the lower to the upper cylinder. The lower transfer cam is so positioned that the transfer butts of the lower cylinder sliders normally pass beneath it unless the sliders have been raised or conditioned by the selecting mechanism hereinafter described which controls the transfer of needles during the knitting operation to produce Links-Links fabric. Hence the'cam 56 transfers to the upper cylinder only those needles that have been selected by the selecting mechanism. It will be noted that the upper transfer cam 55 is located ahead of the lower transfer cam 56 so that needles transferred to the lower cylinder by the upper transfer cam may be transferred back to the upper cylinder by the lower transfer cam 56.
The movable cams such as the transfer cams, welt cam and switch cams are operable by suitable mechanism under the control of the main pattern drum 5'! (Fig. 1) which is intermittently racked around during th knitting of the article being produced by the machine. As the control of such cams is well known in the art, it will be readily understood without further description.
Adjacent the point at which the needles are actuated to draw stitches, there is provided a feeding station for feeding thread to the needles. The feeding station includes means for feedin the body thread B and terry thread T in spaced relation so that instrumentalities which-cooperate with the needles to form terry loops can come between the two threads and seperate them. In Fig. 4 a feed finger for the terry thread is indicated schematically at 58 and a feed finger for the body thread at 59. It will be understood that additional feed fingers may be provided at the feeding station and that the feed fingers can be moved into and out of feeding position, for example, under control of the main pattern drum.
The lower cylinder is provided with a series of sinkers 6| or equivalent instrumentalities disposed between successive needles and cooperating with needles in the lower cylinder to form stitches. The sinkers are shown as having butts 62 which are acted on by sinker cams 63 to move the sinkers between an inner position as illustrated at the left-hand side of Fig, 4 and an outer position as shown at the right-hand side of the same figure.
Mechanism for controlling the selective transfer of needles from one cylinder to the other to produce a Links-Links pattern is associated with the lower needle cylinder in the embodiment of my invention illustrated in the drawings. The selection is effected by putting the upper transfer cam 55 '(Fig. 8) into operation to transfer all upper cylinder needles to the lower cylinder each revolution of the machine and then transferring selected needles from the lower cylinder to the upper cylinder to provide the particular selection required for the course being knitted. The selecting mechanism comprises a series of selectors or jacks 64 associated with the lower cylinder sliders and means for selectively actuating the jacks to raise the sliders of selected needles sufliciently for the transfer butts of the slider to engage the lower transfer cam 56 by which the slider is further elevated to transfer the associated needle to the upper cylinder. The jacks 64 are slidable in grooves or tricks provided in the enlarged extension 32a of the lower cylinder 32 and partially overlie the sliders 39 as clearly shown in Fig. 4a. The jacks are movable vertically by suitable cams which are illustrated as a cam 65 (Figs. 4a and 8) for moving the jacks upwardly and a cam 66 for moving them down. The jacks are also capable of limited movement radially of the cylinder, the movement being more or less pivotal about the upper end of the jack. A shoulder 61 provided on the inner edge of the jack is adapted to engage the lower end of the corresponding slider 39 when the jack is in its inner position so that the slider is raised by the jack when the latter is moved upwardly by the cam 65. This lifts the slider high enough so that the transfer butt engages the lower transfer cam 56 (Fig. 8) to complete the transfer of the corresponding needle to the upper cylinder. When a jack is in its outer position, the shoulder 61 does not engage the slider and the slider is hence not lifted by the jack. The corresponding needle accordingly remains in the lower cylinder. The selective distribution of the needles between the upper and the lower cylinders during successive revolutions of the needle cylinders thus depends upon the actuation of the jacks 64.
The operation of the selectors or jacks 64 is controlled by a pattern drum 68 (Figs. 4a and '7) acting through presser levers 69 pivotally mounted one above the other in a suitable grid H. The pivotal axis of the levers is indicated at 12. A
9 Spring 13 acting on each lever tends to swing it toward the pattern drum 68. The jacks 64 are provided with butts 14 at levels corresponding to the levels of the presser levers 69, each jack that is to be actuated being provided with a butt at one or more levels, The pattern drum 68 is provided with projecting pins 75 removably carried in selected ones of suitable holes in the periphery of the drum and adapted to engage presser levers 69 to swing selected ones of the levers toward the needle cylinder. In Fig. 4a the third presser lever from the bottom of the series is shown in the position to which it is moved by a pin 15, the remaining levers being shown retracted. When a presser lever is pressed inwardly, a cam surface 76 on the lever engages all the jacks that have butts 14 at the same level as the lever to press the jacks inwardly into engagement with the corresponding slider 39. The jacks are then raised by cam 65' to initiate the transfer of the corresponding needles to the upper cylinder as described above. The jack shown at the leftoccupy after being pressed in by the third presser lever from the bottom and subsequently raised by the cam 65. a
Means is provided for intermittently rotating or racking the Links-Links pattern drum 68 during the knitting operation. The racking mechanism is illustrated in the drawings as a pawl 11 engaging a ratchet 78 on the pattern drum and carried by an arm 19 which is swingable about an axis concentric with the drum. The other end of arm i9 carries a roller 8| engaging a cam 82 that is rotatable with the needle cylinder and actuates the arm to rack the pattern drum one step forward each revolution of the needle cylinder. As the pattern drum is racked, different ones of the pins 15 come into engagement with the presser levers 69 disposed at corresponding levels to actuate selected ones of the jacks 64 and thereby initiate the transfer of selected needles to the upper cylinder. By selecting the location of the pins I5 on the pattern drum 68 and the position of the butts 74 on the jacks 64, an infinite number of different Links-Links patterns can be produced.
Additional control of the actuation of the jacks 64 is provided by a neutralizing cam 83 (Figs. 4a and 7) acting on the tails 84 of the -jacks and by cams acting on additional jack butts 85 and 86. Thus the jacks may be provided with tails of diiTerent lengths and the neutralizing cam 83 may be raised or lowered to engage all or certain of the jacks and move them back out to their outer position after they have been pressed inwardly by presser levers 69 but before then engage the up cam 65. For example, the jacks on the sole side of the needle cylinder may be provided with long tails so that during the knitting of the instep and sole portions of an article such as that shown in Fig. 3, the action of the Links-Links pattern drum on the needles knitting the sole can be neutralized so that all of the needles on the sole side of the cylinder remain in the lower cylinder. Butts 85 and 86 are adapted to be engaged by movable cams acting on the jacks after they have been neutralized by the neutralizing cam 83 but before they are raised by the up cam 65. These butts are utilized when the same needle selection is desired for a number of successive courses. For example, butts 85 may be provided on alternate jacks only to obtain a 1 x 1 selection for producing a selvage or a welt while butts 86 maybe used for obtaining a 2 x 2 or other 10 selection for producing vertical ribs in the top portion of a sock.
The neutralizin cam 83 is movable vertically under control of the main pattern drum acting through suitable linkage including arms 81, crossbar 88 and posts 89 (Fig. 7) so as to engage all, some or none of the jacks as desired. Cams for engaging jack butts 85 and 86 are likewise movable into and out of operative position under control of the main pattern drum, as will be readily understood.
The knitting machine in accordance with my invention is also provided with instrumentalities cooperating with the needles to form terry loops and operable concurrently with the mechanism described above for selectively transferring needles from one cylinder to another during the knitting operation to produce Links-Links fabric. In the embodiment illustrated in the drawings the terry instrumentalities are associated with the upper needle cylinder and cooperate with needles in the lower cylinder and with lower cylinder sinkers to form longer loops of one thread than of another. The terry instrumentalities are shown in the drawings (Figs. 4 and 6) in the form of a series of bits 9| which are located directly above the sinkers 6| so as to project out between. successive needles when the needles are in position to receive thread fed at the feeding station. The relation of the bits to the thread feeds is such that the bits project between the terry thread T and the body thread B so that the terry thread is above the bits while the body thread is below the bits and between the bits and the top plate 94 of the machine and is concentric,
the sinkers, The needles operating in the lower cylinder are raised high enough to receive both threads. When the needles are drawn down by the stitch cam, loops of body thread are drawn over the sinkers to form the body stitches of the fabric while longer loops of the terry thread are drawn over the bits 9|. The needle loops of the body thread B and the terry thread T are thus drawn in plating relation while the sinker loops are drawn separately with the sinker loops of" the terry thread much longer than the sinker loops of the body thread because of the location of the terry bits 9! above the sinkers BI. The lengths of the terry loops can beadjusted by varying the distance between the terry bits and the sinkers. Preferably the terry loops are at least twice as long as the corresponding loops of body thread.
In the embodiment of my invention shown in the drawings, the terry bits 9| are moved cyclically between an inner retracted position and an outer position in which the bits project out beyond the needle circle to separate the terry thread and the body thread as described above. The bits are moved out as they reach or approach the thread feeding station and are retracted to release the terry loops after stitches of the body thread and terry thread have been drawn by the needles. While the bits 9| or equivalent instrumentalities may be supported in any desired manner, they are shown as being carried by a' dial 92 located inside the needle circle adjacent the lower end of the upper cylinder and hence about the upper end of the lower cylinder. The dial is rotatably supported at the lower end of a shaft or spindle 93 which extends out through with the needle cylinder. A bearing plate 95 and nut 96 retains the dial on the shaft. The dial 92 is rotatable with the needle cylinder and i provided with radial grooves in which the bits 11 9| are slidable. Thepath traveledby the hits as the dial rotates is illustrated in Fig. 6, which shows the dial in plan. Terry bits may, if desired, be provided all the way around the dial. However, if it is desired to knit terry fabric only in the heel, sole and toe portions of a sock, the bits need be provided only on one side of the dial corresponding to the sole side of the needle cylinders.
The means for cyclically projecting and ret'racting the terry bits 9I is shown by way of example in the drawings as cam surfaces engaging butts 9] provided on the terry bits 9|. A cam plate 98 is secured to a flange 99 of the spindle 93 bymeans of a. plurality of screws or bolts IOI and I02. On the lower surface of the cam plate there are mounted stationary cams I03 and a vertically movable cam section I04 which. together form a cam track I05 (Fig. 6) the shape of which controls the inward and outward movement of the terry bits as the dial 92 rotates relative to the cam plate 98. A thin disc I09 interposed between the cam plate and the dial assists in retaining the bits 9I properly seated in the grooves of the dial.
The cam plate 98 is positioned in predetermined angular relationship with respect to the thread feeding station of the machine to project and retract the bits at the proper time to insure preparatio'n of the body and terry threads and the formation of terry loops. When the cylinders are turned alternately in opposite directions as when knitting the heel and toe, the position at which the bits are projected is preferably shifted upon each reversal of the direction of rotation to assure proper operation. In the arrangement shown in the drawings this is accomplished quite simply by oscillating the cam plate 98. At its upper end, and above the 'top plate 94 of the machine, the spindle 93 is provided with a fitting I01 having angularly spaced arms I08, I09 which straddle a post III projecting up from the top plate 94 (Figs. 1 and 2'). The angular spacing between the arms I08, I09 permits the spindle 93 and hence the cam plate 98 to oscillate through a predetermined angle which is preferably adjustable by means of abutment screws H2, H3. As the dial 92 is oscillated in synchronism with the needle cylinders the frictional drag between the dial, the bearing plate 95 and the cams causes the shaft 93 and cam plate 98 to oscillate within the limits determined by the arms I08 and I09, there'- by properly positioning the cams for each direction of rotation.
The vertical position of the dial 92 is adjustable by vertical movement of the spindle 93. The fitting II at the upper end of the spindle '93 engages the inner end of a lever II'E (Figs. 1 and 2) which is pivoted on the post II I. A tension spring H pulls downwardly oh the outer end of the lever I14 thereby tending to lift the spindle 93-. The downward movement of theouter end of lever H4 is limited by an adjustable stop I I6 (Fig. 1). By adjustment of the stop II6, the height of the bit dial and hence the length of terry loops formed by the bits can be i'eadily adjusted. It will be noted that thespring I15 a'cting through the lever H4 and spindle 93 provides a resilient support for the dial so that the dial w'i11 not be damagedin the event the dial is 'adjusted too high or the upper needle cylinder is adjusted too low.
In order to be able to knit nomterr fabric all around the cylinder, for sample. in knitting the leg portion "or a sock, provision is made for rendering the terry bits 9| inoperative. In the arrangement shown byway of example in the drawings this is done by raising the movable cam section I04 (Figs. 4 and 6) out of engagement with the butts 91 of the terry bits so that the bits are not projected. If it is desired separately to control different groups of terry bits, the bits may be provided with butts of different lengths. For example the bits on one side of the dial may be provided with longer butts than the bits on the other side. By vertical movement of the movable cam section I04, one or more groups of bits may be put into operation or rendered inoperative as desired.
The angular position of the cam plate 98 and the shape of cam track I05 which governs the actuation of the terry bits may be utilized to contrcl accurate plating of the body thread and terry thread during knitting. As the hook of the needle engages the terry thread first and draws a partial loop over the bits 9| before engaging the body thread, the position of the threads in the hooks of the needles and hence the plating of the threads may be controlled by properly timed inward or outward movement of the terry bits. To facilitate'servicing the'machines, a gate II'I (Fig. 6) is provided through which the terry bits may be inserted or removed without dismantling the machine.
When selected needles are operated in the upper cylinder, as occurs in knitting Links-Links fabric, there must be provided a series of verge bits which serve the same purpose as the sinkers in the lower cylinder to engage the previously drawn stitches and cause them to be cast off when new stitches are drawn by the needle. The lower edges of the fins or walls between the needle grooves of the upper cylinder ordinarily serve this function, the lower end portion of the upper cylinder commonly being referred to as a verge. The verge has heretofore been integral with the cylinder or has been in the form of a separate ring secured to the lower end of the cylinder and having needle grooves aligned with the needle grooves of the cylinder. As the terry bits 9| preferably project at a level above the lower edge of the verge in order to form long terry loops, the problem arises as to how to prevent interference between the bits and the verge. The problem is complicated by the fact that during the knitting of the tubular seamless section forming the sole and instep portions of a sock such as that shown in Fig. 3, the terry bi-t's must be in operation on one side of the needle cylinder to form the terry fabric of the sole while the verge must be in operative position on the other side of the cylinder to knit the Links-Links fabric of the instep portion.
In the embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings, this problem is solved by splitting the verge into two sections H8 and H9 and providing means for raising one section independently of another so that the verge section I I8 corresponding in circumferential extent to the group of terry bits on the sole side of the needle cylinder can be raised u out of the way of these bits while the verge section I I 9 on the instep side of the cylinder remains at proper level to coopcrate with the needles in producing Links-Links fabric. As shown in Fig. 4 the verge section 8 is carried by the upper needle cylinder, bein secured by suitable screws T2] to a bearingplate I22 by which the upper cylinder is supported. The bearing plate 122 is carried bythe outer race 123 of an anti-friction bearing H! of which the inner race is fixed to a hollow shaft or sleeve I25 that surrounds the spindle 93 and extends up through the top plate I94 of the machine. The upper end of the sleeve I25 is provided with a collar or fitting I26 that engages the inner end of a lever I21 which is pivotally supported at I28 by a post projecting up from the top plate 94 (Fig. 1!). The outer end of the lever I2! is connected by a link or riser I29 with one end of a rocker arm I 3| which is pivoted at I32 and is provided at the other end with a cam follower I33 adapted to engage a cam I34 on the main pattern drum 51. When the cam follower I33 ride up on cam I34, the upper needle cylinder is lifted and the verge section 8 which is carried by the upper cylinder is raised up out of the way of the bits 9| so that the latter can be operated to produce terry fabric, for example in the sole portion of a sock. During the knitting of the top portion and the leg of a sock where there is no terry, the upper needle cylinder and associatedverge section I I8 are lowered so that the two sections of the verge are at the same level thereby providing a properly positioned knocking-over edge for the upper cylinder needles knitting the vertical rib fabric of the top or the Links-Links fabric of the leg portion. An adjusting screw I35 (Fig. 1) extending through the collar I23 and adapted to engage the top plate 94 adjustably determines the lower position of the upper cylinder.
The other verge section 9 (Fig. 4) is carried by the bit dial 92 and normally remains at a constant level. As the ends of the verge section 9 carried by the dial abut the ends of the verge section 8 carried by the upper needle cylinder, the bit dial 92 is caused to rotate with the upper needle cylinder and the needle grOOVeS of the verge section I I9 are maintained in proper alignment with corresponding needle groove of the upper and lower cylinders. The split verge in accordance with my invention thus forms a simple and effective means for driving the bit dial 92 in synchronism with the needle cylinders.
In accordance with my invention, the operation of the dial bit 9| is coordinated with the raising and lowering of the verge so that the bits are in operation only when the verge section corresponding in circumferential extent to the group of bits is raised up out of the way. In the embodiment of my invention shown in the drawing mechanism for raising and lowering the movable bit cam section I04 (Fig. 4) to put the bits into and out of operation is actuated by vertical movement of the verge section II 8. As illustrated in Figs. 4, and 5a, the movable cam section I04 is carried by two posts or pins I36 which extend up through bearing sleeves or holes I31 in the cam plate 98. A lever I38 for raising the cam section I04 straddles the spindle 93 and rests loosely on the heads of the diametrically opposite bolts I02 Which provide a fulcrum for the lever to rock about a horizontal axis. A pin I39 projecting upwardly from the cam plat 98 through a hole in the lever I38 serves to locate the lever without interfering with its rocking movement. One end of the lever I38 lies under a crossbar |4| that extends across between the two pins I36 and is retained by the heads of the pins. The otherend of the lever I38 projects upwardly and is adapted to engage the lower side of the bearing plate I22 of the upper needle cylinder. The upwardly pro- J'ecting end is preferably hardened or provided with a roller to reduce friction and wear. A spring I42 acts between the movable cam section I04 14 and the cam plate 98 to press the cam section downwardly.
When the upper needle cylinder is lowered so that the verge section I I 8 is in its lower or operative position, the bearing plate I22 presses down on the left-hand end of the lever I38 as viewed in Fig. 4 and lifts the right-hand end of the lever, thereby raising the movable cam section I04 and rendering the bits 9| inactive. Interference between the bit and verge which would otherwise result in breakage of the bits is thereby positively prevented. When the verge section 8 is raised by moving the upper needle cylinder upwardly, the upward movement of the bearing plat I22 permits the movable cam section I04 to be lowered by spring I42 to operative position in which it engages the butts of the terry bits. It will thus be seen that the terry bits on the sole side of the needle cylinder can be put into operation only when the corresponding verge section 8 is raised.
An important feature of my invention from the point of view of construction and maintenance of the machine is that the dial 92, bits 9|, cam plate 98 with its associated cams and the complete operating mechanism for the movable cam section I04 are all assembled as a unit on the spindle 93 and can be removed from the machine without disturbing the relation of the parts.
The operation of the machine will be more fully understood from the following description of the steps in making articles of hosiery such as those shown in Figs. 3 and 3a. The socks are preferably produced by string work with a number of ravel courses or a draw thread between successive socks in the string. To produce the welt or anti-ravel edge 29 alternate needles are transferred to the upper cylinder and at least one course of 1x1 rib is knit. The welt cam 45 (Fig. 8) is withdrawn to render the upper cylinder needles inoperative while a plurality of welt courses are knit on lower cylinder needles only. Thereupon the welt cam again goes in to close the welt.- The 1x1 rib knitting may be continued to form the top portion 2| of the sock. However, if a broad rib top is desired, the needle selection is hanged, for example by means of jack butts 86 (Fig. 4a), to position groups of needles in the lower cylinder and intervening needles or groups of needles in the upper cylinder.
Upon completion of the top portion 2| (Fig. 3), any cams acting on jack butts or 83 (Fig. 4a) are withdrawn and the neutralizing cam 83, which has heretofore been raised to neutralize the jacks, is lowered to the position shown in Fig. 4a so that the Links-Links pattern drum becomes effective. During the knitting of the leg portion 22 all upper cylinder needles are transferred to the lower cylinder each revolution of the machine by the upper transfer cam 55 (Fig. 8) and selected needles are transferred back to the upper cylinder under control of the Links-Links pattern mechanism to provide the needle selection required for the course being knitted to produce the Links-Links pattern desired. It will be understood that during this phase of the knitting operation, selected needles throughout the circumference of the needle cylinder are subject to the control of the Links- Links pattern drum.
When the high splice portion 24 (Fig. 3) is reached, the neutralizing cam 03 (Fig. 4a) is raised sufficiently to engage the long tail jacks, i. e., all the, lacks on the soleside of the needle cylinders so that the corresponding needles are all retained in the lower cylinder to'prcduee'the outwardly facing stitches of the terry fabric of the high splice. At approximately the same time the upper needle cylinder 3| is raised by the cam I34 acting through the linkage shown in Figs 1 and 4. The upward movement of the upper needle cylinder raises the verge section HB (Fig. 4) out of the way of the terry bits on the sole side of the needle cylinder and simultaneously lowers the movable bit cam section I04 into operative position to 'engage the butts of the terry bits. The terry bits are thereby cyclically projected during rotation of the needle cylinder and cooperate with the needles to form the terry fabric of the high splice portion of the sock. The needles on the lower instep side of the needle cylinder continue under the control of the Links-Links fabric of the leg. The Links- Links mechanism and the terr mechanism thus operate concurrently.
During the knitting of the heel, the machine is operated by reciprocation or oscillation-of the needle cylinders and the needles on the instep side of the cylinders are-rendered inactiveunder control'of the switch cams 47 and 54 (Fig. 8). When the heel is completed, circular knitting is resumed to knit the sole portion 26 and integral instep portion 23 by the concurrent operation of the terry mechanism and the Links- Links mechanism as described above for the high splice and the initial part of the instep portion.
If it is desired to form the toe-band portion 21 of terry fabric throughout its coursew'ise extent the knitting of Links-Links fabric on the instep side of the needle cylinders is discontinued when the toe-band is reached and terry bits provided on the instep side of the bit dial 92 are put into operation The verge section H9 on the instep side of the dial is in this event provided with suitable openings to permit projection of the bits. The toe portion 28 is knit in the same manner as the heel and is preferably followed by one or more courses of plain knitting to provide a loopers edge. Upon completiticn of the toe the upper needlecyllnder is lowered, thereby bringing the two sections of the verge to the same'level and lifting the movable bit cam section 104 by engagement of the hearing plate I22 (Fig. 4) of. the upper cylinder with the upwardly projecting end of the lever I38; The terry bits are thereby rendered inactive and interference between the bits and the lowered Verge section H8 is positivelyprevented.
While the operation of. the machine has been described for producing articles of hosiery such as shown in Figs. 3 and 3a it will be understood that the machine is not limited to such ar ticles. Moreover, my invention is not limited'to the structural details herein described by way of example, as modifications may be made both in the knitted article and the machine. For example, in the terry portions of the fabric, terry loops may be provided in spaced wales or spaced courses instead of in consecutive wales and courses. The machine may, if desired, be provided with two or more feeding stations andc'onresponding knitting waves to produce a plurality of courses simultaneously. A multi feed machine can, for example, be advantageously usedto produce terry loops in spaced courses by actuating the terry-forming instrumentalities at one feed but not at another; WhiIe in'the patrioular arrangement shown in the drawings a section of the verge is raised by raising the upper needle cylinder, it will be understood that the verge section may be raised independently of the cylinder, for example, by being slidably mounted on the cylinder or on the dial carrying the terry instrumentalities. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that still other modifications be made within the scope of the ap pende claims.
What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1-. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder, and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of pattern controlled mechanism for transferring selected needles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, and instrumentalities cooperating with the needles to draw longer loops of one of said threads than of another to form portions of terry fabric.
2. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder, and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of pattern controlled mechanism for transferring selected needles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle Wales, and instrumentalities associated with the upper needle cylinder and cooperating with the needles to form terry loops concurrently with the formation of body stitches of the fabric.
3. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder, and. means for feeding a'plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of means for transferring needles from the upper needle cylinder to the lower needle cylinder and pattern controlled mechanism associated with the lower needle cylinder for transferring selected needles from the lower cylinder to the upper cylinder during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predeten'nined sequences in selected needle wales, and instrumentalities cooperating with the needles to draw longer loops'of one of said threadsthan of another to form portions of terry fabric.
4. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of means for transferring needles from the upper needle cylinder to the lower needle cylinder and pattern controlled mechanism associated with the lower needle cylinder for transferring selected needles from the lower cylinder to the upper cylinder during said knitting operation a to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, and instrumentalities associated with the upper needle cylinder and cooperating with the needles to form terry loops concurrently with the formation of body stitches of the fabric.
5. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle a series of bits associated with said'needle cylinders, and means for cyclically moving said bits from a retracted position to an operative position in which said bits project between two of said threads and cooperate with the needles to draw longer loops of one of said threads than of the other.
,6. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles in spaced relation, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of pattern controlled mechanism for transferring selectedneedles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, a dial associated with the needle cylinders and rotatable therewith, a series of bits carried by said dial and cooperatingwith the needles to draw longer loops of one of said threads than of another.
7. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles in spaced relation, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of pattern'cont'rolled mechanism for transferring selected needles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, a dial associated with the needle cylinders and rotatable therewith, a series of bits carried by said dial and movable from a retracted position to an operative position inwhich said bits cooperate with the needles to draw longer loops of one of said threads than of another, and a cam for moving said bits between said positions.
8. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder, and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of pattern controlled mechanism for transferring selected needles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, instrumentalities cooperating with the needles to draw longer loops of one of said threads than of another, a verge section associated with the upper cylinder and cooperating with needles in the upper cylinder to draw inwardly facing stitches, means for moving said verge section vertically, and means for rendering said instrumentalities inoperative to prevent interference with said verge section when said verge section is lowered.
9. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for opcrating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by: said feeding means, of pattern controlled mechanism for transferring selected needles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, instrumentalities cooperating with the needles to draw longer loops of one of said threads than of another, a verge section associated with the upper cylinder and cooperating with needles in the upper cylinder to draw inwardly facing stitches, means for moving said verge section verticallyand means actuated by movement of said verge section for rendering said instrumentalities inoperative.
10. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in, either cylinder, and means'for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of pattern controlled mechanism for transferring seelcted needles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardl facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, instrumentalities cooperating with the needles to draw longer loops of one of said threads than of another, averge associated with the upper cylinder and comprising a plurality of arcuate sections, means for raising'a section of said verge independently of another, and coordinated means controlling the actuation of said instrumentalities.
11. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of pattern controlled mechanism for transferring selectedneedles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, a group of instrumentalities cooperating with needles in a section of the circumference of the needle cylinder to draw longer loops of one of said threads than of another, a vertically movable verge section associated with the upper needle cylinder and corresponding in circumferential extent with said group of instrumentalities and coordinated means for controlling the vertical position of said verge section and the operation of said instrumentalities.
12. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder, and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, of pattern controlled mechanism for transferring selected needles from one cylinder to the other during said knitting operation to form inwardly facing stitches and outwardly facing stitches in predetermined sequences in selected needle wales, a verge associated with the upper needle cylinder and comprising a plurality of arcuate sections, and means for raising a section of said verge independently of another section.
13. In a knitting machine having coaxial needle cylinders with needles operable in either cylinder, and means for feeding a plurality of threads to the needles, the combination with means for operating the needles to receive and knit thread fed by said feeding means, Of pattern controlled
US645862A 1945-07-14 1946-02-06 Circular knitting machine Expired - Lifetime US2435771A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2719416A (en) * 1952-07-24 1955-10-04 Wildt & Co Ltd Circular knitting machine for producing knitted articles of footwear
DE1038225B (en) * 1952-07-24 1958-09-04 Wildt & Co Ltd Double cylinder circular knitting machine for the production of socks with terry cloth stitches
US3174305A (en) * 1962-07-31 1965-03-23 Kramer Bros Inc Means for knitting terry loops

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1827677A (en) * 1929-06-14 1931-10-13 Spiers William Ltd Circular knitting machine
US2223751A (en) * 1940-01-26 1940-12-03 Interwoven Stocking Co Circular knitting machine
US2231399A (en) * 1939-05-13 1941-02-11 Interwoven Stocking Co Method of and apparatus for knitting terry fabric or hosiery containing the same
US2316823A (en) * 1942-02-19 1943-04-20 Interwoven Stocking Co Circular knitting machine
US2318643A (en) * 1942-01-17 1943-05-11 Interwoven Stocking Co Article of hosiery, including terry fabric
US2370449A (en) * 1942-08-07 1945-02-27 Interwoven Stocking Co Circular knitting machine

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1827677A (en) * 1929-06-14 1931-10-13 Spiers William Ltd Circular knitting machine
US2231399A (en) * 1939-05-13 1941-02-11 Interwoven Stocking Co Method of and apparatus for knitting terry fabric or hosiery containing the same
US2223751A (en) * 1940-01-26 1940-12-03 Interwoven Stocking Co Circular knitting machine
US2318643A (en) * 1942-01-17 1943-05-11 Interwoven Stocking Co Article of hosiery, including terry fabric
US2316823A (en) * 1942-02-19 1943-04-20 Interwoven Stocking Co Circular knitting machine
US2370449A (en) * 1942-08-07 1945-02-27 Interwoven Stocking Co Circular knitting machine

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2719416A (en) * 1952-07-24 1955-10-04 Wildt & Co Ltd Circular knitting machine for producing knitted articles of footwear
DE1038225B (en) * 1952-07-24 1958-09-04 Wildt & Co Ltd Double cylinder circular knitting machine for the production of socks with terry cloth stitches
US3174305A (en) * 1962-07-31 1965-03-23 Kramer Bros Inc Means for knitting terry loops

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