US2009694A - Knitting machine - Google Patents

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US2009694A
US2009694A US564780A US56478031A US2009694A US 2009694 A US2009694 A US 2009694A US 564780 A US564780 A US 564780A US 56478031 A US56478031 A US 56478031A US 2009694 A US2009694 A US 2009694A
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Prior art keywords
needles
cams
feeds
cam
yarns
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US564780A
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Harold E Houseman
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STANDARD TRUMP BROS MACHINE CO
STANDARD-TRUMP BROS MACHINE Co
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STANDARD TRUMP BROS MACHINE CO
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Priority to US564780A priority patent/US2009694A/en
Priority claimed from DESt48568D external-priority patent/DE637827C/en
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/26Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics
    • D04B9/28Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics with colour patterns
    • D04B9/34Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics with colour patterns by plating
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/10Patterned fabrics or articles
    • D04B1/12Patterned fabrics or articles characterised by thread material
    • D04B1/126Patterned fabrics or articles characterised by thread material with colour pattern, e.g. intarsia fabrics
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/22Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration
    • D04B1/24Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel
    • D04B1/26Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel stockings
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B15/00Details of, or auxiliary devices incorporated in, weft knitting machines, restricted to machines of this kind
    • D04B15/66Devices for determining or controlling patterns ; Programme-control arrangements
    • D04B15/80Devices for determining or controlling patterns ; Programme-control arrangements characterised by the thread guides used
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/20Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles with provision for narrowing or widening; with reciprocatory action, e.g. for knitting of flat portions

Description

July 30, 1935. H E HQUSEMAN l 2,009,694
KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed March 16, 1931 5 Sheets-Shea?I l /ZMW ya? /777' iwf/6.
juy 30, 1935. ||l El HOUSEMAN 2,009,694
KNITTING MACHINE Original Filed March 16,l 1931 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Hara/af f. /z/aasmar wfiaj July v30, 1935.
H. E. HoUsr-:MAN
KNITTING MACHINE origina Filed March 16, 1931 5 Sheets-Sheet I5 -LII /7/asema/z @T1 WM Patented July 30, 1935 PATi-:NTA OFFICE KNITTING MACHINE Harold E. Houseman, EdgeMoor, Del., assignor to Standard-Trump Bros. Machine Company, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Original application March `16, 1931, Serial No.
522,864. Divided and this application September 24, 1931, Serial No. 564,780Y v 19 Claims.
This invention relates broadly to a knitted fabric and a method and machine for producing the same. More specifically it relates to a stocking embodying the fabric and a method and machine for making the stocking.
This application is a division of my application Serial Number 522,864, filed March 16, 1931 in which the fabric and method are now claimed.
Heretofore it has been found desirable for various reasons to produce stockings of a type said to have a split foot in which the instep, beingV visible when low shoes are worn, is composed of suitable yarn or yarns generally similar to those used for the leg portion of the stocking, While the sole is composed of different yarn, sometimes undyed to cater to certain hygienic ideas, but in general of heavier or stronger character to better withstand wear. Such stockings generally also involve a split fabric above the heel, in which the rear of the leg above the heel is composed of wear resisting yarn where a low shoe would tend to destroy the fabric, this arrangement involving the so-called high splice.
The machines heretofore used to produce such stockings involve two feeds, generally designated the sole and instep feeds in view of their particular functions, each of the feeds being associated with the usual knitting cams, etc. k.In such machines the upper leg is knit from a yarn at the main feed, but the lower leg, at the high splice, and the instep are knit from a similar yarn at the instep feed. Desirably, of course, the same appearance should be maintained continuously from the leg into the instep but since two yarn supplies are necessarily used, and color, weight and texture are rarely duplicated to such degree that differences escape notice, there is almost always a noticeable line of demarcation at the place where change from one yarn to the 40 other occurs. Besides this, the change is further made noticeable by any slight variations in sizes of loops occurring because of varying tensions, different adjustments of cams, etc. Obviously, this change of feeds also makes it diilicult if not impossible to continue a design from the leg into the instep.
In an application of Wilbur L. Houseman, Serial Number 511,949, filed January 29, 1931, there is disclosed a fabric, more specifically a stocking, and a method and machine for its production which has portions formed by both rotary and reciprocatory knitting in which the .same yarn or yarns are continued from one portion into the other without a break; or specilically, in which a design formed by normal and reverse plating is so continued Without interruption.
It is the broad object ofthe present invention to provide a fabric having rotary and reciprocatory portions involving designs in each formed by selective floating of a yarn or yarns normally appearing in plating relationship.
It is a further object of the invention to pro.- vide both a method and machine for effecting this result and overcoming the difliculties inher-A ent in the manipulation of yarns with the production of float designs during reciprocation. Specifically it is the object of the invention to modify the machine of the Wilbur L. Houseman application above referred to for the production of float designs, various features of this machine being retained.
The accomplishment of these and otherl objects will be apparent from the following description read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:
Fig. 1 is a planview, partly in section, of a portion of a machine embodying the invention;
Fig. 2 is a plan View of certain details, parts being omitted for clearness;
Fig. 3 is an inside development of the needle cams;
Fig. 4 is a radially exaggerated development of'a. plan view of the saine showing the positions assumed by the cams during reciprocatory formation of patterns;
Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view of the butt ends of the various types of needles used in the machine;
Fig. 6'is a side elevation of the upper center cam and its associated parts; and
Fig. '7 is an elevation of a stocking embodying featuresV of the invention.
The illustrated. machine is of the rotary needle-stationary cam type having independently 40 movable latch needles and involves various details of construction disclosed in the above mentioned Wilbur L. Houseman application and my Patent 1,725,275, dated August 20, 1929 to which reference may be madev forA such details, only so much being illustrated in the present disclosure asis necessary for an understanding of the invention. The needle cylinder 2 mounts vthe needles in the usual fashion, these needles, designated generally bythe numeral 4 being of various different types hereafter referred to. Broadly speaking, the needlesare arranged in a series consisting of two semicircles one of which is ,composed of longt butt needles, and the other of which is composed of short butt needles with the exception of the two end ones which have intermediate length butts, certain of the needles being further provided with shoulders of different radial extent for the determination of patterns. The needle cylinder is driven through the usual clutch connections for both rotation and oscillation, one of the intermediate driving gears being illustrated at 6 in Fig. 1.
The needles cooperate in the formation of stitches with the usual sinkers moved by suitable cams in the proper wave. The needles take yarn at two feeds in the present machine designated generally as 8 and I8, the former of which will hereafter be called the instep feed and the latter the sole feed in View of their respective most distinctive functions. These feeds are angularly spaced 112.5 apart, the direction of rotation of the needle cylinder during rotary knitting being counterclockwise as viewed in plan.
Referring particularly to Figs. 3 and 4 in which the needle cams are illustrated in developed elevation and exaggerated plan respectively, the cams at the instep feed 8 comprise the upper center cam I2, the lower center cam I4, deector cams I8 and I8, needle depressing cams 28 and 22, stitch cams 24 and 26, xed cams 32 and 34, and end cams 36 and 38'. Similarly the cams at the sole feed comprise the upper center cam 48, the lower center cam 42, stitch cams 44 and 46, end cams 48 and 58, and guard cam 52. A switch cam 54, angularly located as illustrated in Fig. 2 is urged downwardly by a spring 56 and is designed to engage onlylong butt needles to elevate them when they move in one direction but to yield to permit them to pass when they move in the opposite direction. A main switch cam 58 is also provided, this cam being carried by a shaft journalled and slidable in a suitable bearing and carrying a pin 68 engaging a slot 62 in the bearing so that when urged to lowered position by a spring 63 it will occupy an cuter position wherein it engages long butt needles only but when raised by the action of cam 66 on arm 64 it will move inwardly to engage the butts of all the needles. The cam 66 is carried by an arm 61 moved by the main cam disc as illustrated in the application referred to above, this arm also carrying a cam 68 operable when moved inwardly to eifect depression of lowering picker 'I8 to an inoperative position between the levels occupied by the butts of active and inactive needles as they reach its location. It will be noted that the lowering picker is diametrically opposite the feed I8.
The usual raising pickers 12 and 'I4 are associated with the sole feed.
At the instep feed are located a plurality of yarn `fingers 'I6 arranged to carry the yarns required in the knitting operation, certain or all of these fingers having two or more eyes so that each may carry the plurality of yarns to be associated in plating relationship during the formation of designs. Similar yarnrfingers 'I8 are provided at the sole feed. Both sets of fingers may be controlled by the usual devices to be selectively moved into or out of operation.Y
In the present machine, the upper center cam I2, instead of being fixed, as is usual, is carried by a. slide 'I1 mounted for radial movements and normally urged inwardly by a suitable spring. This slide at its inner end is provided with a bevel I9 engageable by a plunger 88 which, when engaged by a suitable cam on the main cam disc, moves upwardly forcing theV slide outwardly against the tension of the spring.
Slide 82 carries cams I6 and 24 and slide 84 carries similar cams I8 and 26, these slides being urged radially inwardly by springs 98 and 92 to positions wherein adjustable stop screws 86 and 88 therein engage upwardly extending ears 94 and 96 of rocking lever 98, pivoted as indicated at |88 and arranged to be rocked to move the slides simultaneously outwardly by the engagement therewith of the upper end of a plunger |82 movable upwardly by suitable cams on the main cam disc.
The ear 94 is provided with an adjustable stop screw |84 engageable by the end of a lever |86 urged in a clockwise direction by a spring |88, this lever having pivoted thereto arms I|2 backed by adjustable stop screws I|8 and having beveled ends engageable selectively by stacked levers I I4 cooperating with levers ||6 carried by the arm II8 which is oscillated by the eccentric groove |24 formed in the gear 6. A lever |22 pivoted to the frame carries members |28 engaging theK levers IIS, this lever |22 being selectively moved to various positions by engagement by lugs of various heights on the pattern chain |28 trained over the sprocket' wheel |26 to which intermittent movements are imparted by the usual pawl carried by the arm I I8. The selective mechanism just indicated is not described in full since details thereof are identical with those fully described in myprior Patent 1,725,275 mentioned above. So far as the present invention is concerned it is merely necessary to point out that radial movements of greater or less extent are imparted simultaneously to the slides 82 and 84 through the action of the pattern chain, these movements being effective to produce patterning as will be hereinafter pointed out. Movements imparted by the plunger |82 are independent of those imparted by the pattern chain and are not for patterning purposes.
The mechanism controlling the pattern chain to insure the proper beginning of the pattern producing cycle of operation at the initiation of the knitting of each stocking is fully described in my Patent #1,805,697 dated May 19, 1931, and is merely indicated herein.
Slides |38 and |32'carry the cams 44 and 46, these slides being yieldingly urged inwardly by springs |34 and |36, against the tension of which they are independently movable at proper times by the usual connections actuated by cams on the main cam disc. The various types of needles used in the machine are illustrated in Fig. 5 and comprise long, intermediate and short butt needles shown in rows L, I and S respectively, each of these types including needles having shoulders of various lengths illustrated in columns A, B, and C and needles without shoulders illustrated in column D. As already outlined, there are in the needles circle two intermediate butt needles, located diametrically opposite each other, there being short butt needles on one side of the diameter so defined and long butt needles on the other side. All of these needles are formed either without shoulders or with shoulders of various lengths as illustrated in Fig. 5. While there are four possible intermediate butt needles illustrated, it will be understood that at any time only two are used, the shoulder arrangements thereof being determined by their location in the make-up of a pattern. While three lengths of shoulders are illustrated, either more or less maybe provided.
The operation of the machine will be rendered clearer by a preliminary consideration of the stocking to be produced thereby, this stocking, in
a preferred form being illustrated in Fig. 7. Ihis stocking comprises a ribbed top a, produced-as usual on a rib machine and transferred to the needles of the plain fabric machine, an extended vtop b, which maybe omitted, consisting of several circularly knit courses, the leg c circularly knitted andin the present instance composed of fancy fabricl produced by selective plating and floating, this fabric extending continuously into the instep and the upper part of the foot as indicated at e .and lz, thehigh splice d, the heel f, the split sole y,
the advanced toe i, which` may be omitted if desired, consisting of several circularly knit courses, the toe k, and the loopers rounds Z. The parts knitted at the sole feed, particularly the high splice, may be formed of a plurality of yarns in plated relationship.
The radially exaggerated development of Fig. 4 will make clear the positions of the stationary cams and the ranges of movements of themovable cams. In this gurerthe lines L, I, S, A, B, C and D indicate respectively the outward extents of the butts and the shoulders and the face of the needle cylinder. The fixed cams 2e, E2, 32, i6 and 52 extend inwardly to a positionbetween the lines S and A so that they are at alltimes in position to engage all of the needle butts but clear all the shoulders. The lower iixed cams |55, 38, d8 and 53 may extend inwardly to the needle cylinder preferably forming a portion of the bearing therefor. Movable cams lf2 and fifi have a range of movement under the action of thecams referred to above between an extreme inner position between the lines S and A and outer positions in which they clear the butts of all of the needles, that is, outside the line L. The movable cam I2 may occupy alternative positions in one of. which it extends between the lines S and A so as to engage all of the needle butts and in thef other of which it extends between the iirie-s and S so as to engage the long and intermediate butts but escape engagement with the short butts. The cams associated with the slides 32 and 31| move simultaneously under the action oi both the plunger I 62 and the pattern chain. The extreme louter position of these carries the cams 24' and 26 outwardly of the line L so that they escape engagement with all of the butts. Thecams 24 and however during operation move between the linesY S and D so that they engage either all of the needle butts and none of the shoulders or Velse shoulders of various lengths, the pattern chain determining the movements between these limiting positions. The cams l and I3 are so located that even when. the cams 24 and 26 are in their extreme operating outward positions these upper deflector cams will at all times engage the `long butt needles. As clearly illustrated in this figure, the switch cam 54 engages the long butts only. Likewise the switch cam 53 engages the long butts only when it is in lower position. However, when it is in raised position it moves inwardly dueto the pin and slot arrangement illustrated in Fig. 2 so that it will lie between the lines `S and A and thus engage the butts of' all of the needles but escape engagement with the shoulders.
When the machine is in stationary conditionV prior to the beginning of a cycle of operation the needles'are levelled to receive the rib top. At this time all of the yarn iingers 'it and 'i3 are raised out of action, and cams I5, I8, 24, 2t, 44 and 45 are fully retracted to disengage all of the needle butts, the retraction of slides 82 and 84 being effected by the rise of plunger |62 under the actionof a cam on the main cam disc, and the retraction of slides |30 and |32 being similarly effected by plunger connections acted upon by cams on the main cam disc.
to engage all needle butts (but clear all shoulders) ,and lowering picker 'I0 occupies its inoperative position intermediate the levels assumedlby the butts of raised and lowered `needles during operation, cams 66 and 68 occupying, at this time, inner positions.. The pickers 12 and 'I4 ride the butts. The pattern chain isstationary in a position determining the beginning of a patterning cycle.
Following the transfer of a rib top a. to the needles, the machine is started to knit a few rounds' of yarn similar to that in the rib top to form the portion b' known as the extended top. Upon .starting of the machine, the main cam disc is advanced one step. Cams 2d, 2i, I and I8 are allowed to move inwardly in the usual fashion, rst dropping against the short butts and then subsequently moving on inwardly as the long butt 'needles pass through, this inward movement being limited by the position of the plunger |02 which is now engaging a cam of less height on the cam disc. These needle cams now occupy positions between lines S and Ain Fig. 4 so that while they engage butts of all lengths they clear all shoulders. It may be now pointed out that the inner ends of stationary cams 20, 22, 32 and 34 also occupy the same positions, the same being true of cams 40 and 52.
The cams d@ and 46 remain retracted although, if desired, the cam may be permitted to move inwardly to a position between lines S and A so to engage the butts of all of the needles and impart an upward wave thereto. 'I'his operation is similar to that of the corresponding cam illustrated in the application of Wilbur L. Houseman, Serial Number '511,949 referred to above, the object of the wave being to avoid climbing of the loops at the idle sole feed at the time the sinkers are retracted. Due to this action the loops occupy a lower position on the needles and when the needles are again lowered by the top center cam 4G the fabric loops are drawn down against the stitch drawing edges of the sinkers and the nebs are Well above the loops as they move in.
The yarn finger 'i5 which carries extended top yarn is dropped in advance of the irst needle to knit which will be the advancing medium butt suture needle. Thereafter knitting takes place on all of the needles at the instep feed to produce the extended top. During this operation the switchcam 53 remains raised so as notrto eiect the operation. The cam 54 swings up during each revolution to allow long butt needles to pass, the motion of the needles during revolution being from right to left as viewed in Figs. 3 and 4.
After the extended top is completed the main cam disc is advanced another step and rotary knitting ofthe upper leg starts. As the movement of the cam disc-takes placethe extended top yarn linger is withdrawnand another finger, ora plurality of fingers carrying yarns suitable for the leg, are dropped into action at the vinstep feed. Ii striping is to take place the ngers originally dropped into action may be replaced by others during formation of the leg in the usual manner, for example, by the mechanism illustrated in my Patent Number 1,769,580.
During this period the fingers at the' sole feed rremain inactive and the switch cam 58 and cams 44 and `fi'retain their previous-positions. Ac-
Switch cam 58 is now raised and in inner position soas to beready Patterning is now commenced, being accomplished in the present instance by selective platingV and floating of the plating yarn. From the following description of operation it will be obvious that a very large variety of designs may be readily produced by the proper selection of shouldered needles and pattern cam.
As the main cam disc advances the pattern chain |28 is put into operation being stepped intermittently by movements of the arm I I8. At the same time the plunger |02 rides off its cam so that the cams 24 and 2S are free to move inwardly against the needle cylinder if such movement is permitted by the lugs on the pattern chain. As the knitting now takes place the cams 24 and 26 move inwardly and outwardly so as to be at all times in position to engage all of the butts but selectively engage or clear the various size shoulders. The two yarns extending from the fingers 'I6 occupy different paths so that while both yarns will be engaged by the needlespassing through a normal knitting wave, if any of the needles is prematurely depressed, it will engage one of the yarns and escape engagement with the other so that the latter will float,.this latter yarn during normal operation appearing on the face of the fabric in plating relationship to the one which is solely knit upon the occurrence of the premature depression. The operation of the arrangement in this respect is entirely similar to that described in my prior Patent 1,725,275 and accordingly need not be described in greater detail herein.
Following the rotary knitting of the leg, the main cam disc again advances and reciprocatory knitting begins for the formation of the high splice reciprocation taking place through 360. Since the pattern is to be continued the yarns previously being knit at the instep feed retain their active locations. The finger 'I8 whichcarries the high splice yarn or yarns is lowered into action. As the cams 24 and 26 must remain actively engaging shoulders so as to produce patterns, they cannot be withdrawn as in the Wilbur L. Houseman application to clear the short butt needles which now must not knit at the instep feed, and accordingly other means must be used to render the short buttneedles inactive at this feed. To this end, the topcenter cam I2 is withdrawn to clear the short butt needles by the rise of plunger 80 under the Aaction of a suitable cam on the main disc, the position of cam I2 being such that it continues to engage long and intermediate butt needles. Accordingly, the short butt needles ride over both cams 24 and 26 in moving in both directions. The short butt needles are depressed by cams 20 and 22.r v
Cam 44 now moves into action joining cam 46 which is preferably already in action for the reasons pointed out above. Switch 'cam 58 is lowered by the partial retraction of lever 61 and simultaneously moves outwardly so that it will engage and raise long butt needles but miss short and intermediate butt needles. The movement of lever 6T is, however, partial so that the lowering picker 'I0 retains its inactive position, the cam 68 being so designed'asvnot to release it upon such partial movement. The pattern chain continues to move without interruption. Because of reciprocatory knitting the usual take up sweeps through which the yarns at both feeds pass are rendered active.
Assuming, rst, acounterclockwise reciprocation of the needle cylinder, the intermediate butt needle which leads the long butt needles rides up cam 26 and is depressed by center cam I2 and stitch cam 24 taking either one or both yarns at Vthe instep feed. The taking of the yarns depends of course on the type of shoulder the needle carries and the position at that time of the cam 24. It then rides up cam 36, passes switch cam 58 by which it is not engaged and follows the short butt needles up over cam 46 and below cams 4I) and 44 taking the high splice yarn at the sole feed and thereby forming a suture between the yarns at the two feeds. The long butt needles follow this suture needle through the cams at the instep feed and also take one or both yarns at that place. However, the long butts do engage the switch cam 58 and are raised thereby so that they ride above thev cams at the sole feed. The long butt needles are brought down into action at the instep feed by the cams I6 and I8.
The intermediate butt needle which follows the long butt needles and precedes the short butt needles starts from a position adjacent switch cam 58 and rides up the end of cam 46 until it engages the picker 'I4 by which it is raised whereupon it follows the long butt needles through the cams at the-instep feed taking one or more yarns there and finally reaching a position adjacent the switch cam 58 without being raised thereby. The short butt needles following this intermediate butt needle ride over cam 46, beneath the picker 14, are moved downwardly by cams 40 and 44 to take the high splice yarn, pass switch cam 54 without engagement, ride upwardly over cam 2G pass cam I2 without engagement therewith, pass above cam 24, and are then depressed by cam 2U. In view of the fact that they are not lowered by the cam 24 they do not take any yarn at the instepfeed.
In a counterclockwise reciprocation a reverse series of events occur. In this case the switch cam 54 takes the place of switch cam 58 and likewise picker l2V lifts the medium butt needle leading the short butt needles.
From the above it will be seen that the yarns at the instep feed are selectively knitted by the long butt needles and both of the medium butt needles on each reciprocation with the formation of either plating or floating in accordance with 'the pattern determined by their shouldersv and thek pattern chain. The high splice yarn at the sole feed is knitted by the short butt needles and that medium butt needle which leads the long butt needles in that stroke. It is to be observed that this alternate suture operation of the medium butt needles is desirable since it forms a substantial but non-bulky seam by the avoidance of excessive yarns in the loops thereof. Since the patterning occurs at the instep feed there is no break-at the change from rotation to reciprocation.
When the knitting at the heel is to begin the main cam disc is again given an intermittent movement and the parts operate to produce the heel in substantially the conventional manner. At this time in order to prevent interruption of the pattern, the pattern chain is stopped in the usual manner by the action of a suitable cam. Cams I6, I8, 24 and 26 are fully withdrawn and yarn linger or lingers 'i6 previously active are raised, this raising being at a point which will cause the yarn or yarns to knit last on the medium butt which is trailing behind the long butt needles when the cylinder is traveling in a counterclockwise direction. These yarns may be clamped and out` but are preferably allowed to float from this needle to the raised yarn finger. Cams 44 and 46 remain in action since the heel is to be knit at the sole feed. The cam 68 remains in position to retain the lowering picker inactive.
The change to the heel yarn having been made at the sole feed the narrowing proceeds in the usual manner, the raising pickers 'l2 and 14 being operative upon the medium and short butt needles while the long butt needles are raised out of action. When narrowing has been completed the cam disc is again stepped around. The only effect of this is to cause lever 6T' to rock further outwardly and permit the lowering picker 'l0 to rise and become operative in theu'sual manner to lower the needles two at a time while the pickers 'l2 and 14 continue to raise them one at a time.
When the heel is completed the disc again advances, restoring all of the elements to the position occupied during the knitting of the high splice, the'main yarn or yarns being reintroduced so that the suture needle which last knit again resumes knitting while the cylinder travels in a counterclockwise direction. A suitable sole yarn replaces the heel yarn, the movements of the pattern` chain continuing from the stopping position. Since the operation is the same as that aboveidescribed during the formation of the high splice it need not be again repeated.
Whenv the sole is completed the cam disc again advances. All fingers 'l5 are raised out of action so that withdrawal takes place on the medium butt suture needle following the long butt needles while the cylinder is traveling in a counterclockwise direction, while the finger 18 which carries the heel yarn is lowered into action to replace the sole yarn nger. Cams I6, I8, 24 and 28 are Withdrawn. Switch cam 58 is raised. The needle cylinder rotates. Accordingly, all of the needles knit at the sole feed to form the advanced toe z'.
The patternchain Inow continues to advance'Y untilit is arrested, as fully described in my Patl ent No. 1,805,697. Stopping of the chain will occur at some time dur'ing the nisln'ng of the stocking. The chain thus becomes ready to properly start the pattern in a subsequent stocking.`
After the formation of the several courses form- I ing the advanced toe the disc again moves bringing the parts into position to perform the narrowing'and then the widening for the toe, the motion of the needle cylinder again becoming reciprocatory. The operations in both narrowing and widening resemble those occurring in the formation of the heel and are not therefore `repeated. p
Following the completion of the widening operation, rotary knitting is resumed, the parts being in the same positions as in the formation of to effect levelling and the machine stops.rv The cycle is-thus completed and a new rib-top may be transferred to the machine.
During the above cycle of operation various different yarns have been inserted at both feeds. At the instep feed, for example, there is first inserted the extended top yarn which is of com'- paratively` light weight. Similar changes take place at the sole feed, the high splice and sole yarns `being generally lighter than thevyarn or yarns constituting the heel, toe, etc. Accordingly, in order to produce proper results it is desirable that various cam adjustments bev provided. Such adjustments may preferably take the form of those illustrated in the application of Wilbur L. Houseman referred to above to which reference may be made for details.
It willbe clear that numerous `changes may be made in details of construction and also by the replacement of certain mechanism by nonequivalent but analogous mechanism without departing from the spirit of the invention.
In the following claims for simplicity of eX- pression the term instep has been used to apply to theentire front and top split portion of a stocking. That is, it refers broadly to such portions of a stocking as are designated at either` c or h, or both, in Fig.y '7. Also, where reference is made to a common or same yarn it will be understood that portions of yarn from the same source are indicated.
What I claim and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:
l. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, twofeeds,velements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to forml stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory move-- ments to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation 0f yarns at at least one of the feeds during reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and iioating, said last means including devices for prematurely selectively depressing needles during movements in both directions relatively to yarns fed from stationary guiding means, the depressed needles failing to engage the same yarn in both movements. Y
2. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and floating, said last means including devices for selectively manipulating needles to move them relatively to yarns fed from stationary guiding means to cause them to fail to engage the same yarn during movements in both directions.
3. A knitting machine includingy a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with theV needles in the `formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds, cams associated with the feeds for actuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, first, rotary movements while only one feed is active to produce one portion of fabric, and, secondly, recip, rocatory movements While both feeds are active to produce a split portion of fabric having two parts, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at that, feed which is active during rotation to produce patterns by plating and floating during both rotary and reciprocatory knitting, said last means including a plurality of devices one of which is operable to selectively manipulate needles d uring movement in one direction to cause them to move relatively to yarns fed from stationary guiding means to fail to engage one yarn and the other of which is operable to selectively manipulate needles during movement in the opposite direction to cause them to move to fail to engage the same yarn, and pattern mechanism controlling said devices simultaneously whereby a pattern may extend uninterruptedly from a rotary into a reciprocatory knit portion of fabric.
4. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds, cams associated with the feeds for actuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, first, rotary movements while only one feed is active t-o produce one portion of fabric, and, secondly, reciprocatory movements while both feeds are activevto produce a split portion of fabric having two parts, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at that feed which is active during rotation to produce patterns by plating and floating during both rotary and reciprocatory knitting, said last means including a plurality of devices one of which is operable to selectively prematurely depress needles relatively to yarns fed from stationary guiding means during movement in one direction to cause them to fail to engage one yarn and the other of which is operable to selectively prematurely depressneedles during movement in the opposite direction to cause them to fail to engage the same yarn, and pattern mechanism controlling said devices simultaneously whereby a pattern may extend uninterruptedly from a rotary into a reciprocatory knit portion of fabric. Y
5. A knitting machine including a circular series of` needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less -extent than the short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating-with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and floating,l said last means including cams for prematurely depressing long.
butt needles by engagement with shoulders thereof during movements inboth directions, the depressed needles failing Vto engage the same yarn in both movements, and means preventing the depression of short butt needles by said cams during such movements.
6. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less extent than the short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and floating, said last means including cams for prematurely depressing long butt needles by engagement with shoulders kthereof during movements in both directions, the depressed needles failing to engage the same yarn inboth movements, and means preventing the depression of L short butt needles by said cams during such movements, said last means including a retractile center cam adapted, in the operation referred to, to engage long butt needles but not short butt needles.
7. A4 knitting machine including a circular series of needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less extent than the short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative rotary and reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during both rotation and reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and floating, said last means including a pair of cams, one of which prematurely depresses both long and short butt needles during rotation by engagement with shoulders thereof, and both of which prematurely depress only long butt needles by engagement with shoulders thereof during reciprocation, whereby in both cases the prematurely depressed needles fail to engage a yarn.
8. A lknitting machine including a circular series of needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less extent than the short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative rotary and reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during both rotation and reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and floating, said last means including a pair of cams, one of which prematurely depresses both long and short butt needles during rotation by engagement with shoulders thereof, and both of which prematurely depress only long butt needles by engagement with shoulders thereof during reciprocation, whereby in both cases the prematurely depressed needles fail to engage a yarn, and means preventing the depression of short butt needles by said cams during reciprocation,
9. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less extent than the short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative rotary and reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during both rotation and reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and floating, said last means including a pair of cams, one of which'prematurely depresses both long and short buttv needles during rotation by engagement With shoulders thereof, and both of which prematurely depress only long butt needles by engagement with shoulders thereof during reciprocation, whereby in both cases the prematurely depressed needles fail to engage a yarn, and means preventing the depression of short butt needles by said cams during reciprocation, said last means including a retractile center cam adapted, during reciprocation, to engage long butt needles but not short butt needles.
10. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less extentthan Vthe short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the-feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the` needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during reciprocation to produce-designs by selective plating and oating, said last means includingcams for prematurely depressing long butt needles by engagement with shoulders thereof during movements in both directions, the depressed. needles failing to engage the same yarn in both movements, and means preventing the depression of short butt needles by said cams duringA such movements, and pattern mechanism for simultaneously controlling inward and outward movements of said cams whereby they selectively engage shoulders of different lengths,
11. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less extent than the short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative rotary and reciprocatory movements tc the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during both rotation and reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and floating, said last means including a pair of cams, one of which prematurely depresses both long and short butt needles during rotation by engagement with shoulders thereof, and both of which prematurely depress only long butt needles by engagement with shoulders thereof during reciprocation, whereby in both cases the prematurely depressed needles fail to engage a yarn, and pattern mechanism for simultaneously controlling inward and outward movements of said cam whereby they selectively engage shoulders of different lengths.
12. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less extent than the short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative recipro-catory movements to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating and floating, said last means including cams for prematurely depressing long butt needles by engagement with shoulders thereof during movements in both directions, the depressed needles failing to engage the same yarn in both movements, and means preventing the depression of short butt needles by said cams during such movements, said cams serving also to draw down long butt needles by engagement with butts thereof to form plated stitches.
13. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles including sets of long and short butt needles, needles of both sets being provided with shoulders adjacent the butts and extending outwardly to a less extent than the short butts, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative rotary and reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, and means for effecting manipulation of yarns at at least one of the feeds during both rotation and reciprocation to produce designs by selective plating` and floating, said last means including a pair of cams, one of which prematurely depresses both long and short butt needles during rotation by engagement with shoulders thereof, and both of which prematurely depress onlylong butt needles by engagement with shoulders thereof during reciprocation, f,
whereby in both cases the prematurely depressed needles fail to engage a yarn, said cams serving also to draw down long butt needles by engagement with butts thereof to form plated stitches.
14. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the'formationof stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds; cams associated with the feeds for actuating the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, drivingmeans for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, first, rotary movements while only one feed is active to produce one portion of fabric, and, secondly, reciprocatory movements while both feeds are active to produce a split portion of fabric having two parts, a plurality of yarns being presented to the needles at one of said feeds during reciprocation, and means individual to the 'needles effective during reciprocation to produce selective relative positioning of the needles and yarns at a point where the needles move to take yarns at the last named feed to produce patterns by plating and floating during reciprocatory knitting.
15. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, elements cooperating with the needles in the formation of stitches, means for presenting yarns to the needles at spaced feeds, cams associated with the feeds for actuatingk the needles and elements during relative rotary or reciprocatory movements, driving means for effecting such rotary or reciprocatory movements, controlling devices for effecting, first, rotary movements while only one feed is active to produce one portion of fabric, and, secondly, reciprocatory movements while both feeds are active to produce a split portion of fabric having two parts, a plurality of yarns being presented to the needles during both rotation and reciprocation at that feed which is active during rotation, and means individual to the needles effective during both rotation and reciprocation to produce selective relative positioning of the needles and yarns at a point where the needles move to take yarns at the last named feed to produce patterns by plating and floating during both rotary and reciprocatory knitting.
16. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, a plurality of yarns being presented to the needles at one of said feeds during reciprocation, and means individual to the needles effective during reciprocation to produce selective relative positioning of the needles and yyarns at a point where the needles move to take yarns at the last named feed to produce patterns by plating and floating during reciprocatory knitting.
17. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, two feeds, elements cooperating with the needles at the feeds to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feeds, a plurality of yarns being presented to the needles at one of said feeds during reciprocation in both directions, and means individual to the needles effective during reciprocation to produce selective relative positioning of the needles and yarns at a point Where the needles move to take yarns at the last named feed to produce patterns by plating and floating during reciprocatory knitting in bo-th directions.
18. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, a. feed, elements cooperating with the needles at the feed to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feed, and means individual to the needles effective during reciprocation to produce selective relative positioning of the needles and yarns at a point where the needles move to takeiyarns at said feed to produce patterns by plating and floating during recprocatory knitting.
19. A knitting machine including a circular series of needles, a feed, elements cooperating with the needles at the feed to form stitches, means for imparting relative reciprocatory movements to the needles and feed, and means individual to the needles effective during reciproton in both directions te produce selective relative positioning of the needles and yarns at a point where the needles'move to take yarns at said feed to produce patterns by plating and floating during reciprocatory knitting in both directions.
HAROLD E. HOUSEMAN.
US564780A 1931-03-16 1931-09-24 Knitting machine Expired - Lifetime US2009694A (en)

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US52286431A true 1931-03-16 1931-03-16
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US564780A US2009694A (en) 1931-03-16 1931-09-24 Knitting machine
DESt48568D DE637827C (en) 1931-09-24 1931-11-21 Process and circular knitting machine for the production of split tubular fabric

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2543172A (en) * 1942-08-07 1951-02-27 Bata Narodni Podnik Circular knitting machine
US3108459A (en) * 1960-08-22 1963-10-29 Textile Machine Works Means for and method of operating circular knitting machines
WO2015181714A1 (en) * 2014-05-27 2015-12-03 Santoni S.P.A. Method for manufacturing a weft knit fabric and fabric obtained with the method
WO2019149387A1 (en) * 2018-02-01 2019-08-08 Lonati S.P.A. Method for the production of portions of manufacture by means of a circular knitting machine with needle cylinder that can be actuated with an alternating rotary motion about its own axis

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2543172A (en) * 1942-08-07 1951-02-27 Bata Narodni Podnik Circular knitting machine
US3108459A (en) * 1960-08-22 1963-10-29 Textile Machine Works Means for and method of operating circular knitting machines
WO2015181714A1 (en) * 2014-05-27 2015-12-03 Santoni S.P.A. Method for manufacturing a weft knit fabric and fabric obtained with the method
WO2019149387A1 (en) * 2018-02-01 2019-08-08 Lonati S.P.A. Method for the production of portions of manufacture by means of a circular knitting machine with needle cylinder that can be actuated with an alternating rotary motion about its own axis
US11047075B2 (en) 2018-02-01 2021-06-29 Lonati S.P.A. Method for the production of portions of manufacture by means of a circular knitting machine with needle cylinder that can be actuated with an alternating rotary motion about its own axis

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