US20110203792A1 - System, method and assembly for wellbore maintenance operations - Google Patents

System, method and assembly for wellbore maintenance operations Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110203792A1
US20110203792A1 US12968503 US96850310A US2011203792A1 US 20110203792 A1 US20110203792 A1 US 20110203792A1 US 12968503 US12968503 US 12968503 US 96850310 A US96850310 A US 96850310A US 2011203792 A1 US2011203792 A1 US 2011203792A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
wellbore
drainage
production
fluid
production wellbore
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12968503
Inventor
Mark D. Looney
Robert S. Lestz
Stephen David Cassidy
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Chevron USA Inc
Original Assignee
Chevron USA Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/30Specific pattern of wells, e.g. optimizing the spacing of wells
    • E21B43/305Specific pattern of wells, e.g. optimizing the spacing of wells comprising at least one inclined or horizontal well
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/12Methods or apparatus for controlling the flow of the obtained fluid to or in wells

Abstract

Methods for performing a wellbore maintenance operation on a system of wellbores used for improved oil recovery are disclosed. A plurality of wellbores are drilled and perforated to receive production fluids from a reservoir. The wellbores are fluidly connected to a production well that is drilled to a depth below the perforations of the wellbores. The production fluids drain and collect in the production well for delivery to the surface. A pump can be used for delivering the production fluids from the production well. During repair and maintenance operations, a fluid is injected into the production well for safely removing the pump components. The fluid is counterbalanced by the pressures in the connected wellbores such that the fluid does not rise above the perforations in the connected wellbores.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO A RELATED APPLICATION
  • The present application for patent claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application bearing Ser. No. 61/286,520, filed on Dec. 15, 2009, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • This invention relates to oil field production apparatus and techniques, and more particularly, to such apparatus and techniques, including wellbore maintenance operations, for use in the production of low pressure wells.
  • BACKGROUND
  • In a typical five-spot producing pattern, four production wells are spaced around a production well that is centrally located. Each well operates independently. Rod pumps can be used to assist in lifting the production fluids, which are typically oil and water, to the surface. Pumps for artificial lift extend the field life by reducing the bottomhole pressure and thereby recovering more oil economically. Typically the bottom of the rod pumping string is placed above the producing interval in order to allow fluid separation and minimize the possibility of the string becoming stuck. Fluid levels should be above the pumping string intake to avoid “pounding the pump” which increases wear and reduces the life of the equipment. This in turn results in an increase of backpressure being placed on the reservoir due to the hydrostatic head. Minimizing this hydrostatic head would increase production rates and extend field life and reserves.
  • During fairly routine well maintenance operations, wells are often “killed” in order to safely remove and repair the rod strings. Killing a well involves injecting a high density, typically water based, fluid into the production well to provide sufficient hydrostatic pressure to keep the well from flowing. Oftentimes this fluid is displaced into the reservoir. In low pressure gas wells, rod pumps are used to keep water out of the reservoir as much as possible. If significant concentrations of water get into the reservoir, the pressure in the reservoir may not be high enough to move it back out. This often results in a significant effort to get these wells back producing. Sometimes the wells are never successfully returned to production.
  • SUMMARY
  • According to an aspect of the present invention, a method of performing a wellbore maintenance operation is disclosed. The method includes providing a drainage wellbore and a production wellbore. The drainage wellbore is perforated such that the drainage wellbore receives reservoir fluids from a producing zone of a subterranean reservoir. The production wellbore is in fluid communication with the drainage wellbore, such as through a drainage string, so that the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore flow to the production wellbore. Fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the flow of the reservoir fluids from the drainage wellbore to the production wellbore is stopped. Maintenance is then performed on the production wellbore.
  • In one or more embodiments, fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the elevation of the perforations in the drainage wellbore. In one or more embodiments, fluid injection is stopped prior to the fluid reaching the perforations in the drainage wellbore.
  • In one or more embodiments, at least two drainage wellbores are provided and fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the perforations in the two drainage wellbores. In one or more embodiments, fluid injection is stopped prior to the fluid reaching any of the perforations in the two drainage wellbores.
  • In one or more embodiments, gas is injected into the drainage wellbore to force the fluid back up through production wellbore and allow the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore to flow to the production wellbore. The reservoir fluids can then be produced from the production wellbore.
  • According to another aspect of the present invention, a method of performing a wellbore maintenance operation is disclosed. The method includes providing a system of wellbores including a drainage wellbore, a drainage string, and a production wellbore for producing reservoir fluids. The drainage wellbore includes a perforation such that the drainage wellbore receives reservoir fluids from a producing zone of a subterranean reservoir. The drainage string extends between the drainage wellbore and the production wellbore. Reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore flow through the drainage string to the production wellbore for production. A fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the hydrostatic pressure in the production wellbore is sufficient to stop the flow of the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore from flowing to the production wellbore. Maintenance is then performed on the production wellbore.
  • In one or more embodiments, fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the elevation of the perforations in the drainage wellbore. In one or more embodiments, fluid injection is stopped prior to the fluid reaching the perforations in the drainage wellbore.
  • In one or more embodiments, at least two drainage wellbores are provided and fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the perforations in the two drainage wellbores. In one or more embodiments, fluid injection is stopped prior to the fluid reaching any of the perforations in the two drainage wellbores.
  • In one or more embodiments, gas is injected into the drainage wellbore to force the fluid back up through production wellbore and allow the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore to flow to the production wellbore. The reservoir fluids can then be produced from the production wellbore.
  • According to another aspect of the present invention, a method of performing a wellbore maintenance operation is disclosed. The method includes providing a drainage wellbore and a production wellbore. The drainage wellbore receives reservoir fluids from a producing zone of a subterranean reservoir. The production wellbore is in fluid communication with the drainage wellbore such that the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore flow to the production wellbore. A fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the hydrostatic pressure in the production wellbore is sufficient to stop the flow of the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore from flowing to the production wellbore. Maintenance is then performed on the production wellbore. Gas is then injected into the drainage wellbore to force the fluid back up through production wellbore and allow the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore to flow to the production wellbore. The reservoir fluids are then produced from the production wellbore.
  • In one or more embodiments, the drainage wellbore is in fluid communication with the producing zone of the reservoir through a perforation in the drainage wellbore. Fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the elevation of the perforations in the drainage wellbore.
  • In one or more embodiments, the drainage wellbore is in fluid communication with the producing zone of the reservoir through a perforation in the drainage wellbore. Fluid injection is stopped prior to the fluid reaching the perforations in the drainage wellbore.
  • In one or more embodiments, at least two drainage wellbores are provided, each drainage wellbore being in fluid communication with the producing zone of the reservoir through a perforation in the drainage wellbore. Fluid is injected into the production wellbore until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the perforations in the two drainage wellbores.
  • In one or more embodiments, at least two drainage wellbores are provided, each drainage wellbore being in fluid communication with the producing zone of the reservoir through a perforation in the drainage wellbore. Fluid injection is stopped prior to the fluid reaching any of the perforations in the two drainage wellbores.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic, sectional view of a prior art arrangement of production wells extending into a reservoir having hydrocarbons.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic, sectional view of an arrangement of wells extending into a reservoir having hydrocarbons according to an aspect of the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic, sectional view of the arrangement of FIG. 2 for workover operations.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring to prior art FIG. 1, a plurality of production wells 11 are spaced for producing hydrocarbons from a reservoir 13. Production wells are spaced in a typical five-spot producing pattern, as shown in FIG. 1, for production of hydrocarbons from reservoir 13. Each well 11 operates independently in the five-spot pattern shown in FIG. 1. Each well 11 typically comprises a plurality of casing strings inserted into the well after being drilled and then cemented into place. The plurality of casing strings collectively define the outer boundary or outer casing 15 of well 11. For ease of illustration, the plurality of casing strings of outer casing 15 are represented in FIG. 1 as a single string of casing. After reaching the desired depth in reservoir 13, such that well 11 extends to oil sands 19—a portion of a reservoir having hydrocarbons, the outer casing is perforated. Forming perforations 17 allows fluid communication between oil sands 19 of reservoir 13 and the interior of well 11.
  • Each well 11 typically includes a string of production casing or tubing 21 that is carried within outer casing 15. Tubing 21 has an opening for receiving production fluids (typically oil, water, and gas) at its lower end. Packer seals 23 are positioned between production tubing 21 and casing 15 to force production fluids from reservoir 13 to flow through production tubing 21.
  • Pump assemblies 25, which have a rod pumping string positioned within production tubing 21, are used for communicating production fluids to the surface. For example, pump assemblies 25 can be used when the pressure associated with reservoir 13 is low and produced fluids do not flow to the surface. Pump assemblies 25 help to extend the life of wells 11.
  • Typically the bottom of the rod pumping string of pump assembly 25 is positioned above “the producing interval” in order to allow initial fluid separation between the gas and liquid phases of the production fluids, and to minimize the possibility of the string becoming stuck. It is preferable that the fluid levels of the liquids in the production fluids remain above the pumping string intake to avoid “pounding the pump” which increases wear and reduces the life of the equipment. Maintaining the liquid levels of the production fluids above the intake of pump assembly 25 increases the hydrostatic head within production tubing 21 which in turn results in backpressure being placed on reservoir 13. Reducing this hydrostatic head can further increase production rates and extend field life associated with reservoir 13.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, a plurality of drainage wellbores 27 extend to production depths within reservoir 13. Drainage wellbores 27 are spaced apart similar to the outer production wells 11 in the five-spot producing pattern of FIG. 1. Drainage wellbores 27 have perforations 29 formed in the respective outer casings 31 for receiving production fluids from reservoir 13. Perforation 29 associated with one drainage wellbore 27 can be at a different reservoir depth from perforation 29 of another drainage wellbore 27 for optimal hydrocarbon production. Each drainage wellbore 27 also includes packer seal 32 positioned within casing 31 above perforation 29.
  • Production well 11′ extends into reservoir 13 adjacent drainage wellbores 27. Production well 11′ is drilled and completed with substantially the same components as wells 11 in FIG. 1, except that production well 11′ extends deeper into reservoir 13 than drainage wellbores 27. A plurality of drainage strings 33 extend between a lower end portion of production well 11′ and drainage wellbores 27 so that production well 11′ is in fluid communication with drainage wellbores 27. Because lower end portion of production well 11′ is deeper than drainage wellbores 27, gravity helps production fluids from drainage wellbores 27 to collect within production well 11′ for collection with pump assembly 25′. Drainage strings 33 can be formed with directional drilling techniques when first drilling drainage wellbores 27 and production well 11′, or with directional drilling between existing wells in an older field. Drainage strings 33 preferably comprise a string of casing or tubing that is installed after drilling.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, pump assembly 25′ is disposed within production well 11′. Drainage wellbores 27 do not include pump assemblies 25′. This inherently reduces the amount of maintenance associated with the wells of the five-spot pattern shown in FIG. 2. Moreover, this also helps to reduce the cost and maintenance associated with pump assemblies 25 (FIG. 1) by only having a single pump assembly 25′ (FIG. 2). In FIG. 2, production well 11′ is positioned in the center of drainage wellbores 27. However, production well 11′ can be any of the positions in the five-spot pattern. Furthermore, drainage wells 27 and production well 11′ can be in other production patterns. In the system of FIG. 2, packer seals 32 can be cheaper packer seals since there is not a string of production tubing being sealed between outer casing 31. This also provides for additional cost savings and reduction of maintenance.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, production well 11′ can be without any perforations 17 such that production well 11′ is merely used for collecting and delivering production fluids from drainage wellbores 27. Not having any perforations within production well 11′ advantageously allows the rod pumping string of pump assembly 25′ to be set below the perforations in all of the other connecting drainage wellbores 27. This achieves the lowest possible bottom-hole pressure in the connecting wells by having a fluid level below the perforations while still maintaining fluid level over the rod string entry. In such a system, higher production rates can be achieved and additional reserves can be realized.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates how the assembly of the present invention is advantageous during workover operations. During workover operations on the well, the pump rod string of pump assembly 25′ is often removed. Additionally, pump rod string of pump assembly 25′ can be removed for maintenance and repair of pump assembly 25′, which is fairly routine.
  • As previously described, to perform such operations in conventional well arrangements, such as production wells 11 shown in FIG. 1, wells are often “killed” in order to safely pull the rod pumping string of pump assembly. “Killing” production well 11 (FIG. 1), typically involves injecting a high density, typically water-based, fluid into production well 11. This provides sufficient hydrostatic pressure to keep production well 11 from flowing (i.e., cease flow of production fluids into production well 11 through perforations 17). It is common for the injected fluid used for “killing” well 11 to get displaced into reservoir 13. In low pressure gas wells, such as production wells 11 shown in FIG. 1 and production well 11′ shown in FIG. 2, pump assemblies 25,25′ are used to keep water out of reservoir 13 as much as possible. Reducing backflow of water into reservoir 13 is important because if significant concentrations of water enter into reservoir 13, the pressure in reservoir 13 may not be high enough to move the water-based injected fluid back out. When the water-based injection fluid does flow into reservoir 13, this often results in a significant effort to get production well 11 producing again—sometimes production wells 11 are never successfully returned to production.
  • According to a method of the present invention, fluidly connected production well 11′ and drainage wellbores 27 act as the closed end of a manometer. In order to “kill” production well 11′ and drainage wellbores 27, fluid can be injected into the bore of production well 11′. As the fluid level of the injected fluid and the produced fluid collecting in production well 11′, drainage wellbores 27, and drainage strings 33 rises, the fluid compresses the separated gas above it in drainage wellbores 27. As seen in FIG. 3, fluid can be injected into production well 11′ until the fluid level within production well 11′ is at least above perforations 29 in all of drainage wellbores 27. The hydrostatic pressure in production well 11′ is balanced by the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in drainage wellbores 27 plus the pressure of the compressed gas phase in drainage wellbores 27. As a result, the fluid level in drainage wellbores 27 is lower than in production well 11′, and the fluid can be kept below perforations 29. With the fluid (produced fluid and the water-based injected fluid) being below perforations 29, the risk of the fluids flowing into reservoir 13 is significantly reduced. Therefore, maintenance and repairs can be performed while production well 11′ is “killed,” while reducing the difficulties with returning production well 11′ to production.
  • Moreover, returning production well 11′ after maintenance is performed is simplified as gas can be injected into drainage wellbores 27 to push the fluid back up through production wellbore 11′. Accordingly, this reduces the likelihood of the “kill” fluid from entering perforations 29 and allows the reservoir fluids received by drainage wellbore 29 to resume flowing to production wellbore 11′. Accordingly, the reservoir fluids can then be produced again from the production wellbore.
  • While the invention has been shown in only some of its forms, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited, but susceptible to various changes without departing from the scope of the invention.

Claims (19)

  1. 1. A method of performing a wellbore maintenance operation, the method comprising:
    (a) providing a drainage wellbore that is perforated with a perforation such that the drainage wellbore receives reservoir fluids from a producing zone of a subterranean reservoir;
    (b) providing a production wellbore in fluid communication with the drainage wellbore such that the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore flow to the production wellbore;
    (c) injecting fluid into the production wellbore until the flow of the reservoir fluids from the drainage wellbore to the production wellbore is stopped; and
    (d) performing maintenance on the production wellbore.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1, wherein the production wellbore is in fluid communication with the drainage wellbore through a drainage string that extends between the lower portions of the drainage wellbore and the production wellbore.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1, wherein the fluid is injected into the production wellbore in step (b) until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the elevation of the perforation in the drainage wellbore.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1, wherein the injecting of the fluid into the production wellbore in step (b) is stopped prior to the fluid level reaching the perforation in the drainage wellbore.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1, wherein:
    at least two drainage wellbores are provided in step (a); and
    the fluid is injected into the production wellbore in step (b) until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the perforations in the at least two drainage wellbores.
  6. 6. The method of claim 1, wherein:
    at least two drainage wellbores are provided in step (a); and
    the injecting of the fluid into the production wellbore in step (b) is stopped prior to the fluid level reaching any of the perforations in the at least two drainage wellbores.
  7. 7. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
    (e) injecting a gas into the drainage wellbore to force the fluid back up through production wellbore and allow the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore to flow to the production wellbore; and
    (f) producing the reservoir fluids from the production wellbore.
  8. 8. A method of performing a wellbore maintenance operation, the method comprising:
    (a) providing a system of wellbores comprising a drainage wellbore that is perforated with a perforation such that the drainage wellbore receives reservoir fluids from a producing zone of a subterranean reservoir, a production wellbore for producing the reservoir fluids, and a drainage string extending therebetween such that reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore flow through the drainage string to the production wellbore;
    (b) injecting a fluid into the production wellbore until the hydrostatic pressure in the production wellbore is sufficient to stop the flow of the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore from flowing to the production wellbore; and
    (c) performing maintenance on the production wellbore.
  9. 9. The method of claim 8, wherein the fluid is injected into the production wellbore in step (b) until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the elevation of the perforation in the drainage wellbore.
  10. 10. The method of claim 8, wherein the injecting of the fluid into the production wellbore in step (b) is stopped prior to the fluid level reaching the perforation in the drainage wellbore.
  11. 11. The method of claim 8, wherein:
    at least two drainage wellbores are provided in step (a); and
    the fluid is injected into the production wellbore in step (b) until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the perforations in the at least two drainage wellbores.
  12. 12. The method of claim 8, wherein:
    at least two drainage wellbores are provided in step (a); and
    the injecting of the fluid into the production wellbore in step (b) is stopped prior to the fluid level reaching any of the perforations in the at least two drainage wellbores.
  13. 13. The method of claim 8, further comprising:
    (a) injecting a gas into the drainage wellbore to force the fluid back up through production wellbore and allow the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore to flow to the production wellbore; and
    (b) producing the reservoir fluids from the production wellbore.
  14. 14. A method of performing a wellbore maintenance operation, the method comprising:
    (a) providing a drainage wellbore that receives reservoir fluids from a producing zone of a subterranean reservoir;
    (b) providing a production wellbore in fluid communication with the drainage wellbore such that the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore flow to the production wellbore;
    (c) injecting a fluid into the production wellbore until the hydrostatic pressure in the production wellbore is sufficient to stop the flow of the reservoir fluids from the drainage wellbore to the production wellbore;
    (d) performing maintenance on the production wellbore;
    (e) injecting a gas into the drainage wellbore to force the fluid back up through production wellbore and allow the reservoir fluids received by the drainage wellbore to flow to the production wellbore; and
    (f) producing the reservoir fluids from the production wellbore.
  15. 15. The method of claim 14, wherein the production wellbore is in fluid communication with the drainage wellbore through a drainage string that extends between the lower portions of the drainage wellbore and the production wellbore.
  16. 16. The method of claim 14, wherein:
    the drainage wellbore is in fluid communication with the producing zone of the reservoir through a perforation in the drainage wellbore; and
    the fluid is injected into the production wellbore in step (b) until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the elevation of the perforation in the drainage wellbore.
  17. 17. The method of claim 14, wherein:
    the drainage wellbore is in fluid communication with the producing zone of the reservoir through a perforation in the drainage wellbore; and
    the injecting of the fluid into the production wellbore in step (b) is stopped prior to the fluid level reaching the perforation in the drainage wellbore.
  18. 18. The method of claim 14, wherein:
    at least two drainage wellbores are provided in step (a), each of the drainage wellbores being in fluid communication with the producing zone of the reservoir through a perforation in the drainage wellbore; and
    the fluid is injected into the production wellbore in step (b) until the fluid level within the production wellbore is at an elevation above the perforations in the at least two drainage wellbores.
  19. 19. The method of claim 14, wherein:
    at least two drainage wellbores are provided in step (a), each of the drainage wellbores being in fluid communication with the producing zone of the reservoir through a perforation in the drainage wellbore; and
    the injecting of the fluid into the production wellbore in step (b) is stopped prior to the fluid level reaching any of the perforations in the at least two drainage wellbores.
US12968503 2009-12-15 2010-12-15 System, method and assembly for wellbore maintenance operations Abandoned US20110203792A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US28652009 true 2009-12-15 2009-12-15
US12968503 US20110203792A1 (en) 2009-12-15 2010-12-15 System, method and assembly for wellbore maintenance operations

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12968503 US20110203792A1 (en) 2009-12-15 2010-12-15 System, method and assembly for wellbore maintenance operations

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110203792A1 true true US20110203792A1 (en) 2011-08-25

Family

ID=44305708

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12968503 Abandoned US20110203792A1 (en) 2009-12-15 2010-12-15 System, method and assembly for wellbore maintenance operations

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US20110203792A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2513418A1 (en)
CN (1) CN102741500A (en)
CA (1) CA2784496A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2011084497A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA2956965A1 (en) * 2014-08-04 2016-02-11 Christopher James CONNELL A well system

Citations (57)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2584605A (en) * 1948-04-14 1952-02-05 Edmund S Merriam Thermal drive method for recovery of oil
US2670802A (en) * 1949-12-16 1954-03-02 Thermactor Company Reviving or increasing the production of clogged or congested oil wells
US2777679A (en) * 1952-03-07 1957-01-15 Svenska Skifferolje Ab Recovering sub-surface bituminous deposits by creating a frozen barrier and heating in situ
US3513914A (en) * 1968-09-30 1970-05-26 Shell Oil Co Method for producing shale oil from an oil shale formation
US3513913A (en) * 1966-04-19 1970-05-26 Shell Oil Co Oil recovery from oil shales by transverse combustion
US3537529A (en) * 1968-11-04 1970-11-03 Shell Oil Co Method of interconnecting a pair of wells extending into a subterranean oil shale formation
US3888307A (en) * 1974-08-29 1975-06-10 Shell Oil Co Heating through fractures to expand a shale oil pyrolyzing cavern
US3957116A (en) * 1975-05-19 1976-05-18 Cities Service Company Fluid flow control in waterflood
US4113314A (en) * 1977-06-24 1978-09-12 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Interior Well perforating method for solution well mining
US4147211A (en) * 1976-07-15 1979-04-03 Union Oil Company Of California Enhanced oil recovery process utilizing a plurality of wells
US4334580A (en) * 1980-03-24 1982-06-15 Geo Vann, Inc. Continuous borehole formed horizontally through a hydrocarbon producing formation
US4390067A (en) * 1981-04-06 1983-06-28 Exxon Production Research Co. Method of treating reservoirs containing very viscous crude oil or bitumen
US4399866A (en) * 1981-04-10 1983-08-23 Atlantic Richfield Company Method for controlling the flow of subterranean water into a selected zone in a permeable subterranean carbonaceous deposit
US4422505A (en) * 1982-01-07 1983-12-27 Atlantic Richfield Company Method for gasifying subterranean coal deposits
US4445574A (en) * 1980-03-24 1984-05-01 Geo Vann, Inc. Continuous borehole formed horizontally through a hydrocarbon producing formation
US4448252A (en) * 1981-06-15 1984-05-15 In Situ Technology, Inc. Minimizing subsidence effects during production of coal in situ
US4545435A (en) * 1983-04-29 1985-10-08 Iit Research Institute Conduction heating of hydrocarbonaceous formations
US5016710A (en) * 1986-06-26 1991-05-21 Institut Francais Du Petrole Method of assisted production of an effluent to be produced contained in a geological formation
US5074360A (en) * 1990-07-10 1991-12-24 Guinn Jerry H Method for repoducing hydrocarbons from low-pressure reservoirs
US5145003A (en) * 1990-08-03 1992-09-08 Chevron Research And Technology Company Method for in-situ heated annulus refining process
US5450902A (en) * 1993-05-14 1995-09-19 Matthews; Cameron M. Method and apparatus for producing and drilling a well
US5669444A (en) * 1996-01-31 1997-09-23 Vastar Resources, Inc. Chemically induced stimulation of coal cleat formation
US5709505A (en) * 1994-04-29 1998-01-20 Xerox Corporation Vertical isolation system for two-phase vacuum extraction of soil and groundwater contaminants
US20010010432A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2001-08-02 Cdx Gas, Llc, Texas Limited Liability Company Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US6425448B1 (en) * 2001-01-30 2002-07-30 Cdx Gas, L.L.P. Method and system for accessing subterranean zones from a limited surface area
US6550542B2 (en) * 2001-07-17 2003-04-22 Conocophillips Company Fluid profile control in enhanced oil recovery
US20030075322A1 (en) * 2001-10-19 2003-04-24 Cdx Gas, Llc. Method and system for management of by-products from subterranean zones
US6598686B1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2003-07-29 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for enhanced access to a subterranean zone
US6662870B1 (en) * 2001-01-30 2003-12-16 Cdx Gas, L.L.C. Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from a limited surface area
US20040020642A1 (en) * 2001-10-24 2004-02-05 Vinegar Harold J. In situ recovery from a hydrocarbon containing formation using conductor-in-conduit heat sources with an electrically conductive material in the overburden
US20040050554A1 (en) * 2002-09-17 2004-03-18 Zupanick Joseph A. Accelerated production of gas from a subterranean zone
US20040050552A1 (en) * 2002-09-12 2004-03-18 Zupanick Joseph A. Three-dimensional well system for accessing subterranean zones
US6725922B2 (en) * 2002-07-12 2004-04-27 Cdx Gas, Llc Ramping well bores
US6729394B1 (en) * 1997-05-01 2004-05-04 Bp Corporation North America Inc. Method of producing a communicating horizontal well network
US20040108110A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2004-06-10 Zupanick Joseph A. Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US20040149432A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2004-08-05 Cdx Gas, L.L.C., A Texas Corporation Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US20040206493A1 (en) * 2003-04-21 2004-10-21 Cdx Gas, Llc Slot cavity
US20050045336A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-03 Kirby Hayes Propellant treatment and continuous foam removal of well debris
US20050045325A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-03 Applied Geotech, Inc. Array of wells with connected permeable zones for hydrocarbon recovery
US20050051326A1 (en) * 2004-09-29 2005-03-10 Toothman Richard L. Method for making wells for removing fluid from a desired subterranean
US20050087340A1 (en) * 2002-05-08 2005-04-28 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for underground treatment of materials
US20050103490A1 (en) * 2003-11-17 2005-05-19 Pauley Steven R. Multi-purpose well bores and method for accessing a subterranean zone from the surface
US20050115709A1 (en) * 2002-09-12 2005-06-02 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for controlling pressure in a dual well system
US7069990B1 (en) * 1999-07-16 2006-07-04 Terralog Technologies, Inc. Enhanced oil recovery methods
US20060157242A1 (en) * 2005-01-14 2006-07-20 Graham Stephen A System and method for producing fluids from a subterranean formation
US20060213657A1 (en) * 2001-04-24 2006-09-28 Shell Oil Company In situ thermal processing of an oil shale formation using a pattern of heat sources
US7222670B2 (en) * 2004-02-27 2007-05-29 Cdx Gas, Llc System and method for multiple wells from a common surface location
US20080217004A1 (en) * 2006-10-20 2008-09-11 De Rouffignac Eric Pierre Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a checkerboard pattern staged process
US20080271885A1 (en) * 2007-03-22 2008-11-06 Kaminsky Robert D Granular electrical connections for in situ formation heating
US7493951B1 (en) * 2005-11-14 2009-02-24 Target Drilling, Inc. Under-balanced directional drilling system
US20090084534A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2009-04-02 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Texas Limited Liability Company, Corporation Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US20090211757A1 (en) * 2008-02-21 2009-08-27 William Riley Utilization of geothermal energy
US7631706B2 (en) * 2007-07-17 2009-12-15 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Methods, systems and apparatus for production of hydrocarbons from a subterranean formation
US20100170672A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2010-07-08 Schwoebel Jeffrey J Method of and system for hydrocarbon recovery
US7814974B2 (en) * 2008-05-13 2010-10-19 Baker Hughes Incorporated Systems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US7921907B2 (en) * 2006-01-20 2011-04-12 American Shale Oil, Llc In situ method and system for extraction of oil from shale
US7926561B2 (en) * 2007-10-31 2011-04-19 Shell Oil Company Systems and methods for producing oil and/or gas

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA2588135C (en) * 2004-11-19 2012-02-14 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods and apparatus for drilling, completing and configuring u-tube boreholes

Patent Citations (85)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2584605A (en) * 1948-04-14 1952-02-05 Edmund S Merriam Thermal drive method for recovery of oil
US2670802A (en) * 1949-12-16 1954-03-02 Thermactor Company Reviving or increasing the production of clogged or congested oil wells
US2777679A (en) * 1952-03-07 1957-01-15 Svenska Skifferolje Ab Recovering sub-surface bituminous deposits by creating a frozen barrier and heating in situ
US3513913A (en) * 1966-04-19 1970-05-26 Shell Oil Co Oil recovery from oil shales by transverse combustion
US3513914A (en) * 1968-09-30 1970-05-26 Shell Oil Co Method for producing shale oil from an oil shale formation
US3537529A (en) * 1968-11-04 1970-11-03 Shell Oil Co Method of interconnecting a pair of wells extending into a subterranean oil shale formation
US3888307A (en) * 1974-08-29 1975-06-10 Shell Oil Co Heating through fractures to expand a shale oil pyrolyzing cavern
US3957116A (en) * 1975-05-19 1976-05-18 Cities Service Company Fluid flow control in waterflood
US4147211A (en) * 1976-07-15 1979-04-03 Union Oil Company Of California Enhanced oil recovery process utilizing a plurality of wells
US4113314A (en) * 1977-06-24 1978-09-12 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Interior Well perforating method for solution well mining
US4445574A (en) * 1980-03-24 1984-05-01 Geo Vann, Inc. Continuous borehole formed horizontally through a hydrocarbon producing formation
US4334580A (en) * 1980-03-24 1982-06-15 Geo Vann, Inc. Continuous borehole formed horizontally through a hydrocarbon producing formation
US4390067A (en) * 1981-04-06 1983-06-28 Exxon Production Research Co. Method of treating reservoirs containing very viscous crude oil or bitumen
US4399866A (en) * 1981-04-10 1983-08-23 Atlantic Richfield Company Method for controlling the flow of subterranean water into a selected zone in a permeable subterranean carbonaceous deposit
US4448252A (en) * 1981-06-15 1984-05-15 In Situ Technology, Inc. Minimizing subsidence effects during production of coal in situ
US4422505A (en) * 1982-01-07 1983-12-27 Atlantic Richfield Company Method for gasifying subterranean coal deposits
US4545435A (en) * 1983-04-29 1985-10-08 Iit Research Institute Conduction heating of hydrocarbonaceous formations
US5016710A (en) * 1986-06-26 1991-05-21 Institut Francais Du Petrole Method of assisted production of an effluent to be produced contained in a geological formation
US5074360A (en) * 1990-07-10 1991-12-24 Guinn Jerry H Method for repoducing hydrocarbons from low-pressure reservoirs
US5145003A (en) * 1990-08-03 1992-09-08 Chevron Research And Technology Company Method for in-situ heated annulus refining process
US5450902A (en) * 1993-05-14 1995-09-19 Matthews; Cameron M. Method and apparatus for producing and drilling a well
US5709505A (en) * 1994-04-29 1998-01-20 Xerox Corporation Vertical isolation system for two-phase vacuum extraction of soil and groundwater contaminants
US5669444A (en) * 1996-01-31 1997-09-23 Vastar Resources, Inc. Chemically induced stimulation of coal cleat formation
US6729394B1 (en) * 1997-05-01 2004-05-04 Bp Corporation North America Inc. Method of producing a communicating horizontal well network
US6604580B2 (en) * 1998-11-20 2003-08-12 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for accessing subterranean zones from a limited surface area
US6280000B1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2001-08-28 Joseph A. Zupanick Method for production of gas from a coal seam using intersecting well bores
US6357523B1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2002-03-19 Cdx Gas, Llc Drainage pattern with intersecting wells drilled from surface
US20090084534A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2009-04-02 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Texas Limited Liability Company, Corporation Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US6439320B2 (en) * 1998-11-20 2002-08-27 Cdx Gas, Llc Wellbore pattern for uniform access to subterranean deposits
US20020148605A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2002-10-17 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US20080060804A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2008-03-13 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Texas Limited Liability Company, Corporation Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US20080066903A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2008-03-20 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Texas Limited Liability Company Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US20010015574A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2001-08-23 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Texas Limited Liability Company Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US20010010432A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2001-08-02 Cdx Gas, Llc, Texas Limited Liability Company Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US20080060806A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2008-03-13 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Texas Limited Liability Company Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US20080060799A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2008-03-13 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Texas Limited Liability Company Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US20080060805A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2008-03-13 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US6688388B2 (en) * 1998-11-20 2004-02-10 Cdx Gas, Llc Method for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US20040031609A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2004-02-19 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Texas Corporation Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US20060096755A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2006-05-11 Cdx Gas, Llc, A Limited Liability Company Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US6976533B2 (en) * 1998-11-20 2005-12-20 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US6964298B2 (en) * 1998-11-20 2005-11-15 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US20040149432A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2004-08-05 Cdx Gas, L.L.C., A Texas Corporation Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface
US20040108110A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2004-06-10 Zupanick Joseph A. Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from the surface and tools therefor
US6598686B1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2003-07-29 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for enhanced access to a subterranean zone
US7069990B1 (en) * 1999-07-16 2006-07-04 Terralog Technologies, Inc. Enhanced oil recovery methods
US6986388B2 (en) * 2001-01-30 2006-01-17 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for accessing a subterranean zone from a limited surface area
US7036584B2 (en) * 2001-01-30 2006-05-02 Cdx Gas, L.L.C. Method and system for accessing a subterranean zone from a limited surface area
US6662870B1 (en) * 2001-01-30 2003-12-16 Cdx Gas, L.L.C. Method and system for accessing subterranean deposits from a limited surface area
US6425448B1 (en) * 2001-01-30 2002-07-30 Cdx Gas, L.L.P. Method and system for accessing subterranean zones from a limited surface area
US20060213657A1 (en) * 2001-04-24 2006-09-28 Shell Oil Company In situ thermal processing of an oil shale formation using a pattern of heat sources
US6550542B2 (en) * 2001-07-17 2003-04-22 Conocophillips Company Fluid profile control in enhanced oil recovery
US6681855B2 (en) * 2001-10-19 2004-01-27 Cdx Gas, L.L.C. Method and system for management of by-products from subterranean zones
US20030075322A1 (en) * 2001-10-19 2003-04-24 Cdx Gas, Llc. Method and system for management of by-products from subterranean zones
US20040020642A1 (en) * 2001-10-24 2004-02-05 Vinegar Harold J. In situ recovery from a hydrocarbon containing formation using conductor-in-conduit heat sources with an electrically conductive material in the overburden
US7360595B2 (en) * 2002-05-08 2008-04-22 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for underground treatment of materials
US20050087340A1 (en) * 2002-05-08 2005-04-28 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for underground treatment of materials
US6725922B2 (en) * 2002-07-12 2004-04-27 Cdx Gas, Llc Ramping well bores
US7073595B2 (en) * 2002-09-12 2006-07-11 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for controlling pressure in a dual well system
US20050115709A1 (en) * 2002-09-12 2005-06-02 Cdx Gas, Llc Method and system for controlling pressure in a dual well system
US20040050552A1 (en) * 2002-09-12 2004-03-18 Zupanick Joseph A. Three-dimensional well system for accessing subterranean zones
US20040050554A1 (en) * 2002-09-17 2004-03-18 Zupanick Joseph A. Accelerated production of gas from a subterranean zone
US7264048B2 (en) * 2003-04-21 2007-09-04 Cdx Gas, Llc Slot cavity
US20040206493A1 (en) * 2003-04-21 2004-10-21 Cdx Gas, Llc Slot cavity
US20050045325A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-03 Applied Geotech, Inc. Array of wells with connected permeable zones for hydrocarbon recovery
US20050045336A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-03 Kirby Hayes Propellant treatment and continuous foam removal of well debris
US7100687B2 (en) * 2003-11-17 2006-09-05 Cdx Gas, Llc Multi-purpose well bores and method for accessing a subterranean zone from the surface
US20050103490A1 (en) * 2003-11-17 2005-05-19 Pauley Steven R. Multi-purpose well bores and method for accessing a subterranean zone from the surface
US7222670B2 (en) * 2004-02-27 2007-05-29 Cdx Gas, Llc System and method for multiple wells from a common surface location
US20050051326A1 (en) * 2004-09-29 2005-03-10 Toothman Richard L. Method for making wells for removing fluid from a desired subterranean
US20060157242A1 (en) * 2005-01-14 2006-07-20 Graham Stephen A System and method for producing fluids from a subterranean formation
US7819187B2 (en) * 2005-01-14 2010-10-26 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. System and method for producing fluids from a subterranean formation
US7451814B2 (en) * 2005-01-14 2008-11-18 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. System and method for producing fluids from a subterranean formation
US20090038792A1 (en) * 2005-01-14 2009-02-12 Graham Stephen A System and method for producing fluids from a subterranean formation
US7493951B1 (en) * 2005-11-14 2009-02-24 Target Drilling, Inc. Under-balanced directional drilling system
US7921907B2 (en) * 2006-01-20 2011-04-12 American Shale Oil, Llc In situ method and system for extraction of oil from shale
US7841401B2 (en) * 2006-10-20 2010-11-30 Shell Oil Company Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process
US20080217004A1 (en) * 2006-10-20 2008-09-11 De Rouffignac Eric Pierre Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a checkerboard pattern staged process
US20080271885A1 (en) * 2007-03-22 2008-11-06 Kaminsky Robert D Granular electrical connections for in situ formation heating
US7854276B2 (en) * 2007-07-17 2010-12-21 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Methods, systems, and apparatus for production of hydrocarbons from a subterranean formation
US7631706B2 (en) * 2007-07-17 2009-12-15 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Methods, systems and apparatus for production of hydrocarbons from a subterranean formation
US7926561B2 (en) * 2007-10-31 2011-04-19 Shell Oil Company Systems and methods for producing oil and/or gas
US20090211757A1 (en) * 2008-02-21 2009-08-27 William Riley Utilization of geothermal energy
US7814974B2 (en) * 2008-05-13 2010-10-19 Baker Hughes Incorporated Systems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US20100170672A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2010-07-08 Schwoebel Jeffrey J Method of and system for hydrocarbon recovery

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CN102741500A (en) 2012-10-17 application
EP2513418A1 (en) 2012-10-24 application
WO2011084497A1 (en) 2011-07-14 application
CA2784496A1 (en) 2011-07-14 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5655605A (en) Method and apparatus for producing and drilling a well
US5765639A (en) Tubing pump system for pumping well fluids
US6591903B2 (en) Method of recovery of hydrocarbons from low pressure formations
US2242166A (en) Apparatus for operating oil wells
US6668925B2 (en) ESP pump for gassy wells
US5211242A (en) Apparatus and method for unloading production-inhibiting liquid from a well
US6508308B1 (en) Progressive production methods and system
US6371206B1 (en) Prevention of sand plugging of oil well pumps
US5497832A (en) Dual action pumping system
US20120048568A1 (en) Upgoing drainholes for reducing liquid-loading in gas wells
US5289888A (en) Water well completion method
US6092599A (en) Downhole oil and water separation system and method
US20100170672A1 (en) Method of and system for hydrocarbon recovery
US6079491A (en) Dual injection and lifting system using a rod driven progressive cavity pump and an electrical submersible progressive cavity pump
US6672392B2 (en) Gas recovery apparatus, method and cycle having a three chamber evacuation phase for improved natural gas production and down-hole liquid management
US6092600A (en) Dual injection and lifting system using a rod driven progressive cavity pump and an electrical submersible pump and associate a method
US5033550A (en) Well production method
US4878539A (en) Method and system for maintaining and producing horizontal well bores
US6123149A (en) Dual injection and lifting system using an electrical submersible progressive cavity pump and an electrical submersible pump
US20090194293A1 (en) Apparatus, assembly and process for injecting fluid into a subterranean well
US20090211755A1 (en) System and method for injection into a well zone
US2939533A (en) Casingless, multiple-tubing well completing and producing system
US6325152B1 (en) Method and apparatus for increasing fluid recovery from a subterranean formation
US5402851A (en) Horizontal drilling method for hydrocarbon recovery
US6125936A (en) Dual completion method for oil/gas wells to minimize water coning

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CHEVRON U.S.A. INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LOONEY, MARK D.;CASSIDY, STEPHEN DAVID;SIGNING DATES FROM 20110202 TO 20110304;REEL/FRAME:025933/0478